Posts tagged with "swimmer"

fitness-01 via 360 Magazine for use by 360 Magazine

Olympic Swimmer Ryan Lochte Sets New Personal Records with X1-PRO Device

Despite his age and setbacks due to the pandemic, 12-time Olympic medalist Ryan Lochte is setting new personal records as he prepares to solidify his legacy in the water at Summer Olympics in Tokyo this year.

To gain a competitive edge, Lochte teamed up with David McCagg, a 7-time gold medalist and former world record holding swimmer, who was working on a revolutionary training device for swimmers. McCagg developed the world’s first resistance trainer that travels the entire pool length with the swimmer. It is called the X1-PRO by GMX7, and Lochte, who holds the current world records in the short and long course individual medley, began training with it in 2019.

“The gains I have been seeing by using the X1-PRO are absolutely unbelievable,” said Lochte. “It’s undoubtedly helping me achieve the best times in my career, which at my age, are rather unprecedented.

The X1-PRO is a small, 6-inch-long, resistance training device that weighs less than 4 pounds and clips into the end-point connections for a pool’s lane lines. It can then be connected to the swimmer via a leash and travels on a line back and forth up to 50 meters in length at the adjustable resistance the swimmer desires.

“The versatility and functionality of the X1-PRO has proven to be the difference maker,” said Lochte. “It really has helped our entire team prepare for the global stage in Tokyo.”

Lochte, who is now married and a proud father of two, has been training near their home in Gainesville. This is where he met McCagg in 2018 and where the X1-PRO was originally tested. 

“Ryan approached me, asked what it was and offered to give it a try,” said McCagg, co-founder of GMX7. “Since then, we can’t keep him away from it. Between his work ethic, and mental fortitude, it’s really no surprise that Ryan is the second-most decorated swimmer in Olympic history. There is no doubt in my mind that he’s going to do something special at trials and in the games this summer.” 

Lochte isn’t the only Olympian training on the X1-PRO. Currently, more than 75 anticipated Olympians from 15 countries across the world are training on the X1-PRO in hopes of qualifying for the Tokyo Olympics with more to come.

The X1-PRO is assembled in the USA by GMX7, and has quickly become a necessity for all levels of competitive swim, especially those collegiate swimmers working so hard to get to the very top of their sport.

Development of the X1-PRO began in 2018, and it was tested extensively at the University of Florida prior to becoming available to the general public earlier last year.

About GMX7

Founded in 2018, GMX7 is based in St. Petersburg, Florida and is dedicated to changing the world of swimming by empowering competitive swimmers with the best aquatic resistance training devices ever created. GMX7 was founded by David McCagg, a 7-time gold medalist, former world record holder and winner of multiple national championships. The first device on the market by GMX7 is the X1-PRO. 

Designed by ROBRADY Engineering, the X1-PRO has already been the recipient of five international awards including the 2020 International Design Excellence Award, 2020 Red Dot Award, the 2020 Good Design Award, IDA Design Award and most recently the MUSE Design award in 2021.

Swim illustration for 360 magazine article

Michael Phelps – Seeing a life through the prism of success

Phelps is one of the biggest Olympians ever born. Arguably he is the best swimmer from the United States. His life is a modern-tale, but many hours are invested in self-development. Michael Phelps looks at life through the prism of success. With the desire to win and passion in swimming, he wrote his name in the Olympics books. What’s the actual process of Michael’s training? Is it a myth that Michael swims for hours every single day without a ‘rest’? With this post, we will dig deeper and find the actual process that took Michael from an average swimmer to a world-champion.

Clean water in the swimming pool

Michael’s training consists of two parts every day. He will go swimming in the morning. The second part of the daily routine starts in the evening to finish the day on a high note. There were many trainers in Michael’s career, and all of them know that crystal clear water is the basic need for every swimmer. Training gets easier for a swimmer if the water is clean. If you own a swimming pool, you’ll need swimming pool services to control water quality. When the water in the swimming pool is not controlled, it may lead to serious injuries. As a swimmer, you’ll need help from experienced people to clean water with various flirtations systems. So, Michael’s first rule was the clean water in the swimming pool.

“People underestimate the power of sleep.”

In one of the interviews with CNBC, Michael Phelps admitted that sleeping schedule helps him get better. Michael has won races in the swimming pool with just a few millimetres and milliseconds. Michael realised that he learned the power of sleep at an early age, and it was a big secret to his success. Phelps noted that he couldn’t express the importance of sleep with the words. People always underestimate and overlook the power of sleep when it comes to a proper training regime. For Michael, sleep is a time when his body can recover from daily work. 

Michael Phelps was training from 3 to 5 hours a day, every day without a rest. His body required a good recovery regime, so sleep was the only option. Phelps added that the sleep regime was different. Getting 8 hours of night sleep is essential for every athlete, but if you want to go extra-mile in the marathons or swimming races, you’ll need to take 1-2 hours nap in the early afternoon. 

Put pressure on him.

Olympian was an excellent swimmer from early childhood. His childhood trainer says that Michael was always the best in the school. Even the adults could not beat his time, and he was proud of any achievements. Bob Bowman admitted that Michael was a very tough guy to break; he was training a few hours a day. Once Bob asked Michael to stop swimming and go home. The trainer told Michael that his body could be tired after three hours of training. Michael looked straight into Bob’s eyes and reminded him that his body is never exhausted. At that moment, Bob knew that Michael could become the world’s first swimmer without any doubt. The trainer increased the pressure on Michael, and the swimmer was performing better and better. It’s believed that people show true potential under pressure. 

Vocabulary without “CAN’T”

Bob Bowman said that Michael Phelps knew nothing about the word “CAN’T”. Trainer asked Michael to forget about that word in early childhood. Phelps knows that he can achieve everything, and he needs to focus his energy on particular tasks. Phelps admitted that he has broad thinking and knows that nothing is impossible in this world. Michael says that to achieve success in a specific space, you need to focus only on possibilities.

Give up good for a best

In the first sentence of the article, we wrote that Michael’s life is like a tale. At the same time, his life is full of rewarded risks. In the interview, Michael said that he risked his personal life, and everything worked perfectly in the end. He gave up good for the best achievements. Michael gave up late-night parties, hookups and friend reunions for the best – Olympic medals and legacy. 

Phelps noted that not everyone is ready to give up on social life. Not everyone has to give up their social life because they want to live with a different perspective. Michael wanted to have a significant legacy, and swimming was his success tool. The Olympian admitted that training every day could be boring and tiring on most days, but that’s the life of a champion. If you are willing to take a risk, go all in just like Michael.

Watch video HERE.

Trash talk as a fuel

The Gold medalist knows that he has to be very silent in the pool. Michael admitted that he is getting silent when he enters the training. He noted that trash talking about others is not his cup of tea. At the same time, Michael admitted that he loves hearing people talking trash about him. Phelps loves stories when people trash talk and drag him down with absurd reasons. Swimmer said that he could use trash talk as a fuel to work harder and get better results. 

Focused only on himself

Michael Phelps is focused only on himself. When it comes to achieving goals, the swimmer knows that he has to fight against his weaknesses. Michael said that he is trying to improve his weaknesses every day in the swimming pool. “I’m always staying in my lane,” said Michael, who believes that working on improvement is way better than focusing on the weaknesses of an opponent. 

The Olympic winner says that he loves focusing on himself. If he wants to achieve something, it depends on his work ethic. There is one way to success – focus on you  and create a better self. Michael Phelps said that he can’t control how other people act in different situations – he can control his actions and path. So, that’s why he worried about his actions and daily habits – it worked well in the end.

Isabelle Fries makes a brief splash inside 360 MAGAZINE

ISABELLE FRIES

At 22 years old, Isabelle Fries has started to make a name for herself in the music industry. Not only is she gifted in her art, she has an extremely large heart.

Born in Sydney, but raised in Denver, Colorado, Fries found her inclination for singing at a young age. “I knew I wanted music to be a part of my life since I was about 7, but as I got older I was able to recognize that it is a labor of love for me,” she expressed. “I have never searched for fame through my music.” 

Not long after, she discovered her heart had room for another love, philanthropy. At just 15 years old, Fries became the first youth board member and youth leader for the Global Livingston Institute (GLI) an NGO in Uganda who’s mission is to educate students & community leaders on innovative approaches to international development and empower awareness, collaboration, conversations and personal growth. 

Through working with this organization, Isabelle travelled to Uganda to teach, perform and empower. In 2017, Fries performed in front of 20,000 people in Uganda at the annual iKnow HIV Awareness Concert Series along with other musicians from around the world, using music to breakdown barriers, bring people together and provide free medical testing and awareness for HIV for over 8,500 Ugandans.  

“I became a part of GLI when I was 15 and fully threw myself into their mission and their work. It is what opened my eyes to one of my passions I am now pursuing in international education. They really focus on young voices and drawing on perspectives from all types of individuals which is why I was asked to be on the board at such a young age. GLI is truly one of the most important things in my life so I could not be more thankful to be a part of it.” 

This wasn’t the only organization Fries carried out philanthropic work with. She volunteered in Haiti with The Road to Hope, an International Affairs Intern with Creative Visions in Malibu, California and a community worker with CEPIA in Costa Rica.

Isabelle still wanted to do more for Eastern African communities. She founded the “Bulamu Raise Your Voice Community Foundation (BCF)” and was able to draw on inspiration from one of her other life-long devotions: swimming. 

For twelve years, she swam competitively breaking records, winning State Championships and being a leader on her teams until complications from several autoimmune disorders forced her out of the water. This was never a part of her plan, but she was able to alter her life’s path and kept pushing through

“It is not something that I let control my life or hold me back from living. I take care of myself in every way I can and find strength in what I am able to do and learn new ways to improve my way of life,” she expressed. 

One of Fries’ missions with both GLI and BCF is to raise awareness for water safety on Lake Bunyonyi in Uganda by teaching swimming to prevent drownings. By working closely with GLI and the headmaster of the Kazi Primary School, Fries has been able to carry out this initiative, as well as implementing academic, music and sports curriculum.  

She said that the community of Lake Bunyonyi changed her life by seeing how they are such powerful and driven people. “I don’t go for my own benefit or to be a ‘white savior’ ,” she asserted. “When I work in Uganda, I give the individuals I work with support and resources and they truly do the rest.”

Isabelle was fortunate enough to meet one of her long time role models, Michael Phelps. Fostering a relationship with someone who has shaped her life in so many ways in and out of the water has been such a blessing, says Fries. This lead to her working with the Michael Phelps Foudation (MPF), where she took the opportunity to become certified in their “IM Water Safety Program” which is implemented in The Boys and Girls Clubs of America.

When given the opportunity again to combine her music and philanthropy through the MPF, she couldn’t resist. Isabelle was asked to open for country singer, Eric Church, at a MPF benefit concert in Chicago at the iconic Arcada Theater. “Swimming is an incredibly big part of my life as I was a serious competitive swimmer from the ages of 5 to 18, therefor having the chance to combine my music with my love and passion for swimming and water safety was very special and meaningful.” 

Now a recent graduate of The University of Southern California, Fries splits her time living between Denver and Los Angeles, continuing to pursue her passions: music and philanthropy, while working in Denver at a non-profit dedicated to mentoring students. Isabelle holds a degree in International Relations with minors in Spanish as well as  Non-Profits, Philanthropy and Volunteerism. 

While studying at USC, Isabelle was fortunate enough to catch the eye of Grammy-winning, multi-platinum producer/mixer Rob Chiarelli, who she’s fostered an incredibly close relationship with. 

She began releasing music signed with Chiarelli’s label Streetlamp records this year, already finding a widespread and loyal audience across all music platforms using her rich, soulful vocal that could be compared to the sound of Lauren Daigle or Adele. She recently released her 6th single, a raw piano ballad called “All We Had. When people listen to her music, Fries always wants to make them truly feel – whatever that feeling may be. Through channeling lyrics with her songwriters from her own life experiences, the emotions she is able to elicit are special to her. 

While the music may be interpreted differently for each unique individual, her raw style is something she hopes help guide those listeners on whatever journey they want to take. “I’ve always said, I love music because it lets you feel something you didn’t think you could.”

This is definitely something she mirrors artistically with one of her musical inspirations, Amy Winehouse. Growing up performing jazz music, Fries describes this genre as a big part of her musical identity, so she was instantly drawn to Winehouse’s style which she catalogs as “authentic, raw and groundbreaking. Amy created music unapologetically.”

But Fries’ number one music icon is Sir Elton John. “His music was always around me when I was growing up. My parents loved all music from that time and exposed me to it at a very young age which is one of the reasons it is the type of music I love the most. 

However, Elton John’s music was different for me, it felt like poetry and real emotion. His sound and songs are like stories that you never want to end. When I began to listen to him more I realized this is the type of music I want to sing and be a part of.” 

Feeling very blessed to have found such a supportive team, guiding her in finally being able to put her own original songs out there into the world, she is excited to evolve using her music to help create change, perform live again, and continue to build upon her body of work. While she’s away in the studio recording, we’ll be out here patiently waiting for more music, while she continues to use her voice to make the world a better place. 

AMS Vans/Athlete Award Van

Atlanta-based AMS Vans teamed up with the Aimee Copeland Foundation and FODAC (Friends of Disabled Adults and Children) to present the keys for a wheelchair accessible minivan to the winner of an essay contest. The winner, Kendra Allen, is an Athens Tech college student whose essay detailed the challenges of growing up with cerebral palsy and her dream to help others with disabilities.

Allen’s prize is a 2012 Honda Odyssey wheelchair accessible minivan with $7,500 worth of reconditioning donated by AMS Vans, which will also provide free oil changes and tire rotation for as long as she owns the vehicle.

“I am so thankful for everyone who helped me get this minivan because it means I will finally be able to use my power wheelchair outside my home, making it so much easier to get to class at Athens Tech, see friends and eventually start my own business,” said Allen.

“AMS Vans is thrilled to help Kendra become more independent and we are inspired by her dedication to finish school and fulfill her dreams to create her own company to help others,” said Mark Shaughnessy, CEO of AMS Vans.

The minivan was donated by Aimee Copeland, a competitive swimmer and counselor who lost her hands, right foot and left leg from a flesh-eating bacterial infection in 2012. After receiving the vehicle as gift, she found new independence, started the Aimee Copeland foundation and became the official spokesperson for FODAC.

“This van changed my life and gave me freedom of mobility, and now I am paying it forward so that Kendra may have a better quality of life,” said Copeland. “We could not have done this without AMS Vans and FODAC, and I am grateful for their support.”

“As an advocate for those with disabilities we see first-hand how reliable transportation can change a person’s life by connecting them more readily to work and the community and we are excited to see Kendra succeed,” said Chris Brand, president and CEO of FODAC.

Allen’s essay was selected from 60-entries submitted to the contest that ran from January 7, 2019 to February 7, 2019. Her essay has been posted in full on the Aimee Copeland Foundation Blog.