Posts tagged with "Oregon"

Chloe Moriondo illustration by Heather Skovlund (photo credit: Jimmy Fontaine) for 360 Magazine

Chloe Moriondo × Blood Bunny

CHLOE MORIONDO DEBUTS NEW ALBUM BLOOD BUNNY RECORD CROWNED AS NEW YORK TIMES CRITIC’S PICK

BODYBAG OFFICIAL MUSIC VIDEO STREAMING NOW

NORTH AMERICAN FALL HEADLINE TOUR ON-SALE TODAY DATES KICK OFF SEPTEMBER 30TH IN CLEVELAND, OH

CHLOE MORIONDO BODYBAG OFFICIAL MUSIC VIDEO

18-year-old artist Chloe Moriondo has shared her major-label debut album Blood Bunny. The release is accompanied by an official video for track Bodybag, which is streaming now on Moriondo’s official YouTube channelBlood Bunny is available now on all streaming platforms via Public Consumption Recording Co./Fueled By Ramen.

In celebration of the record, Chloe Moriondo will embark on a fall headline tour, kicking off September 30th in Columbus, Ohio. The trek will make stops at The Roxy in Los Angeles, CA and New York City’s Bowery Ballroom before wrapping up with a home-state performance at El Club in Detroit, MI (tour itinerary attached). General on-sale begins today at 12pm local time. For up-to-date ticketing information, please visit the Chloe Moriondo website.

The New York Timescrowned the 13-track Blood Bunny a Critic’s Pick, and exclaimed On the robust and vividly plain-spoken ‘Blood Bunny,’ Moriondo is a pop-punk whiz, deftly hopping between musical approaches from spare to lushly produced, and emphasizing intimate, cut-to-the-bone lyrics. The Line of Best Fit hailed the record as Moriondo’s boldest, brightest and most ambitious project to date, while Dork Magazine raved, it’s obvious that [Blood Bunny] is a big deal in a five-star review. FLOOD Magazine praised the record’s intricate production blending cozy pop and rock riffs and UPROXX declared, Blood Bunny is a departure from the sound on Moriondo’s previous work, employing a full band to create alternative rock songs that sound absolutely massive with excellent songwriting.

Blood Bunny was heralded by the release of April single I Eat Boys, a deceptively breezy track inspired by the queer cult classic film Jennifer’s Body, twisting an instance of street harassment into a cannibalistic daydream. In addition to Éc;I Eat Boys,Éd; the albumfeatures previously released singles Manta Rays, GIRL ON TV, and I Want To Be With You, the latter of which was lauded by The New York Times as acutely observed bedroom pop served with a side of arena-emo triumph. Recently labeled one of 2021’s Artists To Watch by PEOPLE and NME, Chloe has racked up praise from BillboardUPROXXRefinery29them., E!, and more. The artist has also become a sought-after collaborator, recently appearing as a featured artist on tracks with Frances Forever, mxmtoon and Ricky Montgomery.

At age eighteen, Chloe Moriondo professes to be an internet kid, yet she tackles overwhelming infatuation, listless daydreams, and first love with keen empathy that’s unsearchable online. With her relatable, confessional lyrics and idiosyncratic humor, the singer-songwriter has built a devoted fanbase of millions, sharing her authentic self to create a genuine connection with her listeners.

CHLOE MORIONDO 2021 HEADLINE TOUR DATES

Thu, SEP 30 Mahalls Cleveland, OH

Fri, OCT 1 Bottom Lounge Chicago, IL

Sat, OCT 2 7th Street Entry Minneapolis, MN

Tue, OCT 5 Lost Lake Lounge Denver, CO

Thu, OCT 7 Kilby Court Salt Lake City, UT

Sat, OCT 9 Holocene Portland, OR

Sun, OCT 10 The Vera Project Seattle, WA

Tue, OCT 12 Rickshaw Stop San Francisco, CA

Thu, OCT 14 The Roxy Theatre Los Angeles, CA

Sat, OCT 16 House of Blues San Diego San Diego, CA

Sun, OCT 17 The Rebel Lounge Phoenix, AZ

Fri, NOV 12 Antone’s Austin, TX

Sat, NOV 13 The Secret Group Houston, TX

Sun, NOV 14 Dada Dallas Dallas, TX

Tue, NOV 16 The Basement East Nashville, TN

BLOOD BUNNY Tracklisting:

Rly Don’t Care

I Eat Boys

Manta Rays

GIRL ON TV

I Want To Be With You

Slacker

Take Your Time

Bodybag

Favorite Band

Samantha

Strawberry Blonde

Vapor

What If It Doesn’t End Well

Rainbow Dreamland illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Rainbow Dreamland Tour

VALLEY TO JOIN COIN ON RAINBOW DREAMLAND NORTH AMERICAN TOUR IN FALL 2021, TICKETS ON SALE NOW

LISTEN TO LIKE 1999 BY VALLEY HERE

PURCHASE TICKETS HERE

JUNO nominated, Canadian indie-pop band, VALLEY has announced their Fall 2021 North American tour in support of COIN. The 17-date tour run will begin on October 26 in Birmingham, AL, and go through November 21 in Houston, TX. The Rainbow Dreamland tour will be VALLEY’s return to the stage, bringing new music directly to their fans.

Most recently, VALLEY released their charmingly nostalgic single Like 1999 along with a video featuring TikTok star Boman. Fittingly, the track first gained momentum when the band posted a teaser of the song on their own TikTok. Since then, Like 1999 has garnered over 10 million global streams and become a form of escapism to fans waiting out the pandemic. Don’t miss your chance to see VALLEY live when shows return this Fall.

High-profile, high-octane – PAPER

A buoyant pop anthem full of emotion and fun, clever references, Like 1999 taps a sentimental vein Atwood Magazine

Taking the shape of a time capsule, the new track is an ode to the 1990s, shimmering with kaleidoscopic textures, sun-kissed melodies, and lush vocals that create an irresistible and dreamy sound. –  Gig Goer

In a world where, especially for artists, everything has been uncertain- VALLEY has cemented themselves as timeless. –  Unfiltered Zine

Tour Dates

October 26 – Birmingham, AL – Iron City Music Hall

October 27- Nashville, TN – Ryman Auditorium

October 29 – Chicago, IL – House of Blues

October 30 – St. Louis, MO – Del Mar

November 2 – Minneapolis, MN – Varsity Theater

November 3 – Kansas City, MO – The Truman

November 5 – Denver, CO – The Summit

November 6 – Salt Lake City, UT – The Complex

November 8 – Portland, OR – Revolution Hall

November 9 – Vancouver, BC Rio Theatre

November 11 – Seattle, WA – Showbox Sodo

November 13 – Los Angeles, CA – The Wiltern

November 15 – San Diego, CA – Observatory North Park

November 17 – Phoenix, AZ – The Van Buren

November 19 – Dallas, TX – South Side Ballroom

November 20 – Austin, TX – Emo’s

November 21 – Houston, TX – House of Blues

FOLLOW VALLEY

TikTok

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Twitter

Facebook

YouTube

Marijuana illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Honest Marijuana Company

In the old days of illegal weed, the price you paid for your weekend toke depended mostly on who was selling it to you. These were behind-the-scenes transactions, with no recourse for a deal gone bad and no way to price compare with a competitor. You paid the price asked or you went without.

Now, as state legalization grows and the chatter about federal legalization becomes less talk and more reality, the game has changed forever for the buyer. So, it’s a good time to be clear on what you’re paying for before you go to your local cannabis boutique, or even the corner store, if you should be so lucky to have marijuana available for sale there!

First off, price comparing starts with quantity

If you want to look at what your weed is going to cost you, and even compare different strains, it’s best to pick a quantity. From state to state, the price of quantity X will vary, based on factors we’ll discuss later, but for now, it’s important to understand what quantities you can order in. 

The most common quantities you can buy cannabis in are a gram, eighth of an ounce, quarter of an ounce, half an ounce, and a full ounce. Notice how the common quantities mix metric and Imperial measuring units? A gram is 1/1000th of a kilogram and an ounce is 1/16th of a pound. Typically, you’ll find that dispensaries will use ounces for larger quantities, and grams for a smaller purchase.

What does a gram look like? It’s about the size of a bottle cap, which gives you a visual point of reference to figure out what you’re getting for what price. The average joint is about 0.7 grams of weed so a gram will give you about 1.5 joints. Here are the other measurements, to give you a rough idea of what you’re getting:

  • An eighth of an ounce (which is roughly 3.5 grams) will give you just about 5 joints.
  • A quarter of an ounce (7 grams) will net about 10 joints.
  • A half an ounce (14 grams) will give you about 20 joints.
  • A full ounce (28 grams) is just about equal to 40 joints.

From Alaska to West Virginia, that price per ounce of medium quality weed can run anywhere from $6 to $12.

Quality is the next factor

If you look at average prices of weed across the country, they’re pretty stable and typically refer to medium quality cannabis. When you want to compare a gram of cannabis from one shop to another, a major increase in price could be because of the quality of the product. 

For example, an organic and locally indoor grown variety might be more expensive than a mass produced, imported one. You really do have to compare apples to apples, if you want to be sure you’re getting the right picture.

Other factors that will influence the price of weed

Your state’s legal stance toward cannabis

If you live in a state where cannabis isn’t legal in any form, obviously you’re still operating in the old ways of quiet deals made with people who don’t really care to negotiate the prices they feel like charging. After all, they risk going to jail for providing you with your ‘chill’ so there’s a premium attached to that.

In the states that have legalized recreational marijuana (Alaska, California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington), you’ll find competition higher and prices that reflect that.

The remaining twenty-one states that have legalized medical marijuana require a doctor’s note to obtain it, which isn’t a particularly challenging hurdle in most places, so this doesn’t affect the prices too significantly.

One place where cannabis is particularly expensive? Washington D.C. Despite legalization of medical and recreational use, they didn’t legalize the purchase of cannabis. That little detail is reflected in prices that are almost twice the national average for legalized / decriminalized states!

The physical geography of where you live

Cannabis isn’t an overly fussy plant to cultivate but it does prefer warm, stable temperatures, averaging in the daytime around 80 degrees. Places that have daytime temperatures that run hotter than 88 degrees or colder than 60 degrees have a harder time growing—it’s a slower process—and can end up with plants that have lower THC content and therefore lower overall quality.

So, if you live in Alaska or New Hampshire, for example, your weed has most likely been brought in from elsewhere, which means added costs in transportation and labor, to package and ship.

How your weed is grown

How your preferred brand is grown makes a difference on quality. 

  • Are they grown outdoors where light, water, soil, and ambient daytime temperatures are all free for the asking and therefore don’t add to the cost of production? 
  • Are they grown indoors, where special electrical lighting, watering and feed systems, and climate control are all required and add to the cost of production? 

Outdoor grown weed can be lower quality in that there aren’t many ways to control Mother Nature. Being able to control elements through technology can yield a higher quality product. From pest and humidity control to very specific watering schedules, as well as the use of light waves to maximize growth and intensity, indoor growers have the keys to control quality in ways that outdoor growers really cannot.

Factor in also whether the grower is using organic production methods, as this will definitely yield a higher quality product. No toxins from pesticides means a cleaner experience for you.

Where you buy your marijuana

Are you buying from a boutique dispensary or a corner store? Are you buying from a chain of cannabis stores or from a one-man dealer? Which way you go will affect the price you pay.

Dispensaries have overhead and staff to pay, which adds to the cost. However, they also have guidelines to follow in terms of packaging and labeling, as well as a vested interest in pleasing their customer, so they’re a good bet. You will know exactly what you’re getting, including the sourcing, THC content, whether it’s organic or not and so on. If you buy from a dealer, who is claiming to sell high quality products, you have no guarantees whatsoever that they are telling the truth.

Competitors drive the price down

Supply and demand is an easy equation. If there are several dispensaries with similar offerings in your area, the price per gram will be lower than in an area with no competition for your one dispensary. There is less supply for potentially similar demand, which can easily affect the price. The key as a consumer is to know your average pricing so you can tell whether or not you are getting a good deal.

Taxation and legalization go hand in hand

The states that have legalized marijuana have also clued in that it is an important revenue source. Sales tax, if the state has one, is applied to cannabis too. The rate can be higher for weed than for other products, as it is in Colorado. They have a state sales tax rate of 2.9% but the rate for weed? 10%.

In addition to sales tax, legal sellers are faced with taxes in production, purchasing, packing and transportation, costs that are typically downloaded to the end consumer.

The timing of your purchases

Time of year can impact the price of weed. Like most cultivated crops, the largest amounts are harvested in and around the month of September. Result? The supply is up, and prices should go down a little. 

As legalization continues to expand, state to state and even federally, the pricing will become more standard and easier to predict. At that point, the quality of the weed will be the big differentiator and as the end consumer, that’s not a small factor to consider. Buy with care and enjoy yourself!

Bio:

Anthony Franciosi, also known as Ant, is an honest to goodness farmer whose fingers are as green as the organic cannabis he grows. He is the proud founder of Honest Marijuana– an all-natural, completely organic marijuana growery in Colorado.

High Times x Oregon

High Times announced Monday its return to Oregon where more than 150 products will compete for the People’s Choice Cannabis Cup.

Consumers will be able to purchase the products and participate as judges in the competition from the safety of their own homes.

A portion of proceeds will also go toward the Cannabis Cares Wildfire Relief Fund, which helps support cannabis brands affected by the fires.

Originally founded in 1988 in Amsterdam, the High Times Cannabis Cup is the world’s most famous cannabis festival. Though the festival typically lasts two or three days, COVID-19 has pushed High Times to allow consumers to judge from home.

28 different strains will be available to try in a one ounce judging kit, then they will be ranked.

The judging kits are expected to sell out quickly, and they will be sold on a first-come, first-serve basis. The categories up for judgement include flower, pre-rolls, concentrates, vape pens and cartridges as well as two edible categories, gummies or candies and baked goods.

The kits are available in over two dozen of the state’s best products through retail partners like TJ’s Gardens on Eugene and Portland, Oregon Euphorics in Bend, Bahama Buds in Coos Bay, Top Crop in Ontario and Rogue Valley Cannabis in Medford.

High Times has also partnered with Oregon cannabis operator STEM Holdings, the owner of TJ’s Gardens and Yerba Buena Farms, to use more than 75 pounds of product during the competition.

For more information, you can click right here.

You can also follow High Times on Twitter.

Kaelen Felix Illustrates a Drug Article for 360 MAGAZINE

Oregon Decriminalizes Drugs

By Justin Lyons

This year’s election will go down as a legendary one in the history of the United States of America, and for some of the bigger fights, the country still doesn’t have an answer.

Where answers do exist seem to be in propositions and measures, and the big winners are those hoping for the decriminalization of drugs. Mississippi, New Jersey, South Dakota, Montana and Arizona all approved the legalization of recreational marijuana.

The biggest victory for those in favor of drug decriminalization probably came in Oregon, where the penalty for small amounts of heroin, methamphetamine, cocaine and other drugs was lessened.

According to Ballotpedia, Oregon’s Measure 110 would reclassify the possession of controlled substances such as those listed above from a Class A misdemeanor to a Class E violation, which would result in a $100 fine or the necessity of a “completed health assessment.”

The Oregon Criminal Justice Commission estimated that convictions for possession would decrease by 90.7%.

Addiction recovery centers conduct the health assessments, which will include a screening from a certified alcohol and drug counselor and must be completed within 45 days of the Class E violation.

The funds for the assessments and the recovery programs will come from the Oregon Marijuana Account and money the state of Oregon saves from reductions in arrests, incarceration and official supervision. The recovery centers will provide treatment 24 hours per day along with health assessments, intervention plans, case management services and peer support and outreach.

The possession quantity of the now decriminalized drugs to be classified as a Class E violation are as follows: one gram of heroin or less, two grams of cocaine or less, two grams of methamphetamine or less, one gram or five pills of MDMA or less, 40 or fewer user units of LSD, less than 12 grams of psilocybin, fewer than 40 user units of methadone and fewer than 40 pills, tables or capsules of oxycodone.

A person carrying more than the specified amounts may face a misdemeanor with less than a year imprisonment, a $6,250 fine or both.

According to Yes on Measure 110, more than 125 Oregon-based organizations endorsed the measure, including Oregon Chapter of the American College of Physicians, Oregon Nurses Association, Oregon School Psychologists’ Association and Law Enforcement Action Partnership.

Ballotpedia also said the Democratic Party of Oregon, Multnomah Democrats and Working Families Party of Oregon support the bill, right alongside 11-time-GRAMMY-Award-Winning artist John Legend.

The measure is to be implemented no later than Feb. 1 of 2021.

Coffee illustration for 360 Magazine

Coffee Capitals of America

By Hannah DiPilato

With National Coffee Day on September 29 followed by International Coffee Day on October first, Wren Kitchen delved into the nation’s coffee-drinking habits to see which states have the greatest consumption of everyone’s favorite hot beverage. 

Their research revealed that The United States drinks 48 billion cups of coffee each year, they have discovered the number one coffee capital of the United States, and the data shows which region has the highest demand for the caffeinated favorite. 

Coffee represents much more than just a drink. It’s a wakeup call bright and early in the morning, a chance to catch up with old friends or a moment for yourself in the middle of a chaotic workday. Pouring yourself a cup of coffee in your kitchen sets you up for the busy day ahead.

There’s no doubt The United States is a coffee-loving nation and a new report by Wren Kitchens has revealed which state craves coffee the most. They have also illustrated which iconic landmarks each state could build with coffee cups based on the coffee consumption of citizens. Grab a cup of joe and read on to find out how your state ranks.

Oregon has been crowned the ultimate coffee capital drinking over 113 Empire State buildings worth of coffee every year. The Beaver State shows that it’s citizens drink the most coffee based on the demand for coffee and population size.

The state consumes more than 624 million cups of coffee per year and if you were to stack up this number of coffee cups in real life, Oregon would drink enough coffee to create 113 Empire State buildings each year. 

With Oregonians having such an appetite for their cup of Joe, search data shows that 2.1% of the states 4.2 million goes online to search for their caffeine fix each month

The second-largest coffee-loving state is Colorado. With a population of 5.7 million, the state of Colorado drinks 852 million cups of coffee every year. The search data reveals that 1.9% of Coloradans head online to look up their nearest coffee spot.

Washington state follows on the list with the third-most online coffee searches, 1.8% of the state’s population searching for java each month, and more than 1.1 billion coffees consumed each year. This is no surprise coming from the state that founded Starbucks. 

When searching to find the region that drinks the most coffee, the west coast takes the prize. With three of the top five states having the greatest demand for coffee based on the Pacific, the West Coast is the place they pay homage to the barista. Nowhere more can this be seen than California with the state sipping more than 5.8 billion cups of the steaming beans.

The data was gathered by looking at search volumes against the population and the average amount of coffee consumed per person. Data for this research was collected from worldatlas.com, statista.com, ncausa.org and The United States Census Bureau, Population Division. 

To work out the coffee capitals, volumes per state surrounding coffee were researched and were calculated as a percent of the state’s population. Then the height, area, and dimensions of landmarks in the US were looked at; before working out the number of 12oz coffee cups it would take to fill each landmark. Finally, how many times each state could cover each landmark with the number of cups of coffee they consume each year was worked out.

COVID Mask Care illustration by Mina Tocalini

Study Shows State-By-State Reopenings Exacerbate COVID

As Summer vacations end in Europe and in the United States and students return to college campuses and primary schools worldwide, fresh waves of COVID infections are causing renewed restrictions after loosening in the Spring and Summer. However, a new study shows that this uncoordinated opening, closing, and reopening of states and counties, is making the COVID problem worse in the U.S., according to the authors of a new study released today. Using methods from their previous work, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, MIT PhD student Michael Zhao and Sinan Aral, Director of the MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy and author of the upcoming book The Hype Machine, have released the first comprehensive study of the impact of state-by-state re-openings on the COVID pandemic, spanning January to July, 2020 with surprising and troubling results.

After studying combined data on the mobility of over 22 million mobile devices, daily data on state-level closure and reopening policies and social media connections among 220 million Facebook users, the team found that reimposing local social distancing or shelter-in-place orders after reopening may be far less effective than policy makers would hope.

In fact, such closures may actually be counterproductive as they encourage those in locked down regions to flee to reopened regions, potentially causing new hotspots to emerge. This analysis demonstrates that travel spillovers are not only systematic and predictable, but also large and meaningful.

Arizona was one of the first states to open businesses, but in late June, bars, gyms, movie theaters, and water parks were shut down for 30 days as the state became one of the virus’s new hot spots. One month after dine-in restaurants, bars, and gyms were allowed to reopen in California, Governor Gavin Newsom made the country’s most aggressive reopening reversal amid his state’s spike in COVID-19 cases, shuttering all indoor dining, bars, zoos, and museums in the state. Similar reversals have occurred in Colorado, Florida, Louisiana, Michigan, New Mexico, Oregon, Texas, West Virginia among other states.

“We’ve seen a patchwork of flip-flopping state policies across the country,” says Sinan Aral, the senior author of the study. “The problem is that, when they are uncoordinated, state re-openings and even closures create massive travel spillovers that are spreading the virus across state borders. If we continue to pursue ad hoc policies across state and regional borders, we’re going to have a difficult time controlling this virus, reopening our economy or even sending our kids back to school.”

The new study showed that while closures directly reduced mobility by 5-6%, re-openings returned mobility to pre-pandemic levels. Once all of a state’s peer states (in travel or social media influence) locked down, focal county mobility in that state dropped by an additional 15-20% but increased by 19-32% once peer states reopened. “State policies have effects far beyond their borders,” says Aral. “We desperately need coordination if we are to control this virus.”

When an origin county was subject to a statewide shelter-in-place order, travel to counties yet to impose lockdowns increased by 52-65%. If the origin had reopened, but the destination was still closed, travel to destination counties was suppressed by 9-17% for nearby counties and 21-27% for distant counties. But when a destination reopened while an origin was still closed, people from the closed origins flooded into the destination by 11-12% from nearby counties and 24% from distant counties. “People flee closures and flood into newly reopened states,” says Aral, “we can’t avoid the travel spillovers caused by our ad hoc policies.”

These findings highlight the urgent need to coordinate COVID-19 reopenings across regions and the risks created by ad hoc local shutdowns and reopenings. In addition, the results highlight the importance of taking spillover effects seriously when formulating national policy and for national and local policies to coordinate across regions where spillovers are strong.

Mina Tocalini, 360 Magazine, Independence Day Drink

2020 Labor Day Celebrations

By Cassandra Yany

In the face of COVID-19, Labor Day weekend looked very different his year. Absent were the large family cookouts and pool parties, or the big end-of-summer beach crowds. Many cities even had to omit public fireworks to prevent mass gatherings. Though the long weekend did not bring the celebrations we’re used to, there were still plenty of safe ways to enjoy the holiday.

Virtual events allow you to take part in more activities in different locations than you would have been able to physically. Made in America, a festival started by Jay-Z in 2012, was set to take place in Philadelphia this past weekend. On July 1, festival organizers announced that it would be rescheduled to Labor Day weekend 2021. They said in a statement “Collectively, we are fighting parallel pandemics, COVID-19, systemic racism and police brutality. Now is the time to protect the health of our artists, fans, partners and community as well as focus on our support for organizations and individuals fighting for social justice and equality in our country.”

This year’s lineup went unannounced, but last year’s festival was headlined by Travis Scott and Cardi B. Since the physical festival was canceled, a livestream showcasing the best performances took place on the music streaming service TIDAL throughout the weekend. The virtual festival included sets from Beyoncé, Nicki Minaj, Lizzo, Coldplay, Rihanna and many other chart-topping artists.

Nationally, a Labor Day virtual race was held by The Best Races for runners to run anywhere on their own time and submit their results. Participants who registered for the full package received a personal coach who was available Monday through Friday to provide help and answer questions during training, and provided encouragement and support on the day of the race.

Runners across the country were able to choose the distance of the race they wanted to participate in. Depending on what package they signed up for, they received a certificate of completion and digital medal, a 3-inch medal sent to their homes, a printable custom bib, a custom digital photo card that contains the race results, a digital running journal, a t-shirt, optional course maps and an optional pen pal program. 

Based in Portland, the Oregon Labor Movement held a statewide virtual Labor Day celebration and call to action on Monday. The organizers brought light to issues taking place in the state saying, “Working Oregonians are facing three crises at once: a deadly global pandemic, an economic free fall, and long-standing institutional racism.”

The event began at noon and featured talks from Oregon’s labor leaders, elected officials, and working Oregon citizens regarding their desire for change and their pursuit toward justice for workers. This event came after Portland’s rise to national prominence for their Black Lives Matter demonstrations and federal agents entering the city in recent months.

A number of virtual events were held in Los Angeles this past weekend, as well. HomeState, the LA-based Texas Kitchen, held its first Margarita Showdown in 2019, but had to move it online this year due to the pandemic and social distancing measures. The virtual event took place Saturday via livestream. Margarita makers in the area competed to see whose drink was the best.

Voters received eight bottled margaritas, along with limes and garnishing salt to try the different submissions from the safety of their homes. The winner chosen was El Compadre, a local Mexcian restaurant. The event was hosted by comedian Cristela Alonzo, and featured musical performances by Chicano Batman, Spoon, Questlove, Fred Armisen, Local Natives and Angela Muñoz. All proceeds from the event benefit the organization No Us Without You! and the Watts Empowerment Center.

The Gourmandise School of Sweets & Savories in Santa Monica hosted a virtual Labor Day Pies class on Sunday. In the class, participants were taught how to make a s’mores pie and key lime pie. Registration for the class included access to the Zoom video meeting, as well as the recipe and shopping list. Recipes can also be found on Gourmandise’s Instagram.

Some cities were able to hold in-person events following social distancing guidelines. Boston’s Institute of Contemporary Art, located in the Seaport District, upheld its tradition of free admission on Labor Day. The museum is typically closed on Mondays, but was open from 10 am to 5 pm for guests who reserved tickets. 

Monday was the last day for guests to see the exhibits Tschabalala Self: Out of Body and Carolina Caycedo: Cosmotarrayas. Also on display were the Sterling Ruby, Nina Chanel Abney and Beyond Infinity: Contemporary Art after Kusama exhibits. The ICA has increased cleaning and follows Massachusetts COVID guidelines by requiring all staff and visitors to wear face coverings, and allowing a restricted number of guests each hour. Spaces that don’t allow physical distancing are temporarily closed, and exhibition labels and printed materials have been made available online to reduce touch surfaces.


In New York City, a Labor Day Paint in the Park event was held in Central Park. The two-hour socially distant class was led by a master artist who gave step-by-step painting instructions. Participants were required to wear masks and sit six feet apart. Admission included a pre-sketched canvas and painting supplies, and parties were encouraged to bring food and drinks to snack on during the class.

For those who wanted to enjoy the holiday by relaxing at home with their favorite movie or TV show, a number of stores had sales to mark the end of summer. There were countless deals that shoppers could take advantage of to celebrate their work.
Many workers have faced great adversity within the past eight months, some losing their positions and having to move quickly to find a new one, and others doing their job in a way they never thought they would have to. Whether you stayed in or got out of the house for some socially-distant fun, Monday was definitely a day worth celebrating.

flor's new song covered by 360 MAGAZINE

flor – lmho

Alt-pop band flor has unveiled an official music video for their latest single lmho.

flor has had quite the exciting 2020. Singer/guitarist Zach Grace, bassist Dylan Bauld, guitarist McKinley Kitts, and drummer Kyle Hill released their EP reimagined earlier this year. reimagined features stripped-down recordings of fan-favorite tracks like unsaid, white noise, warm blood, and slow motion. Additionally, the EP includes a cover of Coldplay featuring label-mates MisterWives. Watch the track’s official music video, which premiered on Billboard.

In September 2019 flor released their sophomore full-length ley lines. Singles from ley lines including slow motion and dancing around received praise from publications including Nylon, Ones to Watch, and Earmilk. The reign of ley lines concluded in March when flor wrapped their second US headline tour.

Follow flor: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | YouTube | Website

Rita Azar illustrates US Federal officer story in 360 MAGAZINE.

Federal Agents Move into Multiple US Cities

By Emmet McGeown

On June 29, 4-year old LeGend Taliferro was killed by gunfire in Kansas City, Missouri. He had fallen asleep inside his pillow fort and at around 2am he was murdered in a targeted shooting of his apartment, according to the Kansas City Police Department.

Having been diagnosed with a heart defect shortly after birth, LeGend received his first open-heart surgery at just 4 months old. His mother, Charron Powell, said that her only child “has the heart of a lion” and was always excited to create awareness for conditions similar to his.

As a result of this horrific murder and spiking crime rates in St. Louis Attorney General, William Barr, announced “Operation LeGend” on July 8. This Justice Department initiative has directed agents from the FBI, DEA, ATF, and US Marshals Service to supplement local law enforcement agencies with the aim of cracking down on illegal gun trafficking and aiding ongoing homicide investigations.

In total, 225 federal agents were sent to Kansas City to help the 400 federal agents already located in the metro area. US Attorney for the Western District of Missouri, Tim Garrison, announced on July 31 that 97 arrests have been made by federal and local law enforcement since the launch of Operation LeGend. Five arrests were made for homicide, but other offenses cited were drug trafficking, robbery, and child molestation.

However, this has not been the extent of federal intervention in US cities. In a Fox News phone interview, the President stated “We’ll go into all of the cities, any of them. We’re ready.” Such a statement is emblematic of the President’s desire to make federal policing a key part of his Nixonian “law and order” campaign strategy. Undoubtedly, he is hoping to appeal to suburban voters worried about crime spilling into their neighborhoods from urban centers. The President also claimed that he was prepared to dispatch “50,000, 60,000 people” into American cities.

Trump has presented increasing crime rates in cities as a partisan issue whereby Democrat-run cities are the most dangerous places in the country largely due to their leadership’s political affiliation. Overall, out of the 50 largest cities in the US the homicide rate has increased by 25% in cities with Democratic mayors and by 15% in Republican-run cities revealing a decidedly bipartisan issue despite the President’s best efforts.

Operation LeGend’s coordinated law enforcement plan has now expanded into Chicago, Albuquerque, Cleveland, Detroit and Milwaukee. Reasons for this move include a 54% increase in homicides in Chicago from last year, a 7% increase in Detroit’s violent crime compared to the previous year while each of Cleveland’s 5 police districts are coping with an increase in shootings of around 20%.

Such statistics reveal a problem in many US cities, yet the question remains as to whether this problem can or should be solved through federal intervention or whether this, being a local issue, should be remedied via local resources.