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Kate Vargas Rumpumpo album art from Tamara Simons, BANDALOOP RECORDS for use by 360 Magazine

ARTIST KATE VARGAS SHARES NEW ALBUM – RUMPUMPO

“Kate Vargas’ ‘Glorieta to the Holy Place’ creaks and sighs with otherworldly atmosphere” – Rolling Stone

“Frequently labeled as ‘junkyard folk,’ Vargas’ work is marked with deep intention, frequently emerging as some of the most ‘honest, authentic’ in the Americana scene.” – American Songwriter

“Eccentric experimental indie darling Kate Vargas explores anxiety, sobriety, the dark side of humans and their flaws in her music.” – Atwood

“Vargas is definitely a dynamic addition to any musicians-to-watch list” – Elmore Magazine

“quirky phrasing, erotic substratum” – Robert Christgau, Noisey

“Her poetic lyricism is rooted in the folklore and storytelling” – NPR

“There is an unlimited amount of potential in this superstar on the rise” – The Huffington Post

Listen to Rumpumpo here.

The New York City-based, New Mexico native shares her album Rumpumpo with the world. Kate Vargas, the “junkyard folk” artist, has put aside the party for meditation, yoga, clean eating, and a fresh perspective on life as she hones in on her music.

Weeks before Vargas was scheduled to record her new album, the pandemic struck. At an impasse, she struggled to move forward in her craft. Months later, in a conversation with a friend about feeling stuck, he stated Newton’s First Law: “An object in motion stays in motion and an object at rest stays at rest unless acted upon by an outside force,” which subsequently inspires the first single and title track off her album, “Rumpumpo.”

Rumpumpo features the previously released singles “Church of Misdirection,” and “Glorieta to the Holy Place”, an ode to her home of New Mexico that celebrates the pilgrimage to Chimayo. Each year, thousands of people travel over 30 miles to El Santuario de Chimayo on Good Friday to commemorate the crucifixion of Jesus. The church is said to have healing powers, particularly the sand inside. Vargas sings about a young girl who hears of this holy place and takes it upon herself to make the pilgrimage for the sake of her suffering family amidst the pandemic.

With Rumpumpo, Vargas continues her meteoric rise with songs that stir the emotional cauldron, blazing a genre-bending path that is both sonically and lyrically daring.

Kate Vargas

Rumpumpo

Tracklisting

  1. Rumpumpo
  2. Honeydripper
  3. Left Shoe
  4. Everything Forever
  5. Animal
  6. Spit 3 Times
  7. Someday
  8. Church of the Misdirection
  9. Lighter
  10. Glorieta to the Holy Place
  11. Like Apollo

About Kate Vargas:

The New Mexico-raised, NYC-based artist is building ever more mindfully on her sound, and the music press is taking notice, Vargas receiving praise from a variety of respected outlets including Billboard, NPR, Noisey, and the Huffington Post, the latter assessing, “There is an unlimited amount of potential in this superstar on the rise.”

Vargas has packed houses from Ireland’s Westport Folk and Bluegrass Festival to The Troubadour in London, The Mansion on O Street in Washington D.C. to New York’s Bowery Electric. Featuring her singular folk-style storytelling, Vargas’ songs are grounded in a darkly melodic, reverb-washed sonic palette of dreampop, dusty folk and junkyard blues, all carried by rough-hewn vocals and guitar playing. In equal measure, she channels a surprising array of artists, from Tom Waits, Fiona Apple, and 16 Horsepower to Lana Del Rey and K. Flay.

In March of 2020, the pandemic brought the world to a screeching halt just weeks before Vargas was scheduled to record her new album. With plans on indefinite hold, Vargas found herself struggling to find a way forward. Months later, while talking to a friend about her feeling that she had stalled out, he simply stated Newton’s 1st law – an object in motion stays in motion, an object at rest stays at rest, unless acted upon by an external force. She needed an external force.

Around the same time, in a fortuitous twist of fate, Vargas found herself on the west coast just as her producer was relocating out west as well. An external force. Not one to squander an opportunity, Vargas quickly made plans to record in Los Angeles. Two more problems emerged. One, Vargas’ beloved Gibson guitar was twenty-eight hundred miles away in her apartment in New York and two, she still needed to write one more song for the album. Ever resourceful, calls were made and in the eleventh hour, Vargas found herself writing a song based on Newton’s 1st law on a guitar on loan from Jackson Browne. That song would become the title track, Rumpumpo.

“Gotta make the levee break, let the tonic take, double-stroking in a swim-or-syncopation; Well you won’t if you don’t get to doing, it’s Newtonian.”

Always challenging, Rumpumpo is peppered with restless moments, from the title track to the mesmerizing “Glorieta to the Holy Place”, a New Mexico-based story of a young girl’s pilgrimage to the town of Chimayo as a test of faith during the pandemic. Vargas escorts us to dark and uncomfortable places, but always with an arm around the shoulder and a reassuring grin. In the swampy “Spit 3 Times”, we are taken on a musical Mr. Toad’s Wild Ride, exploring the nooks and crannies of obsession, then thrust into the stripped-down ballad “Someday”, a love song at once morbid, disturbing and yet beautiful that reaches a peak reminiscent of George Martin and The Beatles (circa 1967). Whether drawn from folklore or direct experience, Vargas injects an intimate feel into each song via her poetic lyricism and jagged vocal delivery. At times, Vargas damn near hypnotizes, her compositions seeping to the edge of the subconscious, hardwiring listeners to ponder questions that, in other contexts, might make them squirm.

Vargas’ childhood in Corrales, New Mexico, had a profound impact on the woman and artist she would become. This artist and farming village just outside Albuquerque was populated with Mexican-Catholic families like hers, as well as creatives and a variety of seekers. It was a community rich in oral tradition and folklore, steeped in tales of good and evil, ghosts and witches, sin, The Devil, even extraterrestrial visitors. “It was a strange and wonderful place that I’ve really come to appreciate as an adult. There was a culture of storytelling, and the stories were often dark: the way I write songs now is rooted in that tradition. The paranormal and the supernatural always seem to make their way in. It was a great place for an imagination to run wild. If I told my mother I was bored, she’d tell me, ‘Go outside and pretend something.’”

Still, the slow pace of rural small-town life was excruciating at times for Vargas, who longed for the action and possibility of the big city. She began playing the flute at a young age and by the time she was in high school developed an interest in jazz that led her to Boston where she studied music at Berklee. Once there, she consistently found herself coming back to writing and guitar after classes. Upon graduating from Berklee, Vargas relocated to New York City, playing an open mic night every Monday at the now defunct P & G Bar on the Upper West Side. “People were so disgustingly positive,” she says, “and that kept me coming back.”

Eventually, the club gave her a showcase spot and more gigs followed. With people continually asking her for a CD, Vargas knew the time had come to make an album. Her debut, the DIY affair Down to My Soul, was released in 2014, hinting at the promise of a vibrant new voice. Her follow-up, 2016’s Strangeclaw, was recorded at New York’s Mercy Sound Studios (Blondie, Macy Gray) and mastered at the legendary Abbey Road Studios in London, capturing Vargas’ impressive growth as an artist in gorgeous fidelity.

Vargas really hit her stride with 2018’s For the Wolfish & Wandering, connecting with audiences like never before, culminating in invitations to perform on NPR’s Mountain Stage, an official showcase at Nashville’s AmericanaFest, several performances at the 30A Songwriters Festival, as well as her songs appearing on television shows Stumptown (ABC), Midnight, Texas (NBC) and Good Trouble (Freeform).

With Rumpumpo, Vargas continues her meteoric rise with songs that stir the emotional cauldron, blazing a genre-bending path that is both sonically and lyrically daring.

illustration by Mina Tocalini for use by 360 Magazine

Santa Fe’s La Fonda On The Plaza

Santa Fe’s grande dame of Southwestern hospitality – La Fonda on the Plaza – will turn 100 in January 2022.  The milestone will be celebrated with a Centennial Gala and a number of other special initiatives. These include the premiere of the hotel’s historic documentary narrated by Ali MacGraw, and the reveal of a luxurious upgrade to the hotel’s exclusive Terrace rooms and suites, now known as “The Terrace Inn at La Fonda.”

La Fonda is not only Santa Fe’s oldest hotel (reports of an inn at the same location date back to the 1600s) but also the only one located right on the historic Santa Fe Plaza, the center of the city’s shopping, nightlife, and art market scenes. Visitors from all over the U.S. and the world choose the hotel for memorable vacations and destination weddings. Santa Fe residents call La Fonda’s iconic lobby their “living room,” and frequent the hotel’s rooftop bar to enjoy the spectacular sunsets, margarita in hand. The hotel has played host to countless world and U.S. leaders, as well as luminaries of film, theater, music and literature.

History

The current La Fonda was built in 1922. It was then acquired in 1925 by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway and leased to the family of legendary hotelier Fred Harvey. The  Harvey family turned La Fonda into one of the famous Harvey Houses, which it remained until 1968, when it was acquired by local businessman Sam Ballen and his wife, Ethel. True to La Fonda’s legacy as one of Santa Fe’s last remaining family-owned hotels, in September 2014, longtime family friend and current Chairman of the Board, Jennifer Kimball along with her brother, Philip Wise, and the investment firm Cienda Partners, purchased La Fonda from the Ballens. For a detailed history of La Fonda, a timeline can be viewed here.

La Fonda Now

To this day, La Fonda visitors are captivated by the distinctive, ever-present style of famed architect John Gaw Meem and celebrated Southwest architect and designer Mary Elizabeth Jane Colter. Their original architectural and décor influences can be seen at every turn, and are complemented by the hotel’s expansive, museum-quality art collection which has been built by the owners over several decades.

While maintaining this heritage, La Fonda keeps evolving to meet the highest standards of modern hospitality.  Since 2008, a phased series of renovations, guided by careful study of the original building plans and décor elements, have brought the hotel’s guest rooms, restaurant, bars, lobby and other public spaces to a new level of comfort and luxury. The latest of these is a luxurious transformation of the exclusive Terrace rooms and suites into the “Terrace Inn at La Fonda.” This hotel-within-a-hotel has a dedicated luxury concierge as well as a private refreshment area offering custom evening appetizers and cocktails and continental breakfast service. The accommodations feature stylish furnishings, original artwork, and private patios or balconies that overlook the beautiful Cathedral Basilica of St. Francis de Assisi or the historic Loretto Chapel and the sunlit Sangre de Cristo Mountains.

Centennial Celebrations

The Centennial celebration will kick off with a Centennial Gala on January 22, 2022. Throughout the year, La Fonda guests will be able to enjoy special accommodations packages as well as Centennial-themed food and drink offerings created by La Fonda’s renowned culinary team. In addition, they can take home a special memento of the milestone in the form of a custom La Fonda Centennial Herradura Tequila in an exclusive etched glass bottle or a handcrafted holiday ornament, both available in Detours, the hotel’s gift shop. More details on these special initiatives will be available soon.

illustration by mina tocallini for use by 360 magazine

Epic Destinations for Adrenaline Junkies to Add to Your Travel List

An adrenaline-filled adventure can be anything from jumping out of a plane to looking off the side of a tall building. Sometimes getting out of your comfort zone can make for a memorable experience, so why not try something new? Whether you like to keep your thrill-seeking desire under wraps or prefer to go full force, there’s going to be something on this list for you to enjoy.

Our Top Destinations for Insatiable Thrill-Seekers

Sedona, Arizona: Off-Roading

There are so many incredible things to do for adrenaline junkies within the state of Arizona, but Sedona’s off-roading center is the place to enjoy desert driving. At Sedona Off-Road Center, you can rent a self-guided Razor, which can seat as many as 6 people. Rent one for a full day, stay on the trails or drift around the sandy hills. Helmets and safety gear are included.

Panama City Beach, Florida: Flight Simulators

At Panama Beach, you’re treated to sandy white beaches and emerald waters, but don’t stick around here for too long. At Cobra Adventure Park, you can experience the Max Flight Simulator or the “rollercoaster of the future.” There are multiple rides dedicated to adrenaline junkies, including the Slingshot, which reaches 100 miles per hour, and the Indy Speedway.

Waikiki Beach, Hawaii: Scuba Diving

Hawaii is one of the best places in the world to scuba dive, and tourists have plenty of options for how they want to experience the ocean depths. You can learn how to scuba dive with qualified instructors across Waikiki Beach. While you do start in shallow waters, you can quickly move up to open water dives, where you’ll see tropical fish, sea turtles, and coral reefs.

Santa Fe, New Mexico: Whitewater Rafting

The whitewater rafting in Santa Fe is top-notch, as it has something for everyone. If you’re looking for a leisurely float, you can go through the azure canyon of the Rio Chama. On the other hand, experienced swimmers can take on the Class IV rapids of the world-famous Taos Box. You can also try kayaking, paddleboarding, and fly fishing while you’re in the area.

Bend, Oregon: Snowboarding

If you haven’t skied in Bend, you need to start now. Thrill-seekers and terrain-tacklers will love riding the 4,300-acre lift-accessible grounds that promise to offer visitors the best snowboarding experience of their lives. There are plenty of other Winter activities for you to enjoy, like hiking, ice skating, sledding, snowmobiling, and snowshoeing, so zip up your coat and stay warm!

Las Vegas, Nevada: ZERO-G

You can’t talk about exciting vacation destinations without adding Las Vegas to the list, and we’re not talking about the rush you get from gambling. The ZERO-G Experience, which mimics astronaut training, allows you to feel what it’s like to live in a world without gravity. It’ll probably make your stomach churn, but strap in because you’re paying for 5 hours of weightlessness.

Twin Falls, Idaho: BASE Jumping

BASE jumping from a cliff is one of the most extreme thrills you can pursue, mainly because you have a short window to deploy your parachute. Travel to Twin Falls to stand 500 feet above Perrine Bridge, which doesn’t seem so bad until you actually jump. You don’t need a permit to try BASE jumping, but it’s recommended you receive some instruction before attempting it.

Anchorage, Alaska: Heli-Skiing

After BASE jumping, heli-skiing doesn’t seem so extreme, but it’s still incredibly scary. Skiers who try heli-skiing are flown up towards the base of an inaccessible mountain top and descend towards the base via skis. The Chugach Mountains in Alaska offer miles of terrain and steep descents that guarantee you won’t see the same line twice in the same trip.

Safe Driving illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

MADD × Auto Tech

MADD Identifies 241 Examples of Auto Tech to Help Prevent Drunk Driving

New Analysis Follows Introduction of Two Federal Bills That Would Lead to Mandate for Drunk Driving Prevention Tech on All New Vehicles

Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) released an updated analysis of vehicle technologies that are available now – or in various stages of development – that could be installed in vehicles to prevent drunk driving and other impairments and save thousands of lives a year.

The analysis was first submitted Jan. 11 to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) in response to the agency’s Request for Information on drunk driving prevention technology. MADD also submitted the RFI to the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee as part of the record for an April 27 auto safety hearing.

MADD’s update to the RFI submission follows the introduction of two bipartisan bills, one in the House and one in the Senate, that require NHTSA to issue a rulemaking that will lead to drunk driving prevention technology as standard equipment on all new vehicles. Representatives Debbie Dingell (D-Michigan), David McKinley (R-WV) and Kathleen Rice (D-NY) introduced the Honoring Abbas Family Legacy to Terminate Drunk Driving (HALT) Act on March 23. The bill is named in memory of a Northville, Michigan family, Issam and Rima Abbas and their children Ali, Isabella, and Giselle, who were killed by a wrong-way drunk driver while driving home from a Florida vacation in January 2019. On April 22, Senators Ben Ray Luján (D-N.M.) and Rick Scott (R-Fla.) introduced the Reduce Impaired Driving for Everyone (RIDE) Act of 2021.

“The HALT and RIDE Acts represent the beginning of the end of drunk driving forever,” said MADD National President Alex Otte. “The many technologies MADD identified in the original RFI, and now our new RFI update, illustrate the very real potential for equipping all cars with technology that will stop an impaired driver. When you see what’s available now, the question becomes, ‘Why isn’t this already on cars and stopping these tragedies that kill 10,000 people and injure 300,000 every year?’ MADD believes automakers can solve this, and we challenge them to move quickly to start saving lives.”

More than 9,400 drunk driving deaths could be prevented each year when drunk driving prevention technology is made standard on every new car, according to a study released last year by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.

MADD’s updated RFI submission describes 241 examples of three different major categories of technologies that can reduce or eliminate drunk and impaired driving. Some of these technologies are referred to as advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS).

  • 77 examples of driving performance monitoring systems can detect signs of impaired driving. These technologies monitor the vehicle movement with systems like lane departure warning and attention assist. These same technologies can be used to monitor erratic driving by a drunk or impaired driver. Although not currently programmed to detect drunk and impaired driving, these systems are standard equipment on almost all new cars today.
  • 122 examples of driver monitoring systems can monitor the driver’s head and eyes, typically using a camera or other sensors. These systems can determine the state of the driver and detect if a driver is drunk or otherwise impaired. 
  • 42 examples of passive alcohol detection technologies use touch or breath-based technology to detect if a driver is drunk. Examples are in two Patents filed 12 years ago by DENSO, one of the largest tier one auto suppliers in the world. The two Patents are for breath or touch-based systems and are detailed in MADD’s RFI:

An example of using both driving performance monitoring and driver monitoring was announced by Volvo in March 2019. Volvo said it would equip new cars with cameras and sensors to enable the car “to intervene if a clearly intoxicated or distracted driver does not respond to warning signals and is risking an accident involving serious injury or death.”

“All of these technologies could be beneficial not only to prevent drunk driving, but to detect other dangerous behaviors that lead to crashes such as drugged driving, drowsy driving, distracted driving and medical emergencies,” Otte said. “That is why it we believe it is urgent that Congress pass the HALT and RIDE Acts, to get these lifesaving technologies in all new cars as soon as possible.”

For more information on the HALT and RIDE Acts, visit the MADD website.

About Mothers Against Drunk Driving

Founded in 1980 by a mother whose daughter was killed by a drunk driver, Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) is the nation’s largest nonprofit working to end drunk driving, help fight drugged driving, support the victims of these violent crimes and prevent underage drinking. MADD has helped to save more than 400,000 lives, reduce drunk driving deaths by more than 50 percent and promote designating a non-drinking driver. MADD’s Campaign to Eliminate Drunk Drivingcalls for law enforcement support, ignition interlocks for all offenders and advanced vehicle technology. MADD has provided supportive services to nearly one million drunk and drugged driving victims and survivors at no charge through local victim advocates and the 24-Hour Victim Help Line 1-877-MADD-HELP. Visit MADD or call 1-877-ASK-MADD.

Transgender Sports illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

NCAA LGBTQ OneTeam

NCAA LGBTQ OneTeam facilitators publish open letter condemning anti-transgender legislation

The NCAA LGBTQ OneTeam, a group of NCAA- trained facilitators at colleges across the country published an open letter condemning the actions taken by 28 states across the country to introduce, pass, and sign anti-transgender legislation. 2021 has been a record year for anti-transgender legislation, with 93 anti-transgender bills introduced across the country, the vast majority of which attempt to ban transgender women and girls’ participation in girls’ sports or ban transgender youth from accessing medically necessary, gender-affirming health care.

Laws have been signed banning transgender women and girls’ participation in girls’ sports in Mississippi, Tennessee, and Arkansas, with Executive Orders being signed to the same effect in South Dakota.  Legislators across the country have failed to provide examples of issues in their states to attempt to justify these attacks, laying bare the reality that these are attacks on transgender youth that are fueled by discrimination and not supported by fact.  Collegiate and professional sports organizations have had trans-inclusive policies for years without incident, and there is no reason any state would need a ban on transgender participation in sports.

The NCAA LGBTQ OneTeam open letter reads as follows:

An Open Letter in Support of Transgender Student-Athletes

We, the undersigned, are facilitators of the National Collegiate Athletics Association’s (NCAA)Division III LGBTQ OneTeam Program, which is a national training program that fosters LGBTQ+ inclusion in NCAA Division III athletics, and members of the NCAA’s Division III LGBTQ Working Group. Given the recent rise in legislation that is focused on excluding transgender people from athletics across the country, we have decided to use our collective voice to condemn such actions. We call on elected officials across the country to immediately halt legislation that is aimed at excluding transgender youth and young adults from equal and equitable participation in sport.

In our role with the NCAA’s LGBTQ OneTeam Program, we train coaches, athletics administrators, and student-athletes across the whole of Division III athletics. This program is aimed at helping to understand the importance of LGBTQ inclusion in college athletics, while also identifying strategies and best practices for institutions and conferences to better ensure that all student-athletes–regardless of their sexuality, gender identity, and/or gender expression–can participate in an inclusive and safe athletic climate. We cannot, in good conscience, fail to speak out at this critical moment.

In the past several weeks, actions–which are aimed at excluding transgender youth and young adults from equal and equitable participation in sport–have been taken by elected officials inseveral states, including Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and West Virginia. At the time of this writing, the Governors ofArkansas,Idaho,Mississippi, andTennessee have already signed such dangerous legislation into law. 

Legislation aimed at categorically banning transgender people–and particularly transgender girls and women–from sport is inherently discriminatory. Such legislation is often “informed” by hate and misinformation rather than science, and it is most certainly “informed” byfear instead of fact. Conversely, trans-inclusive policies, such as those established by theNCAA and theInternational Olympic Committee (IOC), are better informed by the current scientific evidence, and this evidence shows that transgender women do not have an inherent competitive advantage over cisgender women.

Furthermore, discriminatory legislation that is aimed at excluding transgender people from sport has a number ofserious consequences for transgender students. Such legislation dehumanizes transgender students, refuses them the opportunity to participate equally and equitably in athletics, undermines their support in educational settings, damages their mental health, and ultimately harms these students, while also contributing to an exclusionary athletic environment and a more hostile school climate for all students.

We immediately call for 1) an end to such legislation in all states and 2) a repeal of such laws in Arkansas, Idaho, Mississippi, and Tennessee. And finally, we also encourage our legislators to better consider theNCAA best practices and importance of an inclusive athletic environment for all student-athletes.

Sincerely,

The Undersigned

Timothy R. Bussey, Ph.D.

Pronouns: they/them

Associate Director, Office of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion | Kenyon College

Kayla Hayes, M.Ed.

Pronouns: she/her

Associate Head Women’s Basketball Coach Dept. of Athletics | Denison University

Kyrstin Krist, Ph.D.

Pronouns: she/her

Associate Professor of Kinesiology and Faculty Athletic Representative | Methodist University

Melynda Link, M.B.A.

Pronouns: she/her

Director of Athletic Facilities & Game Day Operations, Dept. of Athletics | Haverford College

Kathleen M. Murray

Pronouns: she/her

President, Office of the President | Whitman College

Jess Duff

Pronouns: she/her

Assistant Athletic Director for Student Athlete Services & Internal Operations Dept. of Athletics | Bates College

Jessica Weiss

Pronouns: she/her

Head Field Hockey Coach, Dept. of Athletics | Randolph-Macon College

Jennifer Dubow

Pronouns: she/her

Executive Director | Southern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (SCIAC)

Maura Johnston

Pronouns: she/her

Head Field Hockey Coach, Dept. of Athletics | Fairleigh Dickinson University

Scott McGuiness

Pronouns: no pronouns

Director of Athletics, Dept. of Athletics | Washington & Jefferson College

Danielle Lynch, M.S.Ed.

Pronouns: she/her

Senior Woman Administrator and Head Track and Field/Cross Country Coach Athletic Department | Penn State University – Harrisburg

Melissa Walton

Pronouns: she/her

Senior Associate Athletic Director Athletic Department | Albion College

Amy Reed

Pronouns: she/her

Senior Woman Administrator and Head Women’s Basketball Coach Dept. of Athletics | Rochester Institute of Technology

Donna M. Ledwin

Pronouns: she/her

Commissioner | Allegheny Mountain Collegiate Conference (AMCC)

Donnesha Blake, Ph.D.

Pronouns: she/her

Director of Diversity and Inclusion Dept. of Student Affairs | Alma College

Tim Wilson

Pronouns: he/him

Assistant Track and Field Coach, Dept. of Athletics | Stevens Institute of Technology

Anne Kietzman

Pronouns: she/her

Head Field Hockey Coach, Dept. of Athletics | Washington College

Ashley Crossway, D.A.T., A.T.C.

Pronouns: she/her

Assistant Professor and Coordinator of Clinical Education Dept. of Kinesiology | SUNY Cortland

Melissa Brooks

Pronouns: she/her

Head Women’s Basketball Coach Athletic Department | Fairleigh Dickinson University – Florham 

Tiffany Thompson

Pronouns: she/her

Associate Director of Gender and Sexuality Initiatives, Intercultural Center | Swarthmore College

Kirsten Clark

Pronouns: she/her

Associate Athletic Director, Dept. of Athletics and Recreation | Clark University

Kate Levin

Pronouns: she/her

Assistant Sports Information Director Dept. of Athletics | Ramapo College

Cori Collinsworth

Pronouns: she/her

Head Softball Coach, Athletic Department | Hanover College

Bethany Dannelly

Pronouns: she/her

Associate Director of Athletics, Dept. of Physical Education and Athletics | Washington and Lee University

Jennifer Childress-White, M.Ed.

Pronouns: she/her

Assistant Athletic Director and University Title IX Coordinator Dept. of Athletics | Pacific Lutheran University

Elise Fitzsimmons, M.S., A.T.C.

Pronouns: she/her

Assistant Athletic Trainer, Dept. of Athletics| SUNY Oswego 

Amanda Walker

Pronouns: she/her

Athletic Program Coordinator Athletics Department | Lake Forest College

Danielle O’Leary

Pronouns: she/her

Senior Woman Administrator and Head Women’s Lacrosse Coach Athletics Department | Mount Aloysius College

Crystal Lanning

Pronouns: she/her

Director of Athletics, Dept. of Athletics | University of Wisconsin – River Falls

Neil Virtue

Pronouns: he/him

Assistant Director of Athletics and Head Swimming Coach | Dept. of Athletics, P.E., and Recreation Mills College

Jose’ Rodriguez, M.Ed.

Pronouns: he/him

Chief Diversity Officer, Office of University Diversity Initiatives | Cabrini University

Karen Moberg, M.Ed., L.A.T., A.T.C.

Pronouns: she/her

Associate Athletic Trainer, Athletic Department | Macalester College

Yishka Chin

Pronouns: she/her

Coordinator for Tutoring Services and Trailblazer Program Director, Dept. of Student Success | Notre Dame of Maryland University

Renee Bostic

Pronouns: she/her

Director of Athletics & Wellness Dept. of Athletics & Wellness | Notre Dame of Maryland University

Megan Cullinane

Pronouns: she/her

Assistant Athletic Director and Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Athletics Dept. of Athletics and Recreation | University of Massachusetts – Boston

Maureen Harty

Pronouns: she/her

Executive Director | College Conference of Illinois and Wisconsin (CCIW)

Stephanie Dutton

Pronouns: she/her

Commissioner | North Eastern Athletic Conference (NEAC)

Sharia Marcus-Carter

Pronouns: she/her

Senior Woman Administrator and Director of Compliance, Athletics Department | Brooklyn College

COVID Mask Care illustration by Mina Tocalini

Study Shows State-By-State Reopenings Exacerbate COVID

As Summer vacations end in Europe and in the United States and students return to college campuses and primary schools worldwide, fresh waves of COVID infections are causing renewed restrictions after loosening in the Spring and Summer. However, a new study shows that this uncoordinated opening, closing, and reopening of states and counties, is making the COVID problem worse in the U.S., according to the authors of a new study released today. Using methods from their previous work, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, MIT PhD student Michael Zhao and Sinan Aral, Director of the MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy and author of the upcoming book The Hype Machine, have released the first comprehensive study of the impact of state-by-state re-openings on the COVID pandemic, spanning January to July, 2020 with surprising and troubling results.

After studying combined data on the mobility of over 22 million mobile devices, daily data on state-level closure and reopening policies and social media connections among 220 million Facebook users, the team found that reimposing local social distancing or shelter-in-place orders after reopening may be far less effective than policy makers would hope.

In fact, such closures may actually be counterproductive as they encourage those in locked down regions to flee to reopened regions, potentially causing new hotspots to emerge. This analysis demonstrates that travel spillovers are not only systematic and predictable, but also large and meaningful.

Arizona was one of the first states to open businesses, but in late June, bars, gyms, movie theaters, and water parks were shut down for 30 days as the state became one of the virus’s new hot spots. One month after dine-in restaurants, bars, and gyms were allowed to reopen in California, Governor Gavin Newsom made the country’s most aggressive reopening reversal amid his state’s spike in COVID-19 cases, shuttering all indoor dining, bars, zoos, and museums in the state. Similar reversals have occurred in Colorado, Florida, Louisiana, Michigan, New Mexico, Oregon, Texas, West Virginia among other states.

“We’ve seen a patchwork of flip-flopping state policies across the country,” says Sinan Aral, the senior author of the study. “The problem is that, when they are uncoordinated, state re-openings and even closures create massive travel spillovers that are spreading the virus across state borders. If we continue to pursue ad hoc policies across state and regional borders, we’re going to have a difficult time controlling this virus, reopening our economy or even sending our kids back to school.”

The new study showed that while closures directly reduced mobility by 5-6%, re-openings returned mobility to pre-pandemic levels. Once all of a state’s peer states (in travel or social media influence) locked down, focal county mobility in that state dropped by an additional 15-20% but increased by 19-32% once peer states reopened. “State policies have effects far beyond their borders,” says Aral. “We desperately need coordination if we are to control this virus.”

When an origin county was subject to a statewide shelter-in-place order, travel to counties yet to impose lockdowns increased by 52-65%. If the origin had reopened, but the destination was still closed, travel to destination counties was suppressed by 9-17% for nearby counties and 21-27% for distant counties. But when a destination reopened while an origin was still closed, people from the closed origins flooded into the destination by 11-12% from nearby counties and 24% from distant counties. “People flee closures and flood into newly reopened states,” says Aral, “we can’t avoid the travel spillovers caused by our ad hoc policies.”

These findings highlight the urgent need to coordinate COVID-19 reopenings across regions and the risks created by ad hoc local shutdowns and reopenings. In addition, the results highlight the importance of taking spillover effects seriously when formulating national policy and for national and local policies to coordinate across regions where spillovers are strong.

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The Mob Museum x Crime in Pop Culture

THE MOB MUSEUM DEBUTS “THE MOB ON TV,” EXHIBIT DEDICATED TO ORGANIZED CRIME IN POP CULTURE

The Mob Museum, the National Museum of Organized Crime and Law Enforcement, announces its newest exhibit: “The Mob on TV.” Comprising a collection of on-screen costumes and props from three iconic organized crime-based TV series – “The Sopranos,” “Boardwalk Empire” and “Breaking Bad” – the exhibit is on view in the Museum’s retail store.

While Mob movies dominated the twentieth century with blockbuster hits such as “The Godfather,” “Goodfellas” and “Casino,” the depiction of the Mob on the small screen gave rise to some of the most iconic television series of the twenty-first century. Both “The Sopranos” and “Breaking Bad” rank among the greatest series ever made, being named No. 1 and 3, respectively, by Rolling Stone magazine’s 100 greatest TV shows of all time.

Costumes and props in this collection include:

“Nucky” Thompson’s “Death Suit”: A three-piece suit worn in the series finale by Steve Buscemi, who played real-life Atlantic City crime boss Enoch “Nucky” Johnson in HBO’s “Boardwalk Empire.” The suit features a bullet hole where the character was shot. “Boardwalk Empire,” created by Terence Winter and executive produced by Martin Scorsese, chronicles organized crime in Atlantic City and beyond during Prohibition. The show’s five seasons (56 episodes) ran from 2010 to 2014.

“Breaking Bad” Hazmat Suit: The collection includes the hazmat suit and mask used during meth-cooking scenes worn by Bryan Cranston, who played Walter White in AMC’s “Breaking Bad.” This popular show ran from 2008 to 2013 for five seasons (62 episodes), following the transformation of White from a mild-mannered high school chemistry teacher to ruthless drug kingpin in Albuquerque, New Mexico. “Breaking Bad” was created by Vince Gilligan, who extended the story through a prequel AMC series, “Better Call Saul” and a sequel Netflix film, “El Camino.”

Tony Soprano in Casual Mode: A costume worn by James Gandolfini, in his role of Mob boss Tony Soprano in the HBO series “The Sopranos,” during season five, episode two. “The Sopranos,” created by David Chase, premiered in 1999 and ran for six seasons (86 episodes). The stories and characters were inspired by real-life Mob crime families in New Jersey.

“Boardwalk Empire” Tommy Gun: This submachine gun prop was used by “Nucky” Thompson in season two, episode eight of “Boardwalk Empire.” In the episode, Thompson receives crates of Tommy guns destined for the Irish Republican Army, which is rebelling against English rule. In episode nine, Thompson travels across the Atlantic to deliver the guns, which are smuggled inside a coffin that presumably holds his deceased father’s remains.

On-screen Gas Mask: This gas mask was worn on-screen during meth-cooking scenes in “Breaking Bad.” The drug-making chemistry in the show was quite accurate, from the rudimentary production processes shown in the early episodes to the “super-lab” scenes in later seasons.

For more information about the Mob in pop culture, visit The Mob Museum’s blog HERE, which features numerous posts about that topic.

ABOUT THE MOB MUSEUM

The Mob Museum, the National Museum of Organized Crime and Law Enforcement, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, provides a world-class journey through true stories—from the birth of the Mob to today’s headlines. The Mob Museum offers a provocative, contemporary look at these topics through hundreds of artifacts and immersive storylines. Numerous interactive exhibits include a Crime Lab, Firearm Training Simulator and Organized Crime Today exhibit, as well as The Underground, a basement-level Prohibition history exhibition featuring a speakeasy and distillery sponsored by Zappos. This year, the Museum released an engaging new mobile app providing the ultimate guide to the Museum for visitors, in-depth education for those seeking more about the history of the Mob and law enforcement, and an innovative, interactive lookalike feature called Doppelgangster which matches user’s facial features with those from more than 800 Mob-related images. Since opening in 2012, The Mob Museum has accumulated numerous accolades, including being named one of TripAdvisor’s “Top 25 U.S. Museums,” one of Las Vegas Weekly’s “Twenty Greatest Attractions in Las Vegas History,” one of National Geographic’s “Top 10 Things to Do in Las Vegas,” one of “5 Museums for True-Crime Enthusiasts to Visit” by Oxygen.com, ” USA Today’s “Best Museum in Nevada” and one of its “12 Can’t Miss U.S. Museum Exhibits,” “A Must for Travelers” by The New York Times and one of “20 Places Every American Should See” by FOX News and Budget Travel magazine. The Museum is a two-time winner of the Mayor’s Urban Design Award for Historic Preservation and Adaptive Reuse and is accredited by the American Alliance of Museums. The Museum is open daily

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Photos courtesy of The Mob Museum

Make The Most Out Of Your Vacation

Any trip to the USA should fill you with excitement and even a little awe. It’s a huge, sprawling country with much to see and do. The problem is picking the best state to visit so you get the most out of your vacation.

Is California better than New York? What does Alaska offer that you can’t get in New Jersey? Is Nevada just for gamblers or can you take in a show or two? These are just a few of the questions you might want answers to before you plan your trip.

The team at PlayNJ have done some research to help and now have an interactive map of the US which makes that decision making process a whole lot easier. They’ve taken a range of parameters including tourism income, gambling and theatre, things to do, and general happiness level to rank each of 50 states.

The general ranking gives a listing of overall performance and it’s no surprise that states such as California, Texas, Florida and New York figure at the top. Curiously, the team have also included a happiness ranking which shows a slightly different story. While California comes first in general classification, it only manages 13 for happiness. Hawaii only hits 20 on the general ranking but comes out on top for fun.

While you may have to take some of the listings with a pinch of salt, the interactive map does give you a good idea where the strong point of each state lies.

California has the highest tourist income at $126.3 billion, mainly because it’s one of the most popular holiday destinations on the planet. Not only is it home to Hollywood and the iconic city of San Francisco, it’s also got Disneyland and the Yosemite National Park. Wyoming has a much lower income but does have some noteworthy places to visit such as The Rocky Mountains and the Great Plains.

If gambling is your big thing and you want to combine it with a show or two, then the obvious choice is Nevada. Las Vegas is the gambling capital of the western world and is full of casinos. There are also plenty of shows to take in and the service, so visitors say, is second to none. There are even a couple of zoos and a few theme parks to give you something different to do. For overall happiness ranking though it rates well down at 34.

For those looking for variety in their trip, it’s best to look at the ‘Things to Do’ map. Here Florida is top of the list with 1,699 separate activities and Alaska is not far behind on 1,644. These are two totally different locations, so it’s wise to take a deeper look at what’s on offer. Florida is famous for sun, sea and sangria as well as its numerous theme parks. Alaska is more for your outdoor types with breath-taking locations like Winner Creak, Kincaid Park and Resurrection Bay.

For those who want to take in some sport, Texas and California top the list for stadiums. You can go see the Dallas Cowboys play in Arlington or visit the world famous Rose Bowl in California. If you don’t like sport and won’t be visiting a stadium anytime soon, Vermont is the place to go, they don’t have any. Of course, it will all depend on who your favourite team is and the sport you want to watch.

Next time you’re planning a trip somewhere in the USA, take a look at the PlayNJ interactive map to help you begin planning the best locations to visit. It’s a great way to start exploring what this vast, sprawling country has to offer for the humble tourist.

Halloween Candy Map

In case you haven’t noticed all of the pumpkin-lined porch steps or the multitude of horror movie marathons on TV, it’s spooky season! Halloween is less than two weeks away, which means hayrides, haunted houses, and, most importantly, FREE CANDY!!! Well, free for cute kids dressed up like Spiderman or Moana. For adults, Halloween means stocking up on the good stuff to avoid a yard full of toilet paper or having your car decorated with egg yolks. Halloween is a candy manufacturer’s Christmas. According to The National Retail Federation, it’s expected that 2.7 billion dollars will be spent on trick-or-treat candy this year. It may seem like a good idea to buy the cheapest bag of candy you can find, however, when November 1st rolls around and you’re left with three pounds of store-brand lollipops none of the trick-or-treaters wanted to take, bargain shopping might be a decision you’ll regret.

If you want to avoid the horror that is too much leftover candy, you’ll have to fork over a a few extra bucks for the good stuff. You may stroll down the candy aisle at the supermarket amidst the plethora of different chocolates, gummies, sours, and sweets, and think to yourself, how do I know which candy to buy? Well, CandyStore.com, is here to help. Over the past 10 years, CandyStore.com has been shipping tons of bulk candy all across the United States and Canada. They compiled 10 years (2007-2016) of sales data for the months leading up to Halloween and put together an interactive map that details the top three most popular Halloween candies for each state, indicated by pounds distributed. Check out the interactive map HERE to become the go-to house for all of the witches, ghosts, and Chewbaccas in town. Or, if you’d rather not have hoards of little vampires and Pokemon running through your yard but still want to please the kiddos, CandyStore.com also has a list of the WORST candies, so you know exactly what not to buy.

CandyStore.com also offers the option of skipping the trip to supermarket all together. Order online in bulk so you can avoid facing the delicious temptation of sugary goodness in candy aisle.