Posts tagged with "summer olympics"

Sunisa Lee illustration by Samantha Miduri for use by 360 Magazine

Suni Lee Wins Full Set at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics

By: Ally Brewster

Women’s artistic gymnastics was at the forefront at the Summer Olympics once again this year in Tokyo. Artistic gymnastics is a highly competitive, technical sport that takes a lifetime to perfect. The sport garners millions of viewers worldwide each Olympics, and marketing teams use the sport as one of the faces of the games. Artistic gymnastics has become one of, if not the, most popular sport each Olympics.

At the Olympics, artist gymnastics is set into two categories: team and individual. Each member of every country competes in qualifying rounds for team finals, all-around finals, and individual events finals. Each competitor gets a chance to let their abilities shine as they compete on each apparatus. This year, each competitor of the USA Gymnastics team shined with Simone Biles, Sunisa (Suni) Lee, Jordan Chiles, and Grace McCallum. Jade Carey and MyKayla Skinner participated as individual athletes for individual events. Though each gymnast shined, one gymnast really caught viewer’s attention. This notoriety was expected as she is a fan-favorite in the Olympics: Sunisa Lee. 

But, who is Suni Lee?

Suni Lee, born Sunisa Phabsomphou, competed in her first ever Olympics this year at only 18-years-old. Though she graduated high school just a few months ago, the Minnesota-native has been doing gymnastics since she was six-years-old. She first began her training at Midwest Gymnastics Center. No Olympic journey is easy, and Suni’s was no exception. Olympians need to train most hours of the day to perfect their craft, which can be difficult to afford. Suni’s father took that problem into his own hands. Her father had always been one of her biggest supporters. He decided to build her a wooden beam in their backyard for her to practice on when they couldn’t afford a real one.

Notably, Suni Lee is the first Hmong-American gymnast to ever compete at the Olympics. Her parents are immigrants from Laos. The Hmong community was excited to have this representation, especially after the year of anti-Asian rhetoric and violence. It meant a lot to the Asian-American community for Suni to be in the Olympics as a positive voice for the community. For some people, Suni was the first time they heard of the Hmong people – an ethnic group living mainly in southern China, Vietnam, Laos, Thailand, and Myanmar. By qualifying for the Olympics, she was able to represent her community. This moment can be used to educate the world on the Hmong people, their community, and the hardships they have fought to overcome.

Going into the Olympics, Suni was a newcomer to watch for Team USA. She was known for her stellar bar routines. Suni went above and beyond even her own expectations. She qualified not only for Team USA and bar individuals, but also for all-around and beam.

During finals, all of Team USA did amazing. The US team gave the competition their all and ending up winning a Silver medal. They were all ecstatic because, with the exception of Simone Biles, it was each member’s first time winning an Olympic medal.

As they went onto individual competition, the team members of Team USA continued to support each other, even while competing. Suni continued to dominate the competition in the individual rounds. She caught the attention of people as she performed beautifully on each apparatus in all-around. Her performance earned her gold in the all-around competition. With the win, Suni became the first Asian-American to win an all-around gold medal.

After the all-around, the individual competition continued with Suni competing on the beam and uneven bars. On beam she performed beautifully, just missing a medal by placing 4th place. Though she did not win a medaling placement, Suni was as impressive as ever as she competed amongst the best gymnasts in the world. 

Coming into the competition, the uneven bars were known as Suni’s specialty. This proved to be the case as she performed a stunning routine. She was awarded third place and earned a bronze medal.

With each of her wins, Suni entered a distinguished group of Olympians that won a full set – earning a gold, silver and bronze medal. Suni made her community proud as she became the first Asian-American to win all-around. Suni is also the first Hmong American to compete in artistic gymnastics. Suni dedicated her Olympic wins to her father, who supported her through everything and watched her live her dream.

fitness-01 via 360 Magazine for use by 360 Magazine

Olympic Swimmer Ryan Lochte Sets New Personal Records with X1-PRO Device

Despite his age and setbacks due to the pandemic, 12-time Olympic medalist Ryan Lochte is setting new personal records as he prepares to solidify his legacy in the water at Summer Olympics in Tokyo this year.

To gain a competitive edge, Lochte teamed up with David McCagg, a 7-time gold medalist and former world record holding swimmer, who was working on a revolutionary training device for swimmers. McCagg developed the world’s first resistance trainer that travels the entire pool length with the swimmer. It is called the X1-PRO by GMX7, and Lochte, who holds the current world records in the short and long course individual medley, began training with it in 2019.

“The gains I have been seeing by using the X1-PRO are absolutely unbelievable,” said Lochte. “It’s undoubtedly helping me achieve the best times in my career, which at my age, are rather unprecedented.

The X1-PRO is a small, 6-inch-long, resistance training device that weighs less than 4 pounds and clips into the end-point connections for a pool’s lane lines. It can then be connected to the swimmer via a leash and travels on a line back and forth up to 50 meters in length at the adjustable resistance the swimmer desires.

“The versatility and functionality of the X1-PRO has proven to be the difference maker,” said Lochte. “It really has helped our entire team prepare for the global stage in Tokyo.”

Lochte, who is now married and a proud father of two, has been training near their home in Gainesville. This is where he met McCagg in 2018 and where the X1-PRO was originally tested. 

“Ryan approached me, asked what it was and offered to give it a try,” said McCagg, co-founder of GMX7. “Since then, we can’t keep him away from it. Between his work ethic, and mental fortitude, it’s really no surprise that Ryan is the second-most decorated swimmer in Olympic history. There is no doubt in my mind that he’s going to do something special at trials and in the games this summer.” 

Lochte isn’t the only Olympian training on the X1-PRO. Currently, more than 75 anticipated Olympians from 15 countries across the world are training on the X1-PRO in hopes of qualifying for the Tokyo Olympics with more to come.

The X1-PRO is assembled in the USA by GMX7, and has quickly become a necessity for all levels of competitive swim, especially those collegiate swimmers working so hard to get to the very top of their sport.

Development of the X1-PRO began in 2018, and it was tested extensively at the University of Florida prior to becoming available to the general public earlier last year.

About GMX7

Founded in 2018, GMX7 is based in St. Petersburg, Florida and is dedicated to changing the world of swimming by empowering competitive swimmers with the best aquatic resistance training devices ever created. GMX7 was founded by David McCagg, a 7-time gold medalist, former world record holder and winner of multiple national championships. The first device on the market by GMX7 is the X1-PRO. 

Designed by ROBRADY Engineering, the X1-PRO has already been the recipient of five international awards including the 2020 International Design Excellence Award, 2020 Red Dot Award, the 2020 Good Design Award, IDA Design Award and most recently the MUSE Design award in 2021.

Swim illustration for 360 magazine article

Michael Phelps – Seeing a life through the prism of success

Phelps is one of the biggest Olympians ever born. Arguably he is the best swimmer from the United States. His life is a modern-tale, but many hours are invested in self-development. Michael Phelps looks at life through the prism of success. With the desire to win and passion in swimming, he wrote his name in the Olympics books. What’s the actual process of Michael’s training? Is it a myth that Michael swims for hours every single day without a ‘rest’? With this post, we will dig deeper and find the actual process that took Michael from an average swimmer to a world-champion.

Clean water in the swimming pool

Michael’s training consists of two parts every day. He will go swimming in the morning. The second part of the daily routine starts in the evening to finish the day on a high note. There were many trainers in Michael’s career, and all of them know that crystal clear water is the basic need for every swimmer. Training gets easier for a swimmer if the water is clean. If you own a swimming pool, you’ll need swimming pool services to control water quality. When the water in the swimming pool is not controlled, it may lead to serious injuries. As a swimmer, you’ll need help from experienced people to clean water with various flirtations systems. So, Michael’s first rule was the clean water in the swimming pool.

“People underestimate the power of sleep.”

In one of the interviews with CNBC, Michael Phelps admitted that sleeping schedule helps him get better. Michael has won races in the swimming pool with just a few millimetres and milliseconds. Michael realised that he learned the power of sleep at an early age, and it was a big secret to his success. Phelps noted that he couldn’t express the importance of sleep with the words. People always underestimate and overlook the power of sleep when it comes to a proper training regime. For Michael, sleep is a time when his body can recover from daily work. 

Michael Phelps was training from 3 to 5 hours a day, every day without a rest. His body required a good recovery regime, so sleep was the only option. Phelps added that the sleep regime was different. Getting 8 hours of night sleep is essential for every athlete, but if you want to go extra-mile in the marathons or swimming races, you’ll need to take 1-2 hours nap in the early afternoon. 

Put pressure on him.

Olympian was an excellent swimmer from early childhood. His childhood trainer says that Michael was always the best in the school. Even the adults could not beat his time, and he was proud of any achievements. Bob Bowman admitted that Michael was a very tough guy to break; he was training a few hours a day. Once Bob asked Michael to stop swimming and go home. The trainer told Michael that his body could be tired after three hours of training. Michael looked straight into Bob’s eyes and reminded him that his body is never exhausted. At that moment, Bob knew that Michael could become the world’s first swimmer without any doubt. The trainer increased the pressure on Michael, and the swimmer was performing better and better. It’s believed that people show true potential under pressure. 

Vocabulary without “CAN’T”

Bob Bowman said that Michael Phelps knew nothing about the word “CAN’T”. Trainer asked Michael to forget about that word in early childhood. Phelps knows that he can achieve everything, and he needs to focus his energy on particular tasks. Phelps admitted that he has broad thinking and knows that nothing is impossible in this world. Michael says that to achieve success in a specific space, you need to focus only on possibilities.

Give up good for a best

In the first sentence of the article, we wrote that Michael’s life is like a tale. At the same time, his life is full of rewarded risks. In the interview, Michael said that he risked his personal life, and everything worked perfectly in the end. He gave up good for the best achievements. Michael gave up late-night parties, hookups and friend reunions for the best – Olympic medals and legacy. 

Phelps noted that not everyone is ready to give up on social life. Not everyone has to give up their social life because they want to live with a different perspective. Michael wanted to have a significant legacy, and swimming was his success tool. The Olympian admitted that training every day could be boring and tiring on most days, but that’s the life of a champion. If you are willing to take a risk, go all in just like Michael.

Watch video HERE.

Trash talk as a fuel

The Gold medalist knows that he has to be very silent in the pool. Michael admitted that he is getting silent when he enters the training. He noted that trash talking about others is not his cup of tea. At the same time, Michael admitted that he loves hearing people talking trash about him. Phelps loves stories when people trash talk and drag him down with absurd reasons. Swimmer said that he could use trash talk as a fuel to work harder and get better results. 

Focused only on himself

Michael Phelps is focused only on himself. When it comes to achieving goals, the swimmer knows that he has to fight against his weaknesses. Michael said that he is trying to improve his weaknesses every day in the swimming pool. “I’m always staying in my lane,” said Michael, who believes that working on improvement is way better than focusing on the weaknesses of an opponent. 

The Olympic winner says that he loves focusing on himself. If he wants to achieve something, it depends on his work ethic. There is one way to success – focus on you  and create a better self. Michael Phelps said that he can’t control how other people act in different situations – he can control his actions and path. So, that’s why he worried about his actions and daily habits – it worked well in the end.

Allison Christensen Illustrates a Sports Article for 360 MAGAZINE

2020 Summer Olympics

by Justin Lyons

The 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo are following the old show business gospel of “the show must go on.”

John Coates, vice president of the International Olympic Committee, spoke with AFP to say the Olympics would indeed begin in July 2021, whether COVID-19 is still around or not.

The summer games were originally scheduled to take place this summer, but complications from COVID-19 delayed them until next year.

Coates said the next Olympiad will be “the Games that conquered COVID.”

According to BBC, chief executive of the Tokyo Games Toshiro Muto also said it was possible for a limited audience to be in attendance and wanted to avoid having no spectators.

BBC also reported that Muto said a vaccine was not necessary for the games to go on.

Sports were warmly welcomed back in the United States in July, and the National Football League will return this week. Though basketball, baseball and hockey are finishing their seasons without fans, plan for fans in football stadiums remain tentative.

Fans around the country will have their eyes on the situation, and we obviously hope to see fans cheering on their home countries next year in one of the most unifying events in the world if conditions so permit.

JAPAN × CONDÉ NAST TRAVELER

JAPANESE CITIES OF TOKYO, KYOTO AND OSAKA RECOGNIZED WITH CONDÉ NAST TRAVELER’S 2018 READERS’ CHOICE AWARD 

Condé Nast Traveler magazine today announced the results of its 31st annual Readers’ Choice Awards, including the “The Best Cities in the World: Best Big Cities” list, featuring the Japanese cities of Tokyo, Kyoto and Osaka ranked as #1, #2, and #12, respectively. 

“This wonderful recognition of three of Japan’s most prominent cities demonstrates the continued interest in Japan as a top destination among North American travelers,” stated Naohito Ise, Executive Director of the New York Office of the Japan National Tourism Organization (JNTO). “JNTO will continue to work to inspire travelers to visit even more destinations throughout the country, both within these popular cities as well as to more lesser-known regions.”

The Condé Nast Traveler Readers’ Choice Awards are the longest-running and most prestigious recognition of excellence in the travel industry and are commonly known as “the best of the best of travel.” 

One of the most popular cities in the world, Japan’s capital city of Tokyo is a thriving center of culture and the hub of innovation where visitors travel with endless opportunities for diverse activities. In June 2018, Tokyo saw the opening of the world’s first digital museum, the MORI Building DIGITAL ART MUSEUM, bringing three-dimensional art to life in collaboration with renowned art collective group teamLab. On October 11, 2018, Tokyo’s world-famous 80-year-old Tsukiji Market will move into an entirely new space in Toyosu

Two hours via bullet train from Tokyo, Kyoto, the former capital of Japan, offers rich history throughout the city and continues to be a favorite destination among travelers. In 2019, Kyoto will welcome many highly anticipated hotel openings, including the Ace Hotel and the Park Hyatt Kyoto. Even more, in June 2018, Kyoto City Tourism Association launched a new multi-language service to make restaurant bookings easier for incoming travelers, allowing tourists to make reservations and prepay at restaurants in Kyoto. 

The second largest metropolitan area in Japan, Osaka offers modern attractions and classic landmarks throughout the region. Home to Osaka Castle, Shitennoji Temple, Universal Studios Japan, a rich local food scene and abundant nightlife offerings, Osaka has something for every traveler. 

The results of the Readers’ Choice Awards will be published in the November 2018 issue of Condé Nast Traveler, on newsstands nationwide on October 16, 2018. The full list is available online at www.CNTraveler.com/rca.


ABOUT JAPAN NATIONAL TOURISM ORGANIZATION (JNTO):

As the official tourism board of Japan, JNTO is involved in a wide range of promotional activities to encourage international travelers to visit Japan. Through a variety of campaigns and initiatives, JNTO is inspiring more American travelers to visit Tokyo, Kyoto and beyond, and is raising awareness of Japan.

About Condé Nast Traveler 

As the most discerning, up-to-the-minute voice in all things travel, Condé Nast Traveler is the global citizen’s bible and muse, offering both inspiration and vital intel. Condé Nast Traveler is the most trusted and celebrated name in travel with 6 National Magazine Award wins and 26 nominations in its 30-year history. www.cntraveler.com