Posts tagged with "Oregon"

High Times x Oregon

High Times announced Monday its return to Oregon where more than 150 products will compete for the People’s Choice Cannabis Cup.

Consumers will be able to purchase the products and participate as judges in the competition from the safety of their own homes.

A portion of proceeds will also go toward the Cannabis Cares Wildfire Relief Fund, which helps support cannabis brands affected by the fires.

Originally founded in 1988 in Amsterdam, the High Times Cannabis Cup is the world’s most famous cannabis festival. Though the festival typically lasts two or three days, COVID-19 has pushed High Times to allow consumers to judge from home.

28 different strains will be available to try in a one ounce judging kit, then they will be ranked.

The judging kits are expected to sell out quickly, and they will be sold on a first-come, first-serve basis. The categories up for judgement include flower, pre-rolls, concentrates, vape pens and cartridges as well as two edible categories, gummies or candies and baked goods.

The kits are available in over two dozen of the state’s best products through retail partners like TJ’s Gardens on Eugene and Portland, Oregon Euphorics in Bend, Bahama Buds in Coos Bay, Top Crop in Ontario and Rogue Valley Cannabis in Medford.

High Times has also partnered with Oregon cannabis operator STEM Holdings, the owner of TJ’s Gardens and Yerba Buena Farms, to use more than 75 pounds of product during the competition.

For more information, you can click right here.

You can also follow High Times on Twitter.

Kaelen Felix Illustrates a Drug Article for 360 MAGAZINE

Oregon Decriminalizes Drugs

By Justin Lyons

This year’s election will go down as a legendary one in the history of the United States of America, and for some of the bigger fights, the country still doesn’t have an answer.

Where answers do exist seem to be in propositions and measures, and the big winners are those hoping for the decriminalization of drugs. Mississippi, New Jersey, South Dakota, Montana and Arizona all approved the legalization of recreational marijuana.

The biggest victory for those in favor of drug decriminalization probably came in Oregon, where the penalty for small amounts of heroin, methamphetamine, cocaine and other drugs was lessened.

According to Ballotpedia, Oregon’s Measure 110 would reclassify the possession of controlled substances such as those listed above from a Class A misdemeanor to a Class E violation, which would result in a $100 fine or the necessity of a “completed health assessment.”

The Oregon Criminal Justice Commission estimated that convictions for possession would decrease by 90.7%.

Addiction recovery centers conduct the health assessments, which will include a screening from a certified alcohol and drug counselor and must be completed within 45 days of the Class E violation.

The funds for the assessments and the recovery programs will come from the Oregon Marijuana Account and money the state of Oregon saves from reductions in arrests, incarceration and official supervision. The recovery centers will provide treatment 24 hours per day along with health assessments, intervention plans, case management services and peer support and outreach.

The possession quantity of the now decriminalized drugs to be classified as a Class E violation are as follows: one gram of heroin or less, two grams of cocaine or less, two grams of methamphetamine or less, one gram or five pills of MDMA or less, 40 or fewer user units of LSD, less than 12 grams of psilocybin, fewer than 40 user units of methadone and fewer than 40 pills, tables or capsules of oxycodone.

A person carrying more than the specified amounts may face a misdemeanor with less than a year imprisonment, a $6,250 fine or both.

According to Yes on Measure 110, more than 125 Oregon-based organizations endorsed the measure, including Oregon Chapter of the American College of Physicians, Oregon Nurses Association, Oregon School Psychologists’ Association and Law Enforcement Action Partnership.

Ballotpedia also said the Democratic Party of Oregon, Multnomah Democrats and Working Families Party of Oregon support the bill, right alongside 11-time-GRAMMY-Award-Winning artist John Legend.

The measure is to be implemented no later than Feb. 1 of 2021.

Coffee illustration for 360 Magazine

Coffee Capitals of America

By Hannah DiPilato

With National Coffee Day on September 29 followed by International Coffee Day on October first, Wren Kitchen delved into the nation’s coffee-drinking habits to see which states have the greatest consumption of everyone’s favorite hot beverage. 

Their research revealed that The United States drinks 48 billion cups of coffee each year, they have discovered the number one coffee capital of the United States, and the data shows which region has the highest demand for the caffeinated favorite. 

Coffee represents much more than just a drink. It’s a wakeup call bright and early in the morning, a chance to catch up with old friends or a moment for yourself in the middle of a chaotic workday. Pouring yourself a cup of coffee in your kitchen sets you up for the busy day ahead.

There’s no doubt The United States is a coffee-loving nation and a new report by Wren Kitchens has revealed which state craves coffee the most. They have also illustrated which iconic landmarks each state could build with coffee cups based on the coffee consumption of citizens. Grab a cup of joe and read on to find out how your state ranks.

Oregon has been crowned the ultimate coffee capital drinking over 113 Empire State buildings worth of coffee every year. The Beaver State shows that it’s citizens drink the most coffee based on the demand for coffee and population size.

The state consumes more than 624 million cups of coffee per year and if you were to stack up this number of coffee cups in real life, Oregon would drink enough coffee to create 113 Empire State buildings each year. 

With Oregonians having such an appetite for their cup of Joe, search data shows that 2.1% of the states 4.2 million goes online to search for their caffeine fix each month

The second-largest coffee-loving state is Colorado. With a population of 5.7 million, the state of Colorado drinks 852 million cups of coffee every year. The search data reveals that 1.9% of Coloradans head online to look up their nearest coffee spot.

Washington state follows on the list with the third-most online coffee searches, 1.8% of the state’s population searching for java each month, and more than 1.1 billion coffees consumed each year. This is no surprise coming from the state that founded Starbucks. 

When searching to find the region that drinks the most coffee, the west coast takes the prize. With three of the top five states having the greatest demand for coffee based on the Pacific, the West Coast is the place they pay homage to the barista. Nowhere more can this be seen than California with the state sipping more than 5.8 billion cups of the steaming beans.

The data was gathered by looking at search volumes against the population and the average amount of coffee consumed per person. Data for this research was collected from worldatlas.com, statista.com, ncausa.org and The United States Census Bureau, Population Division. 

To work out the coffee capitals, volumes per state surrounding coffee were researched and were calculated as a percent of the state’s population. Then the height, area, and dimensions of landmarks in the US were looked at; before working out the number of 12oz coffee cups it would take to fill each landmark. Finally, how many times each state could cover each landmark with the number of cups of coffee they consume each year was worked out.

COVID Mask Care illustration by Mina Tocalini

Study Shows State-By-State Reopenings Exacerbate COVID

As Summer vacations end in Europe and in the United States and students return to college campuses and primary schools worldwide, fresh waves of COVID infections are causing renewed restrictions after loosening in the Spring and Summer. However, a new study shows that this uncoordinated opening, closing, and reopening of states and counties, is making the COVID problem worse in the U.S., according to the authors of a new study released today. Using methods from their previous work, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, MIT PhD student Michael Zhao and Sinan Aral, Director of the MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy and author of the upcoming book The Hype Machine, have released the first comprehensive study of the impact of state-by-state re-openings on the COVID pandemic, spanning January to July, 2020 with surprising and troubling results.

After studying combined data on the mobility of over 22 million mobile devices, daily data on state-level closure and reopening policies and social media connections among 220 million Facebook users, the team found that reimposing local social distancing or shelter-in-place orders after reopening may be far less effective than policy makers would hope.

In fact, such closures may actually be counterproductive as they encourage those in locked down regions to flee to reopened regions, potentially causing new hotspots to emerge. This analysis demonstrates that travel spillovers are not only systematic and predictable, but also large and meaningful.

Arizona was one of the first states to open businesses, but in late June, bars, gyms, movie theaters, and water parks were shut down for 30 days as the state became one of the virus’s new hot spots. One month after dine-in restaurants, bars, and gyms were allowed to reopen in California, Governor Gavin Newsom made the country’s most aggressive reopening reversal amid his state’s spike in COVID-19 cases, shuttering all indoor dining, bars, zoos, and museums in the state. Similar reversals have occurred in Colorado, Florida, Louisiana, Michigan, New Mexico, Oregon, Texas, West Virginia among other states.

“We’ve seen a patchwork of flip-flopping state policies across the country,” says Sinan Aral, the senior author of the study. “The problem is that, when they are uncoordinated, state re-openings and even closures create massive travel spillovers that are spreading the virus across state borders. If we continue to pursue ad hoc policies across state and regional borders, we’re going to have a difficult time controlling this virus, reopening our economy or even sending our kids back to school.”

The new study showed that while closures directly reduced mobility by 5-6%, re-openings returned mobility to pre-pandemic levels. Once all of a state’s peer states (in travel or social media influence) locked down, focal county mobility in that state dropped by an additional 15-20% but increased by 19-32% once peer states reopened. “State policies have effects far beyond their borders,” says Aral. “We desperately need coordination if we are to control this virus.”

When an origin county was subject to a statewide shelter-in-place order, travel to counties yet to impose lockdowns increased by 52-65%. If the origin had reopened, but the destination was still closed, travel to destination counties was suppressed by 9-17% for nearby counties and 21-27% for distant counties. But when a destination reopened while an origin was still closed, people from the closed origins flooded into the destination by 11-12% from nearby counties and 24% from distant counties. “People flee closures and flood into newly reopened states,” says Aral, “we can’t avoid the travel spillovers caused by our ad hoc policies.”

These findings highlight the urgent need to coordinate COVID-19 reopenings across regions and the risks created by ad hoc local shutdowns and reopenings. In addition, the results highlight the importance of taking spillover effects seriously when formulating national policy and for national and local policies to coordinate across regions where spillovers are strong.

Mina Tocalini, 360 Magazine, Independence Day Drink

2020 Labor Day Celebrations

By Cassandra Yany

In the face of COVID-19, Labor Day weekend looked very different his year. Absent were the large family cookouts and pool parties, or the big end-of-summer beach crowds. Many cities even had to omit public fireworks to prevent mass gatherings. Though the long weekend did not bring the celebrations we’re used to, there were still plenty of safe ways to enjoy the holiday.

Virtual events allow you to take part in more activities in different locations than you would have been able to physically. Made in America, a festival started by Jay-Z in 2012, was set to take place in Philadelphia this past weekend. On July 1, festival organizers announced that it would be rescheduled to Labor Day weekend 2021. They said in a statement “Collectively, we are fighting parallel pandemics, COVID-19, systemic racism and police brutality. Now is the time to protect the health of our artists, fans, partners and community as well as focus on our support for organizations and individuals fighting for social justice and equality in our country.”

This year’s lineup went unannounced, but last year’s festival was headlined by Travis Scott and Cardi B. Since the physical festival was canceled, a livestream showcasing the best performances took place on the music streaming service TIDAL throughout the weekend. The virtual festival included sets from Beyoncé, Nicki Minaj, Lizzo, Coldplay, Rihanna and many other chart-topping artists.

Nationally, a Labor Day virtual race was held by The Best Races for runners to run anywhere on their own time and submit their results. Participants who registered for the full package received a personal coach who was available Monday through Friday to provide help and answer questions during training, and provided encouragement and support on the day of the race.

Runners across the country were able to choose the distance of the race they wanted to participate in. Depending on what package they signed up for, they received a certificate of completion and digital medal, a 3-inch medal sent to their homes, a printable custom bib, a custom digital photo card that contains the race results, a digital running journal, a t-shirt, optional course maps and an optional pen pal program. 

Based in Portland, the Oregon Labor Movement held a statewide virtual Labor Day celebration and call to action on Monday. The organizers brought light to issues taking place in the state saying, “Working Oregonians are facing three crises at once: a deadly global pandemic, an economic free fall, and long-standing institutional racism.”

The event began at noon and featured talks from Oregon’s labor leaders, elected officials, and working Oregon citizens regarding their desire for change and their pursuit toward justice for workers. This event came after Portland’s rise to national prominence for their Black Lives Matter demonstrations and federal agents entering the city in recent months.

A number of virtual events were held in Los Angeles this past weekend, as well. HomeState, the LA-based Texas Kitchen, held its first Margarita Showdown in 2019, but had to move it online this year due to the pandemic and social distancing measures. The virtual event took place Saturday via livestream. Margarita makers in the area competed to see whose drink was the best.

Voters received eight bottled margaritas, along with limes and garnishing salt to try the different submissions from the safety of their homes. The winner chosen was El Compadre, a local Mexcian restaurant. The event was hosted by comedian Cristela Alonzo, and featured musical performances by Chicano Batman, Spoon, Questlove, Fred Armisen, Local Natives and Angela Muñoz. All proceeds from the event benefit the organization No Us Without You! and the Watts Empowerment Center.

The Gourmandise School of Sweets & Savories in Santa Monica hosted a virtual Labor Day Pies class on Sunday. In the class, participants were taught how to make a s’mores pie and key lime pie. Registration for the class included access to the Zoom video meeting, as well as the recipe and shopping list. Recipes can also be found on Gourmandise’s Instagram.

Some cities were able to hold in-person events following social distancing guidelines. Boston’s Institute of Contemporary Art, located in the Seaport District, upheld its tradition of free admission on Labor Day. The museum is typically closed on Mondays, but was open from 10 am to 5 pm for guests who reserved tickets. 

Monday was the last day for guests to see the exhibits Tschabalala Self: Out of Body and Carolina Caycedo: Cosmotarrayas. Also on display were the Sterling Ruby, Nina Chanel Abney and Beyond Infinity: Contemporary Art after Kusama exhibits. The ICA has increased cleaning and follows Massachusetts COVID guidelines by requiring all staff and visitors to wear face coverings, and allowing a restricted number of guests each hour. Spaces that don’t allow physical distancing are temporarily closed, and exhibition labels and printed materials have been made available online to reduce touch surfaces.


In New York City, a Labor Day Paint in the Park event was held in Central Park. The two-hour socially distant class was led by a master artist who gave step-by-step painting instructions. Participants were required to wear masks and sit six feet apart. Admission included a pre-sketched canvas and painting supplies, and parties were encouraged to bring food and drinks to snack on during the class.

For those who wanted to enjoy the holiday by relaxing at home with their favorite movie or TV show, a number of stores had sales to mark the end of summer. There were countless deals that shoppers could take advantage of to celebrate their work.
Many workers have faced great adversity within the past eight months, some losing their positions and having to move quickly to find a new one, and others doing their job in a way they never thought they would have to. Whether you stayed in or got out of the house for some socially-distant fun, Monday was definitely a day worth celebrating.

flor's new song covered by 360 MAGAZINE

flor – lmho

Alt-pop band flor has unveiled an official music video for their latest single lmho.

flor has had quite the exciting 2020. Singer/guitarist Zach Grace, bassist Dylan Bauld, guitarist McKinley Kitts, and drummer Kyle Hill released their EP reimagined earlier this year. reimagined features stripped-down recordings of fan-favorite tracks like unsaid, white noise, warm blood, and slow motion. Additionally, the EP includes a cover of Coldplay featuring label-mates MisterWives. Watch the track’s official music video, which premiered on Billboard.

In September 2019 flor released their sophomore full-length ley lines. Singles from ley lines including slow motion and dancing around received praise from publications including Nylon, Ones to Watch, and Earmilk. The reign of ley lines concluded in March when flor wrapped their second US headline tour.

Follow flor: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | YouTube | Website

Rita Azar illustrates US Federal officer story in 360 MAGAZINE.

Federal Agents Move into Multiple US Cities

By Emmet McGeown

On June 29, 4-year old LeGend Taliferro was killed by gunfire in Kansas City, Missouri. He had fallen asleep inside his pillow fort and at around 2am he was murdered in a targeted shooting of his apartment, according to the Kansas City Police Department.

Having been diagnosed with a heart defect shortly after birth, LeGend received his first open-heart surgery at just 4 months old. His mother, Charron Powell, said that her only child “has the heart of a lion” and was always excited to create awareness for conditions similar to his.

As a result of this horrific murder and spiking crime rates in St. Louis Attorney General, William Barr, announced “Operation LeGend” on July 8. This Justice Department initiative has directed agents from the FBI, DEA, ATF, and US Marshals Service to supplement local law enforcement agencies with the aim of cracking down on illegal gun trafficking and aiding ongoing homicide investigations.

In total, 225 federal agents were sent to Kansas City to help the 400 federal agents already located in the metro area. US Attorney for the Western District of Missouri, Tim Garrison, announced on July 31 that 97 arrests have been made by federal and local law enforcement since the launch of Operation LeGend. Five arrests were made for homicide, but other offenses cited were drug trafficking, robbery, and child molestation.

However, this has not been the extent of federal intervention in US cities. In a Fox News phone interview, the President stated “We’ll go into all of the cities, any of them. We’re ready.” Such a statement is emblematic of the President’s desire to make federal policing a key part of his Nixonian “law and order” campaign strategy. Undoubtedly, he is hoping to appeal to suburban voters worried about crime spilling into their neighborhoods from urban centers. The President also claimed that he was prepared to dispatch “50,000, 60,000 people” into American cities.

Trump has presented increasing crime rates in cities as a partisan issue whereby Democrat-run cities are the most dangerous places in the country largely due to their leadership’s political affiliation. Overall, out of the 50 largest cities in the US the homicide rate has increased by 25% in cities with Democratic mayors and by 15% in Republican-run cities revealing a decidedly bipartisan issue despite the President’s best efforts.

Operation LeGend’s coordinated law enforcement plan has now expanded into Chicago, Albuquerque, Cleveland, Detroit and Milwaukee. Reasons for this move include a 54% increase in homicides in Chicago from last year, a 7% increase in Detroit’s violent crime compared to the previous year while each of Cleveland’s 5 police districts are coping with an increase in shootings of around 20%.

Such statistics reveal a problem in many US cities, yet the question remains as to whether this problem can or should be solved through federal intervention or whether this, being a local issue, should be remedied via local resources.

Allison Christensen, 360 Magazine, Vaughn Lowery

Federal Officers in Portland

By Eamonn Burke

In the wake of George Floyd’s death, cities around the country and the world erupted in protest. While in many cities protests have diminished or stopped, one city has shown crowds of protestors since Memorial Day: Portland, Oregon.

Rallies were shrinking here too, but were reinvigorated following repeated and excessive use of force by federal officers in the city. Video shows officers responding to one protest using non-lethal ammunition, gas, and fire. Secretary Chad Wolf of the Department of Homeland Security sided with the officers, calling the protestors “lawless anarchists.” Trump and his administration have also given consistent support to the efforts of the officers.

Tensions first rose last Thursday night when protestors gathered around a local precinct shouting “Who do you protect? Who do you serve?”, and police told them to leave after hearing rumors of a plot to burn down the building. The crowd, however, were equipped with homemade shields and flashlights. The crowds stayed however, leading to police discharging impact munitions and using smoke and tear gas to disband them.

The ongoing clash continued Tuesday when roughly 1,000 people filled Portland’s center, with help from the recently dubbed “Wall of Moms.” Hundreds of moms stood before the officers to provide protection for protestors. Their arms were linked as they chanted things like “Don’t shoot your mother!”

“That really affected me the most, being a mom. I wanted to come down and give my support as a mother and a grandmother to all these people who have been out every night” said 55 year old mom Debbie Scott.

The “Wall or Moms” has recently spread beyond Portland into other major cities such as New York, Chicago, and Philadelphia, ready to defend Democratic-lead cities from Trumps’ plan to deploy federal officers. Meanwhile, the violence continued in Portland on Tuesday when officers used more gas, non-lethal bullets and stun grenades as protestors gathered outside the courthouse.

360 Magazine, Max Leone

Max Leone – Malleable

MAX LEONE PREMIERES NEW SINGLE & VIDEO “MALLEABLE”

21-YEAR-OLD SONGWRITER/PRODUCER’S DEBUT EP DUE OUT LATER THIS YEAR

“Burgeoning pop star”- Billboard

“Smooth vocals and sticky melodies”- Paper

“One of pop’s next young stars” – Pigeons and Planes 

Today, songwriter/producer/multi-instrumentalist Max Leone shares his new single “Malleable” and its accompanying video. Released via Darkroom Records, “Malleable” showcases the 21-year-old’s artist’s signature sound — an alt-leaning yet urban-inspired breed of lo-fi bedroom pop.

Listen to “Malleable” by Max Leone HERE.

Set against a backdrop of stark beats and moody guitar work, “Malleable” channels the pain and frustration of drifting apart from someone who once felt close. With his delicate balance of detailed storytelling and plainspoken confession, Leone reveals his gift for crafting unforgettable melodies and lyrics that cut right to the heart.

True to his DIY sensibilities, Leone created the video for “Malleable” along with his sister while the two were quarantined in their hometown of Portland, Oregon. As the camera follows Leone through lonely landscapes and empty streets, each shot perfectly intensifies the song’s bittersweet mood.

“Malleable” arrives as the follow-up to Leone’s recent single “The Beach,” an Alexander 23 produced track that earned acclaim from NME (who praised his “genuine raw talent”) and Ones to Watch (who noted that “we’re expecting Leone to hold a steady presence in pop’s next wave”). Earlier this year, Leone drew raves for “Cautious” — a February release that was quickly added to Triple J rotation and supported by BBC Radio 1, with Billboard hailing Leone as a “Gen Z bedroom pop star.”

Leone is now at work on his debut EP, due out later this year. With its themes of self-doubt, nostalgia, and the tension between keeping up appearances and striving to build real-life connections, the EP tells the story of navigating a new city alone while chasing a potentially far-fetched dream.

About Max Leone:

Born and raised in Portland, Max Leone took up guitar at the age of seven, then later began experimenting with violin, drums, and piano. He soon started composing his own material and playing in jazz bands, in addition to teaching himself music production and posting his remixes to SoundCloud. Although his tremendous passion for music eventually led him to attend the prestigious Berklee College of Music as a guitar principal, Leone left the school after one year and relocated to Los Angeles to pursue music full-time. Soon after signing with Darkroom Records, he made his label debut with “First Grade” — a January 2020 release that quickly garnered acclaim from outlets like Hillydilly.

For more information on Max Leone, visit:

Instagram | Twitter | YouTube

Photo Credit: Clyde Munroe

AUSTN – Phases

17-year-old singer/songwriter AUSTN returns with an emotionally charged new single called “Phases.” Released via 10K Projects, the sweet and soulful track centers on the showstopping vocal presence he’s previously brought to songs like “In Betweenin’” — a 2019 single that’s amassed over 40.8 million streams Spotify.
 
Listen to “Phases” by AUSTN HERE

The first release from AUSTN’s upcoming sophomore EP (due later this year,) “Phases” is a real-time reflection on the fast-changing stages of love. With its tender guitar work and understated pop sound, the song is a perfect showcase for AUSTN’s stunning vocal range and heart-on-sleeve songwriting.
 
Originally from rural Central Oregon, AUSTN began building his vocal skills as a little kid. His natural talent is especially incredible considering that, for the first four years of his life, AUSTN struggled with significant hearing problems — an issue stemming from the fact that the tubes in his ears had closed at birth. After undergoing surgery to restore his hearing, AUSTN kept up with singing, eventually learning to play ukulele and posting his impromptu performances to Instagram.

As he built up a major following, AUSTN relocated to Los Angeles and fully devoted himself to music, quickly finding management and releasing his debut EP Chapter 1: In Betweenin’ in May 2019. Along with greatly expanding his fanbase, the EP’s infectious title track landed on many coveted playlists across Apple Music, Spotify, and Amazon Music, and also found AUSTN featured on Amazon Music’s 2019 Artists To Watch list.