Posts tagged with "analysis"

UTA × MEDIAHOUND

The acquisition will accelerate UTA’s already substantial data and analytics capabilities and allow it to drive value for the agency’s clients at scale. UTA IQ – the agency’s research, data analytics, and digital strategy division – will utilize MediaHound‘s proprietary technology, which includes The Entertainment Graph, a deep database of film and television content and talent that has been used by leading studios, streamers, and agencies to produce actionable insights and fuel user recommendation engines.

MediaHound and its team of engineers and product developers will become part of UTA IQ.

“Although Talent and creativity remain the coin of the realm, data aligned with strong insights is also a critical tool for our colleagues and clients,” said Jeremy Zimmer, UTA CEO. “Today’s acquisition is a strong addition to the potency of our capabilities in this space.”

“Since the launch of UTA IQ in 2018, our team has been synthesizing information from multiple sources to create unique tools and insights for our clients and agents, and along the way we became aware of the impressive products and services MediaHound offers the industry,” said Joe Kessler, Partner and Global Head of UTA IQ. “Now that we can combine MediaHound’s capabilities with ours, we can exponentially expand and hasten UTA’s ability to navigate multiple layers of data to support critical client transactions and provide insights to inform their strategies.”

“In UTA, we found a partner that shares our vision and ideals about the growing value and impact of data-driven software solutions in entertainment and media,” said Addison McCaleb, CEO and founder of MediaHound. “We could not be happier than to move into the next phase of our evolution as part of such a dynamic, visionary company.”

In addition to its technical expertise and unique IP, MediaHound operates two consumer web sites, “Autum” and “Date Night,” that help streaming consumers select content that will appeal to them based on their preferences and prior viewership.

MediaHound’s financial advisor for this deal was Qualia Legacy Advisors.

UTA unites ideas, opportunities and talent. The company represents some of the world’s most iconic, barrier-breaking artists, creators and change makers—from actors, athletes and musicians to writers, gamers and digital influencers. One of the most influential companies in global entertainment, UTA’s business spans talent representation, content production, as well as strategic advisory and marketing work with some of the world’s biggest brands. UTA is headquartered in Los Angeles with offices in Atlanta, Chicago, Nashville, New York and London. More information can be found at HERE

Hydrofoil article by Chalmers University of Technology via 360 MAGAZINE

Ships Fly Over Surface

Soon, electric passenger ferries skimming above the surface across the seas may become a reality. At Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, a research team has created a unique method for further developing hydrofoils that can significantly increase the range of electric vessels and reduce the fuel consumption of fossil-powered ships by 80 per cent.  

While the electrification of cars is well advanced, the world’s passenger ferries are still powered almost exclusively by fossil fuels. The limiting factor is battery capacity, which is not enough to power ships and ferries across longer distances. But now researchers at Chalmers and the marine research facility SSPA have succeeded in developing a method that can make the shipping industry significantly greener in the future. The focus is on hydrofoils that, like wings, lift the boat’s hull above the surface of the water and allow the boat to travel with considerably less water resistance. A technology that in recent years has revolutionised sailing, by which hydrofoils make elite sailors’ boats fly over the surface of the water at a very high speed.
The researchers at Chalmers and SSPA now want to enable the sailboats’ hydrofoil principle to be used on larger passenger ferries as well, resulting in major benefits for the climate.

“The electrification of ferries cannot be done without drastically reducing their water resistance. This method will allow the development of new foil designs that can reduce resistance by up to 80 per cent, which in turn would significantly increase the range of a battery powered ship. In this way, we could also use electric ferries on longer distances in the future,” says research leader Arash Eslamdoost, Associate Professor in Applied Hydrodynamics at Chalmers and author of the study Fluid-Structure Interaction of a Foiling Craft published in the Journal of Marine Science and Engineering.

Even for ships that today run on fossil fuels the climate benefit could be  significant, as similar hydrofoil technology could reduce fuel consumption by no less than 80 per cent.

Unique measurement method arouses broad interest
At the centre of the research project is a unique measurement technique that the researchers have put together in order to understand in detail how hydrofoils behave in the water when, for example, the load or speed increases or the positioning of the hydrofoil changes. Using the data collected from the experiments, the team has developed and validated a method to simulate and predict with great precision how the hydrofoil would behave under a variety of conditions. The method is unique of its kind and can now be used to develop the design of hydrofoils for electric powered hydrofoil ferries.

The study was conducted in collaboration with the research facility SSPA – one of only a few of its kind in the world – where Laura Marimon Giovannetti works as a researcher and project manager. She is the lead author of the study and has herself competed at the elite level for both the British and Italian national sailing teams. Today she is a research and development adviser to Sweden’s Olympic committee and the Swedish national team with her sights set on helping the team win more medals at the Olympics in 2024. Marimon Giovannetti sees many possibilities for the unique measurement method developed by the team:

“At the Americas Cup in San Francisco Bay in 2013, it was the first time we saw a 72-foot sailing boat learning how to “fly” using hydrofoils during the competition. And since then, we’ve seen a huge increase in sailing boats with hydrofoils. With this new method and knowledge we are able to bring together a range of different branches of engineering – naval architecture, advanced materials and aeronautics as well as renewable energy.”

Paving the way for hydrofoils on electric ferries
Hydrofoil technology is not in itself a novelty, but was developed as early as the 60s and 70s. Back then the focus was on getting boats to travel at as fast as possible and the hydrofoils were made of steel, a heavy material with higher maintenance costs. Today’s modern hydrofoils are made of carbon fibre, a much lighter and stiffer material that can maintain its rigidity even under high loads – and can be tailored to the expected loads. Part of the research project was therefore to fully understand how a carbon fibre structure behaves underwater during different operational conditions. The research team’s method developed in association with modern technology is now paving the way for the use of carbon fibre hydrofoils on larger passenger ships that can travel in a safe, controlled and climate-friendly way even at low speeds.

“You want the foil to be as efficient as possible, which means carrying as much weight as possible at as low a speed as possible with the least resistance. Our next goal is to use this method when designing more efficient hydrofoils for ferries in the future,” says Eslamdoost.

More about the scientific article

  • The study “Fluid-Structure Interaction of a Foiling Craft” has been published in the Journal of Marine Science and Engineering. The authors are Laura Marimon Giovannetti, Ali Farousi, Fabian Ebbesson, Alois Thollot, Alex Shiri and Arash Eslamdoost. The researchers are active at SSPA (part of RISE Research Institutes of Sweden), Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden and INP-ENSEEITH in France.
  • Hugo Hammar’s funding from SSPA and Rolf Sörman’s funding from Chalmers University of Technology provided the financial support to run the experimental tests at SSPA. This study also received funding from the Chalmers University of Technology Foundation for the strategic research project Hydro- and Aerodynamics.
Safe Driving illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

MADD × Auto Tech

MADD Identifies 241 Examples of Auto Tech to Help Prevent Drunk Driving

New Analysis Follows Introduction of Two Federal Bills That Would Lead to Mandate for Drunk Driving Prevention Tech on All New Vehicles

Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) released an updated analysis of vehicle technologies that are available now – or in various stages of development – that could be installed in vehicles to prevent drunk driving and other impairments and save thousands of lives a year.

The analysis was first submitted Jan. 11 to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) in response to the agency’s Request for Information on drunk driving prevention technology. MADD also submitted the RFI to the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee as part of the record for an April 27 auto safety hearing.

MADD’s update to the RFI submission follows the introduction of two bipartisan bills, one in the House and one in the Senate, that require NHTSA to issue a rulemaking that will lead to drunk driving prevention technology as standard equipment on all new vehicles. Representatives Debbie Dingell (D-Michigan), David McKinley (R-WV) and Kathleen Rice (D-NY) introduced the Honoring Abbas Family Legacy to Terminate Drunk Driving (HALT) Act on March 23. The bill is named in memory of a Northville, Michigan family, Issam and Rima Abbas and their children Ali, Isabella, and Giselle, who were killed by a wrong-way drunk driver while driving home from a Florida vacation in January 2019. On April 22, Senators Ben Ray Luján (D-N.M.) and Rick Scott (R-Fla.) introduced the Reduce Impaired Driving for Everyone (RIDE) Act of 2021.

“The HALT and RIDE Acts represent the beginning of the end of drunk driving forever,” said MADD National President Alex Otte. “The many technologies MADD identified in the original RFI, and now our new RFI update, illustrate the very real potential for equipping all cars with technology that will stop an impaired driver. When you see what’s available now, the question becomes, ‘Why isn’t this already on cars and stopping these tragedies that kill 10,000 people and injure 300,000 every year?’ MADD believes automakers can solve this, and we challenge them to move quickly to start saving lives.”

More than 9,400 drunk driving deaths could be prevented each year when drunk driving prevention technology is made standard on every new car, according to a study released last year by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.

MADD’s updated RFI submission describes 241 examples of three different major categories of technologies that can reduce or eliminate drunk and impaired driving. Some of these technologies are referred to as advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS).

  • 77 examples of driving performance monitoring systems can detect signs of impaired driving. These technologies monitor the vehicle movement with systems like lane departure warning and attention assist. These same technologies can be used to monitor erratic driving by a drunk or impaired driver. Although not currently programmed to detect drunk and impaired driving, these systems are standard equipment on almost all new cars today.
  • 122 examples of driver monitoring systems can monitor the driver’s head and eyes, typically using a camera or other sensors. These systems can determine the state of the driver and detect if a driver is drunk or otherwise impaired. 
  • 42 examples of passive alcohol detection technologies use touch or breath-based technology to detect if a driver is drunk. Examples are in two Patents filed 12 years ago by DENSO, one of the largest tier one auto suppliers in the world. The two Patents are for breath or touch-based systems and are detailed in MADD’s RFI:

An example of using both driving performance monitoring and driver monitoring was announced by Volvo in March 2019. Volvo said it would equip new cars with cameras and sensors to enable the car “to intervene if a clearly intoxicated or distracted driver does not respond to warning signals and is risking an accident involving serious injury or death.”

“All of these technologies could be beneficial not only to prevent drunk driving, but to detect other dangerous behaviors that lead to crashes such as drugged driving, drowsy driving, distracted driving and medical emergencies,” Otte said. “That is why it we believe it is urgent that Congress pass the HALT and RIDE Acts, to get these lifesaving technologies in all new cars as soon as possible.”

For more information on the HALT and RIDE Acts, visit the MADD website.

About Mothers Against Drunk Driving

Founded in 1980 by a mother whose daughter was killed by a drunk driver, Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) is the nation’s largest nonprofit working to end drunk driving, help fight drugged driving, support the victims of these violent crimes and prevent underage drinking. MADD has helped to save more than 400,000 lives, reduce drunk driving deaths by more than 50 percent and promote designating a non-drinking driver. MADD’s Campaign to Eliminate Drunk Drivingcalls for law enforcement support, ignition interlocks for all offenders and advanced vehicle technology. MADD has provided supportive services to nearly one million drunk and drugged driving victims and survivors at no charge through local victim advocates and the 24-Hour Victim Help Line 1-877-MADD-HELP. Visit MADD or call 1-877-ASK-MADD.

Art by Mina Tocalini for use by 360 Magazine

COVID-19 Wastewater Testing

COVID-19 Wastewater Testing Proves Effective in New Study, Research Offers Needed Guidance for Early Detection in Nursing Homes, Dorms

Wastewater testing is an effective way to identify new cases of COVID-19 in nursing homes and other congregate living settings, and it may be particularly useful for preventing outbreaks in college dormitories, a new University of Virginia study finds.

The research, a collaboration of UVA’s School of Medicine and School of Engineering, was led by UVA Health’s Amy Mathers, MD. It offers some of the first clear guidance on the most effective methods to perform testing to detect COVID-19 in wastewater.

The researchers evaluated and compared sampling and analysis techniques by testing them within buildings with known numbers of positive cases. They were then able to determine wastewater testing’s strengths and limitations as a tool for monitoring COVID-19 in a building population. For example, the technique proved better at detecting initial infections than determining the number of occupants infected or how long they had been infected. 

One important answer revealed by the research: Wastewater testing can detect even small numbers of asymptomatic cases, something not previously documented.

“This work could be applied to surveillance in buildings where people live in groups, where transmission may be hard to control but the risk of spread could be high,” said Mathers, an infectious disease expert in the School of Medicine’s Department of Pathology. “Since we can identify new infections with high sensitivity, it provides an early warning signal of when to test everyone in the building to find and isolate the newly infected persons before an outbreak becomes large.”

Wastewater Testing for COVID-19

To evaluate the effectiveness of wastewater testing for detecting COVID-19, Mathers collaborated with Lisa Colosi-Peterson, PhD, an associate professor in UVA Engineering’s Department of Engineering Systems and Environment, who connected with Mathers through UVA’s Center for Engineering in Medicine. They and their colleagues monitored wastewater from two student dormitory complexes for eight weeks. They then compared their findings to the results of periodic student testing UVA had implemented to prevent COVID-19 transmission. The researchers found that the wastewater testing caught more than 96% of cases.

One limitation of wastewater testing: It could not distinguish between new infections and virus found in stool from those who had recovered and were no longer contagious. That means the wastewater testing detected both active and former cases. “The inability to distinguish recently infected but no longer contagious persons from new contagious infections within a building is an important finding, as it means that wastewater testing would be best for identifying new cases and isolating individuals in groups without recent infections,” Mathers said.

UVA’s new research also establishes useful protocols for wastewater testing. In a scientific paper outlining their findings, the researchers describe how they collected and tested the samples, noting that refrigerating the samples on ice adequately preserved them for testing that same day. Institutions that plan to send their samples elsewhere for testing, however, may need to take additional steps to preserve the samples for longer, the researchers note. Cleansers and disinfectants used in the facilities could also degrade the viral RNA over time, they caution.

While the researchers are urging further study, they conclude that wastewater testing holds great promise for detecting and controlling COVID-19 in places where people live in close quarters. “Passive pooled surveillance of wastewater is now serving as an early warning system in many dormitories, barracks and prisons to identify new cases in situations where transmission risk is high,” Mathers said. “Applications for wastewater surveillance to inform and control infectious disease transmission will continue to evolve, but it is hard to believe how far and how fast we have come in the last year.”

Findings Published

The project was a collaborative effort of UVA’s School of Medicine, School of Engineering, School of Data Science and UVA Health’s Facilities Management. The research team consisted of Colosi-Peterson, Katie E. Barry, Shireen M. Kotay, Michael D. Porter, Melinda D. Poulter, Cameron Ratliff, William Simmons, Limor I. Steinberg, D. Derek Wilson, Rena Morse, Paul Zmick and Mathers.

The researchers have published their findings in the scientific journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology.

The work was supported by a UVA Engineering in Medicine Seed Grant and support from the University Reopening Committee.

To keep up with the latest medical research news from UVA, subscribe to the Making of Medicine blog at http://makingofmedicine.virginia.edu.

Netflix's Bridgerton illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 MAGAZINE

Bridgerton, Netflix’s Take on a Period Piece

By Dana Feeney

“Bridgerton,” a dramatic and sexually charged period piece, is the first show of Shonda Rhimes‘ highly anticipated slate of content from her $150 million deal with Netflix. The showrunner Chris Van Dusen‘s adaptation of Julia Quinn’s “Bridgerton” novels takes classic period piece tropes and turns them on their head. The show maintains the formality of 1800s Regency age England with courtship, elegant, bejeweled costuming, and a heavy emphasis on the value of a young woman’s modesty while contrasting it with sexual tension so thick one could cut it with a knife. The eight-episode series premiered on Netflix on December 25, 2020, and has remained in the Top 10 in the United States, currently at number two.

The first season focuses on the love story of Daphne Bridgerton, played by Phoebe Dynevor, and Simon Basset, the Duke of Hastings, played by Regé-Jean Page. The characters spend their season enduring taunts from the anonymous Lady Whistledown, voiced by Julie Andrews, who reports the scathingly hot tea on anyone who slips up. Due to her brother’s actions, her competition, and Lady Whitstledown’s rumor mill, Daphne finds herself alone and without any viable options for an amicable marriage. These circumstances lead to the juiciest part of the story– Daphne and the Duke. The pair conspire to fake courtship and trick Lady Whistledown into reporting their love so Daphne can find a husband and the Duke can avoid all of the mothers trying to arrange his marriage with their daughters. What starts as a mutually advantageous deal for both quickly grows into a torrid love affair.

Unlike most period pieces, the producers chose to honor talent and diversity over historical accuracy. The series portrays many people of color in high places of authority, as well as mixed into the Royal Court and as tradespeople, despite the white-washed reality of 1800s British royalty. Queen Charlotte, played by Golda Rosheuvel, was of mixed descent, the daughter of an African woman and Alphonso III of Portugal. In this story, her union with King George III leads to the inclusion of other races in proper London society. Other notable characters of color are the Lady Danbury, played by Adjoa Andoh, a widowed woman of high social status, the Duke of Hastings, one of the most eligible bachelors despite being unwilling to marry, and Marina Thompson, played by Ruby Barker, who’s beauty rivals that of the main character.

Shonda Rhimes has become one of the most successful showrunners in the game and uses this position to celebrate diversity and interracial relationships on television. Her older content approaches race in a far more color-blind fashion, unlike her more recent work with both ABC and Netflix. “Bridgerton” comes with the recognition that the characters’ social standings come with their racial identities, instead of creating a theoretically color-blind world.

Shondaland, as a production company, has a deep portfolio when it comes to diversity and inclusion. More specifically, they highlight black women across all of their content; including Miranda Bailey, Maggie Pierce, and Catherine Fox in “Grey’s Anatomy,” Annalise Keating, and Michaela Pratt in “How to Get Away with Murder,” Victoria Hughes in “Station 19,” and Olivia Pope in “Scandal.” “Bridgerton” is no different as three black women are prominent characters: The Queen, Lady Danbury, and Marina Thompson.

At first, their love story seems predictable, but in true Shonda Rhimes fashion, every obstacle that could stand in the way of a character’s happiness absolutely will. As with the other shows she has helmed, Shonda Rhimes pulls every heartstring she can find while giving the audience just enough of what they want to keep them on the edge of their seats. Throughout the series, Lady Danbury carefully plays matchmaker to help bring Simon and Daphne together again and again throughout the ups and downs of their relationship.

Simon also receives counsel from his close friend Will Mondrich, a black boxer, played by Martins Imhangbe, and his wife Alice Mondrich, played by Emma Naomi. As a couple, they are the antithesis of the Duke because they are poor and lack class status but are rich in love and family. In the eight episodes, Van Dusen and Rhimes create three-dimensional characters whose conflicts span complex issues such as love versus duty, race, class, sexuality, and childhood trauma. At times the flashbacks used to force character development feel rushed, but overall, it does create a deeper understanding of the characters’ inner worlds.

“Bridgerton” dives wholeheartedly into the social, emotional, and sexual lives of its characters. Any viewer familiar with other Shondaland shows knows they do not shy away from passionate scenes or sensitive topics, but all of their prior content was limited by network television decency standards. The genre tends to be chaste and formal, but this series allows its characters drugs, alcohol, passionate sex, explosive arguments, and an attempted rape scene. Instead of maintaining eloquent composure shown in shows like “The Crown” (another Netflix Original), the flirtation and frustration between characters are all too familiar to real life as not even the Queen is above gossip, manipulation, and meddling.

The soundtrack and editing lend heavily to the tension development in scenes that will make your heart ache throughout the series. The soundtrack is another well done modern inclusion that defies the period piece genre with instrumental versions of songs by Billie Eilish, Ariana Grande, Taylor Swift, and more. The eloquent juxtaposition of the classic string instruments and modern pop songs creates a familiarity that draws the viewer deeper into the world.The ballroom scene scored with a Vitamin String Quartet cover of Shawn Mendes’ song “In My Blood” hits every musical and emotional beat as the camera cuts closer and closer, the background blurs, and the music swells. Expertly, tension builds with inside jokes, the brush of hands, and the change of attention from the world around to only seeing each other.

For anyone seeking binge-worthy entertainment during these quarantine days, “Bridgerton” is on Netflix here, and its soundtrack is available on Spotify, Apple Music, Amazon Music, and iTunes, find it here. The next season is not yet confirmed by Netflix, but it is rumored to be in development according to What’s On Netflix. Shondaland’s next project with Netflix is a documentary drama series called “Inventing Anna,” which is set to release early 2021.

Streaming, tv, film, Nielsen story illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 MAGAZINE

STREAMING PLATFORMS LEADING THE WAY 

IN ON-SCREEN DIVERSE REPRESENTATION

Diversity at all-time high due to growing television landscape but notable disparities persist

The explosion of new television platforms across broadcast, streaming and cable has led to an increase in on-screen representation of diverse identity groups, according to Nielsen’s latest Diverse Intelligence Series report: Being Seen on Screen: Diverse Representation and Inclusion on TV. 

Among the 300 most-viewed programs in 2019, 92% had some level of diversity in the cast (i.e. women, people of color or LGBTQ+). Whites, African Americans and LGBTQ+ had the largest overall share of screen while Women, Hispanics, Asians and Native Americans were underrepresented relative to their population estimates. The report uncovers notable differences in identity group representation across different platforms; with streaming over-indexing on representation for certain identity groups versus traditional broadcast and cable.

In this report, Being Seen on Screen: Diverse Representation and Inclusion on TV, Nielsen reports on scripted, reality, variety and news programming on key metrics: 

  • Share of Screen (SOS): composition of the top 10 recurring cast members in a program
  • Inclusion Opportunity Index (IOI): compares the SOS of an identity group (e.g. women) to their representation in population estimates
  • Inclusion Audience Index (IAI): compares the SOS of an identity group to their representation in a program’s audience.

The report is powered by Gracenote Inclusion Analytics, a new solution delivering cutting-edge metrics created from Gracenote content metadata and Nielsen audience measurement data, providing the industry with consistent and reliable measurement of granular viewing. The report also leverages Gracenote Video Descriptors, metadata relating to story, mood, character, theme and scenario in each program. 

Key insights from the report include:

Overall, representation of diverse identity groups in on-screen programming is low across all media platforms. Streaming fares better for inclusion followed by broadcast and cable. Viewing audiences are increasingly seeking content that tells their stories. As a result, people are migrating to platforms that have broad and more diverse content offerings. 

  • Representation by platform (Broadcast, Cable, Streaming): Nearly one-third of the content on cable doesn’t have parity representation of Indigenous, People of Color (Black, Native American, Asian & Pacific islander, Hispanic/Latinx, Middle eastern/ North African, Multiracial), Women or LGBTQ talent. 
  • Subscription video on demand (SVOD) programming represents several identity groups e.g. Blacks, Hispanic and Asians well, helping us understand, in part, why more diverse audiences are subscribing to streaming services than the general population.
  • Representation of identity groups by genre (e.g. comedy, drama, news): 
    • While women are not well represented in any single genre, the highest representation for women is in science fiction, drama, comedy and horror. 
    • Women have the lowest representation in news. 
    • People of color representation is at parity in music and drama, followed by science fiction and action and adventure.  
    • People of color have least relative representation in news. 
    • News does prominently feature LGBTQ talent on-screen. 
    • Reality and horror programming also prominently feature LGBTQ talent. 

All audiences, regardless of how they identify, like to see diversity in the content they view on TV. Programs that represent multiple identity groups evenly yield higher overall audience ratings for all viewers when compared to shows that have a significant over or under representation of any one identity group.  

Quality of representation matters too. The themes and narratives depicted on-screen can contribute to identity formation and social perceptions. As the industry seeks to improve diversity on-screen, content creators and publishers should consider the context in which women, people of color, and LGBTQ+ talent are presented. Equally important is investing in marketing those diverse programs so that they are watched.

  • Women insights
    • Comprise 52% of the U.S. population; show up on screen only 38% of the time
    • Women 50+ years old 
      • 60% less likely to see themselves in programming than in the general population, and 2x the representation of men 50+
      • Women 50+ comprise 20% of the population and 20% of all TV viewers, but have a SOS of less than 8%
      • Men 50+ years old are 17% of the total population and have SOS of 14%
  • LGBTQ+ insights
    • 1 out of 4 top performing programs across cable, broadcast and streaming have relative representation of LGBTQ+ cast members 
    • Total SOS for LGBTQ was 7%. LGBTQ people are 4.5% of the population so across all platforms we see fair representation
    • The highest level of representation is on SVOD (8% SOS), followed by cable (7%) then broadcast (5%). 

Aligning representative casting and content themes is an area of opportunity. In the programming where identity groups see themselves represented at parity, these are the themes that are most present: 

  • Latinas: dysfunction, emotional, suspenseful, melodramatic, police stations
  • Black women: emotional, personal relationships, sons, investigation, rivalry
  • Black men: investigation, thrilling, streets, pursuit, teamwork, discovery
  • East Asians: challenge, courage and bravery, justice, sons, discovery
  • South/Southeast Asian males: thrilling, awakening, offices, courtrooms
  • White women: friendship, family, love, husbands, daughters

Nielsen’s findings aim to show media owners the degree to which their programming is inclusive, coupled with the diversity of the audience they draw. Additionally, brands and agencies will now be able to measure their advertising investment and alignment to inclusive content. The identity groups measured included: Female, Male & Expansive Gender Identities, Black/African American, Hispanic, Asian & Pacific Islander, Middle Eastern/North African, Multiracial, White, Native American/Native Alaskan, and Sexual Orientation. The data, which was both intersectional and granular, enables Nielsen to look at specific identity subsegments like Afro-Latino or Southeast Asian. 

“At Nielsen, we believe that the audience is everything and that inclusion is a prerequisite of a healthy media ecosystem, ensuring all communities and individuals are heard and seen,” stated Tina Wilson, Nielsen EVP, Media Analytics and Marketing Outcomes. “The call for inclusive programming that breaks traditional stereotypes and gives a voice to underrepresented groups has never been louder.”

“This work underscores the essential importance of on-screen representation in an increasingly diverse audience landscape,” said Sandra Sims-Williams, Nielsen SVP, Diversity, Equity and Inclusion. “Not only is the business case for inclusion made but it also provides practical recommendations on how media companies can address inclusion gaps. This is a must-read for any media professional who wants to be part of the change that today’s television viewers demand.”

For more details and insights, download Being Seen On Screen: Diverse Representation & Inclusion on TV. Please visit nielsen.com/inclusionanalytics to learn more. Join the discussion on Facebook (Nielsen Community) and follow us on Twitter (@NielsenKnows).

ABOUT NIELSEN 

Nielsen Holdings plc (NYSE: NLSN) is a global measurement and data analytics company that provides the most complete and trusted view available of consumers and markets worldwide. Our approach marries proprietary Nielsen data with other data sources to help clients around the world understand what’s happening now, what’s happening next, and how to best act on this knowledge. For more than 90 years Nielsen has provided data and analytics based on scientific rigor and innovation, continually developing new ways to answer the most important questions facing the media, advertising, retail and fast-moving consumer goods industries. An S&P 500 company, Nielsen has operations in over 100 countries, covering more than 90% of the world’s population. For more information, visit www.nielsen.com.

“PANDEMIC!” – New Slavoj Žižek Book

The Book:

As an unprecedented global pandemic sweeps the planet, who better than the supercharged Slovenian philosopher Slavoj Žižek to uncover its deeper meanings, marvel at its mind-boggling paradoxes and speculate on the profundity of its consequences?

We live in a moment when the greatest act of love is to stay distant from the object of your affection. When governments renowned for ruthless cuts in public spending can suddenly conjure up trillions. When toilet paper becomes a commodity as precious as diamonds. And when, according to Žižek, a new form of communism – the outlines of which can already be seen in the very heartlands of neoliberalism – may be the only way of averting a descent into global barbarism.

Written with his customary brio and love of analogies in popular culture (Quentin Tarantino and H. G. Wells sit next to Hegel and Marx), Žižek provides a concise and provocative snapshot of the crisis as it widens, engulfing us all.

Purchase “PANDEMIC!” HERE

The Author:

Slavoj Žižek is one of the most prolific and well-known philosophers and cultural theorists in the world today. His inventive, provocative body of work mixes Hegelian metaphysics, Lacanian psychoanalysis, and Marxist dialectic in order to challenge conventional wisdom and accepted verities on both the left and the right.

The Praise:

“An impressive feat… [Žižek] at his most powerful.” —  The Guardian

“Žižek leaves no social or cultural phenomenon untheorized, and is master of the counterintuitive observation.” — The New Yorker

“The most dangerous philosopher in the West.” — Adam Kirsch, The New Republic

Key to Auto Dealer Satisfaction

As auto dealers confront a rapidly changing consumer landscape in which many customers now apply for credit online before visiting a dealership, the experienced and empowered credit and sales personnel at captive and non-captive lenders are becoming critical elements in the success of an automotive finance operation. According to the J.D. Power 2019 U.S. Dealer Financing Satisfaction Study,SM the ability to answer dealer questions correctly the first time, facilitate electronic transactions and resolve contracts quickly is key to helping dealers successfully navigate the changing marketplace.

“Dealers are able to put together more attractive, seamless transactions for their customers when they are able to work in lock-step with lenders they trust to deliver fast, accurate and competitive products,” said Jim Houston, Senior Director, Automotive Finance Intelligence at J.D. Power. “That relationship becomes more important as vehicle sales slow and more buyers may seek to secure financing outside of the dealership. Credit analysts and sales personnel perform some of the most important functions for dealers looking to match customers purchase with the right financial transaction. When these teams are available, knowledgeable and empowered, they improve dealer satisfaction and enhance the lender’s value proposition.”

The 2019 U.S. Dealer Financing Satisfaction Study is based on 16,870 retail credit and 2,117 floor plan provider evaluations from dealer personnel, a 17% increase in response rate from the 2018 study. The study was fielded in April-May 2019, measuring auto dealer satisfaction in three segments of lenders: non-captive, captive mass market and floor planning. The non-captive analysis evaluates the dealer/lender relationship across three factors: relationship; provider offerings; and application/approval process. In the captive segment, four factors are evaluated: relationship; provider offerings; application/approval process; and lease return. Three factors are measured in the floor planning segment: relationship; portfolio management; and provider credit line.

Pirelli: World Leader in Sustainability

Results of annual review

Pirelli is the world leader in Sustainability in the Auto Components sector on the Dow Jones World and Europe indices. This is the result that emerged from the annual review of the indices conducted by RobecoSam and S&P Dow Jones and which will take effect from September 24th. Pirelli recorded a total score of 81 points compared with the sector average of 32. Launched in 1999, the Dow Jones sustainability indices are among the most important market indices regarding sustainability at the world level. Involving over 2,000 companies from 60 industrial sectors, the analysis is based on the integrated evaluation of economic, environmental and social factors, that are the three aspects which define the concept of sustainability in terms of enduring value creation for all stakeholders.

The Economist x Midterms

Today The Economist launched its first real-time midterm model, which uses statistical forecasting to predict how many seats in the House of Representatives each party is likely to win in this year’s US midterm elections.

View the model here:

Applying cutting-edge machine-learning techniques to political science, the model combines information from polling, past elections, special elections, fundraising, ideology and “fundamental” factors like the economy and incumbency.  It has been trained on every election cycle since 1942 and nearly 6,500 historical district races. The model will conduct 4.35 million simulated elections every day until the vote, live-updating to incorporate up-to-the-minute data.

The Economist’s midterm model currently predicts that Democrats have a 2 in 3 (or 65%) chance of taking the House, and holding an average of 222 seats, or 4 more than is needed for a majority.  It shows that there is a 95% chance that the Democrats will hold between 206 and 241 seats.

The Economist’s data team plans to launch a similar model to forecast Senate results later in the year once primaries are complete and more polls become available.

Find out more about The Economist’s midterm model here.