Posts tagged with "language"

Do Korean Lessons Have to be Daunting?

For native English speakers, Korean can be a challenging language to adopt later in life. Unlike the Spanish or French languages, which often feel more intuitive to English speakers, Korean is challenging precisely because it shares neither alphabet nor origin with the Romance languages. Korean is written in Hangul, and requires English speakers to navigate an entirely new character writing system. Luckily, learning to read Korean can be done within a couple hours with the help of an experienced Korean tutor and one or two private lessons. 

Chinese characters share a pool of 250 radicals of which they are comprised; meanwhile, Korean is written in “bundles” of letters that are themselves consonant blocks. Each of these blocks is made of several elements—some combination of consonant and vowel—which are combined into one consonant element,  then grouped into words. This means that the writing system is actually fairly easy for many native English speakers to grasp, once they have a solid understanding of the basics.

Is Korean Always Difficult to Learn?

Learning Korean is generally less difficult for native English speakers than picking up, say, Chinese or Arabic. Pronunciation is fairly straightforward: Korean phonetics tend to be easy for English speakers, and there are no tones such as in Mandarin. 

Korean grammar has certain points of ease: there’s no grammatical gender, and verbs don’t conjugate much. However, the sentence structure is basically “backward” according to native English speakers: subject-object-verb. 

Formality and relationships also affect how Korean is spoken. The ending of a sentence may change based on whether you are speaking to someone older or younger than you, someone who “outranks” you, or someone you are familiar with. Korean vocabulary is where things get tricky; for native English speakers, there are very few loan words from English, and Korean words can often be quite lengthy, especially during formal speech. 

Overall, Korean can pose many challenges for those who do not also speak Chinese or Japanese; those that are familiar with either of these other languages have a leg up on native English speakers trying to learn Korean from scratch. That said, with dedication, practice, and the assistance of a private online Korean tutor, most students determined to master the language can do so in relatively little time!

What Are My Options for Learning Korean On My Own?

Depending on where you are, you may be able to take Korean lessons from a nearby university or college. The primary drawback of college courses is that they can be cost-prohibitive and may not work with your schedule. Some schools may not even offer Korean language classes. 

If you are an ardent self-starter (lucky you), then online Korean language learning resources such as EllenJovin.com and apps such as DuoLingo may work for you. Though ideally used as a supplement to actual courses, some people can make serious headway using only language learning software and a heaping helping of internal motivation. That said, many language learning apps struggle with the nuances of the Korean language; for example, some don’t differentiate between formalities, bothering only to teach students the most formal, stilted version of the language—this has dubious applicability at best. 

With a private online Korean tutor, a student has the benefits of human feedback from someone not only fluent, but able to function as a cultural point of contact. This means that a student’s resulting fluency will not only be comprehensive in terms of grammar and vocabulary, but also organic, natural-sounding, and conducive to actual conversations. Plus, on websites such as Eurekly.com, you can find a wide range of private online Korean tutors within your price range, as well as easily discern their compatibility with your scheduling needs. Local scarcity of in-person teachers is no longer an issue with the advent of video technology such as Zoom, Discord, or Skype. 

Where Can I Find Private Online Korean Tutors?

Websites such as Eurekly.com host thousands of tutors, each rigorously vetted to ensure that prospective students select from a range of experienced and culturally competent teachers. With Korean lessons starting as low as $13 a session, private online Korean tutoring is something available to anyone with a computer and functional internet access. With many tutors to choose from, you’re sure to find one who is able to work within your required parameters: each tutor’s language fluencies and location are listed upfront, so you know exactly where their specialties lie. Some tutors even offer free trial lessons to ensure that teaching styles and student needs all align. Stop by Eurekly.com today and take your first steps on the journey to language mastery. 

ITALKI: A GLOBAL LANGUAGE LEARNING COMMUNITY

Although excessive screen time is often frowned upon, language experts say that watching shows in a foreign language – if done with near obsession – can help someone learn that language. Since its Netflix release in September, Korean thriller Squid Game has become an international phenomenon.

We’ve relied on online platforms like Netflix more than ever these last two years, proving that the streaming platform can inspire one to learn a language through entertainment.

italki, the premiere online language platform, can help even the most devout Squid Game enthusiast take their curiosity of Korean culture to the next level with dedicated 1-on-1 lessons. The online platform currently offers 150+ languages taught by teachers from 180 countries. 

“In the US we’ve seen a 15% increase in demand for Korean language lessons in the past 3 weeks” says Kevin Chen, founder of italki. Korean is the 6th most studied language in the US on the platform. So far, nearly 30,000 italki teachers have helped 10 million users from 190 or from all over the world countries learn a new language more effectively and efficiently.  

“Most of my students have already learned the Korean alphabet, called Hangeul, for themselves before taking their very first lesson. That’s why they understand its structure and how it works pretty much well. There are some who believe all the Asian languages are a lot in common as European languages originated from Latin are, which actually are not true.” says italki Teacher Karen. “I am also a big fan of BTS, one of the biggest Boyband in the world. Also, some of my students are fans of K-Pop stars, Korean actors or actresses. There are a growing number of people who get interested in K-Pop, K-Movie, K-Drama, K-Food, K-Beauty, etc. Sometimes, their interest in Korean culture encourages students to learn Korean continuously” 

Apart from grammar, vocabulary, and the technical building blocks of language, learning a language means learning the culture. Learning a language through video chat or italki’s own “italki Classroom” would have offered a private and supportive environment. 

“I’ve seen an article about the drama that has earned a critics’ score of 100% on Rotten Tomatoes and also became the most popular show on Netflix ever. People started making merchandising of the Squid Game Netflix show and I’ve been seeing those all over social media. So yes, I can say I’ve noticed an increase in the popularity of Korean culture.” says italki Community Tutor Gio. “I think people sometimes underestimate the importance of Hangul, which is the Korean alphabet. Memorizing Hangul is inevitable for learning Korean. But it might take more time than you expected. Even if memorizing Hangul takes some time, I hope people know that they have to endure it to move on to the next level.”

If you would like to speak with our teachers Gio and Karen, to get their thoughts on the popularity of Korean Culture as it relates to online learning, please let us know. italki also offers the gift of language through its gift cards throughout the holiday season and beyond: https://www.italki.com/giftcards

About italki

italki is a global language learning community that connects students and teachers for 1-on-1 online language lessons. At italki, we believe that human interaction and cultural sharing are the best way to become fluent in a foreign language. With over 5 million students and 10,000 high-quality teachers teaching more than 130 languages, italki helps everyone with their personal journey to fluency. Learn more at www.italki.com and follow their social channels on FacebookTwitterInstagram, and YouTube

Heather Skovlund computer illustration for use by 360 Magazine

CSR In The Digital Age: With 360 Magazine

By: Kai Yeo

“We’re all connected through culture. Basically, we all must learn to adapt. We learn more through traveling and seeing more. When you’re in a different environment, everybody must love and laugh and dance. I don’t need to know your language. But companies need to focus on connecting everyone through love, not war.” – Vaughn Lowery

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has been around for years, with its’ roots being found as early as the 18th Century. In my CSR research assignment before, I wrote that “the key idea of CSR is for companies to pursue pro-social objectives and promote volunteerism among employees (such as through donating to charity and participating in volunteer work), as well as by minimizing environmental externalities.” As an international student trying to find my career path in the United States, I find that company CSR is one of the first few things I look for when finding a suitable company to work with: how genuine they are and how much they care for their employees. The process of researching and writing my essay on CSR in the modern day and CSR within my internship site provided me with the valuable opportunity not only to learn about an important business topic, but also allowed me to develop a better understanding of what it is.

For my CSR Interview, I got the opportunity to speak on the phone with my supervisor Vaughn Lowery. His career started from “humble beginnings in Detroit to a full scholarship in Cornell University under the ILR program. From there, he became active in modeling, acting, and producing screenplays.” Now, Vaughn is the publisher and founder of leading fashion and lifestyle magazine, 360 Magazine, which is also my internship site. His job involves fostering relationships within the community and being an editorial director that curates and oversees content for all columns of the magazine. The position also entails making sure that Apple News, LinkedIn, Twitter, and all other news sites are updated. As a pop culture and design magazine, it is important to constantly be up to date with relevant content and breaking news. Being a quarterly publication, 360 is also working on their summer magazine issue. Vaughn mentions that with COVID making everything digital, the team has been working on expanding the business: creating a self-publishing division, developing e-commerce, getting sponsors, and most importantly, waiting for things to start opening back up.

With a background in studying business and company culture, Vaughn says that his education helped him design a company culture that made sense, “Transparency, cool kids, intelligence. I wanted a space for comfort regardless of race, age, and religion. Education was not the answer to my business but a part of the process to help with preparing for my magazine. The most important thing is life experiences, there are no books on it.” Vaughn emphasizes sending people in his company for events and communicating with clientele because “you can’t speak about things you don’t know.” COVID has made jobs in the media a little more mundane, but he’s excited about things opening back up and is hopeful for the future. Without in-person experiences, it is hard to understand the inner workings of media companies with everything being digitally produced.

Vaughn defines Corporate Social Responsibility at 360 Magazine as “having an environment that is inviting and inclusive, especially showcasing inclusivity.” As a magazine that promotes culture and lifestyle, it is important that everyone he works with is aware of what is going on in the world that we live in and what is happening with minority populations. He speaks about being the only African American in a lot of his school and work experiences, and he created 360 with the ideal of having more minorities and women working in his company: “We all live in the same world… and some people don’t know that. But we need representation and for people to see us. It’s not on us to educate them, but it’s on us to speak up.” 360 avidly speaks up for diversity (#metoo) and openly supports nonprofit organizations.

When asked about how veritable he thinks big companies are with CSR movements, he says that they’re doing it for a myriad of reasons. Companies get away with more stuff as a corporation, “But the responsibility is about being genuine. The board of directors and Zoom calls and the whole spiel. If they’re trying to just make money, revenue principals are not true to themselves. 360 was founded on real culture. The diversity is important. It is what it is.”

“Your company diversity is a reflection of the world, we’ve been doing this since the start of 360, we’ve been ahead of the trend.” The magazine has always featured drag queens, people who are transgender, and minorities, “This is very important when doing events and stuff, it’s a big family. We have less than 50 people. And it’s important for our clients to know that we have each other and rely on each other. That we know how to respect one another and appreciate each other, despite all odds.” Vaughn believes that diversity and inclusion of people of color has always been important, and he emphasizes that 360 will keep pushing these agendas and morals as long as he’s the head of the company. I see this in his effort to get everyone together (even if it is just on Zoom for now) to celebrate big articles, book releases, sponsorships, and so on.

As I type this interview essay, I find two key points to really reflect on: 1) assumptions about company morale and 2) why diversity is so important to me.

1) I think back on everyone else I’ve spoken to during my time as an intern here with 360, and I find that these core values that Vaughn spoke about with me are reflected in all the conversations I’ve had with him and other employees. Coming from a very structured, patriarchal Asian background, I came into this internship thinking that it would be like all my previous experiences (they talk of diversity, but it’s never really executed once you’re a part of it – school projects, internships, part-time jobs, and so on). However, no one in the company has been curt or condescending when speaking with me, and they truly mean it when they point out mistakes and gently correct me. Maybe it is because of the way I was brought up, or the environment I was most familiar in, but these good intentions had me on my toes for the first couple weeks I was here, and I’m honestly still getting used to it.

2) With the rise of Asian hate crimes in the past year, I find myself turning very reclusive and immediately trying to find fault with people when something brushes me the wrong way (though sometimes it really is a racist comment or remark). It’s been difficult having to correct people when they say my name wrong or trying to explain my culture when these simple things can so easily be looked up online. I’ve been very lucky growing up well-traveled and seeing different parts of the world, and I understand that not everyone has that privilege, but how far does “I don’t know” get you in the digital age? I need to work in a company where people are willing to learn and grow new perspectives, and I see this quality in Vaughn too as he speaks about his loneliness as the only African American in his industry when he was first starting out.

After 45 minutes of talking about diversity and the whole CSR conversation winding down, Vaughn tells me to keep doing what I love, “Understanding the industry through work experiences is how you’ll get in. It’s constantly changing.” He talks about learning to forecast and foreshadow and having connections at arms’ reach. By the end of our conversation, I felt that I learnt a lot and could have a clearer vision of what I wanted out of this internship. I’ve had the opportunities to go for company events (for brands including Lillet, Chinese Laundry, Rockstar Original, etc.), though I would really like to be able to go to a CSR event in the near future to promote these same values that I share with 360 Magazine.

To read more about Vaughn Lowery, please visit his Wikipedia and IMBD.

Illustration by Alex Bogdan for use of 360 Magazine

Banner Public Affairs Launches New Artificial Intelligence Tool

Banner Public Affairs is excited to announce the launch of BannerAI – a new artificial intelligence platform that further amplifies Banner’s ability to pair the right reporters with the right story, amongst other expanded capabilities. Custom-built to meet our client’s needs, our tool combines IBM Watson and AI Natural Language Processing to analyze a database of thousands of articles from key reporters and news outlets. From showcasing top keywords and concepts to identifying article sentiment, BannerAI helps our professionals pinpoint emerging trends within industries, select the right reporters to pitch, and uncover the best language to use in pitching reporters. The tool can find clear connections between keywords, outlet, title and reporter – giving next-level insights with 100% confidence. Through artificial intelligence and data analytics, our PR experts can discover prominent insights and recommendations for clients – keeping them one step ahead of their competition.

From showcasing top keywords and concepts to identifying article sentiment, BannerAI helps our professionals pinpoint emerging trends within industries, select the right reporters to pitch, and uncover the best language to use in pitching reporters. The tool can find clear connections between keywords, outlet, title and reporter – giving next-level insights with 100% confidence. Through artificial intelligence and data analytics, our PR experts can discover prominent insights and recommendations for clients – keeping them one step ahead of their competition.

“The combination of Artificial Intelligence blended with our public relations experts takes Banner Public Affairs to the next level,” wrote Brett Thompson, one of the firm’s partners. “By analyzing thousands of stories and providing actionable data, the AI tool allows our PR professionals to find the perfect reporters and outlets to cover our clients’ stories.”

About Banner Public Affairs

Banner Public Affairs executes winning strategies to achieve the unexpected and avoid the predictable. Our bipartisan team of experienced lobbying, public relations, and digital professionals provides best-in-class counsel and executes long-term growth strategies with a short-term hustle, problem-solving mindset. With a track record of victories, Banner is a natural and sought-after partner for the big moments. Banner is headquartered in Washington, D.C. and has offices in St. Louis, Denver, San Francisco and Los Angeles.

Business woman article illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 Magazine

How To Host Inclusive Corporate Training

Is Your Corporate Training Program Inclusive? If Not, Here’s How You Can Do It

Inclusion is an important aspect of every workplace. However, surprisingly even the greatest of the companies with impeccable work culture often gloss over accessibility and inclusion in regards to training and development as an afterthought.

It’s crucial for every organization and its leadership to understand that training employees will never have a one-size-fits-all solution. Every employee has a different learning capability. They interact and engage with the program in different ways. Therefore, they cannot be expected to yield similar results. That’s simply impractical.

That’s where inclusive training plays an important role. Inclusive training includes the steps that you take to remove every hindrance that prevents, or could prevent, your workforce from reaching their full potential.

The more inclusive and accessible your training is, the more it’ll help employees retain what they learn. It helps a majority of employees stay engaged and consequently, improve the ROI of the program.

Here’s how you can achieve greater engagement and ROI:

  • Use the Right Language

Start by adopting an LMS that offers multilingual features. Take Totara LMS, for example. Once you have an LMS that supports different languages, identify the linguistic capabilities of your team members. Even if you have English as your working language, you can still translate training in the language that a maximum number of your employees speak.

When they learn in their own language, this helps them retain information and understand concepts better.

You should also tone down your training. Make it more user-friendly, avoid technical terms, steer clear of jargon, and use shorter sentences.

  • Adopt Different Methods to Deliver Content

We’ve already talked about how different learners have different capabilities to engage with the content. Thus, finding different ways to deliver content to your employees is considered one of the best practices.

While a few might learn better with employees, there are others that may prefer PDFs or infographics to grasp the content better. You should consider offering different options to employees if you want your training to be inclusive and effective.

Also, be sure that your content can be accessed from different operating systems on different devices. This will allow your employees to engage in microlearning and be a part of the program even when they’re on the go.

  • Consider Age and Technology Literacy Gaps 

Your entire workforce will not be tech-savvy and you need to keep this in mind. In an organization, you will not only find millennials that are comfortable around technology. You have your workforce that is built of individuals from varied generations.

While you wouldn’t want the baby boomers in your team to feel left out, you also wouldn’t want your millennials to lose interest. So, how do you create a balance? By pairing individuals from different age groups together.

Make employees from different generations and tech skills study buddies. While millennials can play their part in helping the older generation learn about technology, baby boomers can help millennials learn from their experience.

  • Encourage Self-Paced Learning 

As companies adopt remote working as their permanent or temporary work arrangement, remote training with the help of different online courses became a norm. However, the workplace was not the only change that individuals had to face.

Those in the workforce working from home had to deal with changes that were taking place at their home as well. Many have kids who are homeschooling, or may need to take care of elderly family members. It is likely their stress levels are higher than usual.

It’s true that the training program should be completed on time and it’s important for everyone to be involved. However,  inclusive training means offering flexibility and encouraging self-paced learning.

Conclusion 

Inclusive training in today’s time is a crucial practice. The best ways to make your training more inclusive is by using different language, delivering content in more than one way, pairing up different employees from different generations together, and encouraging self-paced learning. The more inclusive you make your training, the more successful it’ll be.

Computer illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

VC Pitch Deck Advice

­­14 words to take out of your VC pitch deck

By: May Habib

170 seconds. Weeks or even months of working on your pitch deck could come down to the 170 seconds (on average) that investors spend looking at your deck. “Investors see a lot of pitches. In a single year, the classic general partner in a venture firm is exposed to around 5,000 pitches…and ends up doing between zero and two deals,” writes VC and LinkedIn co-founder Reid Hoffman.

With all that pressure to make an impact quickly, founders spend an incredible amount of time on the design of their slides. Less consideration, however, is usually spent on the words on the slide. That’s a mistake, especially when you only have 170 seconds. When not used intentionally, the words in your deck can be distracting or downright off-putting. We used what we know about language and healthy communication from the millions of documents we’ve processed at Writer to come up with 14 words and phrases to remove from your VC pitch deck:

Negative Association

Runway”

  • Pitching VCs is a balancing act: you want to position your idea in the best light, but also show that you’ve thought things through. However, volunteering for certain types of information can have the opposite effect. Don’t write: I’m seeking $X in funding to provide Y months of runway. You certainly need to show how you’re going to use the funding you’re asking for, but you don’t want to frame things in terms of runway in a pitch deck. The word is associated with a looming cash-out date, which can put an investor in a negative state of mind.

Exit strategy”

  • Don’t write: Our exit strategy is…Yes, thinking through your business means knowing how you’ll handle worst-case and best-case scenarios. But putting exit strategy in your deck can only get investors thinking about the inherent risks. You want them focused on the opportunity. You need to know what to say when the topic comes up — just don’t volunteer the information on a slide.

Cliches

Just one percent”

  • A pitch deck is a tool to show VCs why your idea merits an investment. Using cliches can work against that goal. Don’t write: If we could capture X% of the market… It’s not only a cliche but also wishful thinking rather than a plan. Keep the text on your slides grounded in relevant facts and figures. Other cliches to cut include: the Amazon of X, imagine a future, and moving Y to the blockchain.

 Absolutes

Everyone”, “always”, “never”, “no one”

  • A great pitch requires nuance. Using absolutes to talk about your idea fails on that count. And, if you look closer, chances are there will be exceptions to the absolute that’s being set up. When discussing your TAM, target customer, or product value, your words need to reflect a thoughtful and measured approach. Using absolutes, such as everyone likes X falls short of that goal and casts doubts about the validity of your plan.

 Imprecise Language

Unique”

  • Precise communication makes it easier to bet that a business has the potential to succeed. But imprecise language is one of the top no-no’s we see in pitch decks. Take the word It may seem like an ideal word to show differentiation, but it’s imprecise as to the nature of the uniqueness. Just describe the uniqueness directly, or better yet, the plan to execute on the uniqueness. Ideas are important — but the plan is what gets companies funded.

“Intend”

  • Good intentions aren’t the same as a plan. Using the word intend in your pitch deck makes the discussion conceptual and somewhat nebulous. An intention is easier to reject than a plan backed up by compelling storytelling.

No competition”

  • Don’t write no competition anywhere in your deck. Like, anywhere. At best, it will be seen as an exaggeration: if there isn’t direct competition, there may be indirect competition to consider. And, at worst, it could make investors think that you haven’t fully explored the market, meaning your entire premise could be flawed.

“Good”

  • Investors don’t want good ideas; they want the best Using the word good to describe any part of your plan (for example, good growth) lacks specificity and lowers your pitch’s believability.

Qualifiers a.k.a Intensifiers

“Very”, “so”, “quite”

  • Brevity is key when you’re working with a visual format, like a pitch deck. Qualifiers not only clutter your slides with unnecessary text, but they’re also less precise. Don’t write: very, so, and quite. Ask yourself one question: What does very fast growth look like? Your answer would likely be different than someone else’s. Instead, you might say the growth of X% a year so there isn’t confusion. Again, you want to be as precise and fact-based as possible.

Other things to keep in mind:

Readability

  • In an analysis of successful decks, we found an average readability level of Grade 10 or 11. For unsuccessful decks, that number was higher — Grade 12 or college. Never use jargon, keep your sentences simple, and include a maximum of 1-2 sentences per paragraph. To analyze your own deck’s language, try out Writer’s readability

Humor: Just don’t

  • Cracking a joke on a slide can easily backfire. The last thing you want is to have a failed joke make your pitch awkward or throw you off. That could derail the entire process. So, it’s best to skip the deck humor and get to what really matters: your plan.

Duolingo Amounts to Four University Semesters

Duolingo’s Spanish and French courses teach the equivalent of four university semesters of language classes in less than half the time, according to a study released today that compares reading and listening proficiency levels of French and Spanish learners. Consumers can sign up for free at Duolingo.com.

Among the study’s findings:

  1. After completing all beginner-level content in Duolingo’s Spanish and French courses, learners on average reached intermediate levels of proficiency in reading in both French and Spanish.
  2. These learners also approached or acquired “Novice High” proficiency level in Spanish and French listening.
  3. College students took four semesters of classes to achieve similar levels of proficiency.
  4. The median number of hours for Duolingo learners to complete the beginner materials was ~112 hours. By comparison, four semesters of university classes require ~240 hours, based on 4 hours of class time a week and 15 weeks per semester, not including hours spent outside of class.

“Our #1 focus at Duolingo is improving how well we teach,” said Bozena Pajak, head of learning science at Duolingo. “After three years of investing into improving our largest courses by aligning them with the CEFR, adding new content and new features like Stories & Tips, we’re proud to be able to share the results of our new efficacy research. The research demonstrates that Duolingo can be an effective tool for learning a language. The broader implications of this research are that online learning is not only convenient, but can also deliver high-quality education that is comparable with classroom instruction.”

Language skill was measured using the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency tests, a widely used assessment tool.

One Hour Translation: Google Wins the Battle of Real Time Voice Translators

OHT used expert in-house linguists to compare the performance of Skype Translator, Google Assistant and Apple’s Siri in translating business and tourism expressions from English into Japanese, French, German and Spanish and vice versa

On average across languages, Google scored the highest – 4.54 out of 6, Skype second (4.32) and Siri third (4.09). Google was the best in Japanese (4.01), German (4.5) and Spanish (4.8), while Siri led in French (4.87) 

Google Assistant is the top performing real time voice translator, according to a benchmark conducted by One Hour Translation (OHT), an online platform which provides translations in more than 100 languages and 3,000 language pairs.

With demand for real time voice translation on the rise, OHT decided to test out the leading services: Skype Translator (run by Microsoft Translate), Google Assistant and Apple’s Siri, and rank them for accuracy.

With the help of expert in-house linguists OHT took 16 business and 10 tourism expressions and translated them from English into Japanese, French, German and Spanish and vice versa. The same sentences were then given to real time voice translator devices, apps and digital assistants to see just how they performed. The results were rated by the linguists on a scale of 0 to 6.

On average across languages, Google scored the highest – 4.54 out of 6, Skype second (4.32) and Siri third (4.09). Google was the best in three out of the four languages – Japanese (4.01), German (4.5) and Spanish (4.8), while Siri led in French (4.87).  Overall Japanese was the hardest language to translate with an average score of 3.7.  French was the easiest language for the instant voice translator devices to translate with an average of 4.75, followed by Spanish (4.54) and German (4.41).

“The real time voice translators were more accurate in translating tourism related experssions in comparison to business expressions” said Yaron Kaufman, chief marketing officer and co-founder of OHT. He attributed this to the use of a lot of business-related abbreviations which are not easily recognized by real time voice devices. Kaufman added that “despite the recent improvements in all of the assistants we tested, real time voice translations still cannot be relied on for business related content.”

Some examples of the sentences: “Stay on budget for this campaign, we can’t have it affecting our ROI”; “R&D are cutting too many corners, the product is undeployable”;  “Schedule a meeting between your CMO and our product manager”; “Do you have any allergies? This dish contains peanuts and avocado”; “I need to find the fastest way to the airport, my plane is leaving soon”; “My travel insurance should cover that bill.”

There are also new developments on the horizon in the field of real time voice translation. Among other advancements, Amazon is planning to release a DIY toolkit for creating translation apps and Xiaomi has released a new and advanced physical device for real time translations.

About One Hour Translation

One Hour Translation (OHT) believes that businesses should be able to reach any customer, anywhere, anytime, with no language barriers.

One Hour Translation’s AI powered cloud-based translation management platform, HALO,  helps enterprise customers reduce overhead by automating their translation process and workflow. HALO combines automated workflows, Neural Machine Translation (NMT) and professional translation services, to process all of the enterprise content quickly and easily via API/WEB. A dedicated NMT engine is automatically trained as the translations proceed and as a result the project’s cost keeps decreasing while translation speed improves. HALO is easy to implement and use, encrypted, secured and allows the enterprise to use any mix of its translators and reviewers with those of OHT, as well as any mix of NMTs for optimal quality and cost. The platform also allows OHT to manage a company’s resources and in-house budgets earmarked for translation in order to obtain the best possible results.

OHT is the leader in translations for enterprise customers, currently serving over 60 percent of the Fortune 500 companies, including Coca-Cola, Deutsche Bank, Microsoft, Amazon, IBM, HP, Xerox, Acer, Shell, Deloitte, HSBC, Procter & Gamble, IKEA, 3M, McCann, Allianz, Xiaomi and many other organizations.

One Hour Translation specializes in translation for 30 expert domains, including law, technology, marketing, website translation, applications, software and more.

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ONEs – OHT NMT Evaluation Score

Ultimate Guide to Yoga Therapy

Yoga therapy represents a new approach to mental health that seeks to alleviate emotional pain and restore well-being through a series of meditative practices that involve both the body and mind.

Over the last decades, researchers and mental health professionals have realized what Hindu monks have been teaching for thousands of years – a holistic approach to psychological and physical health is the key to balance and well-being.

Yoga – which is the foundation of yoga therapy – is an extremely complex spiritual tradition that has a history of roughly five thousand years, rich literature, and clear practice guidelines.

Luckily, over the years, practitioners have simplified this approach and made it accessible to anyone who’s interested in self-exploration and self-growth.

Yoga Therapy: What is it?

Considered both an art and a discipline, yoga is an ancient Indian practice characterized by meditation and physical activity, which can improve the body’s flexibility, reduce stress, and cultivate an overall state of health and well-being.

Yoga therapy represents a collection of principles, techniques, and practices derived from Hindu philosophy and adapted to clinical settings. By using meditation, breathing techniques, and body poses, this approach aims to improve our overall health and promote a state of calm and well-being.

According to a 2013 study [1], yoga therapy helps people with mental illness by cultivating a state of calm, increasing awareness and focus, promoting acceptance and adaptability, and cultivating a sense of security.

Yoga Therapy Theory

In Sanskrit (a language of ancient India), yoga means union. In other words, yoga therapy promotes an integrative and holistic [2] approach to mental health.

The union that yoga therapists and practitioners often mention is that between body, mind, and spirit. Yoga teachings stipulate that once we unite these three fundamental aspects of human experience into one element, we can reach a state of balance and health on all levels.

Some practitioners go so far as to believe that spiritual enlightenment and true unity can only be achieved in India, the birthplace of Yoga.

However, this doesn’t mean that yoga – as a series of health-promoting practices – can’t be effective in other parts of the world. In fact, countless practitioners have successfully promoted and implemented this approach all over the globe.

How Does Yoga Therapy Suggest the Mind Works?

In yoga therapy, the relationship between body, mind, and spirit represents a fundamental element that can serve as an explanatory model for the cause of physical and mental illness and also provide a pathway to balance and healing.

We all strive, more or less consciously, to free ourselves from the limited notion of what we are or, more precisely, what we commonly believe we are. In broad lines, we tend to identify with our body, mind, possessions, relationships, social status, bringing all these elements into one comprehensive picture we call ‘life.’

But these mental constructs are merely shadows of the truth that lies within ourselves; a truth that’s often hard to understand because of ignorance, narrow-mindedness, or lack of self-awareness.

By taking a holistic approach to health, yoga therapy seeks to restore balance and well-being through a series of physical, mental, and spiritual practices.

Read more about yoga therapy HERE.

Introducing Debut Artist No/Me + New Single “Consistent” Out Now

Just recently, Los Angeles-based vocalist and songwriter, No/Me, shares her debut single “Consistent” vie Republic Recores–listen to it here!

On “Consistent,” No/Me lists off her flaws: a skeptic, a cynic, neurotic, and narcissistic–a freak who’s “got the best intentions,” but tends to “fuck them up.”

The moody and mesmerizing track comes to life with each confession delivered in her hypnotic vocals.

“‘Consistent’ feels like a page from my journal. Writing this song made me embrace parts of myself that were hard to face, but it also helped me stop curating the facade that people would prefer to see,” says No/Me.

The L.A. native’s sound is a blend of her electric influences, from early 90’s alt-rock to the quirky anti-folk of Regina Spektor to Israeli music. With Hebrew as her first language, her lyrics reveal a raw but poetic sensibility closely shaped by her upbringing.

Having a deep-rooted mission to use her music as a vehicle for positive change, No/Me’s stage name is her Hebrew name and meant to signify the transparent nature of her songwriting. She aims to spark that change on the most personal level. “Consistent” sets the stage for more new music from No/Me in 2018.