Posts tagged with "2020 Tokyo Olympics"

Sunisa Lee illustration by Samantha Miduri for use by 360 Magazine

Suni Lee Wins Full Set at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics

By: Ally Brewster

Women’s artistic gymnastics was at the forefront at the Summer Olympics once again this year in Tokyo. Artistic gymnastics is a highly competitive, technical sport that takes a lifetime to perfect. The sport garners millions of viewers worldwide each Olympics, and marketing teams use the sport as one of the faces of the games. Artistic gymnastics has become one of, if not the, most popular sport each Olympics.

At the Olympics, artist gymnastics is set into two categories: team and individual. Each member of every country competes in qualifying rounds for team finals, all-around finals, and individual events finals. Each competitor gets a chance to let their abilities shine as they compete on each apparatus. This year, each competitor of the USA Gymnastics team shined with Simone Biles, Sunisa (Suni) Lee, Jordan Chiles, and Grace McCallum. Jade Carey and MyKayla Skinner participated as individual athletes for individual events. Though each gymnast shined, one gymnast really caught viewer’s attention. This notoriety was expected as she is a fan-favorite in the Olympics: Sunisa Lee. 

But, who is Suni Lee?

Suni Lee, born Sunisa Phabsomphou, competed in her first ever Olympics this year at only 18-years-old. Though she graduated high school just a few months ago, the Minnesota-native has been doing gymnastics since she was six-years-old. She first began her training at Midwest Gymnastics Center. No Olympic journey is easy, and Suni’s was no exception. Olympians need to train most hours of the day to perfect their craft, which can be difficult to afford. Suni’s father took that problem into his own hands. Her father had always been one of her biggest supporters. He decided to build her a wooden beam in their backyard for her to practice on when they couldn’t afford a real one.

Notably, Suni Lee is the first Hmong-American gymnast to ever compete at the Olympics. Her parents are immigrants from Laos. The Hmong community was excited to have this representation, especially after the year of anti-Asian rhetoric and violence. It meant a lot to the Asian-American community for Suni to be in the Olympics as a positive voice for the community. For some people, Suni was the first time they heard of the Hmong people – an ethnic group living mainly in southern China, Vietnam, Laos, Thailand, and Myanmar. By qualifying for the Olympics, she was able to represent her community. This moment can be used to educate the world on the Hmong people, their community, and the hardships they have fought to overcome.

Going into the Olympics, Suni was a newcomer to watch for Team USA. She was known for her stellar bar routines. Suni went above and beyond even her own expectations. She qualified not only for Team USA and bar individuals, but also for all-around and beam.

During finals, all of Team USA did amazing. The US team gave the competition their all and ending up winning a Silver medal. They were all ecstatic because, with the exception of Simone Biles, it was each member’s first time winning an Olympic medal.

As they went onto individual competition, the team members of Team USA continued to support each other, even while competing. Suni continued to dominate the competition in the individual rounds. She caught the attention of people as she performed beautifully on each apparatus in all-around. Her performance earned her gold in the all-around competition. With the win, Suni became the first Asian-American to win an all-around gold medal.

After the all-around, the individual competition continued with Suni competing on the beam and uneven bars. On beam she performed beautifully, just missing a medal by placing 4th place. Though she did not win a medaling placement, Suni was as impressive as ever as she competed amongst the best gymnasts in the world. 

Coming into the competition, the uneven bars were known as Suni’s specialty. This proved to be the case as she performed a stunning routine. She was awarded third place and earned a bronze medal.

With each of her wins, Suni entered a distinguished group of Olympians that won a full set – earning a gold, silver and bronze medal. Suni made her community proud as she became the first Asian-American to win all-around. Suni is also the first Hmong American to compete in artistic gymnastics. Suni dedicated her Olympic wins to her father, who supported her through everything and watched her live her dream.

illustration by Samantha Miduri for use by 360 Magazine

How Much is an Olympic Medal Worth?

This year, one of the world’s largest precious metals wholesale trading firms, Dillon Gage Metals, is sharing secrets behind the globally recognized Olympic medals athletes train so hard to obtain. The value of an Olympic medal is said to be worth quite a bit, and with the major sporting event just around the corner—beginning July 23 through August 8, in Tokyo, Japan—all eyes will be glued to the television wondering who is going home with a precious piece of history. 

The design of the Tokyo medals, designed by Junichi Kawanishi, reflects the ideology that athletes must always strive to achieve glory and victory daily. The design incorporates light and brilliance in the shape of polished stones, symbolically mirroring the warm glow of friendship, diversity, and representation, and the athletes’ energy and those who continue to uplift them.

“The value of gold is a curious inquiry we receive all the time, especially around the time of the Olympics,” said Terry Hanlon, president of Dillon Gage Metals. “It’s one of the most discernible medals in the world, and it’s only natural for individuals to be curious about what it’s made of and its true value. Most medals awarded during the sporting event aren’t worth much because they aren’t solid gold but rather silver with gold plating.” 

So, the question resides, how much is an Olympic medal actually worth? Every gold medal that athletes receive for their accomplishments is comprised of 99.9 percent silver and 6 grams of plated gold, weighing about 556 grams. Subtracting the gold from the silver brings the medal down to 550 grams in weight, while silver and bronze are a lesser metal weight at 550 grams and 450 grams respectively. 

Considering it takes 31.1033 grams to equal a troy ounce, and if the silver is truly pure silver, it takes some simple mathematics to discover the true value of the Olympic medals. Taking these numbers plus the current trade price of silver, approximately $26.00, and utilizing a common equation, the estimated value of gold can be calculated. 

The equation includes grams divided by troy ounce, then multiplying by trade price to find the dollar amount. In practical terms to solve for the total dollar amount in silver, use 550g/31 x $26.00 to equal $461.29.

In addition to the previous calculation, then add in 6 grams to account for the gold plating. In today’s currency, an ounce of gold is trading approximately for $1,808. Using the same equation to solve the gold composition: 6g/31 x $1,817 = $350.75. 

Combined, the gold and silver composition’s value for the Tokyo 2020 Olympics gold medal is approximately worth $812.04. And the value for the Tokyo 2020 Olympics silver medal is approximately worth $461.29. 

But no matter the actual value of all these medals, to compete on the world stage of the Olympics, one of the most prestigious sports competitions, is truly priceless. Dillon Gage Metals wishes every Olympian luck and sends their support to each nation’s competitors during the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo.

Illustration By Alex Bogdan for use by 360 Magazine

Sha’Carri Richardson Faces Olympics Suspension

By: Emily Bunn

American sprinter, Sha’Carri Richardson, has been suspended from the Olympics for one month.

Sha’Carri Richardson has recently been drug tested and found positive for marijuana usage. As such, she faces a one month suspension from the Olympics- threatening the sensational sprinter’s involvement in the upcoming Tokyo Olympics. Her suspension is set to begin June 28th, 2021.

The New York Times reports that the timing of this suspension could clear Richardson in time to run in the 4×100 meter relay, which takes place later in the games. However, Richardson is set to miss the qualifying rounds for the women’s 100.

Richardson has recently reveled in victory at last month’s 100-meter race at the U.S. track and field trials in Oregon. However, while in Oregon, the Olympian was also dealing with unexpected death of her mother. Not only was this news devastating, but Richardson found out about the very personal circumstance from a reporter.

As a means of coping with the harrowing tragedy, Richardson admitted to her marijuana usage. She stated: “It sent me into a state of emotional panic…I didn’t know how to control my emotions or deal with my emotions during that time.” It should be notes that in Oregon, the use of recreational marijuana has been legalized.

Cannabis is still among the United States Olympic & Paralympic Committee ruling of prohibited substances. The famed athlete apologized to her family, friends, and sponsors for her drug usage: “I greatly apologize if I let you guys down, and I did.”

As a result of Richardson’s suspension, several top runners have been bumped up in their rank positioning. Jenna Prandini is now set to be one of the three American Olympians involved in the women’s 100. Additionally, Gabby Thomas now stands as an alternative athlete for the same race.

Commenting to the Today Show on the situation, Richardson pleaded for spectators to recognize their shared humanity: “I just say, don’t judge me and I am human — I’m you, I just happen to run a little faster.