Posts tagged with "homework"

Illustration By Alex Bogdan for use of 360 Magazine

Sam Fscher – Hopeless Romantic

Following the release of his duet with Demi Lovato on ‘What Other People Say’, hit single ‘This City’ and recent fan track ‘Simple’, Sam Fischer has shared his emotional and uplifting new single ‘Hopeless Romantic’, available now through Sony Music UK/RCA Records. Check it out HERE.

In true Sam style, ‘Hopeless Romantic’ wears its heart on its sleeve and discusses the struggles Sam has faced as an artist and romanticizes what every-day life should be. While the song is lyrically deep and emotional, musically it is a melodic and uplifting pop song that builds to a catchy and bold chorus. Sam says; “There have been times over the past 2 years where I really felt like I’d never get to do the things I’d always dreamed about doing as an artist. With every virtual performance that ended with a deep silence from my furniture, it just started making me really sad, and at the same time guilty, because I wasn’t appreciating what I have at all. I was actively refusing to accept the reality and instead romanticizing a version of life that just simply didn’t exist. That’s really what Hopeless Romantic is about. Though I will say, having just come off of my first headline tour, where I got to meet my fans for the first time, who are the people who give me this life, I’m in a much better place.”

Sam’s debut single ‘This City’ currently stands at over 500 million worldwide streams and stayed in the UK Top 20 for 11 weeks. The track is also double platinum in Australia, platinum in the UK and Gold in the US, New Zealand and Switzerland. Sam also performed the track on US TV, including The Ellen DeGeneres Show, Jimmy Kimmel Live! and The Late Late Show With James Corden. He recently completed his first live tour in the UK, including a packed out London Garage performance and will be bringing the tour to the US in January 2022.

Australian born Sam Fischer first introduced himself with his Not A Hobby EP and has achieved incredible and well deserved attention through his soulful voice and heartfelt lyrics. Touring North America with his friend Lewis Capaldi, he wowed crowds with his buoyant personality and pure love and talent for song-writing. Now based in LA, he not only has received acclaim for his own work, but he continues to solidify his spot as one of the hottest current writers, having worked with global pop superstars including Ciara, Lennon Stella, Louis Tomlinson, Elle King, Jessie J, Virginia To Vegas and many more.

However, it hasn’t all been plain sailing for Sam, who endured his own heartache to achieve his dreams. With the promise of a recording contract in the bag, he set off to LA only for the deal to be pulled away. After months of couch-surfing, he finally and deservedly received his break with This City and project Homework, which has been just the amazing start of an exciting new chapter in Sam’s career.

Sam Fischer A Simple Tour Image via Kirsten Mikkelson for use by 360 Magazine

Sam Fischer Announces US & UK Tour

Sam Fischer announces his international Fall 2021 tour, A Simple Tour.

Sam Fischer – the man behind last year’s platinum hit This City, duets with Demi Lovato on What Other People Say, and Sam Feldt’s Pick Me Up, has announced a string of US and UK tour dates this Autumn.

Sam says, “It’s been a unique journey this past 18 months, having my songs travel further around the world than I’ve been able to and not getting to meet the people who have given me this life I now lead has been a bit heartbreaking, so to be announcing a tour feels surreal, but here we are. The support I’ve had in both the UK & US  has been incredible and I can’t wait to be on stages, doing what I love the most & finally meeting everyone, for the first time.”

Sam’s debut single This City is currently sitting on over 500 million worldwide streams and was Top 20 in the UK for 11 weeks. The track has gone double platinum in Australia, platinum in the UK and Gold in the US, New Zealand, and Switzerland. He’s also had some incredible US TV performances on Ellen, Jimmy Kimmel, and The Late Late Show With James Corden.

Australian-born Sam Fischer  first introduced himself with his Not A Hobby EP and has garnered incredible attention through his soulful voice and heartfelt lyrics. Touring North America with his friend Lewis Capaldi, he wowed crowds with his buoyant personality and pure love and talent for songwriting. Now based in LA, he not only has received acclaim for his own work, but he continues to solidify his spot as one of the hottest current writers, having worked with global pop superstars including Ciara, Lennon Stella,  Louis Tomlinson, Elle King, Jessie J, Virginia To Vegas and many more.

However, it hasn’t all been plain sailing for Sam, who endured his own heartache to achieve his dreams. With the promise of a recording contract in the bag, he set off to LA only for the deal to be pulled away. After months of couch-surfing, he finally and deservedly received his break with This City  and  album Homework which has been just the amazing start of an exciting new chapter in Sam’s career.

His relatable lyrics and unique, resonant sound are a staple of his work from his debut song, Lean, to his newest release, Simple. Sam’s impressive skill will be on full display this fall in A Simple Tour.

Tour Dates:   

Sept 8 – Chicago, IL – Lincoln Ballroom

Sept 9 – Nashville, TN – Basement East

Sept 13 – New York, NY – Mercury Lounge

Sept 14 – New York, NY – Mercury Lounge

Sept 16 – Los Angeles, CA – Troubadour

Sept 29 – Bristol, UK – Thekla

Sept 30 – Manchester, UK – Academy 3

Oct 1 – Nottingham, UK – Rescue Rooms

Oct 3 – Glasgow, UK – SWG3 Warehouse

Oct 5 – London, UK – The Garage

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How to Juggle Travel and Study in College

College students are the busiest because they do tons of schoolwork, prepare for a career, and take care of their personal life. This means juggling everything that life throws at them. In school, students need to take care of their academics and accomplish all schoolwork and projects given to them.

With this, some college students find help through go deal now where they get professional writing help. Many of these student help sites offer help for difficult topics such as sociology essays – Proessays, and many more needed in schoolwork. 

Aside from paperwork, students also have exams, homework, school activities, and projects. The presence of student help sites eases the students from the demand of writing tasks required in school. College life should not be all work and no play. Students also need to relax, enjoy, and unwind. This is why many college students get into traveling, even while in college, as this is a way to release the pressure and stress of school.

There are many trips students can afford. However, to enjoy their travels one needs to know how to manage college life properly so that it will not get in the way of their trips. When a college student chooses to travel while studying, they should know how to juggle the two successfully. Proper management and planning are important to juggle traveling and college life. 

Tips to Juggle Travelling and College Life

Consider Study Abroad Programs

There are study-abroad programs open for college students. This is the best opportunity for students looking to study and travel at the same time. With these programs, students can enjoy a new place while taking their courses and studies at the same time.

Consider Taking Online Classes

Opting for online classes means that classes can be taken anywhere. Even if the student is on a trip, they can easily access the classes. It is just important to find a school that offers online classes for college courses. This will enable one to travel, without being tied down to school. 

Join an Outdoor School Club

There are school organizations that host outdoor trips and activities. By joining these groups, students get to travel while making it part of their academics. College schools usually have a lot of outdoor school groups that students can join.

Go to Class 

Finishing the school year persistently will give the students a lot of free time. This way, students will not need to attend extra days to make up for failed subjects or incomplete school requirements. To obtain the maximum amount of time for traveling during school vacations, a student needs to be diligent in completing their work. One has to finish everything needed by the end of a semester, so vacation can start right away.

Save up for Trips

No matter how much free time one has, a trip will not happen when funds are insufficient. Part-time jobs are a good way to easily earn money and save for their planned trips.

Get to Know the School Schedule 

Knowing the activities and programs of the school for the entire semester or year will help in planning up a trip. Some breaks are scheduled for the school year and knowing the dates will aid in putting up a travel itinerary. 

Finish up School Work Right Away

It is common to have tons of schoolwork, projects, and activities towards the final weeks of the semester. That being said, students who have planned trips should accomplish everything needed before taking off. This way, they never have to worry about unfinished requirements while on a trip. 

Traveling is a great activity, even for college students. There are inexpensive trips that they can take, but they need to ensure that the trip will not be a disturbance to their college life. These trips must be managed properly so that they are hassle-free and worry-free. Knowing how to juggle travel and college life is important for enjoy each trip that students take. After all, traveling is what many students look forward to, especially after months of hard work in school.

Image of Darren Criss from Christina Santamaria and BMG for use by 360 Magazine

Darren Criss x I Can’t Dance

Today, singer and songwriter Darren Criss releases his newest single, “I Can’t Dance,” via BMG.

This is the second in a series of new songs which Darren described as “character-driven singles.” He announced the track on Instagram earlier this week, writing, “Half masc, half fem, half bad bitch, half brazen baller. This song is an ode to both those we love to hate and those we hate to love. What can I say, I live for dualities.”

“I Can’t Dance” arrives on the heels of “f*kn around,” which Billboard described as “a slick alt-pop single built around a wiggly bass line.”  MTV News praised, “With synthy distortions and a banging guitar loop, the song echoes the sharper edges of contemporaries like Shawn Mendes and Justin Timberlake’s with a theatrical flair fans have come to expect from Criss.” Darren made his late-night television performance debut with the single on The Late Late Show with James Corden alongside Este Haim of HAIM on bass, The Pocket Queen on drums, frequent collaborator and San Fermin frontwoman Charlene Kaye on guitar, and the track’s co-writer CJ Baran on keys.

Music has always played an integral role in Darren’s artistry. As a solo artist, his 2017 EP Homework debuted at #1 on Billboard’s Heatseekers Album chart. Criss has toured to sold-out audiences around the world including headlining the 2019 iHeartRadio Music Festival with multi-GRAMMY Award nominee and renowned DJ Steve Aoki. In 2019, he also headlined the Balmain Music Festival for the Balmain men’s spring 2020 show. He has been featured on the cover of numerous magazines including such music publications as Billboard and American Songwriter.

As a songwriter, Darren has penned songs for the comedy musical Royalties, for which he was also the creator and executive producer. He received his first Emmy nomination for songwriting in 2015 for Best Original Music and Lyrics for the song “This Time,” which appeared on Glee’s series finale. In addition to collaborations with fellow artists including Rufus Wainwright, Sabrina Carpenter, Bonnie McKee, Jordan Fisher, and many others, he has also written for Apple’s animated series “Central Park.”

LISTEN HERE 

Dog illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Backyarding is Here to Stay

Backyarding is Here to Stay & It Has a Purpose. What’s Yours? 

By Kris Kiser, President & CEO of the Outdoor Power Equipment Institute

What once only happened indoors now happens outdoors. It’s called “backyarding,” and it’s a trend that’s here to stay. From office work to working out, from eating to entertaining, if these activities were once typically held inside a home or office, they are now being brought to the great outdoors.

Simply think back over the last year and recount the number of times your backyard has taken center stage in your everyday life. The family yard became the safe and purposeful space where we could gather and recharge. Spending time outdoors is great for your physical and mental health, and our backyards are the bridge between indoor and outdoor living.

The backyard is nearly limitless with possibilities, and you can get really creative in how you expand and enjoy your yard. But before you get to work in your yard, you must first identity what type of “backyarder” you are. Then, you can keep that idea in mind to create a more purposeful outdoor space that is customized to your family’s needs.

Here are just a few of the backyarding personality types. Which one(s) are you?

Entertainer Extraordinaire
Your backyard was the neighborhood hot spot long before the pandemic made that trend posh. Family milestones, birthdays, graduations, reunions, socially distanced BBQs – your yard is *the* place to gather. Your yard is set up for success with patio furniture, fire pit, yard games, plenty of outdoor seating, string lights, and maybe even an outdoor kitchen.  The family yard and community park are five-star event spaces that are always easy to book!  

Environmentalist
You know that nature starts in your own backyard and that taking small steps in your yard can make a big impact on climate change. As the proverbial Robin to your yard’s Batman, you embrace your role in supporting the superhero powers of your living landscape. Those include capturing and filtering rainwater, producing oxygen, and absorbing carbon, just to name a few. 

Expert Landscaper
Your yard makes neighbors green with envy. You know how to maintain a healthy living landscape all year long, and you have the latest outdoor power equipment to make even big jobs easier. Your idea of a good time? Spending the weekend doing yardwork. You love the sense of accomplishment that comes from working in your yard, and friends can count on you for advice about their own living landscapes.

Horticulturist
The USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map is bookmarked on your browser because putting the right plant in the right place is the living landscape Golden Rule you live by. You consider location, maintenance, sunlight and watering requirements, as well as your climate zone and lifestyle needs, before you even think about sticking your shovel in the dirt.

Kid Zone Creator
You know the safest place for your kids to be is in your own backyard, and you work hard to create an outdoor fun zone they will never want to leave. A flat area of sturdy turfgrass to play sports and pitch a tent? Check. Treehouse? Check. Zipline strung safely between backyard trees? Check. An elevated garden where kids can help grow the family’s meals? Check. Natural playscapes, like a patch of sand bordered by rocks and log stump seating? Check. “Fun” is your middle name, and you are winning at this game.

Nature Lover
No binging Netflix for you. You subscribe to “Nature TV” and prefer to spend your free time watching the birds, bats, butterflies and other wildlife that count on your yard for food and shelter. You cultivate a living landscape that supports a rich biodiversity with butterfly bushes, flowering plants, water sources, and trees and shrubs with nooks for nesting and food.  

Pet Pamperer
Your focus is on Fido, and you take cues from your four-legged friends about how to purpose your backyard. You’ve planted sturdy turfgrass like Buffalo or Bermuda that can stand up to pet play, and you’ve used soft foliage to create a natural barricade between “off limits” areas and the rest of the lawn. Trees and shrubs are strategically planted for shade, and you’ve even set up a shallow water feature to help your pup cool off on hot days. For you, planting with purpose means keeping toxic plants out of the picture. (For a complete list, visit ASPCA’s list of non-toxic and toxic plants.

Work (and learn!) from Home Warrior 
You don’t need to turn to technology to create a virtual backdrop for your video calls. The natural setting created by your yard’s trees, flowers, bushes and other plants is your go-to video call background. Your kids aren’t doing in-person school? No problem. Your backyard or neighborhood park is a living laboratory for learning that supports outdoor learning, even when school isn’t in session. Your kids take online classes under the shade of a tree. Do homework at a patio or picnic table. Brush up on STEM education by planting and studying flowers, bug hunting, and weather watching.

Zen Master
Enjoying your morning coffee on the balcony as songbirds serenade you. Meditating under the shade of a tree. De-stressing by swinging in a backyard hammock. Taking a break from your busy day to feel the sun on your face and the breeze in your hair. Your backyard is your sacred space for rest, relaxation, and rejuvenation. It’s the best “green spa” in town. You know that spending time outside is good for your health and well-being and that, thanks to your yard, these benefits are only steps away.

Setting the stage for backyarding. One final and important note to backyarders of all kinds. Creating a yard that supports all of the aspects of your family’s outdoor lifestyle means taking stock of what you might need to care for your lawn. Take an inventory of your outdoor power equipment to make sure you are prepared. Then, get out there and create your canvas for even more backyard memory-making.

To learn more about creating the yard of your dreams, visit TurfMutt.

Digital Divide illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Digitally Disconnected

DIGITALLY DISCONNECTED

13 TIPS FOR HELPING BRIDGE THE DIGITAL DIVIDE FOR CHILDREN DURING COVID-19

While social, racial, and economic disparities have always existed within the educational system, the COVID-19 pandemic is exasperating these inequities and widening gaps between students at a drastic rate. For families who can’t afford home computers, laptops, or high-speed internet access, remote learning is nearly impossible, and for students who already found themselves struggling before the pandemic, the prospect of more than a year of lost classroom time is a devastating blow. However, there are steps parents can take to shrink this digital divide, and there are resources available via schools, non-profits, and government initiatives that can help children access the technological tools they need to succeed. Indeed, Dr. Pamela Hurst-Della Pietra, President and Founder of Children and Screens, notes that “the inclusion of 17.2 billion dollars for closing the ‘homework gap’ in the recently passed American Rescue Plan is a watershed moment for digital equity.”   
 
Several of the leading figures in the fields of public health, education, psychology, and parenting have weighed in with their suggestions on the best ways to combat the digital divide, and many will participate in an interdisciplinary conversation and Q&A hosted by Children and Screens: Institute of Digital Media and Child Development on Wednesday, March 24, at 12pm ET via Zoom. Moderated by the Director of Internet and Technology Research at the Pew Research Center Lee Rainie, the panel will engage in an in-depth discussion about the digital divide and actionable steps we can all take to bridge the gap. RSVP here.
 
1. DON’T WAIT, ADVOCATE 

While schools across the country are doing everything they can to make sure that children have access to the technology and connectivity they need for remote learning, the unfortunate reality is that many families still lack adequate resources. If your family is among them, says author and MIT Assistant Professor of Digital Media Justin Reich, know that you’re not alone and that there are steps you can take to advocate for what your children need. “Start with your school staff,” Reich recommends. “They’re often overwhelmed during this challenging time but be polite and persistent. If you run into a dead-end with your school system, consider reaching out to school libraries and youth organizations like The Boys and Girls Club or the YMCA to see what kind of support they might be able to offer.”
 
2. SCALE DOWN 

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro Professor Dr. Wayne Journell agrees, pointing out that sometimes, despite their best efforts, teachers and administrators may not always know which students are struggling with connectivity issues. “Let teachers know if you have slow internet at home,” says Journell. “Sometimes detailed graphics and animations that look cute but have little relevance to the actual lessons being delivered can cause problems for students with unreliable internet. If teachers are aware, then they can scale down the ‘frilly’ stuff and still get the important content across.”
 
3. STAND UP FOR YOURSELF  

While it’s important for parents to speak up on behalf of their children, RAND Senior Policy Researcher Julia Kaufman, Ph.D., highlights the importance of encouraging children to express their needs, as well. “If your child does not have access to technology at home and is falling behind, make sure your child’s teacher knows the obstacles they’re facing and ask what accommodations will make it easier for your child to do assignments offline,” says Rand. “At the same time, help your child feel comfortable expressing any technology concerns or confusion to their teachers, including cases where they have the technology but cannot use it well.”
 
4. CHECK YOUR ASSUMPTIONS 

One critical step that educators and policymakers can take in addressing the digital divide is to check their assumptions. They cannot – and should not – assume that students do or do not have access based solely on demographics such as family income level. “In addition, they cannot assume that providing access alone creates equity,” adds Dr. Beth Holland, a Partner at The Learning Accelerator (TLA) and Digital Equity Advisor to the Consortium of School Networking (CoSN). “This is a complex and nuanced challenge that needs both a technical and a human solution to ensure that students not only have access to sufficient high-speed internet and devices but also accessible systems and structures to support their learning.”

5. SURVEY AND MODIFY  

For teachers who are on the ground and in the classroom, checking your assumptions can be as simple as asking a few basic questions at the start of the term. “Survey students to determine the percentage of your population that doesn’t have home Internet access,” recommends former AAP President Dr. Colleen A. Kraft, MD, MBA, FAAP. “Once you know the divide, you can address it,” adding, “When planning 1:1 projects and choosing devices, for example, you can consider a device’s capacity for offline use. For those without Wi-Fi, a public library in the child’s neighborhood can also be an excellent resource.”

6. VOTE FOR CHANGE 

That parents and teachers need to worry about the digital divide at all is a failure on the part of our elected leaders, says Bates College Associate Professor of Education Mara Casey Tieken. “Contact your elected officials—local, state, and federal—and complain,” she suggests. “Write letters, call their offices, attend their legislative sessions, and make your voice heard. Join with other families whose children are impacted by this divide to amplify your message and use your vote to support lawmakers who understand the impacts of this divide, have a clear plan to address it and are willing to take action.”
 
7. MAKE BROADBAND A UTILITY  

Reich agrees, reminding those families who already have their needs met that they share in the responsibility to advocate for the less fortunate. “It’s our job as citizens to demand that we as a society give families and children the tools and resources that they need for remote learning now and in the future,” says Reich. “We need to advocate for a society where broadband is treated as a utility rather than a luxury good, and young people enrolled in schools and educational programs have access to computers for learning.”

8. CONCRETE INITIATIVES  

Angela Siefer, Executive Director of the National Digital Inclusion Alliance, advocates four concrete initiatives. “Establish a permanent broadband benefit, increase access to affordable computers, digital literacy and technical support, improve broadband mapping (including residential cost data), and support local and state digital inclusion planning.” By implementing these changes, Siefer says, policymakers can start to mitigate the digital divide. 

9. USE TECH FOR GOOD 

There are many reasons to consider equitable solutions along a “digital continuum” rather than the “digital divide;” a binary description leaves less room for nuanced and customized interventions. It may be imperative to fortify existing institutions, implement new governance structures and promulgate policies to confront disparities regarding working families. Antwuan Wallace, Managing Director at National Innovation Service, suggests that legislators consider a Safety and Thriving framework to increase family efficacy to support children with protective factors against the “homework gap” by utilizing technology to train critical skills for executive functioning, including planning, working memory, and prioritization. 
 
10. LEVEL THE FIELD 

Emma Garcia of the Economic Policy Institute emphasizes that guided technology education will be of great value after the pandemic. She says, “it will need be instituted as part of a very broad agenda that uses well-designed diagnostic tests to know where children are and what they need (in terms of knowledge, socioemotional development, and wellbeing), ensures the right number of highly credentialed professionals to teach and support students, and offers an array of targeted investments that will address the adverse impacts of COVID-19 on children’s learning and development, especially for those who were most hit by the pandemic.”
 
11. APPLY FOR LIFELINE 

Research also shows that the digital divide disproportionately affects Latino, Black, and Native American students, with the expensive price of internet access serving as one of the main obstacles to families in these communities. “Eligible parents can apply for the Lifeline Program, which is a federal program that can reduce their monthly phone and internet cost,” suggests Greenlining Institute fellow Gissela Moya. “Parents can also ask their child’s school to support them by providing hotspots and computer devices to ensure their child has the tools they need to succeed.”
 
12. GET INVOLVED 

Learning remotely can be difficult for kids, even if they have access to all the technological tools they need. Research shows that parental encouragement is also an important aspect of learning for children, notes London School of Economics professor and author Sonia Livingstone. “Perhaps sit with them, and gently explain what’s required or work it out together.” She adds that working together is a great way that parents with fewer economic or digital resources can support their children. “And if you don’t know much about computers, your child can probably teach you something too!”
 
13. NO ONE SIZE FITS ALL 

When it comes to encouraging your children, there’s no one-size-fits-all approach. “Reflect on the more nuanced ways your children learn and leverage accessible resources (digital and non-digital) to inspire their continued curiosity,” says University of Redlands Assistant Professor Nicol Howard. Leaning into your child’s strengths and interests will help them make the most of this challenging time.
 
While the move to remote learning may seem like an insurmountable obstacle for families that can’t afford reliable internet or dedicated devices for their kids, there are a variety of ways that parents can help connect their children with the tools they need. For those privileged enough to already have access to the necessary physical resources, it’s important to remember that emotional support is also an essential piece of the puzzle when it comes to children’s educational success, especially during days as challenging as these. Lastly, it falls on all of us to use our time, energy, and voices to work towards a more just world where the educational playing field is level and all children have the same opportunity to thrive and succeed, regardless of their social, racial, or financial background.
 
About Children and Screens
Since its inception in 2013, Children and Screens: Institute of Digital Media and Child Development, has become one of the nation’s leading non-profit organizations dedicated to advancing and supporting interdisciplinary scientific research, enhancing human capital in the field, informing and educating the public, and advocating for sound public policy for child health and wellness. For more information, visit Children and Screens website or contact by email here.
 
The views and opinions that are expressed in this article belong to the experts to whom they are attributed, and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Children and Screens: Institute of Digital Media and Child Development, or its staff. 

SF and DL_Photo Credit Angelo Kritikos.jpg for 360 Magazine

Sam Fischer x Demi Lovato “What Other People Say”

Following the huge success of his global smash hit This City and recent project HomeworkSam Fischer has teamed up with Demi Lovato to release his new single What Other People Say  out now via RCA Records. Listen HERE.

Written by Sam before his single This City became a hit, it was a song he always knew would be a duet. Sam was blown away when Demi Lovato became the perfect person to accompany him on vocals. What Other People Say was written about feeling alone and not wanting to let people down. The pairing takes two different lives and perspectives and unites them into one message of human experience, emotion and togetherness, so they are alone with one another in the song. It is a truly special track with a powerful, moving and relatable chorus. It is the next official single release for Sam since This City.

Sam says; “What Other People Say is a confession, realizing how far away you can get from who you are in an effort to be liked. It’s about the pressures of society and how getting caught up with the wrong things can change you.”

Demi says; “This song is a reflection on what it’s like to lose who you truly are in an effort to please other people and society.  It’s why I wanted to make this song with Sam – ultimately it’s about two humans coming together to connect and find solutions to their problems.”

Alongside the announcement of the single, Sam Fischer has also shared that he has been chosen as YouTube’s first ‘Artist on the Rise’ for 2021, following previous winners Mabel, Aitch, Freya Ridings, Mahalia, Beabadoobee and Celeste.

About Sam Fischer:

Always wearing his heart on his sleeve and with sincerity in both his lyrics and conversations, Sam Fischer released his project Homework last year. This project is a cathartic body of work, acknowledging the moments in life that Sam has struggled to deal with, and how these situations have changed him for the better.

Beginning as a TikTok sensation and quickly cementing itself in hearts and heads around the world, the emotive and heartfelt This City now stands at over 350 million worldwide streams, over 2 million worldwide sales and over 50 million video views. It has been certified Platinum in the UK with a Top 20 chart position, which steadily climbed over 19 weeks, and was also nominated for ‘Song of the Year’ at the 2020 Aria Awards. It was also a top 5 UK Airplay record, receiving radio support from Radio 1, Radio 2 (B List), Capital, Virgin and Bauer; alongside TV performances on Jimmy Kimmel Live, The Late Late Show with James Corden and The Ellen DeGeneres Show.

Australian born Sam Fischer first introduced himself with his Not A Hobby EP and has garnered incredible attention through his soulful voice and heartfelt lyrics. Touring North America with his friend Lewis Capaldi, he wowed crowds with his buoyant personality and pure love and talent for song-writing. Now based in LA, he not only has received acclaim for his own work, but he continues to solidify his spot as one of the hottest current writers, having worked with global pop superstars including Ciara, Lennon Stella, Louis Tomlinson, Elle King, Jessie J, Virginia To Vegas, and many more.

About Demi Lovato:

One of the world’s most successful music artists today, GRAMMY-nominated singer Demi Lovato first broke out in 2008 with the Disney Channel film Camp Rock and its sequel Camp Rock 2: The Final Jam in 2010.  Also in 2008, she released her debut studio album Don’t Forget.  What followed was what continues to be a hit musical career, with top selling and acclaimed hit records and world tours.  She also continues to be one of the biggest names on social media with an engaged combined following of over 108 million.

On the music front, Lovato went on to release five more albums with her most recent being 2017’s Tell Me You Love Me. With this release also came the single Sorry Not Sorry, which garnered over 195 million streams and climbed to #1 on the viral charts. Other past releases include albums Confident in 2015 and 2013’s DEMI, which hit #1 on iTunes in over 50 countries around the world, as well as singles Cool for the SummerHeart AttackNeon Lights and Really Don’t Care.

Lovato kicked off 2021 with a performance in the Presidential Inauguration Committee’s “Celebrating America” special following President Biden’s inauguration. This follows notable 2020 performances with the debut of her powerhouse ballad Anyone during a stripped-down performance at the GRAMMY Awards. She also performed the National Anthem at Super Bowl LIV. Lovato’s return to the stage was followed by the release of her empowering new single and video I Love Me, as well as collaborations with fellow global superstar Sam Smith on I’m Ready and dance music star Marshmello on the timely OK Not To Be OK. Lovato will be premiering her powerful four-part documentary series from YouTube Originals and director Michael D. Ratner entitled Demi Lovato: Dancing with the Devil as SXSW, where it will open the 2021 festival.

COLLEGE STUDENTS × HOMELESSNESS

For the fifth year in row, the #RealCollege survey has documented a crisis affecting American higher education. Researchers conclude that more than 6 million students are affected by food and/or housing insecurity.

The #RealCollege survey is led by the Hope Center for College, Community, and Justice at Temple University.  In 2019, the survey was completed by more than 167,000 students at 227 community colleges and four-year colleges and universities located in 44 states and the District of Columbia.

A remarkable 17% of students who answered the survey were homeless at some point in the last year, almost 40% were food insecure, and almost half faced housing insecurity.  The results are consistent with the prior #RealCollege surveys and those led by other researchers around the nation.

“It is clear that college is now about serious financial struggles, not partying.  Money weighs heavily on students’ minds, and without a safe place to sleep and enough to eat they cannot concentrate on learning,” said Dr. Sara Goldrick-Rab, founding director of the Hope Center and the leading expert on basic needs insecurity among college students. “This is a waste of talent and it undermines our economy. To become student-ready, colleges need to move beyond food pantries and take preventative measures, and policymakers must support them. There are six pieces of federal legislation to address these issues pending in Congress now—it is time to act!”

Among the 167,000 respondents in this year’s survey:

·      39% were food insecure in the last 30 days;

·      46% were housing insecure in the previous year;

·      17% were homeless in the previous year; and

·      Some groups of students were more at risk than others: community college students, racial/ethnic minorities, and LGBTQ students were all more likely than others to face one or more of these challenges

This year’s response rate of 167,000 students represents about 8% of the total number of students contacted for the survey, according to the Hope Center.  “We think these are conservative estimates of the true extent of the problem, since students without funds rarely have time to do surveys or access to the necessary technology for e-surveys like this one,” said Christine Baker-Smith, Managing Director of the Hope Center. “We don’t advertise the survey as focused on food or housing, and do not offer any help.”  The Hope Center’s research team estimates that that the figures extrapolate to at least 6 million affected students.

There are many interconnected reasons college students are facing basic needs insecurity today, according to the report. Some of these are:

· Tuition is up, but more importantly, financial aid to students has not kept up with the cost of living although college loans are still available;

·      Students are being asked to pay for books and tuition but lack the financial support the system demands—many students today are themselves parents or are supporting other family members;

·      Employers are less likely to want to hire students since they may have complicated schedules, and for the students who can find flexible work, the minimum wage has not kept up with cost of living increases;

·      Th social safety net is not what it used to be—today, many college students are excluded from programs such as SNAP, for example; and

·      College themselves are struggling with insufficient money to help students in need. For example, in public higher education, budgets have been cut 25% on a per-student basis over the last 30 years.

Because the problem stems from many different avenues, the solutions are multi-pronged as well. The first step, according to the report, is for colleges and universities to admit there is a problem. The Hope Center is offering to support any institution that wants to address these problems; they can sign up here.  Among the programs the report describes that have helped at campuses across the U.S.:

·      Meal vouchers or swipes;

·      Access to public benefits, such as SNAP, or transportation/housing assistance;

·      Emergency aid that students can access quickly, for unforeseen expenses like car repairs or groceries;

·      Case management, so the students have a contact on campus who can help them navigate the help available to them.

In 2020, the Hope Center plans to release the following reports that focus on different college student populations and aspects of student life:

·      March 24: Student Athletes 

·      April TBA: Staff and Faculty

·      April 8: Parenting Students

·      April 13Philadelphia

·      May 13: Transportation

·      May TBA: Mental Health

The full #RealCollege National Survey 2020 can be found online at this link: http://hope4college.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/2019_RealCollege_Survey_Report.pdf  

The colleges and universities that took part in this year’s #RealCollege Survey are:

Two-Year Colleges

Aims Community College (CO)

Alexandria Technical & Community College (MN)

Amarillo College (TX)

Anoka Technical College (MN)

Anoka-Ramsey Community College (MN)

Arapahoe Community College (CO)

Atlantic Cape Community College (NJ)

Austin Community College District (TX)

Bay de Noc Community College (MI)

Bellevue College (WA)

Bergen Community College (NJ)

Blackhawk Technical College (WI)

Blue Mountain Community College (OR)

Bristol Community College (MA)

Brookdale Community College (NJ)

Brookhaven College (TX)

Bucks County Community College (PA)

Bunker Hill Community College (MA)

Camden County College (NJ)

Cayuga Community College (NY)

Cedar Valley College (TX)

Central Lakes College Brainerd (MN)

Central Lakes College Staples (MN)

Central Oregon Community College (OR)

Centralia College (WA)Cerritos College (CA)

Chaffey College (CA)

Clackamas Community College (OR)

Clark College (WA)

Clatsop Community College (OR)

Clover Park Technical College (WA)

Columbia Basin College (WA)

Columbia Gorge Community College (OR)

Community College of Allegheny County (PA)

Community College of Baltimore County (MD)

Community College of Philadelphia (PA)

Community College of Rhode Island (RI)

Compton College (CA)

County College of Morris (NJ)

Cuyamaca College (CA)

Dabney S. Lancaster Community College (VA)

Delaware County Community College (PA)

Durham Technical Community College (NC)

Dutchess Community College (NY)

Eastfield College (TX)

Edmonds Community College (WA)

El Centro College (TX)

Essex County College (NJ)

Everett Community College (WA)

Finger Lakes Community College (NY)

Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College (MN)

Galveston College (TX)

Glendale Community College (CA)

Grayson College (TX)

Green River College (WA)

Greenville Technical College (SC)

Grossmont College (CA)

Hibbing Community College (MN)

Highline College (WA)

Holyoke Community College (MA)

Hudson County Community College (NJ)

Hudson Valley Community College (NY)

Itasca Community College (MN)

Ivy Tech Community College (IN)

Jamestown Community College (NY)

Jefferson State Community College (AL)

Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwa Community College (WI)

Lake Washington Institute of Technology (WA)

Leeward Community College (HI)

Linn-Benton Community College (OR)

Lone Star College (TX)

Lower Columbia College (WA)

Massasoit Community College (MA)

Mesabi Range College (MN)

Middlesex Community College (MA)

Middlesex County College (NJ)

Minneapolis Community and Technical College (MN)

Minnesota State College Southeast (MN)

Minnesota State Community and Technical College (MN)

Mohawk Valley Community College (NY)

Monroe Community College (NY)

Montgomery College (MD)

Mountain View College (TX)

Mt. Hood Community College (OR)

Napa Valley College (CA)

Nassau Community College (NY)

North Central Texas College (TX)

North Lake College (TX)

North Seattle College (WA)

Northern Essex Community College (MA)

Northern Virginia Community College (VA)

Northland Community and Technical College (MN)

Northwest Technical College (MN)

Ocean County College (NJ)

Olympic College (WA)

Onondaga Community College (NY)

Oregon Coast Community College (OR)

Orleans Technical College (PA)

Ozarks Technical Community College (MO)

Passaic County Community College (NJ)

Patrick Henry Community College (VA)

Pellissippi State Community College (TN)

Pierce College-Fort Steilacoom (WA)

Pierce College-Puyallup (WA)

Portland Community College (OR)

Rainy River Community College (MN)

Raritan Valley Community College (NJ)

Red Rocks Community College (CO)

Reedley College (CA)

Renton Technical College (WA)

Richland College (TX)

Ridgewater College (MN)

Riverland Community College (MN)

Riverside City College (CA)

Rochester Community and Technical College (MN)

Rogue Community College (OR)

Rowan College at Burlington County (NJ)

Rowan College of South Jersey (NJ)

SUNY Adirondack (NY)

SUNY Corning Community College (NY)

SUNY Erie Community College (NY)

SUNY Morrisville (NY)

SUNY Orange (NY)

Saint Paul College (MN)

Salish Kootenai College (MT)

San Diego City College (CA)

San Diego Continuing Education (CA)

San Diego Mesa College (CA)

San Diego Miramar College (CA)

San Jose City College (CA)

Santa Rosa Junior College (CA)

Santiago Canyon College (CA)

Seattle Central College (WA)

Shoreline Community College (WA)

Skagit Valley College (WA)

South Puget Sound Community College (WA)

South Seattle College (WA)

Southwestern Oregon Community College (OR)

Spokane Community College (WA)

Spokane Falls Community College (WA)

St. Cloud Technical and Community College (MN)

St. Philip’s College (TX)

Sussex County Community College (NJ)

Tacoma Community College (WA)

Tallahassee Community College (FL)

Texas Southmost College (TX)

Tillamook Bay Community College (OR)

Treasure Valley Community College (OR)

Trinity Valley Community College (TX)

Umpqua Community College (OR)

Union County College (NJ)

Wake Technical Community College (NC)

Walla Walla Community College (WA)

Wallace State Community College Hanceville (AL)

Warren County Community College (NJ)

Wenatchee Valley College (WA)

Westchester Community College (NY)

Western Technical College (WI)

Whatcom Community College (WA)

White Earth Tribal and Community College (MN)

Yakima Valley College (WA)

Four-Year Colleges and Universities

Alfred State College (NY)*

Bridgewater State University (MA)

Cedar Crest College (PA)

Colorado School of Mines (CO)

Colorado State University—Fort Collins (CO)

Colorado State University— Global (CO)

Daytona State College (FL)*

Diné College (AZ)*

Drexel University (PA)

Emporia State University (KS)

Fashion Institute of Technology (NY)*

Fitchburg State University (MA)

Florida State College at Jacksonville (FL)*

Fort Lewis College (CO)

Framingham State University (MA)

George Fox University (OR)

Grand Valley State University (MI)

La Salle University (PA)

Lehigh University (PA)

Maryville College (TN)

Massachusetts College of Art and Design (MA)

Mercy College of Ohio (OH)*

Metropolitan State University (MN)

Metropolitan State University of Denver (CO)

Miami Dade College (FL)*

Minnesota State University Moorhead (MN)

Muhlenberg College (PA)

Northern Vermont University Johnson (VT)

Oglala Lakota College (SD)

Rhode Island College (RI)

SUNY Cobleskill (NY)

SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry (NY)

SUNY College Old Westbury (NY)

SUNY Cortland (NY)

SUNY Delhi (NY)*

SUNY Empire State College (NY)

SUNY Fredonia (NY)

SUNY Maritime College (NY)

SUNY Morrisville (NY)*

SUNY New Paltz (NY)

SUNY Oneonta (NY)

SUNY Oswego (NY)

SUNY Polytechnic institute (NY)

SUNY Potsdam (NY)

SUNY Upstate Medical University (NY)

Salem Community College (NJ)

Southwest Minnesota State University (MN)

St. John’s University (NY)

St. Norbert College (WI)

Stony Brook University (NY)

Temple University (PA)

The College at Brockport (NY)

The University of Montana (MT)

United Tribes Technical College (ND)*

University of Alaska Fairbanks (AK)

University of Central Missouri (MO)

University of Colorado Denver (CO)

University of Kansas (KS)

University of Massachusetts Boston (MA)

University of Massachusetts Lowell (MA)

University of Memphis (TN)

University of Missouri St. Louis (MO)

University of Northern Colorado (CO)

West Virginia University (WV)

Western Washington University (WA)

Westfield State University (MA)

York College of Pennsylvania (PA)

* Institution primarily offer credentials other than a Bachelor’s degree and was included in two-year rates.