Posts tagged with "economic"

illustration by Maria Soloman for use by 360 Magazine

First Public Health Insurance Option For Nevadans Passed

USofCare on Assembly Passage of Nevada Public Option to Make Health Care More Accessible and Affordable

United States of Care’s Liz Hagan, Director of Policy Solutions, issued the following statement today in response to the Nevada Assembly’s passage of SB 420, a bill to create a public health insurance option in Nevada:

“Today is a day of great progress and promise for Nevadans, as the Assembly has now joined the state Senate in passing a public insurance option (SB 420). This critical legislation will significantly reduce both the cost of health coverage and the number of Nevada residents forced to go without health insurance because they can’t afford it.

“The Silver State ranks 49th overall in state health system performance and it’s one of the least-insured states despite having expanded Medicaid. The pandemic has shone a light on many of the longstanding shortcomings in Nevada’s health care system and has made all too clear that people need dependable coverage that is with them through life’s changes, like losing a job or starting their own business.

“The number of people without insurance is especially high among Hispanic/Latino Nevadans, over 20% of whom are uninsured. The approved legislation goes a long way towards increasing access to coverage options that people can depend on and afford — all while helping to reduce disparities. We look forward to the governor signing this legislation into law, which will make the Silver State the second in the nation to enact a public option and will be a national model for expanding access to equitable, quality, affordable health care.”

Digital Divide illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Digitally Disconnected

DIGITALLY DISCONNECTED

13 TIPS FOR HELPING BRIDGE THE DIGITAL DIVIDE FOR CHILDREN DURING COVID-19

While social, racial, and economic disparities have always existed within the educational system, the COVID-19 pandemic is exasperating these inequities and widening gaps between students at a drastic rate. For families who can’t afford home computers, laptops, or high-speed internet access, remote learning is nearly impossible, and for students who already found themselves struggling before the pandemic, the prospect of more than a year of lost classroom time is a devastating blow. However, there are steps parents can take to shrink this digital divide, and there are resources available via schools, non-profits, and government initiatives that can help children access the technological tools they need to succeed. Indeed, Dr. Pamela Hurst-Della Pietra, President and Founder of Children and Screens, notes that “the inclusion of 17.2 billion dollars for closing the ‘homework gap’ in the recently passed American Rescue Plan is a watershed moment for digital equity.”   
 
Several of the leading figures in the fields of public health, education, psychology, and parenting have weighed in with their suggestions on the best ways to combat the digital divide, and many will participate in an interdisciplinary conversation and Q&A hosted by Children and Screens: Institute of Digital Media and Child Development on Wednesday, March 24, at 12pm ET via Zoom. Moderated by the Director of Internet and Technology Research at the Pew Research Center Lee Rainie, the panel will engage in an in-depth discussion about the digital divide and actionable steps we can all take to bridge the gap. RSVP here.
 
1. DON’T WAIT, ADVOCATE 

While schools across the country are doing everything they can to make sure that children have access to the technology and connectivity they need for remote learning, the unfortunate reality is that many families still lack adequate resources. If your family is among them, says author and MIT Assistant Professor of Digital Media Justin Reich, know that you’re not alone and that there are steps you can take to advocate for what your children need. “Start with your school staff,” Reich recommends. “They’re often overwhelmed during this challenging time but be polite and persistent. If you run into a dead-end with your school system, consider reaching out to school libraries and youth organizations like The Boys and Girls Club or the YMCA to see what kind of support they might be able to offer.”
 
2. SCALE DOWN 

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro Professor Dr. Wayne Journell agrees, pointing out that sometimes, despite their best efforts, teachers and administrators may not always know which students are struggling with connectivity issues. “Let teachers know if you have slow internet at home,” says Journell. “Sometimes detailed graphics and animations that look cute but have little relevance to the actual lessons being delivered can cause problems for students with unreliable internet. If teachers are aware, then they can scale down the ‘frilly’ stuff and still get the important content across.”
 
3. STAND UP FOR YOURSELF  

While it’s important for parents to speak up on behalf of their children, RAND Senior Policy Researcher Julia Kaufman, Ph.D., highlights the importance of encouraging children to express their needs, as well. “If your child does not have access to technology at home and is falling behind, make sure your child’s teacher knows the obstacles they’re facing and ask what accommodations will make it easier for your child to do assignments offline,” says Rand. “At the same time, help your child feel comfortable expressing any technology concerns or confusion to their teachers, including cases where they have the technology but cannot use it well.”
 
4. CHECK YOUR ASSUMPTIONS 

One critical step that educators and policymakers can take in addressing the digital divide is to check their assumptions. They cannot – and should not – assume that students do or do not have access based solely on demographics such as family income level. “In addition, they cannot assume that providing access alone creates equity,” adds Dr. Beth Holland, a Partner at The Learning Accelerator (TLA) and Digital Equity Advisor to the Consortium of School Networking (CoSN). “This is a complex and nuanced challenge that needs both a technical and a human solution to ensure that students not only have access to sufficient high-speed internet and devices but also accessible systems and structures to support their learning.”

5. SURVEY AND MODIFY  

For teachers who are on the ground and in the classroom, checking your assumptions can be as simple as asking a few basic questions at the start of the term. “Survey students to determine the percentage of your population that doesn’t have home Internet access,” recommends former AAP President Dr. Colleen A. Kraft, MD, MBA, FAAP. “Once you know the divide, you can address it,” adding, “When planning 1:1 projects and choosing devices, for example, you can consider a device’s capacity for offline use. For those without Wi-Fi, a public library in the child’s neighborhood can also be an excellent resource.”

6. VOTE FOR CHANGE 

That parents and teachers need to worry about the digital divide at all is a failure on the part of our elected leaders, says Bates College Associate Professor of Education Mara Casey Tieken. “Contact your elected officials—local, state, and federal—and complain,” she suggests. “Write letters, call their offices, attend their legislative sessions, and make your voice heard. Join with other families whose children are impacted by this divide to amplify your message and use your vote to support lawmakers who understand the impacts of this divide, have a clear plan to address it and are willing to take action.”
 
7. MAKE BROADBAND A UTILITY  

Reich agrees, reminding those families who already have their needs met that they share in the responsibility to advocate for the less fortunate. “It’s our job as citizens to demand that we as a society give families and children the tools and resources that they need for remote learning now and in the future,” says Reich. “We need to advocate for a society where broadband is treated as a utility rather than a luxury good, and young people enrolled in schools and educational programs have access to computers for learning.”

8. CONCRETE INITIATIVES  

Angela Siefer, Executive Director of the National Digital Inclusion Alliance, advocates four concrete initiatives. “Establish a permanent broadband benefit, increase access to affordable computers, digital literacy and technical support, improve broadband mapping (including residential cost data), and support local and state digital inclusion planning.” By implementing these changes, Siefer says, policymakers can start to mitigate the digital divide. 

9. USE TECH FOR GOOD 

There are many reasons to consider equitable solutions along a “digital continuum” rather than the “digital divide;” a binary description leaves less room for nuanced and customized interventions. It may be imperative to fortify existing institutions, implement new governance structures and promulgate policies to confront disparities regarding working families. Antwuan Wallace, Managing Director at National Innovation Service, suggests that legislators consider a Safety and Thriving framework to increase family efficacy to support children with protective factors against the “homework gap” by utilizing technology to train critical skills for executive functioning, including planning, working memory, and prioritization. 
 
10. LEVEL THE FIELD 

Emma Garcia of the Economic Policy Institute emphasizes that guided technology education will be of great value after the pandemic. She says, “it will need be instituted as part of a very broad agenda that uses well-designed diagnostic tests to know where children are and what they need (in terms of knowledge, socioemotional development, and wellbeing), ensures the right number of highly credentialed professionals to teach and support students, and offers an array of targeted investments that will address the adverse impacts of COVID-19 on children’s learning and development, especially for those who were most hit by the pandemic.”
 
11. APPLY FOR LIFELINE 

Research also shows that the digital divide disproportionately affects Latino, Black, and Native American students, with the expensive price of internet access serving as one of the main obstacles to families in these communities. “Eligible parents can apply for the Lifeline Program, which is a federal program that can reduce their monthly phone and internet cost,” suggests Greenlining Institute fellow Gissela Moya. “Parents can also ask their child’s school to support them by providing hotspots and computer devices to ensure their child has the tools they need to succeed.”
 
12. GET INVOLVED 

Learning remotely can be difficult for kids, even if they have access to all the technological tools they need. Research shows that parental encouragement is also an important aspect of learning for children, notes London School of Economics professor and author Sonia Livingstone. “Perhaps sit with them, and gently explain what’s required or work it out together.” She adds that working together is a great way that parents with fewer economic or digital resources can support their children. “And if you don’t know much about computers, your child can probably teach you something too!”
 
13. NO ONE SIZE FITS ALL 

When it comes to encouraging your children, there’s no one-size-fits-all approach. “Reflect on the more nuanced ways your children learn and leverage accessible resources (digital and non-digital) to inspire their continued curiosity,” says University of Redlands Assistant Professor Nicol Howard. Leaning into your child’s strengths and interests will help them make the most of this challenging time.
 
While the move to remote learning may seem like an insurmountable obstacle for families that can’t afford reliable internet or dedicated devices for their kids, there are a variety of ways that parents can help connect their children with the tools they need. For those privileged enough to already have access to the necessary physical resources, it’s important to remember that emotional support is also an essential piece of the puzzle when it comes to children’s educational success, especially during days as challenging as these. Lastly, it falls on all of us to use our time, energy, and voices to work towards a more just world where the educational playing field is level and all children have the same opportunity to thrive and succeed, regardless of their social, racial, or financial background.
 
About Children and Screens
Since its inception in 2013, Children and Screens: Institute of Digital Media and Child Development, has become one of the nation’s leading non-profit organizations dedicated to advancing and supporting interdisciplinary scientific research, enhancing human capital in the field, informing and educating the public, and advocating for sound public policy for child health and wellness. For more information, visit Children and Screens website or contact by email here.
 
The views and opinions that are expressed in this article belong to the experts to whom they are attributed, and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Children and Screens: Institute of Digital Media and Child Development, or its staff. 

United States Suicide Crisis

The United States is a nation currently plagued by many crises. We are facing a public health, economic, and civil rights crisis all at the same time. The coronavirus pandemic alone is changing almost every facet of life for hundreds of millions of Americans. Cases of COVID19 are rising again with fear and anxiety close behind.

Dr. Carlin Barnes and Dr. Marketa Wills – two Harvard-trained psychiatrists and co-founders of Healthy Mind MDs, LLC – a wellness enterprise whose sole mission is to improve the emotional and mental well-being of all Americans. They believe this increased rate of clinical anxiety and depression can lead to another major crisis – suicide. Mental health professionals are concerned that suicide rates will greatly increase over the next few months related to Americans deal with what is happening around them. 

Suicide is not a new national problem. Research has established a strong link between economic upheaval and suicide and substance us In fact, it is a public health crisis that has plagued America for quite some time. Suicide rates among adults in the U.S. were on the rise before this pandemic. In 2020, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that suicide deaths among those age 1 to 64 had increased to 35% in less than two decades. It is evident by our nation’s response, COVID-19 caught us off guard. A study of the Great Recession that began in late 2007 found that every percentage point increase in the unemployment rate, there was about a 1.6 percent increase in the suicide rate.

Drs. Barnes and Wills believe it is important that we, individually and collectively, ring the alarm regarding the possibilities of COVID-19 related suicide. They are available to talk about the signs of a loved one who may be contemplating suicide and how to combat it. Signs include:

• Extreme withdrawal from all family and friends from someone who had previously been outgoing and friendly

• Increased use of alcohol and drugs

• Stating that life is not worth living

• Starting to get possessions and final paperwork in order

• Erratic behaviors,  mood swings, increased agitation/aggression/irritability

• Severe changes in sleep (increased sleep or decreased sleep) and appetite (increased appetite or decreased appetite

Given this confluence of stressors, the mental health of many Americans is becoming a major concern as we adapt to absorb the psychologic impact of all these major events. Data shows that one third of U.S  adults have reported symptoms of clinical anxiety and depression related to this public health crisis.

Barnes, MD, is a board-certified psychiatrist and behavioral health medical director at a Fortune 500 managed care company. For the past eighteen years, she has practiced child, adolescent, and adult psychiatry—she has a thriving, diverse, boutique private practice with patient clientele ranging from working adults to urban children and  adolescents. She trained in the specialty of psychiatry at programs  affiliated with both Harvard University and Emory University Schools Medicine and attended Texas A&M University College of Medicine, where she received a Doctor of Medicine degree. Dr. Barnes is a member of several professional organizations including the National Medical Association, the Black Psychiatrists of America, and the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry. She is originally from Hillside, New Jersey, and currently resides in Houston, Texas, where she lives with her son.

Marketa Wills, MD, is a board-certified psychiatrist with a master’s in business administration from the Wharton School of Business and serves as a physician executive at a Fortune 500 health insurance company. She has cared for severely mentally ill patients in inpatient, outpatient, and emergency room clinical settings. As treatment team leader and medical director, she effectively collaborated with other mental professionals to ensure that patients with a variety of ailments—ranging from schizophrenia to postpartum depression to substance abuse—were able to live as productively as possible. Dr.Wills earned her medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and completed a residency in adult psychiatry at Harvard’s Massachusetts General Hospital/McLean Hospital program. In her last year of the program, she served as chief resident. She has received numerous accolades and awards highlighting her clinical and community achievements. Originally from Dayton, Ohio, she currently resides in sunny Tampa, Florida.

The doctors have shared their expertise on numerous news outlets as well as CBS News, NBC Syndication and CBS Radio.
July is Minority Mental Health Awareness Month. Drs. Barnes and Wills would be ideal experts to talk about mental health and suicide issues.

Elle Canada, 360 MAGAZINE

ELLE CANADA × SUSTAINABILITY

KO Média is proud to announce that the April issue of ELLE Canada is dedicated to pushing forward a frank dialogue about sustainability—as evidenced by a graphic still-life cover treatment, a first for the boundary-pushing brand and a choice which mirrors our rapidly changing times.
 
“The seed for the cover idea grew out of the urgent conversations we at ELLE Canada were having about climate change with each other and our readers,” says Editor-in-Chief Vanessa Craft. “Even though we have long covered the importance of sustainability, the issue has never been more top of mind for our team and we know our readers are looking for an experience that feels authentic and reflective of what is happening in the world around them. We wanted to create a cover that echoes the dialogue taking place and helps us pause and acknowledge the new eco-era we have entered. This powerful image captures this mood—and the questions we are seeking answers to.”
 
The comprehensive April issue includes a wealth of can’t-miss special reports that foster conversation around the issues of importance for Canadians, including a shocking look at why young Canadian women, faced with an ever-worsening environmental crisis, are pledging to not have children; a close look at the merits of recycled textiles; design-forward sustainable shopping picks; the designer transforming the eco-fashion; natural skincare hacks from ELLE beauty editors from around the world; the Canadian skincare brand leading zero-waste innovation and everything you need to know about buying refillable beauty products.
 
Also in this issue: A sneak peek at the ELLE Canada office transformation, including smart strategies to personalize your office space, intimate chats with the new crop of Canadian stars storming Hollywood, and sophisticated dressing that outlasts trends.
 
The April issue of ELLE Canada will hit stands on Monday, March 16th.
 

Stock Market could predict Trump’s impeachment?

Those who want President Trump to stay in office should hope the stock market rises, and those who want him ousted should hope it crashes.

Why? History shows that the stock market is a useful indicator of people’s attitudes toward the president. Socionomic theory proposes that society’s overall mood regulates both stock prices and the public’s perceptions of its leaders. Positive social mood makes society feel optimistic, bid up stock prices and credit leaders for their good feelings. Negative social mood makes society feel pessimistic, sell stocks and blame leaders for their bad feelings.

These tendencies are evident in presidential re-election outcomes. Presidents Hoover and Carter, for example, lost bids for re-election during trends toward negative social mood as reflected by declining stock prices. In fact, the stock market is a better re-election indicator than inflation, unemployment and GDP growth combined, as my colleagues at the Socionomics Institute demonstrated in a 2012 paper.

Social mood’s influence is also evident in the results of U.S. presidential impeachments and near-impeachments. Twice in history, the U.S. House of Representatives has voted to impeach a president. In both cases, social mood was trending positively, as reflected by rising stock prices, and in both cases, the Senate voted for acquittal.

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Figure 1

Figure 1 illustrates the timing of the first presidential impeachment. On March 2, 1868, the House of Representatives formally agreed to eleven articles of impeachment against President Andrew Johnson. The Senate took three separate votes, and each fell one vote short of the two-thirds majority necessary to remove Johnson from office. The Senate acquitted Johnson on May 26, 1868, during a stock rally that added to the 250% increase since October 1857.

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Figure 2

Figure 2 shows that a substantial trend toward positive social mood preceded President Bill Clinton’s impeachment in the House and subsequent acquittal in the Senate. Note that some of the most serious events in the Monica Lewinsky scandal coincided with the largest downturn in the Dow during Clinton’s presidency. Yet, as the Dow recovered, so did Clinton’s approval ratings. And despite a $70-million prosecution of Clinton’s related perjury and obstruction of justice charges, the Senate acquitted the president as positive social mood lifted the Dow, Dow/gold and Dow/PPI to important peaks.

 

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Figure 3

President Richard Nixon’s near-impeachment and resignation from office serves as a textbook case of how social mood influences the fortunes of public figures. Figure 3 shows the Dow Jones Industrial Average surrounding his time in office. The soon-to-be-infamous Watergate break-in occurred toward the end of a strong 67% rally in the Dow from May 1970-January 1973. That trend toward positive mood helped Nixon win re-election in a landslide. But as mood trended toward the negative, the public’s view of its leader darkened, its appetite for scandal increased, the investigation accelerated, and Nixon’s fortunes changed. With almost certain impeachment looming, Nixon became the first president to resign from office on August 9, 1974.

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Figure 4

What does this history tell us about the probability that President Trump will serve a full term in office? We considered this question in the June 2017 issue of The Socionomist. Figure 4 is a chart from that issue, updated to the present. It depicts the trend of social mood as reflected by the Dow. We left the gray arrows showing our 2017 analysis in place, and we added red arrows to indicate the possibilities going forward. In July 2017, Congressman Brad Sherman formally introduced an article of impeachment against the president in the House of Representatives. Yet as the market rose during 2017, President Trump—despite low approval ratings, tremendous staff turnover, unrelenting criticism from the political left and numerous indictments and charges of Trump associates in the ongoing Mueller investigation—did not face an impeachment vote. After the stock market peaked on January 26, 2018, however, the tone changed, and even some on the political right became more critical of the president.

Since the October 3 stock market peak, disapproval of the president has grown steadily louder and more strident. At the same time, the Mueller investigation has implicated more and more of the president’s inner circle in illegal activities. The Democrats won control of the House in the 2018 midterms. A November 26 Gallup poll revealed Trump’s disapproval rating had hit an all-time high. On December 10, Fox News’s senior judicial analyst Andrew Napolitano said Trump could be charged with “three separate crimes and could be indicted while serving as president.” By December 17, the Mueller investigation had issued more than 100 criminal counts and charged 34 people, 10 of whom have been found guilty. That same day, Wired published its list of “All 17 (Known) Trump and Russia Investigations” and said, “it’s increasingly clear that, as 2018 winds down, Donald Trump faces a legal assault unlike anything previously seen by any president.”

In the weeks since the Trump Foundation agreed to dissolve, and Secretary of Defense James Mattis and diplomat Brett McGurk have resigned. On December 24, Time reported, “National Christmas Tree to Stay Dark During Holiday Due to Government Shutdown,” and several news organizations ran stories with versions of The Atlantic’s headline, “President Trump’s Nightmare Before Christmas,” as the stock market plunged. Of course, stalwart supporters of the president remain. Yet the number of oppositional voices is rising. A December 19 NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll found that 41% of Americans favor impeachment hearings.

We don’t know what the Mueller investigation will ultimately reveal, but for Trump, the facts may not matter as much as the social mood. Fasten your seatbelt and keep your eyes on stock market indexes, our best reflection of the trend of social mood.

Pirelli: World Leader in Sustainability

Results of annual review

Pirelli is the world leader in Sustainability in the Auto Components sector on the Dow Jones World and Europe indices. This is the result that emerged from the annual review of the indices conducted by RobecoSam and S&P Dow Jones and which will take effect from September 24th. Pirelli recorded a total score of 81 points compared with the sector average of 32. Launched in 1999, the Dow Jones sustainability indices are among the most important market indices regarding sustainability at the world level. Involving over 2,000 companies from 60 industrial sectors, the analysis is based on the integrated evaluation of economic, environmental and social factors, that are the three aspects which define the concept of sustainability in terms of enduring value creation for all stakeholders.

DISABILITY EMPLOYMENT

“People with disabilities are entering the workforce in unprecedented numbers?” It’s worth looking at the reports that show how “no group has felt the benefits of accelerated economic growth more than Americans with a disability”

Indeed, people with disabilities experienced a four-fold increase in job opportunities last year – unprecedented growth

In states across the country, Governors are undertaking new efforts to expand job opportunities for all. For example, Gov.Edwards recently launched a task force focused on employment for Louisianans with disabilities. Gov. Walker just signed historic legislation that makes Wisconsin an Employment First and commits resources to expanding competitive, integrated employment. Remarkable progress and remarkable leadership.

During the Meeting of the National Governors Association (NGA), our team and partner organizations spoke 1-on-1 with thirty-four different Governors. In each meeting we advocated for policies and practices that will expand economic opportunities. For several Governors, we had the chance to honor them with an award for their leadership and their continuing commitment to these issues.

At the end of the day, there are hundreds of self-advocates, community organizations and state leaders in a position to drive this change forward. Your involvement can move progress even faster! Expanding opportunities requires leaders across the public sector, the private sector and advocates to join forces and find solutions. First, check out where your state ranks and what challenges impact opportunities. You can also see what your state has done or is already doing to expand jobs for people with disabilities. We have written in-depth reports about what each of the 50 states is doing to advance opportunities for Americans with disabilities. image-2018-04-18 (1)

SOUTH BY THE WEST CONFERENCE

Texas A&M University has announced it will return to Austin for South By Southwest Conference (SXSW) during Interactive Week March 11-14 to showcase thought leadership and innovation in addressing some of the world’s most urgent challenges.

Texas A&M’s follow-up SXSW appearance to 2017’s “Texas A&M House” will feature panel discussions with internationally recognized thought leaders and immersive Texas A&M brand experience opportunities at multiple locations in the heart of downtown Austin.

Texas A&M’s participation in SXSW in 2018 will showcase faculty expertise and generate brand impressions with a global audience of 280,000 attendees in a way that solidifies the institution’s commitment to a modern, progressive future while celebrating its prestigious land-, sea-, and space-grant status, academic prominence and storied traditions. This week of panels, exhibitions and brand engagement opportunities will impart Texas A&M’s reputation for creating leaders of character and substance to the future employers of students.

Panel Sessions at the Courtyard Marriott

Texas A&M’s faculty innovators, creators and influencers will team up with some of the world’s leading voices in national affairs, next-generation technologies and public policy to explore cutting-edge solutions to issues that include human rights, artificial intelligence, health care and natural disaster mitigation.

• Human Rights Policy in a Connected World: Texas A&M President Michael K. Young, former United Nations Ambassador John Bolton and former U.S. Ambassador-at-Large Rabbi David Saperstein will dissect social, economic and diplomatic strategies that could be enhanced by the integration of digital technology. The panel will be moderated by BBC Journalist Kasia Madera.

• Future Society: AI and Generative Systems: Emmy-winning TV host Mario Armstrong and industry experts from the College of Architecture Philip Galanter, Ann McNamara and Jinsil Hwaryoung Seo will analyze how technology has not only reshaped the media landscape, but society itself.

• Disrupting Traditional Healthcare with Innovation and Technology: PhilipsUSA Chief Medical Officer Joseph Frassica will lead a discussion on challenging the traditional health care model with Carrie L. Byington, Dean of the Texas A&M College of Medicine, Senior Vice President of the Texas A&M University Health Science Center and Vice Chancellor for Health Services, CEO of Engineering Health (EnHealth) and Executive Dean for Engineering Medicine (EnMed) Roderic I. Pettigrew and Center for Remote Health Technologies and Systems Director Gerard Coté.

• “Future Proofing” Disaster Recovery: Commission to Rebuild Texas Chair and Texas A&M University System Chancellor John Sharp, Texas Senator John Whitmire (D-Houston) and State Representative Geanie Morrison (R-Victoria) will explore the changing dynamics of natural disaster recovery and preparedness with journalist Roland S. Martin.

• The Community, Culture and Science of Texas BBQ: Author and cook Jess Pryles will lead a discussion on Texas’ rich BBQ culture and the techniques, seasonings and cuts that drive the culinary art. Joining Pryles will be Jeff Savell, Davey Griffin and Ray Riley, meat scientists and pitmasters behind Texas A&M’s Camp Brisket.

Texas A&M X ’47 Brand Discovery House at The Clive on Rainey Street

The Texas A&M X ’47 Brand Discovery House will bring Texas A&M’s global impact as a land, sea and space-grant institution to life through a captivating sensory experience at a redesigned Clive. The Discovery House collaboration between Texas A&M, premier apparel partner ’47 Brand and leading new media lifestyle brand Highsnobiety also will feature live musical performances from emerging talents and breakfast, lunch and dinner from Texas A&M’s BBQ Geniuses and Stiles Switch BBQ.

Texas A&M Discovery Lounge at the Courtyard Marriott’s Brazos Ballroom

SXSW-goers will have an opportunity to relax and recharge at the Discovery Lounge while exploring Texas A&M through engaging sensory experiences.

• Live Mural with LifeWTR: Teams of Texas A&M students will create a mural in real-time and compete for scholarships and an opportunity to have their work featured on apparel in a special campus series.

• “Saving Brunch” Smoothie Counter: Attendees can take a pit stop and refuel with coffee, juice and smoothies while learning about Texas A&M sustainable agriculture research and the Healthy Texas initiative.

• BBQ Genius Q&A Counter: Pick the brains of Texas A&M’s “brisketeers” and learn the finer points of the culinary art of BBQ while snacking on complimentary samples.

• Aggies in Space: Guests will have an opportunity to experience outer space through the eyes of Aggie astronauts with Q&A sessions, virtual reality experiences and a chance to try ice cream developed by Texas A&M scientists for NASA.

• Buyer BeWhere: Residents of Galveston and Harris counties can receive flood hazard risk information through an interactive map developed by coastal environmental planning expert Sam Brody.

• Innovation Hour: The Mays Business School and the School of Innovation will crowdsource and identify global challenges with the help of SXSW guests, and then discuss them.

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Funding for Texas A&M at SXSW was made possible through brand licensing revenues, without the use of tuition dollars.

This story is posted on Texas A&M Today.