Posts tagged with "photographer"

Frank Pena for 360 Magazine

Jonte’ Moaning × Brian Thomas

360 Magazine had the opportunity to collaborate with Jonte’ Moaning and Brian Thomas for an editorial fashion shoot that encompasses the new age of fashion. The incredibly talented duo worked together to produce a photoshoot that displays high fashion and uniqueness. The creative director of the shoot was Franklin Peña and the production was done by Brian Rubiano

This shoot features two exquisite looks which Moaning carries off flawlessly. The chained shirt, paired with leather shorts and unique, gladiator boots creates a modern-day, stylish armor. The second look features a silver overcoat with red and black dripping detail falling from the jacket’s shoulders. When paired with this statement red and grey hat, the look comes together effortlessly. 

Jonte’ Moaning has been a pioneer for the entertainment industry worldwide. He has influenced major pop artists with his unique discography. His work can recently be seen in the Black is King film which was directed, written and executively produced by Beyoncé. Jonte’ has been of major importance for the LGTBQ+ community and has broken down barriers for men to explore their gender expression. 

Jonte’ is best known for taking part in curating the iconic “Sasha Fierce” persona of BeyoncéAlthough, he has also worked closely with a number of other notable artists such as Janet Jackson, Cassie, Tamar Braxton, Blackpink and many more.

Jonte’ released his first solo single, “Bitch You Betta” in 2008 and has continued to release music from there. The artist has stated that he was inspired to work on his solo career while he was working alongside performing artists and felt that he “could do it better.”

As a performer, Jonte’ is known for his androgynous look and trademark high heels which challenge classic gender norms. He has worked into the elite status and continues to produce music that embodies all he represents. His music, along with his style makes waves within the entertainment industry and this editorial shoot is no different. 

You can read more about Jonte’s successful career on his website, HelloJonte.com.

The photographer for the shoot, Brian Thomas, is an astound choreographer and photographer who is best known for working with legend Michael Jackson. Throughout his career, he has gained a great deal of experience and works closely with a variety of performing artists. Thomas also owns Spinkick Pictures in New York City, which produces extraordinary films. 

Thomas has had major success in the directing industry and some of his credits include “Amy’s Victory Dance,” an award-winning documentary as well as, “Follow, Lead, Love” and “P.S. Love Robby,” two documentaries currently in production. He also directed the short film, “Dark Matter” which features dancer Desmond Richardson

Thomas has also won the GLAM award for various music videos including “Higher Love,” which stares Carishma. He has also worked as the Associate Director for the Cirque du Soleil  Flash mob Time Square performance. 

As well as being an accredited director, Thomas has choreographed for many notable stars. He has worked with stars such as Michael Jackson, Mary J. Blige, Pink, Whitney Houston, Usher, Jason Durelo and Alicia Keys, all giant names within the music industry. He has also worked closely with stars like Destiny’s Child, Jamie Foxx, Mya, Brian McKnight, Deborah Cox, India Arie, Liza Minnelli, Gloria Gaynor and Marc Anthony to produce stellar choreography. 

Thomas has also choreographed for companies such as Sesame Street, The Electric Company, New York City Knicks Dancers, Brooklynettes, Optimum triple play, Are We There Yet, and numerous other TV and live stage events.

Thomas explained that his mission is to promote empathy through his work with Visual Art. He wants to further conversations about Equality, Representation, and Diversity which he certainly does with his films.   

Read more about Brian Thomas and his success on his website, http://brianthomasfilms.com/

The creative direction of the shoot was executed by Franklin Peña, a professional dancer and fashion model from New York City. He has always been heavily involved in the entertainment industry and in 2016 decided to make the move from the Bronx to Los Angeles. There, he appeared on E Network’s reality show, What Happens at The Abbey. This series takes a glance inside of The Abbey in West Hollywood, which is known as the “Best Gay Bar in the World.” The show follows the workers of the bar as they interact with celebrities and navigate love and drama. 

Pena was also tapped by 360 Magazine as a red carpet correspondent in 2017. He continues to grow his success working with a variety of other creatives in the industry. 

This shoot was produced by Brian Rubiano. As a first-generation immigrant from the Philippines, Brian Rubiano has gained success as an actor and producer. He also started “Humanize It,” his own Film Production and Brand Strategy consultation company. 

Rubiano has worked closely with Brian Thomas on many similar films for Spinkick Pictures. Rubiano worked as the Post-Production Producer for both the Award-Winning feature documentary “Amy’s Victory Dance” and the short film “Dark Matter,” both of which Thomas also worked on. 

Rubiano has a goal to use his platform, skills & knowledge in order to help artists and the creative community to expand their brand’s purpose. He aspires to be a vessel to the voiceless, marginalized & underrepresented by using film production as his medium.

You can keep up with Moaning, Thomas, Peña and Rubiano on their Instagrams. 

Model: Jonte’ Moaning 

Photographer: Brian Thomas 

Creative Direction: Franklin Peña

Producer: Brian Rubiano

Frank Pena for 360 Magazine

Frank Pena for 360 Magazine

Roger Moenks photography inside 360 MAGAZINE

With a Style of Their Own

The NuAuthentic Celebrates Fluid And Transgender Individuals
 
By Photographer Roger Moenks with Shelly Brown
 
Roger Moenks is a leading celebrity and fashion photographer who has published several books highlighting inspirational beauty including The Class of Click (featuring Click Agency’s most notable models), Inheriting Beauty, and I Am Eco-Warrior: Portraits From The Front Lines Of The Sustainability Revolution. However, The NuAuthentic is his first book portraying the transgender community through individual personal expression, creative freedom, and the ability to embrace one’s identity and proclaim it with a spectacular boldness.
 
The NuAuthentic is a 196-page visual exploration and portrayal of 100 of the most intriguingly beautiful genderfluid and transgender individuals in New York City.  The book by photographer Roger Moenks with curator Shelly Brown sets out to underscore the triumphs, struggles and powerful beauty of its non-conformist subjects who are “free to be” through self-expression, self-acceptance and love. Life may have been much simpler when people were divided into two genders, male and female,  but today’s new reality reveals that a full-spectrum of beauty may be found through the freedom to express oneself in non-traditional ways and through a rainbow of colors. 
 
“Today gender is actually an ever-expanding continuum comprised of authentic warriors who dared to be who they want to be and claim their right to express themselves freely, making them all the more beautiful and intriguing subjects to photograph,” says Roger Moenks. “The exciting thing about today’s social landscape is that you can’t assume anyone is either a ‘he’ or a ‘she,’ nor can you presume they are just one of those two possibilities. It’s up to them to tell you how they identify, and you just might be surprised by what they say.”
 
“Gender is optional, expression is everything,” adds Shelly Brown.  “Diversity and differences are to be celebrated and supported. My role as curator for The NuAauthentic was a labor of love since I recently lost my 28-year old trans sister who struggled in life and found solace and love in the transgender community which gave her the freedom and acceptance to reveal her beautiful soul. The book is a testament to those trailblazers who took abuse from their families, schools, communities, and stayed true to their individual beauty. We salute you with love, acceptance and respect.”
 
Transgender and genderfluid people have always come to the nightlife, a world of inclusion where one is accepted and applauded for the very features that may have gotten them bullied in the high school cafeteria and ostracized in everyday life.
 
Susanne Bartsch known as “Queen of the Night” for her iconic club nights, special events and show productions representative of New York City nightlife graces the cover of The NuAuthentic.  She was instrumental in promoting the drag queen and House Ball scenes and also gave rise to the careers of such notables as RuPaul and Marc Jacobs. She continues to create an Avant Garde club landscape in which people are art and use their looks to make bold fashion statements and continues to provide the space and freedom for people to express themselves.
 
Rob Smith, CEO and founder of The Phluid Project, the world’s first gender-free retail store and global movement, is also portrayed in the book. The concept of non-gender clothing designed by Phluid and independent artists were carried by Phluid and featured throughout the book. 
 
MILA JAM is a model, actress and pop recording “artivist” who had always celebrated diversity and the different gender expressions. According to MILA JAM, “The NuAuthentic is a snapshot in time that commemorates the trans movement as another slice of life to be celebrated. As we find strikingly beautiful differences in plant and animal species, we can also find exquisite differences in how we view humanity.”
 
The NuAuthentic speaks to Bradley Miller, who is also portrayed in the book, because it is representative of “who I am.” “The trans community has to face pain and adversity to be who we are, but it also shows the world that we can be loved and beautiful.”
 
Trans people are continually targeted with bigotry and hatred. And so, trans and gender nonconforming people are left to fight the battles of everyday life, which they do with flair, activism, and chutzpah. The NuAuthentic captures them in all their gutsy glory and will retail for $75.00 on Amazon.com beginning December 10th.  Proceeds from The NuAuthentic will be 100% donated to LGBTQ youth programs.
 

About Photographer Roger Moenks

German-born Roger Moenks is a celebrity and fashion photographer who has called New York City home for almost 20 years. Best known for his portraiture, he has previously published three books: The First Class of CLICK; Moving Still; and Inheriting Beauty, featuring 90 women from around the world at the forefront of society and industry—a group that includes such high-profile figures as Roberta Armani, Delphine Arnault, Kiera Chaplin, Francesca Versace, and many more. In cooperation with Montblanc and UNICEF, Moenks also created images of 12 leading actresses for a Sotheby’s auction, the proceeds of which raised a quarter of a million dollars for the charity. Moenks’ work has appeared in such magazines as L’Officiel, Harper’s Bazaar, GQ, Interview, Visionaire, and Flaunt. He has directed music videos for Blank & Jones, commercials for Van Cleef & Arpels and Moët & Chandon, and created the documentary Shooting Milk, featuring survivors of the Andy Warhol era and including never-before-seen footage of the artist himself. In the past several years Moenks has dedicated much of his time to socially conscious causes. His last book “I Am Eco Warrior” features 53 innovator environmentalist around the world trying to save our planet featuring Jane Goodall, Ted Turner, Richard Branson, Stella McCartney and many more. 

For additional information on Roger Moenks go HERE.

Conison, Blake Holmes and Connor Morton article inside 360 MAGAZINE

CONISON: OUR CHAT WITH HIGH-END STREETWEAR LABEL FOUNDER, CONNOR MORTON 

By Blake Holmes

A celebration of the LA dream, Conison is an up-and-coming, high-end streetwear brand from Melbourne, Australia. 
Recently, we caught up with Founder and Creative Director, Connor Morton, to chat vision, inspiration and what’s in store for the year ahead. 

TELL US ABOUT CONISON..

Conison is a high-end streetwear and design brand. 

At the heart of Conison is a message of inspiration. I want to encourage people to express themselves, providing an avenue for them to explore their own sense of style and creative potential through fashion and design. 

WHAT’S YOUR WHY? 

I’ve always endeavoured to express my creativity through outlets available to me, from DJing and music, to clothing customisation and art. I think everyone deserves this opportunity and my dream is that Conison will provide that for others; an inspiration source that spreads positivity and reinforces the idea that everyone has the power to shape their reality. 

WHAT’S IN STORE FOR YOUR UPCOMING COLLECTION? 

Collection 2 Rise & Fall is a two-part capsule. This collection celebrates an ascension to your highest self and the fall of negative energy. These ideas are expressed in my messaging and I’ve catered to both the NZ/Aus and US/Euro markets, with different materials and designs. 

WHO/WHAT INSPIRES YOU? 

There are countless brands and creators that fuel my fire. Designers like Reese Cooper and Heron Preston, brands like Riot Hill and photographers like Kyle Caulfield to name just a few. 

HOW DO YOU STAY MOTIVATED? 

I believe motivation is something you have to seek constantly. This can be challenging at times and the interruptions of this year have been a prime example. 

Regularly contacting my mentors, listening to podcasts, and painting have kept me in the zone this year. There’s always motivation to be found if you look hard enough. 

WHAT DOES A TYPICAL DAY LOOK LIKE FOR YOU? 

Every day is different but I start and end them in the same way. I usually wake up with a warm/cold soak to get focused, then have breakfast while watching motivational content on YouTube. From then I work ‘til i’ve felt i’ve done enough, which means late nights a lot of the time. I also work other jobs and fit in time at the gym or some form of exercise each day. I end the day with business content on YouTube to get inspired for the day ahead.

WHAT’S THE BIGGEST FINANCIAL STRAIN WHEN RUNNING YOUR OWN BRAND? 

Being a one-man band with no backing at 22 has been a struggle. There are definitely financial challenges and they’ve taken a lot of practice, help from mentors and learning to overcome. In saying that, I’m feeling confident in the belief that now is the time to be bold, take risks and bet on myself. When you believe in your brand and the message you’re trying to share, anything is possible. 

WHAT’S THE BEST PIECE OF ADVICE YOU’VE EVER RECEIVED? 

My mentor sent me a message a few weeks back. I think it’s spot on and something I struggle with at times. “Your art is not about how many people like your work, your art is about if your heart likes your work, if your soul likes your work, it’s how honest you are with yourself”. I try to follow this ethos daily and remind myself of this at times I’m questioning my vision and creative direction. I’ve implemented this into my work daily and it’s become more authentic as a result. 

WHAT’S NEXT FOR CONISON? 

The sky’s the limit. I want to push creative boundaries, not just with Conison but in the global fashion and lifestyle brand space. This means everything from painting collections and exclusive pieces to furniture. 
Most importantly, I want to continue telling the Conison story in an authentic way. Giving people a story to truly connect with is what drives me and the best way to keep people engaged and on-board for the journey. 

I’m learning and growing every day and Conison will continue to evolve with me. I can’t wait to share it with everyone.

LEAVE US WITH A FAVOURITE QUOTE..

I’ve got a few. ‘Ignore the boos, they usually come from the cheap seats’. This one has been really important to me. As a young person, you often face a lot of negativity and doubt from others about your ability to step outside the norm and succeed. I’ve learnt not to take this to heart and stay true to myself, which is something I think we should all strive to do. 

Another favourite is, ‘an arrow can only be shot forward by pulling it backward’. This one’s all about resilience to me, and the idea that on the other side of struggle and hardship is success, fortune and prosperity. I try to remember this with every minor setback and keep a positive mindset no matter the circumstances. When you do, nothing can discourage you from achieving your dreams. This is what Conison is all about. 

Rise & Fall Part 1 drops 7th December, 7:00pm EST
at www.conisondesigns.com 

James Marcus Haney plans to release his debut photo book – FANATICS

James Marcus Haney, the LA based photographer and director of the acclaimed music documentary “No Cameras Allowed,” announces the release of his first photo book, “FANATICS.”

WATCH A TRAILER FOR THE BOOK HERE

The book is available for pre-order today via https://stop-and-fix.com/.

Haney pulls together photographs of fans from his time touring with Coldplay, Elton John, and Mumford & Sons, alongside the countless festivals and shows he’s been to across the world. Capturing the spirit and sheer elation of witnessing live music with friends, the book features imagery from concerts in 35 different countries, spanning the decade of 2010-2020.

Accompanying these images are stories and testimonials from musicians Haney has toured alongside, including Chris Martin of Coldplay, Alex Ebert of Edward Sharpe, Maggie Rogers, Lars Ulrich from Metallica, Marcus Mumford of Mumford & Sons, Albert Hammond JR of The Strokes and many more, all talking about the importance of fans and anecdotes and memories of their own as fans themselves. The book opens with a foreword penned by Elton John, who Haney has also been out on the road with.

Explaining the inspiration behind the book, Haney recalls, “Back when I was in college, I couldn’t afford to go to music festivals so I would sneak into them with my friends. Often, I used a borrowed camera from school and posed as a press photographer. I filmed all the bands I loved and used the guise of a fake press pass to get as close to the stage as possible. After a few festivals, I cut together a short documentary of my friends and I sneaking into Coachella and Bonnaroo. At another show, I handed a roadie a burnt DVD copy of my short doc, who then passed it onto the band he was teching for, Mumford & Sons. Soon, I found myself on an old-school vintage train chugging across America with Mumford & Sons, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros, and Old Crow Medicine Show as part of the Railroad Revival Tour.”

“My passion for touring came at a cost though: as my time on the road coincided with my final exams at film school. I forfeited a college degree but made some of the best friends of my life and embarked on a career adventure that I could never have dreamed of. Through touring the world with artists like Mumford & Sons, Elton John, and Coldplay, I was able to immerse into all sorts of cultures and musical worlds and all sorts of wild crowds and fans. I found myself taking photos of fans everywhere – there was something so captivating about watching people completely lost in the music, witnessing that spiritual experience.”

This book is a culmination of a decade of touring the world and the truckload of film negatives that have amassed in that time. It captures the emotions, fashions, and faces of the 2010 decade through live music. And it is only now, from the depths of a pandemic, do these photographs remind us of a time, so recent yet so different, and represent the ultimate experience to look forward to again.

Words on FANATICS by Elton John:

“FANATICS is a book that celebrates that dedication, that music fan’s rite of passage, what you might call the magical festival spirit. It’s partly the sense that you can do whatever you want – get drunk, get high, have sex, whatever – at least for a weekend. And it’s partly that the one thing that’s bonding everyone together at a festival is the love of music. You can see that spirit, that common humanity, in the photos in this book.

Marcus has captured that indomitable festival spirit brilliantly through these photographs. With his trusted camera in hand, he’s the ultimate fly on the wall, or the fly on the canvas of the tent. He seizes these moments, almost like the invisible man, catching people in every imaginable state – in rapture and in decay, the ecstasy and the agony.”

Interview with Contemporary Photographer

In an interview of contemporary photographer Christy Lee Rogers by the Colnaghi Foundation, a non-profit London organization with the purpose of promoting Old Masters, art historian Isabelle Kent compares Rogers’ works to Ruben.

Kent, who lectures at the Victoria and Albert Museum and was a Curatorial Assistant at the Wallace Collection, said:

“[Rogers] is best known for her pioneering use of water and pools in her photography… [Rogers’] art plays with themes of strength and vulnerability, loss and beauty… creating ethereal and otherworldly images full of color and billowing fabrics. They have often been compared to Baroque paintings, in particular the likes of Caravaggio and I certainly think her multi-figure works, with all of their movement, really remind me of Rubens.”

In the interview Rogers, who won first prize in the Sony World Open Photographer of the Year Award and was recently commissioned by Apple, said, “There is a message in my work – it is connected to that Baroque feeling about something greater than ourselves, a drama and passion and motion.”

Listen to the interview here:

www.instagram.com/p/CEHj4scHHal/

african, art, spiritual, museum, exhibition, Phyllis Galembo, rituals,

African Masquerade Exhibition

Major photography exhibition (Now on view until May 31). Meet the artist on May 17 at 3:00 p.m. at the Museum for a special appearance (lecture and book signing)

Museum goers will be spellbound by the transformative power of the African masquerade, as the Boca Raton Museum of Art presents Phyllis Galembo:Maske. Her striking photographic series of contemporary mask rituals has drawn national and international critical acclaim. These large-scale images are nearly life-size and explore spiritual realms with brilliant, mesmerizing colors.For more than 30 years, the artist has traveled around the world to photograph participants in contemporary masquerade events that range from traditional, religious ceremonies to secular celebrations.

The exhibition is now on view through May 31. Galembo will visit the museum on May 17 at 3:00 p.m. to share personal stories about her work and her travels, the ritual mask ceremonies, and will sign two of her books at this personal appearance–Maske (published by Aperture), and Mexico, Masks and Rituals (by Radius Books and DAP). Her portraits are celebrated by the world’s leading fine art photography editors for their stunning resonance, setting her work apart from documentary and anthropological studies.

Galembo’s Art Work:

Otoghe-Toghe, by Phyllis Galembo. Aromgba Village, Nigeria, (2005), Ilfochrome

Awo-O-Dudu (A Spirit They Saw), by Phyllis Galembo. Freetown, Sierra Leone, (2008), Ilfochrome.

Akata Dance Masquerade, by Phyllis Galembo. Cross River, Nigeria (2004), Ilfochrome

They will be shown in concert with the Museum’s historical collection of more than 40 African tribal artifacts and indigenous masks in the gallery across from Galembo’s show, for a complementary perspective.

Through her lens, the viewer gains special access to the rarely seen other-worlds, as she captures the raw and sometimes frightening aspects of ceremonial garb. Masking is a complex, mysterious and profound tradition in which the participants transcend the physical world and enter the spiritual realm.

In her vibrant images, Galembo exposes an ornate code of political, artistic, theatrical, social, and religious symbolism and commentary. She has made over twenty trips to sites of ritual masquerades, capturing cultural performances with a subterranean political edge. Her photographs depict the physical character, costumes, and rituals of African religious practices and their diasporic manifestations in the Caribbean and Mexico. Galembo’s images reflect both the modern and ancient worlds.The fifteen portraits by Galembo that were selected for this exhibition reveal the meticulous detail and creative imagination of mask-making.

Affianwan, by Phyllis Galembo. Calibar South, Nigeria, (2005), Ilfochrome

“The tradition of masquerading is universal and timeless, and continues today in most cultures, including western societies,” says Irvin Lippman, the Executive Director of the Boca Raton Museum of Art.

“Bringing together the Galembo photographs and masks from the Museum’s African collection underscores the cross-cultural complexity of meaning and purpose. However, what they have in common is their vitality, power, and boldness of humanity.”

Aye Loja (The World is a Market Place that we Visit), Gelede Masquerade, by Phyllis Galembo. Agonli Village, Benin, (2006)

The costumes in Galembo’s photographs are worn in several types of modern-day rituals. They are created to summon ancestral spirits and deities during a range of events, including agricultural hardships,
land disputes, rites of passage, funerals, harvests, moments of gratitude and celebration. Galembo’s large-scale portraits in this exhibition capture the mask-oriented cultural traditions of Nigeria, Benin, Ghana and Sierra Leone.

Banana Leaf Masquerade, EkongIkon Ukom, by Phyllis Galembo. Calabar, Nigeria (2005), Ilfochrome

While traveling and embedding herself for long periods in these societies, Galembo works with local assistants and translators.They negotiate the terms with elders, so that she may be granted permission
to make photos of these masqueraders.

“The translators often find that gaining permission from community leaders can sometimes be quite helpful during these painstaking negotiations,”says Galembo. “Once an agreement has been struck, I set my own lighting and place the subjects in front of a neutral backdrop that enables the eye to focus on the diversity of materials in each costume.”

Two in a Fancy Dress, Red Cross Masquerade Group, by Phyllis Galembo. Winneba, Ghana, (2010), Ilfochrome

The masks and costumes in these photographs are made from a wide variety of surprising materials ─ leaves, grass, patterned fabrics, burlap sacks, full-bodied crocheted yarns, colored raffia, quills, shells, and even lizard excrement. All of her photographs are shot as portraits rather than during the act of ritual. She is allowed to photograph her subjects at the very moment right before their rituals and festivities commence. Galembo prefers her colors to be brightly saturated, enhancing the spiritual and transformative powers of these garments. “I never see my subjects out of costume, although the masqueraders are always men, often paying homage to women,” adds Galembo.

Ekpeyong Edet Dance Group, by Phyllis Galembo. Etikpe Village, Nigeria, (2005), Ilfochrome

Despite secularization and fading traditions, masquerading in Africa is abundant, robust, and far from disappearing. Most of the photographs in this exhibition reflect sacred rituals, the spiritual aspect of masquerading rather than secular celebrations.By donning garments, the masqueraders gain access to traditional knowledge, enabling them to relay critical messages to the community.

Egungun, by Phyllis Galembo. Adandokpodji Village, Benin, (2006), Ilfochrome

“I like the way viewers can grasp the real stories behind each image. Every mask, costume and fiber of material can represent so much to the people in these portraits. Many of these subjects created these ritual costumes because a spirit inspired them. These are people who make masks and costumes that are very spiritually motivated,” says Galembo. The modern world also finds its way into these costumes and masks with the usage of plastic bags, cardboard, and found objects.

Ringo (Big Deer) Masquerade, by Phyllis Galembo. Kroo Bay, Sierra Leone,(2008)

Awo-O-dudu (A Spirit They Saw) reveals a ghost- like shape summoning ancestral spirits during the dry months or times of crisis, when spirits are called to bless the deceased and entire villages.Ko S’Ogbon L’Ate (You Can’t Buy Wisdom at the Market) is a tribute to mothers, goddesses and ancestors. The wooden headpieces represent an animal and a human, each sings a different song during the ritual. Affianwan (“white cat woman”) represents spirit and transparency. The stunning headdress of this work is crocheted from one long flowing piece of fabric. Two in a Fancy Dress and Rasta illustrates the cross of African and European traditions (fancy dress).

More About the Artist: Phyllis Galembo

Phyllis Galembo’s photographs are included in numerous public and private collections including the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the New York Public Library. She is represented by Axis Gallery. She was born 1952 in New York, where she continues to live and work. Galembo graduated with a Master of Fine Arts from University of Wisconsin at Madison in 1977 and has been a Professor Emeritus at Albany, State University of New York since 1978. Using a direct, unaffected portrait style, she captures her subjects informally posed but often beautifully attired in traditional and ritualistic dress.

Attuned to a moment’s collision of past, present and future, Phyllis Galembo is recognized for her ability to find the timeless elegance and dignity of her subjects.She highlights the creativity of the individuals morphing into a fantastical representation of themselves, having cobbled together materials gathered from the immediate environment to idealize their vision of mythical figures.

While still pronounced in their personal identity, the subject’s intentions are rooted in the larger dynamics of religious, political and cultural affiliation. Establishing these connections is the artist’s hallmark. Her work has appeared in Tar Magazine, Damn Magazine, Photograph and Harpers. She has been profiled on CNN, NPR Radio and NBC Today.

Other collections that feature her work include: Oceania and the Americas, Photography Study Collection (New York); the Philadelphia Museum of Art; the Houston Museum of Art; the International Center for Photography(New York); the British Art Museum, Yale University; Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library; Polaroid Corporation (Boston); and the Rockefeller Foundation, among many others.

MORE ABOUT THE MUSEUM’S AFRICAN COLLECTION

Complementing Galembo’s exhibition are more than 40 African tribal artifacts from the Museum’s collection, including headdresses and masks, each pertaining to masquerades and ceremonies. These are exhibited in an adjacent gallery, across from the Galembo show.

Pictured above are some of the historic African masks from the Museum’s collection that complement Galembo’s contemporary photographs. More than 40 African tribal artifacts will be shown in an adjacent gallery across from Galembo’s exhibition.

The two Kuba masks in the collection (Kuba Bwoom Mask and Kuba Ngaady-A Mwash Mask) are both from the Democratic Republic of Congo, recreating the Kuba dynastic history.

Another work in the museum’s African collection, a Bamana Headdress (Chiwara), represents a mythical character who taught humans to turn wild grasses into grain.

A Mossi Nakomse Headdress (Zazaido), is used in secular and religious rituals by young men. The Zazaido masquerade honors male and female elders at funeral ceremonies, and blesses survivors.

A Yoruba Crown from Nigeria is worn on state occasions, and reflects the spiritual connections of the ruler. The face represents his royal lineage and ultimately the god Oduduwa, who remained on earth and became their first king.

The collection also includes a Dan mask (Deangle), an Ogoni Mask (Nigeria), a Toma Mask (Landai), a Senufo Mask (Kpelie), a Guru Mask (Gu), an Igbo Crest Mask (Nigeria), and a Yoruba Oro Efe Gelede Mask (Nigeria/Republic of Benin).

ABOUT THE BOCA RATON MUSEUM OF ART

Celebrating our 70th anniversary in 2020, the Boca Raton Museum of Art
encompasses a creative campus that includes the Museum in Mizner Park,
Art School, and an Artists Guild. As the “Official Art Museum of the City of
Boca Raton, “the Museum has provided seven decades of cultural and artistic service to the community, and to many visitors from around the world. Open–10:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Fridays; 10:00 a.m.-8:00 p.m. on Thursdays; and 12:00-5:00 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays.

Visit HERE for more information.

African, Art, Museum, Phyllis Galembo, Spiritual, Realm, tradition, African, Art, Museum, Phyllis Galembo, Spiritual, Realm, tradition,

Condé Nast Collection

The other night at Morrison Hotel Gallery inside the Sunset Marquis Hotel, the younger generation of today’s Hollywood came out to celebrate the unveiling of the new Condé Nast Collection.

The exclusive event was hosted by John Varvatos and photographer Timothy White. Co-hosts included Hollywood’s new generation, Tommy Dorfman, Adam Faze, Gulliver Oldman, Odessa A’zion, Duke Nicholson and Amanda Steele.

Guests enjoyed signature cocktails like Mr. White’s Red Margarita and the Diltz Daiquiri – both made with Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Whiskey – and the Mezzin’ Around and Love Live Tequila, each made with Villa One Tequila, who presented the event

The Morrison Hotel Gallery Condé Nast Collection, an exquisite lineup of contemporary photography carefully curated from the extensive Condé Nast archive, featuring work from remarkable master photographers such as Edward Steichen, George Hoyningen-Heune, John Rawlings, and Bert Stern. Famed for their unparalleled perspective, these photographers have captured timeless moments that range from alluring and captivating to unconventional and provocative – images that will be on display as extraordinary archival prints for discerning collectors and lovers of fine art to view, enjoy, and make a part of their personal collection.

Curated by photographer Timothy White and Condé Nast Corporate Photography Director Ivan Shaw, this elegant collection features an exclusive grouping of 30 prints. From Joni Mitchell in a pensive pose to a temple-clutching Jack Nicholson and the ever-elegant Audrey Hepburn, each image was chosen based on having driven the historical direction of photography forward, as well as having left an indelible mark on fashion, art, and pop culture.

After its unveiling, the collection will be showcased on a dedicated wall in each Morrison Hotel Gallery. The prints will also be available for purchase online via all of the gallery’s digital channels.

About Morrison Hotel Gallery:

With over 50,000 photographs in our archive and 18 years of experience, we strive to curate the best collections privately and through our galleries, creating unique offerings to our broad range of diverse collectors.

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*Photo by Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE , Vaughn Lowery

How To Achieve Better Bokeh

Bokeh is the blurry part of an image. It is one of the best effects in photography and is often used but still, not as much as it should. Since your bokeh is the blurry part of an image, it keeps the clear part of the photo in good focus and makes it more noticeable. In fact, bokeh makes the most outstanding effect in photography. However, to achieve that, you have to know how to make one perfectly.

Here are four things you can do to improve your bokeh:

Create your own custom bokeh

This is the first thing to try – creating your own bokeh. In any case, photographers have been doing this for ages.

The main way to do this is to make a cutout in any shape that you fancy. You will then place this cutout on your camera lens such that when you take the photo, the opaque parts of the cutout block the light in the right places.

Preferably, use a black paper to make the cutout. You can always start with the simplest bokeh. Just cut a hole the size of a coin on the paper. Stick the paper in front of the lens and when you take your shot, the part blocking the light will be your bokeh. It will be just perfect.

After you have had some practice with simple circles, rectangles and so on, go for shapes that are more complex.

Use the right lens

This is about the choice of the aperture. They come in two types mostly. Cheaper cameras come with octagonal apertures, which produce bokehs in the same shape. Costlier cameras have more blades or curved blade apertures and they give circular bokehs. If you have good budget to buy quality bokeh lens to add to your camera, you can expect to have the best possible bokeh for your photos.

Create a relationship between focus image and the bokeh

This requires you to be a bit creative, but the effect will be worth all the effort. The best bokeh is when the blurred image is related to the image in focus. For example, a goalkeeper standing with the ball with the net in the blurred background makes a striking effect.

A car in sharp focus looks much better with a big truck in the blurred part of the photo. The reason for this is that there is an interaction, especially when you take the photo of the car on the road. The bokeh effect will be much better if the focus and the blurred images are related.

Depth of field adjustment

Even if the background is out of focus, you still want to be able to tell what is in the blurred part of the picture. It is best to aim for a great field of depth. It is all about just how much of the photo is out of focus. Do not make the mistake of using a low value aperture.

Such has the effect of blurring a large part of the image. Since you just want to keep a small part of the photo blurred, you should use a high aperture value. Likewise, do not go for the blurriest background that you can make. The best bokeh is achieved when you can tell what the blurry objects in your photo are.

Jeff Langlois, 360 MAGAZINE, The Mill, LA, photography, fine arts

Jeff Langlois

It took a one-way road trip for Jeff Langlois to cultivate a passion for photography. The adventure to LA brought forth stunning deserts and mountainous peaks, as he drove from Minneapolis through the Rockies – in a 2002 Honda Civic; eager to jumpstart a career at a commercial house called The Mill. The best way to balance out the fast-paced, unpredictable, and ever-changing environment that is advertising, was to break away and see what the west coast really looks like. Traveling solo allowed him to arrive in beautiful destinations and wait for these locations to unveil their scenic characteristics. Jeff notes that the best shots always come unexpectedly. Now while still mainly shooting the outdoors, he plans just enough to get him out and moving around, but his best and most memorable shots come unexpectedly. It’s about showing up and being patient and receptive to what’s going on. 

Harvey Stein “Mexico Between Life and Death”

By Katelynn Dunn

Harvey Stein is an internationally renowned street photographer. His work spans Mexico to the United States, Italy, India and many other places. His most recent book titled “Mexico Between Life and Death” explores the idea of a culture living in a state of limbo. He travelled to numerous cities throughout the course of 14 trips in 18 years to complete this thorough body of work.

During his presentation at the Mexican Cultural Institute of Washington DC, Stein discussed his particular style and the photographic techniques that he uses to tell stories in his work. He was specific about his straight forward approach towards photographing his subjects to express stark emotion. Stein photographs people head on and without smiles to present a natural and whole form of humanity, without filter. He uses compositional elements, the placement of people, shapes, and 2D vs. 3D planes to create images that challenge the eye. Additionally, his use of film provides another layer of genuine expression in his art.

Stein made the point that although he travelled to Mexico for almost a decade for this series, he does not know Spanish. This did not hinder his ability to interact with his subjects.