Posts tagged with "Harvard University"

Putting the Pause in Menopause

Doctor Tips for Keeping your Mind Sharp and Your Mood Up

By Dr. Julianne Arena

We’ve heard lots about the changes that happen to your body during menopause – hot flashes, sleepless nights, and a true knock to your libido, to name a few. But what about what happens to your mind? Cognition and Mood is the theme for this year’s National Menopause Day because the changes to your mind and mojo are definitely affected by the physical changes in your body. 

But hey, it’s not all so bad! How about the top three upsides to menopause:

  • No more periods
  • No more PMS 
  • Sex for pure pleasure!

Looking at this life change positively helps with mindset, for sure. And – there are so many things you can do to take charge of this time in your life, especially when it comes to your mind and mood! 

The Mind + Body Connection and Menopause

The truth is a neurological change does happen with menopause. Hormonal changes can affect the chemicals in the brain. You aren’t just imagining it when you find yourself “searching for words” more often than not – menopause can cause a delayed verbal memory. General forgetfulness and some cognitive decline are normal for many. (Although it does come back post-menopause!) For some women, the neurological changes occurring around this time can trigger emotional issues like depression and anxiety.  The great news is there are things you can do to get through the peri, post, and menopausal years without losing your mind! 

Fight menopause brain fog and improve your mood with five simple steps:

  1. Protect the Heart – You may be surprised to learn how connected your heart and mind are. As progesterone and estrogen levels decrease with menopause, cholesterol levels can increase, upping the chances of heart disease.  Postmenopausal women are at an increased risk of mental deterioration due to cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and diabetes. Focus on small but mighty steps to being heart-healthy, like moderate exercise (starting with just a 10-minute walk a day), ditching bad habits like smoking and excessive drinking, and upping your healthy foods are great places to start.
  1. Stay Active – You already know that exercise may improve your mood, but it can also be highly beneficial for your brain. Exercise increases your neurotransmitters which pump up your endorphins – the feel-good chemicals that boost your mood. For extra endorphin boosting, invite a friend to walk with you. The friendship connection is powerful for endorphin levels too. Studies show that regular exercise changes the brain, not just cognition but also memory. (Oh, and added plus, regular exercise also boosts the libido.) And keep your mind active too. It’s the perfect time to feed your brain with stimulating hobbies to help it stay sharp – crosswords, reading, even chess!  
  1. Establish a Sleep Routine – Hormones and hot flashes significantly impact sleep. And we don’t have to tell you, but less sleep = a bad mood, especially as we age. Good sleep is also one of the primary factors for overall good health, and studies show that varied sleep schedules worsen women’s cognition skills. It’s all about routine and sticking with it. We’ve probably all heard the basics of developing a sleep schedule: setting a consistent bedtime, limiting alcohol, putting the screens away well before bed, and so on. Try finding a mantra you can say in the middle of the night to get yourself asleep quickly and shut down the nighttime worrying. Remember how we were told to “count sheep” when we were little? There is something to that. Figure out a way to keep your mind busy and the worries away, you aren’t going to solve any problems in the middle of the night, and everything looks brighter in the morning anyway! Putting sleep as a top health priority will pay off in many ways.
  1. Get your Mojo Back – Your estrogen, progesterone and testosterone dip following menopause, leading to changes in sexual drive. In addition, less estrogen means less blood flow to the vagina, more dryness, and painful intercourse. Also, mood disorders and depression can cause low self-esteem, physical fatigue, lowered libido, and Anorgasmia, or trouble having an orgasm. Cliovana can help with these issues. The sound wave technology boosts the process of regenerating cells in the genitals, resulting in improved blood flow to the clitoris, which creates a long-term increase in women’s sexual responsiveness and intensity, helps with painful sex and lubrication, and increases orgasm frequency. It’s a quick and easy, entirely non-invasive treatment that creates a long-term increase in women’s sexual responsiveness and intensity. 
  1. Be Friends with your Gynecologist – Many people in the menopausal years suffer from moodiness, anxiety, and even depression. It’s not just the hormones; some people feel sad that the childbearing years are over, and other significant mid-life changes complicate it physically and emotionally. Everyone’s journey and body are different. As uncomfortable as it may be, talk to your doctor. They have the resources and the knowledge to help you get back on track.

And… a bonus #6: Embrace this time in life! With middle age comes wisdom, unique opportunities to experience travel, go deeper in relationships, discover new hobbies, and more. We are all affected differently by our changing hormones. Every one of us going through menopause can focus on staying positive and not let menopause be a stumbling block to our happiness. 

Focus on what you CAN do to get your mind and body in a better place to handle the changes you can’t control.  You have the power to manage menopause and not let it rule you!

Dr. Julianne Arena is a double board certified physician from Harvard and a certified Cliovana specialist who specializes in women’s health and sexual well-being.  

Actress Sienna Miller on Elle Canada cover via 360 MAGAZINE

SIENNA MILLER COVERS ELLE

KO Média is excited to unveil the June issue of ELLE Canada featuring actress Sienna Miller. The star talks openly about navigating familiar ground in the new Netflix drama Anatomy of a Scandal, as her character is thrust into a similar kind of toxic tabloid culture Miller faced throughout her 20s. “I can’t quite believe that it all happened,” she says in the candid interview. “The chaos of that entire decade is so far removed from my life now.” In particular, turning 40 has felt like starting a decidedly new chapter for this hard-working mother, who recently moved from London to New York with her nine-year-old daughter. “I feel more in control of my life,” she says. “I know what matters to me: my friendships, my child and, ultimately, trying to be happy. That really is enough.”

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dakota_FanningSkincare is front and centre in this edition — with a few twists. To kick off summer, we offer a sun-protection refresh on everything from UV basics to reapplication. We also look at whether increasingly popular skincare products for vulvas and vaginas actually work, and we explore a new trend toward creating fragrances that emulate the scent of skin. Plus, Dakota Fanning shares her morning beauty regimen and bedtime rituals, and the co-founders of skincare brand Youth to the People reflect on their commitment to sustainable products and the idea that youth is more than skin deep.

In fashion, the scholastic, bookish vibe of preppy style is making a major comeback, but this time with subversive undertones and major sex appeal. French jewellery prototypist Marine Billet gives us a behind-the-scenes look at how she makes some of high fashion’s most avant-garde designs. And sisters Myriam and Romy Belzile-Maguire, founders of the Montreal-based brand Maguire, share their goal of making luxury footwear friendly with ethical craftsmanship, transparency and an accessible shopping environment.

Loss makes a few appearances in this issue. Singer-songwriter Angel Olsen opens up about how her latest album, Big Time, draws on all sorts of grief, including the deaths of her parents and the end of her first queer relationship. One of our writers reflects on the role of transient friendships in our lives as she mourns the loss of one such relationship. And actress Minnie Driver’s new memoir, Managing Expectation, is filled with deeply personal, intimate snapshots of her life, including the last few days she spent with her mother, who was diagnosed with terminal cancer.

This edition runs the gamut of stories about empowerment. We sit down with four female Indigenous leaders who are using tourism as a way to shape a new narrative for Indigenous women in Western Canada. We explore how kink is stepping out of the shadows and pushing our definition of sex beyond being just a one-way street to orgasm. Toronto’s Mouna Traoré shares her experience as part of the predominantly Black cast and crew of The Porter, a show about unwavering ambition and Black life. And British actress Indira Varma, who takes a leading role in the Star Wars miniseries Obi-Wan Kenobi, opens up about her early introduction to the arts and navigating the industry as a woman of Indian descent.

Finally, we get serious with a look at a new media movement centred around giving a voice to cult survivors, allowing them to share their experiences and educate others. Readers will also get to meet journalist Zahra Joya and non-profit founder Pashtana Durrani, two Afghan women who are fighting against repression despite imminent danger in an attempt to reclaim their rights and those of others.

Read digital issue HERE.

Visit Elle Canada.

2021 Collegiate Inventors Competition

5 Student Teams’ Innovations Win 2021 Collegiate Inventors Competition

A glimpse into the future of American innovation and emerging technological trends from the nation’s brightest young innovators — from a robot used in search and rescue situations to an accessible COVID-19 testing solution — were recognized and honored this week at the 2021 Collegiate Inventors Competition®, an annual competition for college and university students and their advisers.

Finalist teams (six Undergraduate and six Graduate), consisting of 20 students from 13 colleges and universities across the United States, presented their inventions in a virtual format to an esteemed panel of final-round judges composed of the most influential inventors and innovation experts in the nation — National Inventors Hall of Fame® (NIHF) Inductees and United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) officials.

“As our world’s challenges continue to grow in complexity, we increasingly need to look to the next generation of innovators to meet these problems head on,” said NIHF CEO Michael Oister. “We are proud to recognize and celebrate this latest group of collegiate inventors who are committed to creating a better future for us all.”

Established in 1990, the Collegiate Inventors Competition is a program of the National Inventors Hall of Fame and is sponsored by the USPTO and Arrow Electronics (Arrow Electronics People’s Choice Award). In addition to cash awards, the winning teams also receive an opportunity to meet with a NIHF Inductee for mentorship and advice, and a USPTO Patent Acceleration Certificate.

FIRST-PLACE WINNERS ($10,000 PRIZE)

UNDERGRADUATE:

EarFlow, Harvard University

Team Member: Eva Cai; Advisers: Samir Mitragotri, Aaron Remenschneider

An easier treatment for healthier ears: Otitis media, or middle ear infection, is a painful condition triggering excess fluid production in the middle ear, affecting the eardrum by altering its vibration and hearing levels. It is especially common in young children. EarFlow is a drug delivery device that is placed on a patient’s eardrum to deliver dexamethasone, a steroid, and ciprofloxacin, an antibiotic, to the middle ear to treat otitis media. Placing the device takes less than five minutes in a doctor’s office and does not require general anesthesia. With low cytotoxicity and low risk of hearing damage, EarFlow offers a vast improvement from standard treatments for recurrent infections.

GRADUATE:

SolarClear, Stony Brook University

Team Member: Shrish Patel; Adviser: Alexander Orlov

A better solar panel cleaning solution: Dust storms, especially in the Western United States, Middle East and North Africa, are a significant problem for large-scale solar power plants. While solutions exist to clean them off, they are impractical and expensive. Cleaning a typical utility-scale solar installation requires a staggering 600,000 to 1 million gallons of potable water. SolarClear addresses this problem by using autonomous waterless cleaning technology that is both significantly more effective and efficient compared to existing technologies. Additionally, the unique design of the electrodes that are used in the system makes SolarClear economically viable for utility-scale installation in the desert.

RUNNER-UP WINNERS ($5,000 PRIZE)

UNDERGRADUATE:

Augment Health Bladder Management System, Georgia Institute of Technology

Team Members: Stephen Kalinsky, Jared Meyers; Adviser: Martin Jacobson

Smart monitoring that can empower millions: Over 6.5 million people in the United States alone have limited bladder sensation. They cannot feel when their bladder is full and often suffer incontinence. Many use incontinence products or a catheter and collection bag. Often, these solutions lead to urinary tract infections and are costly, difficult and embarrassing to manage. The Augment Health Bladder Management System is a noninvasive connection between a catheter and catheter valve that monitors the bladder and tells the user when it is full via their smart device, eliminating the need for obtrusive incontinence products. This invention has the potential to reduce costs and infections, restore dignity and offer better quality of care.

GRADUATE:

VirSENSE, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Team Member: Maha Alafeef; Adviser: Dipanjan Pan

An accessible COVID-19 testing solution: To manage and ultimately control the spread of the COVID-19 virus, rapid, inexpensive and easily deployable testing is crucial. It’s for this reason that Maha Alafeef created VirSENSE, a rapid test for COVID-19 that users can administer entirely at home. Using an electrochemical biosensor paired with an electrical reader, the test screens for active cases and is over 98% accurate. Thanks to the technology that VirSENSE is using, individuals are able to determine in real time if they are COVID-19 positive, even before their bodies develop a detectable antibody response.

ARROW ELECTRONICS PEOPLE’S CHOICE AWARD WINNER ($2,000 PRIZE)

Firebot, University of Texas at Austin

Team Member: Siddharth Thakur; Adviser: Roland Fields

Navigating safer search and rescue operations in fire situations: Firefighters face life-threatening situations while searching for human life in structural fires, leading to 33 fatalities in the past decade and 10,575 injuries in 2019 alone. Firebot, a thermally insulated, wirelessly controlled, obstacle-climbing robot, locates victims without requiring firefighters to enter burning buildings. Firefighters can deploy Firebot near an entrance and remotely steer it using a joystick and laptop displaying live video, thermal imagery and sensor data, which warns of potentially hazardous situations. Firefighters can use a two-way speaker to lead conscious victims out, or a siren and GPS map to allow them to quickly find and rescue unconscious victims, helping to mitigate risks and save lives.

Mina Tocalini illustration for mental health article inside 360 magazine

Five Ways to Improve Emotional Wellness

October is Emotional Wellness Month, making it a great time to put emotional health in the spotlight. According to Mental Health America, 31% of adults will experience an anxiety disorder in their lifetime, over 17 million adults have depression, and 7% of the adult population has major depression. Clearly, we need to put a bigger emphasis on emotional wellness, including what it is and how to improve it.

“Emotional health confronts your internal states of being. Emotions being love, anger, joy, and sadness. Emotions can be broken down into secondary and tertiary states,” explains Katie Sandler, personal development and career coach. “Emotions and behaviors go hand in hand, such that our emotions conduct systems: reactions, choices, goals, perception, etc.”

Stress, anxiety, and low self-worth are all emotional aspects of our health which require tending to. Emotional health shows up in positive attitudes, high self-esteem and self-worth, and a healthy body image. Some ways we can tend to and bolster our emotional wellness include: 

  • Learn to identify emotions: Being able to identify emotions happens to be extremely challenging for even the most successful. It is not something we were truly taught to identify and then articulate. Start by simply becoming aware of your own emotional states and patterns. Once you become aware of them you can learn to successfully work through them in a healthy way, and ensure they don’t become overwhelming.  
  • Master coping skills: Coping is a wonderful tool for tending to our emotional health and building resilience. Coping comes in many different shapes and sizes – it’s important for people to build a tool box of effective personal coping mechanisms. This also requires a period of trial and error. Coping can be done through things like meditation, spending time in nature, phoning a friend, doing breathing exercises, or journaling. Once you find one that works, add it to the ethereal tool box and remember to pull it out in times of need. 
  • Get to know you: Work on understanding yourself (aka loving yourself). The more you lean into yourself and show a desire to be curious and compassionate, the greater the likelihood of you shifting into emotional health. We spend a lot of time getting to know others, but very little time getting to know ourselves, and we need to change that.
  • Practice mindfulness: According to Harvard University, mindfulness is paying attention to the present moment with openness, curiosity, and acceptance. The benefits of practicing mindfulness include decreasing depression, improving emotional reactivity, improves resiliency, and improving healthy coping skills. One of the most effective ways to improve mindfulness is to practice mindfulness meditation.
  • Get physically active: Not only is getting enough physical exercise each week important to your overall health, but it’s beneficial for your emotional wellness, too. The Mayo Clinic reports that exercise can help to improve depression and anxiety symptoms, as well as improve mood and help you feel better overall. Additionally, exercise helps people feel more confident and releases feel-good endorphins. Aim for getting at least 30 minutes of exercise per day on three to five days per week to get the most benefits.

Every day you should spend time on emotional wellness,” added Sandler. “When you do that it will pay off in all areas of your life. Make yourself a priority, stick with it, and see the beauty of the results.”

Sandler has worked with many people to help them identify a plan for personal achievement, take steps to reach goals, and identify areas that need to be worked on. She provides people with meaningful tools that they can use to help bring calm and insight into their life. In addition to working with individuals, she offers luxury impact retreats. 

About Katie Sandler

She has a bachelor’s degree in psychology and a master’s degree in mental health counseling, has a strong foundation in mindfulness-based stress reduction, and has worked in hospitals and private practice. She previously spent time as a research assistant while at Johns Hopkins, focusing on purpose in life. To learn more about Katie Sandler and her services, or to see the retreat schedule, visit her site.

image from Polity Press for use by 360 Magazine

DIDIER FASSIN — DEATH OF A TRAVELLER

It is a simple story. A 37-year-old man belonging to the Traveller community is shot dead by a special unit of the French police on the family farm where he was hiding since he failed to return to prison after temporary release. The officers claim self-defense. The relatives, present at the scene, contest that claim. A case is opened, and it concludes with a dismissal that is upheld on appeal. Dismayed by these decisions, the family continues the struggle for truth and justice.

Giving each account of the event the same credit, Didier Fassin conducts a counter-investigation, based on the re-examination of all the available details and on the interviews of its protagonists. A critical reflection on the work of police forces, the functioning of the justice system, and the conditions that make such tragedies possible and seldom punished, Death of a Traveller is also an attempt to restore to these marginalized communities what they are usually denied: respectability.

The Author:

Didier Fassin is the James D. Wolfensohn Professor at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, a Director of studies at the École des hautes études en sciences sociales in Paris and a Professor on the Annual Chair of Public Health at the Collège de France.

Advance Praise:

“In seeking to do justice to yet another young life, another racialized suspect, snuffed out in the name of public order, Fassin provides a stunning indictment of a new moral economy: a culture of institutional duplicity that allows police to get away with murder.”Jean Comaroff, Harvard University

“How can an account of a controversial killing do justice to it sociologically and according to the laws of the land, and at the same time politically and humanely? This is the multifaceted conundrum addressed by this beautifully written and meticulously crafted book. A riveting must-read for all those concerned by the broader meaning of death at the hands of the police, in France and in other countries.”Dame Caroline Humphrey, University of Cambridge

scholastics illustration by sara davidson for 360 Magazine

Robert George Joins Pepperdine Faculty

Philosopher and Legal Scholar Robert P. George Joins Faculty at Pepperdine Caruso School of Law and School of Public Policy.

Princeton University professor Robert George has been named the inaugural Nootbaar Honorary Distinguished Professor of Law at the Caruso School of Law and the Ronald Reagan Honorary Distinguished Professor of Public Policy at the School of Public Policy at Pepperdine University. George will commence his new roles at Pepperdine in fall 2021 and serve a five-year term. He will continue to serve as McCormick Professor of Jurisprudence at Princeton University where he is a full-time faculty member. As an honorary distinguished professor at both schools, he will be invited to give academic lectures, lead student colloquia, and participate in other speaking engagements with members of the Pepperdine community.

“I am delighted that Dr. George has accepted our invitation to affiliate with our schools of public policy and law as an honorary distinguished professor. His national platform and influential voice will elevate the conversation of respectful discourse and intellectual freedom at Pepperdine,” said Jim Gash (JD ’93), president of Pepperdine University. “Dr. George brings to Pepperdine his passion to invest in the leadership development of students, which is one of our most cherished core values.”

George was introduced to the University community at the inaugural President’s Speaker Series event in January 2021, where he joined fellow professor and political scholar Cornel West for a discussion about honesty, civility and courage through the lens of faith. During the event George expressed that universities have a sacred mission to open students’ minds to the truth and to encourage the pursuit of information from opposing sides in order to better understand and defend the truth.

“Pepperdine is one of the world’s truly great Christian universities—an institution that embodies the conviction that faith and reason are the ‘two wings on which the human spirit ascends to contemplation of truth,’” said George. “Some years ago I was delighted to speak at Pepperdine’s Commencement and become an honorary alumnus. I’m thrilled now to deepen my relationship with the University’s exceptional faculty and student body by becoming an honorary distinguished professor of law and public policy.”

The Ronald Reagan Honorary Distinguished Professor of Public Policy, which is the most distinguished of the School of Public Policy’s visiting professorships, was launched in the program’s first years and approved by Nancy Reagan. As the school’s first-ever visiting professorship, and the only professorship in the president’s name at any policy program in the United States, the position was initially endowed and facilitated by University supporter Flora L. Thornton.

A Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Swarthmore College, George holds degrees from Harvard University and Oxford University, in addition to 22 honorary degrees. He is a recipient of the US Presidential Citizens Medal, the Honorific Medal for the Defense of Human Rights of the Republic of Poland, and is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. The University of Dallas and the American Enterprise Institute host the Robert P. George Initiative in Faith, Ethics, and Public Policy in Washington, D.C. His most recent book is Conscience and Its Enemies.

To learn more about Dr. Robert George visit the Pepperdine Newsroom.

Ben Zaidi, 360 magazine

Ben Zaidi

‘Sultry singer performs with perfection.’ 360 MAGAZINE

Ben Zaidi‘s music combines the lyrical sharpness of spoken-word poetry with the soft lushness of electronica. Written and produced by himeslf in his bedroom, his songs bleed with the intimacy of a private journal.

Growing up in Seattle, Zaidi was surrounded by the natural serenity of the Pacific Northwest. While still in high school he began writing songs that caught the attention of local record labels and, ultimately, Harvard University, where he enrolled to study music and poetry. In his dorm room he honed an individual sound that blended the confessional songwriting of Blue-period Joni Mitchell with the sonic minimalism of James Blake.

He developed a following online, relocated to New York City, and within months had sold out back-to-back shows at Rockwood Music Hall. The independently released single ‘Like It Was Nothing’ soon followed and shot to #2 on the iTunes Electronic Charts. Doors began opening, and Zaidi soon found himself in the studio with artists and producers he’d dreamed of working with, and headlining a packed show at Baby’s All Right.

As his music has expanded outward, Zaidi’s pen has turned inward––examining the self and its relationship to the outside world with unflinching honesty. His meditations on love, loss, and solitude in the digital age often point to the paradox that the more connected we have become, the more isolated and lonely we can feel. But, whether listening on headphones or at one of his intimate live shows, it is the familiarity of these feelings that pulls us right into the bedroom alongside him.

Nick DiGiovanni, MasterChef, 360 MAGAZINE

Nick DiGiovanni

Nick DiGiovanni is a 23-year-old recent grad of Harvard, who was the youngest contestant to ever compete in the finale of MasterChef. He started cooking when he was only eight years old, and started working in restaurants in high school, including an internship at Benu, a Michelin three-star restaurant in San Francisco. He ultimately decided to forego culinary school for Harvard, before deciding to leave for a semester to compete on MasterChef and ultimately make it to the finale.

During his time at Harvard, Nick created the first-ever food concentration called Food & Climate, to figure out ways to address the environmental crisis through food. That then led to the start of a new business venture called Voodles that would help revolutionize the way kids eat vegetables. The veggie based pasta is organic certified, kosher, gluten free, vegan & non-GMO and will be available online by 2020. 

Facing Addiction

By James W. Hood

I had a horrible feeling that October Friday. I’d been in that situation many times before, but this time felt different.

That Wednesday, Austin left voicemails that sounded confused — from a friend’s phone, because Austin had lost his.

On Thursday, Austin sent texts from that same phone. Something wasn’t right. I called the friend to say I was concerned and to have Austin call me. Several hours later, the friend called to say he went to Austin’s apartment, but no one was home.

A few hours later I received a blocked call but couldn’t answer in time. Three minutes later a call came with a New Orleans area code. It was the coroner saying my beautiful boy was found slumped over his kitchen table, dead from an opioid overdose.

Austin’s journey was over. Mine was just beginning.

Like every child, Austin was a wonderful person — just a kid trying to grow up in a world that throws endless challenges at us. But at age 14, Austin started drinking. We were concerned and sought help. By 15, we found pipes and marijuana in his room. We sought more help. By 16, Austin was using opioids.

The next three years were a blur of therapists, interventions, wilderness programs, therapeutic boarding schools, and ER visits. At 19, Austin was doing great. He went to college with new-found determination and optimism. Until those 48 hours that I’ll never be able to understand or reconstruct.

Until the phone call came that would bring any parent to his or her knees. Until he lost his battle and I lost my son.

Someone said losing a child is the greatest pain we will ever face.

They were right.

Looking back, I wondered why it was so difficult to help Austin. Why did he have to go to 18 different people or places for help? Why was there no roadmap? Why did I feel we were lurking in shadows the entire time? Wasn’t there anyone who’d figured out what needs to be done?
I came to understand our family’s journey was far from unique. But even in Westport, CT, society wants to pretend addiction is not the horrific problem it is.

Addiction is devastating our country and stealing our youth. With 21 million people currently suffering and 23 million more in long-term recovery, addiction to alcohol and other drugs impacts one in three households. Addiction affects as many people as diabetes; one-and-a-half times as many as all cancers combined.

Someone, usually a young adult, dies from alcohol or other drugs every four minutes — like a jumbo jet falling from the sky every day with no survivors. Addiction and accidental overdose are now the leading killer of people under 50 years of age, and addiction costs our country $1 trillion a year.

Where is the outrage?

Our country has done little to combat the scourge of addiction, and so it continues to get worse, striking an ever-younger audience every year. Why? Because the stigma, shame, and hopelessness surrounding addiction have kept this issue in the shadows.

As a result — astonishingly — there has never been a well-funded equivalent of the American Cancer Society or American Heart Association to battle the addiction crisis.

This is why I left my career and, with others whose lives have also been forever changed by this crisis, created Facing Addiction (now Facing Addiction with NCADD).

We’ve crafted a comprehensive strategy to turn the tide against addiction in America.

To do that, we’re building a national movement — as exists with every other major health issue — to bring a unified voice and sustainable source of funding to this effort.
On October 4, 2015, Facing Addiction made history on the National Mall, when tens of thousands gathered to end the silence surrounding addiction. This was the first time major musicians, politicians, actors, and advocates all joined to create a united voice, supporting Facing Addiction’s pledge to help solve the most urgent health crisis of our time. It was the AIDS-quilt moment for addiction in America.

Since then, Facing Addiction with NCADD has become the leading voice in the effort to end addiction in our country, and has accomplished many important things. Still, because of the stigma, shame, and misunderstanding surrounding addiction, many ask if we can truly reverse this problem.
The answer is, unconditionally, yes.

First, we must educate people that addiction is an illness, not a moral failing. It happens to good people who no more want to become addicted than others want to get cancer, heart disease, or diabetes.

Addiction is not inherently fatal. It is treatable, and recovery is real. But people must understand the risks. One in every seven Americans will experience a substance use disorder.

Second, we must make accurate information readily accessible, in a trusted place, so people who need help know where to turn. Facing Addiction with NCADD, with Transforming Youth Recovery, created the Addiction Resource Hub that lists some 40,000 assets, to help people with prevention, intervention, treatment, recovery, and advocacy. This is the most comprehensive addiction resource ever assembled, and is already helping countless people.

Third, we must remove impediments that have been holding back progress for decades. Prevention programs that don’t work. Pediatricians untrained in addiction. Shady, under-regulated addiction treatment centers. And our wrong-minded response to addiction as a crime, instead of an illness.
America has faced other health crises throughout history and, each time, found ways to dramatically lessen their impact.

Thirty-five years ago, people thought HIV/AIDS, another highly stigmatized illness, was insurmountable. But since the AIDS quilt moment in 1983, great strides have been made to reduce its devastation — with $3 billion raised toward that end.

But we must act…now. More than 50 years ago, Martin Luther King, Jr. spoke of “the fierce urgency of now” when discussing a very different crisis in America. We must focus today’s “fierce urgency of now” on the addiction crisis in America, before we lose an entire generation of our youth.

JAMES W. HOOD
Co-CEO of Facing Addiction with NCADD

Jim has had a distinguished career, with an emphasis on helping companies identify and implement strategies for significant growth. He has more than three decades of experience in general management, business strategy, marketing, finance, consulting, private investing and as an entrepreneur.

Since the death of his son, Austin, from drug-related causes in October 2012, Jim has devoted all his time helping to forge a national organization, Facing Addiction, to serve as “the American Cancer Society of the addiction space.”

Facing Addiction launched with a history-making event on the National Mall on October 4, 2015. In January 2018 Facing Addiction merged with NCADD. The resulting organization, Facing Addiction with NCADD, is now recognized as the leading voice in the effort to end addiction in our country. Jim serves as Co-CEO of Facing Addiction with NCADD.

During his years in advertising, Jim managed some of Young & Rubicam’s largest accounts, headed the agency’s strategy review board, served as Director of Global Business Development, and was CEO of the joint venture between Y&R and Dentsu, the largest advertising agency in the world.

During his years on Wall Street, Jim was Chief Marketing Officer of Lehman Brothers and CS First Boston (now Credit Suisse).

Jim also had a successful strategic consulting practice for more than a decade, working with clients in the financial services, telecom, defense, technology and restaurant industries. While a consultant, Jim co-founded and became CEO of HipCricket, a groundbreaking mobile marketing firm that went public in 2006. He was also a director of Einstein Noah Restaurant Group and served as a member of their executive committee when the company went public.

Jim is an investor in several private equity and hedge funds and invests in and advises early stage companies. He also serves as a mentor at the Yale Entrepreneurial Institute.

Jim holds a BA in Psychology and Economics from Cornell University and an MBA from Harvard University. He has served on many community boards in his hometown of Westport, CT.

THE ECONOMIST x OPEN FUTURE

The Economist, a leading source of analysis on international business and world affairs, today announced “Open Future”, an editorially driven initiative (www.economist.com/openfuture) which aims to remake the case for The Economist’s founding principles of classical British liberalism which are being challenged from all sides in the current political climate of populism and authoritarianism.

“Although the world has changed dramatically since James Wilson founded The Economist to fight against the Corn Laws, the liberalism we have championed since 1843 is as important and relevant as ever,” said Zanny Minton Beddoes, editor-in-chief, The Economist.  “Yet the core tenets of that liberalism—faith in free markets and open societies—face greater resistance today than they have for many years. From globalization to free speech, basic elements of the liberal credo are assailed from right and left.”

Content for Open Future will be developed and organised around five themes: Open Society (diversity, and individual rights versus group rights); Open Borders (migration); Open Markets (trade, markets, taxes and welfare reform); Open Ideas (free speech); and Open Progress (the impact and regulation of technology). In addition to content from The Economist editorial staff, the Open Future hub will feature commentary from outside contributors, including from those with dissenting points of view.

The initiative launches with a debate between Larry Summers and Evan Smith about no-platforming and free speech at universities. Mr Summers is the Charles W. Eliot University Professor and President Emeritus at Harvard University. He served as Secretary of the Treasury for President Clinton and as the Director of the National Economic Council for President Barack Obama. Evan Smith is a Research Fellow in history at Flinders University in Adelaide, Australia and is writing a book on the history of no-platforming.

A special report on the future of liberalism written by editor-in-chief Zanny Minton Beddoes will appear in the newspaper’s 175th anniversary edition dated September 15th. And on that Saturday, the newspaper will host the Open Future Festival, to be held simultaneously in Hong Kong, London and New York. There will also be an Open Future essay contest for young people; surveys and other data visualizations; podcasts; social-media programs and new video from Economist Films.