Posts tagged with "Haiti"

DJ Koze Remix Artwork via Infamous PR for use by 360 Magazine

Lakou Mizik × Joseph Ray

Anjunadeep warmly welcomes DJ Koze for his Anjunadeep debut with his remix of Lakou Mizik & Joseph Ray’s ’Sanba Yo Pran Pale’.

One of electronic music’s most beloved artists, DJ Koze runs the acclaimed Pampa Records, where he puts out his own music alongside material from the likes of Mano Le Tough, Axel Boman and Robag Wruhme. His 2018 album ‘Knock Knock’, released on Pampa, was named as Pitchfork’s 3rd best album of the year, whilst his single ‘Pick Up’ was named track of the year by both Resident Advisor and Mixmag. Known for his inventive production style, he has remixed Gorillaz, Mount Kimbie, Moderat and Lapsley, and collaborated with Róisín Murphy, Bon Iver, José González, Caribou and Matthew Dear.

’Sanba Yo Pran Pale’ is Kosi’s first remix in two years and is typically eclectic. Reimagining the traditional Vodou song as a summer dance anthem, warping and stretching the original vocals from Lakou Mizik’s Sanba Zao onto a bed of catchy rhythmic synths and warm enveloping bass. Ten minutes long, the original mix has a nostalgic analogue warmth that feels perfect for an Indian summer’s day. To celebrate the release, Anjunadeep is pressing a limited run of white label vinyl, which are available for pre-order now.

About Leave the Bones

’Sanba Yo Pran Pale’ is the first track off Lakou Mizik & Joseph Ray’s album Leave the Bones, and is a traditional Haitian song steeped in Vodou tradition: “The Sanbas are the poets and keepers of Haitian history and culture. They pass on their wisdom through song and story. ‘Sanba Yo Pran Pale’ is an invitation to the Sanbas to speak their truth whilst paying respect to the Vodou ‘Lwa’ or spirits.”

Referred to by NPR as a “mesmerizing, haunting and uplifting journey into the heart of Haitian culture”, Leave the Bones has accrued 1M streams on Spotify and Apple Music and has garnered a wealth of global support from the tastemakers such as BBC Radio 1, 6 Music, The Times, Billboard, Crack Magazine, Mixmag, Songlines, The New York Times, and Gilles Peterson’s Worldwide FM. It is out now, available digitally and as a 2 x 12” LP.

Lakou Mizik × Joseph Ray – Leave the Bones

Few albums manage to evoke a time and place with such startling effect as Leave the Bones, the unlikely collaboration between the multi-generational Haitian band Lakou Mizik and Grammy-winning electronic music artist Joseph Ray. Out today, the album has already garnered support from global tastemakers NPR, BBC Radio 3, BBC 6 Music, KCRW, KEXP, CRACK, Afropunk, Songlines, Worldwide FM, and many more.

 The album arrives after the release of three incredible singles and videos, “Ogou (Pran Ka Mwen)”, ‘Lamizè Pa Dou” and “Bade Zile”, offering a window into the beauty of the rich and vibrant culture of the Haitian people. The album precedes a range of high-profile remixes and a feature-length documentary out later this year. In what has been a tumultuous year for Haiti, Leave the Bones provides a unique insight into the creative heart of the island nation.

 “Haiti” is a word that conjures up a lot of images. It is a country judged by many, most of whom have never set foot on its shores. But its history is rich, its people proud and defiant, and nowhere is that more evident than in its music. Culture is what defines the country, its drums and Vaksins (horns) are symbols of freedom and pride, liberty and struggle, and the joy of dancing.

 Leave the Bones paints a musical portrait, a fresh glimpse of an oft misrepresented country. Through Vodou chants, chest-pounding Rara dance tunes and contemporary protest songs, the record conveys the listener to Haiti’s spiritual heart, a place that remains a compelling mystery for foreigners and a source of pride for every Haitian.

 Since its inception Lakou Mizik has sought to re-define people’s conceptions of Haiti through its music. The nine piece band, formed in 2010, is emblematic of the melting pot that is Haiti’s musical culture. Lakou’s figurehead, Sanba Zao, one of only ten original Sanba poets left, played a central role in Haiti’s Rasin (roots) movement of the 1980s which sought to re-imagine traditional Haitian Vodou music through radical experimentation with modern instruments. This spirit of Haiti’s rich musical history underpins Lakou Mizik today; a multi-generational genre-blending ensemble that plays traditional Haitian music with a punk energy and a deep sense of their heritage.

 Joseph Ray, a Grammy winner and founding member of the pioneering Platinum selling electronic music trio, NERO, had never heard of Lakou when he arrived in Haiti in 2015, having volunteered to teach a course at Haiti’s only music production and audio engineering school, the Artist’s Institute. Ray stumbled on Lakou at a tiny beach side club in Jakmel; the scene that night was frenetic and ecstatic, evocative of the spirit of Ray’s early electronic music clubbing experiences. The band’s organic power entranced Ray, who saw the possibility of merging his cinematic electronic production style with Lakou’s own traditional dance rhythms. Their subsequent six year journey led to Leave the Bones, teaching Ray more about himself and music than any other period in his life.

Ray had initially wanted to sample the band, and overlay them on traditional 4×4 electronic beats, but he realized this approach would not evoke the spirit he was so captivated by. Lakou’s organic style needed more room to stretch and breathe, and the album became far more collaborative and deeper in scope. Ray was forced to rethink his approach, learning how to produce and engineer for a nine piece band. He incorporated new time signatures to capture Lakou’s complex drum patterns, lacing in 1930s field recordings from ethnomusicologist Alan Lomax and replacing synth sounds with Mbrias and conch shell samples that he stretched. 

By way of preview, Leave the Bones weaves us through the euphoric swagger of No Rival! and the the mystical underworld of Bade Zile (Under the Island), yet offers lessons for the living, reminding us we should not underestimate those who seem easy to walk upon on Zeb Atè (Grass of the Earth), and that we are all one people, Nou Tout Se Moun.

Leave the Bones is a record that sounds like it could come from nowhere else, and while its rhythms undoubtedly possess a universal danceability, their meaning and depth are also unique to Haiti. It’s powerful to imagine these tracks being played on dancefloors in Miami, London or Ibiza, transporting people from around the world, inviting them to dance, celebrate and get lost in the richness of Haiti, if only for a moment.

Lakou Mizik and Joseph Ray x Leave The Bones

Few albums manage to evoke a time and place with such startling effect as the unlikely collaboration Leave the Bones (out August 6), between the multi-generational Haitian band Lakou Mizik and Grammy-winning electronic music artist Joseph Ray. Following its first two singles, the album has already garnered support from NPR, BBC Radio 3, KCRW, KEXP, CRACK, Afropunk, Songlines, and many more.

Since 2002, German deep house legend Henrik Schwarz has straddled the worlds of electronic, classical and jazz. A key figure in the rise of the iconic Innervisions label alongside Dixon and Âme, Henrik is a renowned producer and live performer. He has delivered cult remixes for Stevie Wonder & Omar, Coldcut, London Grammar and Carl Craig, as well as scoring a ballet in collaboration with Berghain.

Schwarz now makes his debut on Anjunadeep with this remix of Lakou Mizik & Joseph Ray’s ‘Lamizè Pa Dous’, taken from their upcoming album ‘Leave the Bones’. Schwarz builds on the original melancholic tones via a jazzy chord progression and a dissonant hard-hitting hook. Melancholic and evocative, ‘Lamizè Pa Dous’ focuses on one woman’s search for support and meaning. Singing the words “misery is not sweet”, she is pleading with her friends, her community, and the angels to help her get to a better place. Beautiful yet brutally sad, the eventual lyrics “Bondyè rele’m m prale” signal that it is too much and she has given up – “God is calling me and I’m going to go.” The remix is the second of the Leave the Bones album campaign, which lands on August 6.

“Haiti” is a word that conjures up a lot of images – it is a country judged by many, most of whom have never set foot on its shores. But its history is rich, its people proud and defiant, and nowhere is that more evident than in its music. Culture is what defines the country – its drums and Vaksins (horns) are symbols of freedom and pride, liberty and struggle, and the joy of dancing.

Leave the Bones paints a musical portrait, a fresh glimpse of an oft misrepresented country. Through Vodou chants, chest-pounding Rara dance tunes and contemporary protest songs, the record conveys the listener to Haiti’s spiritual heart, a place that remains a compelling mystery for foreigners and a source of pride for every Haitian.

Since its inception Lakou Mizik has sought to re-define people’s conceptions of Haiti through its music. The nine piece band, formed in 2010, is emblematic of the melting pot that is Haiti’s musical culture. Lakou’s figurehead, Sanba Zao, one of only ten original Sanba poets left, played a central role in Haiti’s Rasin (roots) movement of the 1980s which sought to re-imagine traditional Haitian Vodou music through radical experimentation with modern instruments. This spirit of Haiti’s rich musical history underpins Lakou Mizik today; a multi-generational genre-blending ensemble that plays traditional Haitian music with a punk energy and a deep sense of their heritage.

Joseph Ray, a Grammy winner and founding member of the pioneering Platinum selling electronic music trio, NERO, had never heard of Lakou when he arrived in Haiti in 2015, having volunteered to teach a course at Haiti’s only music production and audio engineering school, the Artist’s Institute. Ray stumbled on Lakou at a tiny beach side club in Jakmel; the scene that night was frenetic and ecstatic, evocative of the spirit of Ray’s early electronic music clubbing experiences. The band’s organic power entranced Ray, who saw the possibility of merging his cinematic electronic production style with Lakou’s own traditional dance rhythms. Their subsequent six year journey led to Leave the Bones, teaching Ray more about himself and music than any other period in his life.

Ray had initially wanted to sample the band, and overlay them on traditional 4×4 electronic beats, but he realized this approach would not evoke the spirit he was so captivated by. Lakou’s organic style needed more room to stretch and breathe, and the album became far more collaborative and deeper in scope. Ray was forced to rethink his approach, learning how to produce and engineer for a nine piece band. He incorporated new time signatures to capture Lakou’s complex drum patterns, lacing in 1930s field recordings from ethnomusicologist Alan Lomax and replacing synth sounds with Mbrias and conch shell samples that he stretched.

By way of preview, Leave the Bones weaves us through the euphoric swagger of No Rival! and the the mystical underworld of Bade Zile (Under the Island), yet offers lessons for the living, reminding us we should not underestimate those who seem easy to walk upon on Zeb Atè (Grass of the Earth), and that we are all one people, Nou Tout Se Moun.

Leave the Bones is a record that sounds like it could come from nowhere else, and while its rhythms undoubtedly possess a universal danceability, their meaning and depth are also unique to Haiti. It’s powerful to imagine these tracks being played on dancefloors in Miami, London or Ibiza, transporting people from around the world, inviting them to dance, celebrate and get lost in the richness of Haiti, if only for a moment.

Isabelle Fries makes a brief splash inside 360 MAGAZINE

ISABELLE FRIES

At 22 years old, Isabelle Fries has started to make a name for herself in the music industry. Not only is she gifted in her art, she has an extremely large heart.

Born in Sydney, but raised in Denver, Colorado, Fries found her inclination for singing at a young age. “I knew I wanted music to be a part of my life since I was about 7, but as I got older I was able to recognize that it is a labor of love for me,” she expressed. “I have never searched for fame through my music.” 

Not long after, she discovered her heart had room for another love, philanthropy. At just 15 years old, Fries became the first youth board member and youth leader for the Global Livingston Institute (GLI) an NGO in Uganda who’s mission is to educate students & community leaders on innovative approaches to international development and empower awareness, collaboration, conversations and personal growth. 

Through working with this organization, Isabelle travelled to Uganda to teach, perform and empower. In 2017, Fries performed in front of 20,000 people in Uganda at the annual iKnow HIV Awareness Concert Series along with other musicians from around the world, using music to breakdown barriers, bring people together and provide free medical testing and awareness for HIV for over 8,500 Ugandans.  

“I became a part of GLI when I was 15 and fully threw myself into their mission and their work. It is what opened my eyes to one of my passions I am now pursuing in international education. They really focus on young voices and drawing on perspectives from all types of individuals which is why I was asked to be on the board at such a young age. GLI is truly one of the most important things in my life so I could not be more thankful to be a part of it.” 

This wasn’t the only organization Fries carried out philanthropic work with. She volunteered in Haiti with The Road to Hope, an International Affairs Intern with Creative Visions in Malibu, California and a community worker with CEPIA in Costa Rica.

Isabelle still wanted to do more for Eastern African communities. She founded the “Bulamu Raise Your Voice Community Foundation (BCF)” and was able to draw on inspiration from one of her other life-long devotions: swimming. 

For twelve years, she swam competitively breaking records, winning State Championships and being a leader on her teams until complications from several autoimmune disorders forced her out of the water. This was never a part of her plan, but she was able to alter her life’s path and kept pushing through

“It is not something that I let control my life or hold me back from living. I take care of myself in every way I can and find strength in what I am able to do and learn new ways to improve my way of life,” she expressed. 

One of Fries’ missions with both GLI and BCF is to raise awareness for water safety on Lake Bunyonyi in Uganda by teaching swimming to prevent drownings. By working closely with GLI and the headmaster of the Kazi Primary School, Fries has been able to carry out this initiative, as well as implementing academic, music and sports curriculum.  

She said that the community of Lake Bunyonyi changed her life by seeing how they are such powerful and driven people. “I don’t go for my own benefit or to be a ‘white savior’ ,” she asserted. “When I work in Uganda, I give the individuals I work with support and resources and they truly do the rest.”

Isabelle was fortunate enough to meet one of her long time role models, Michael Phelps. Fostering a relationship with someone who has shaped her life in so many ways in and out of the water has been such a blessing, says Fries. This lead to her working with the Michael Phelps Foudation (MPF), where she took the opportunity to become certified in their “IM Water Safety Program” which is implemented in The Boys and Girls Clubs of America.

When given the opportunity again to combine her music and philanthropy through the MPF, she couldn’t resist. Isabelle was asked to open for country singer, Eric Church, at a MPF benefit concert in Chicago at the iconic Arcada Theater. “Swimming is an incredibly big part of my life as I was a serious competitive swimmer from the ages of 5 to 18, therefor having the chance to combine my music with my love and passion for swimming and water safety was very special and meaningful.” 

Now a recent graduate of The University of Southern California, Fries splits her time living between Denver and Los Angeles, continuing to pursue her passions: music and philanthropy, while working in Denver at a non-profit dedicated to mentoring students. Isabelle holds a degree in International Relations with minors in Spanish as well as  Non-Profits, Philanthropy and Volunteerism. 

While studying at USC, Isabelle was fortunate enough to catch the eye of Grammy-winning, multi-platinum producer/mixer Rob Chiarelli, who she’s fostered an incredibly close relationship with. 

She began releasing music signed with Chiarelli’s label Streetlamp records this year, already finding a widespread and loyal audience across all music platforms using her rich, soulful vocal that could be compared to the sound of Lauren Daigle or Adele. She recently released her 6th single, a raw piano ballad called “All We Had. When people listen to her music, Fries always wants to make them truly feel – whatever that feeling may be. Through channeling lyrics with her songwriters from her own life experiences, the emotions she is able to elicit are special to her. 

While the music may be interpreted differently for each unique individual, her raw style is something she hopes help guide those listeners on whatever journey they want to take. “I’ve always said, I love music because it lets you feel something you didn’t think you could.”

This is definitely something she mirrors artistically with one of her musical inspirations, Amy Winehouse. Growing up performing jazz music, Fries describes this genre as a big part of her musical identity, so she was instantly drawn to Winehouse’s style which she catalogs as “authentic, raw and groundbreaking. Amy created music unapologetically.”

But Fries’ number one music icon is Sir Elton John. “His music was always around me when I was growing up. My parents loved all music from that time and exposed me to it at a very young age which is one of the reasons it is the type of music I love the most. 

However, Elton John’s music was different for me, it felt like poetry and real emotion. His sound and songs are like stories that you never want to end. When I began to listen to him more I realized this is the type of music I want to sing and be a part of.” 

Feeling very blessed to have found such a supportive team, guiding her in finally being able to put her own original songs out there into the world, she is excited to evolve using her music to help create change, perform live again, and continue to build upon her body of work. While she’s away in the studio recording, we’ll be out here patiently waiting for more music, while she continues to use her voice to make the world a better place. 

Michael Brun illustration done by Mina Tocalini of 360 MAGAZINE.

Michael Brun – Bayo Tour

Michael Brun has been touring his critically acclaimed BAYO performances since the show’s inception on the streets of Haiti in 2016. Inspired by Haitian block parties, BAYO brought the energy and soul of these parties, as well as performances from numerous Haitian artists to sold-out venues across the US and Canada.

2020 would have been Bayo’s biggest year to date, but Coronavirus has halted touring around the world. Undeterred, Brun has sought out a pioneering new approach and model to touring during the Covid 19 crisis. This August, Brun will play three city specific Bayo shows which will give fans the unique sense of connection, intimacy and experience that we have all been missing in the absence of live touring. Brun will bring his BAYO Showcase to Chicago, Miami and Los Angeles August 14-15.

These Bayo concerts will be limited to ticket buyers located within 100 miles of each city. Brun will perform each show fully live with audiovisual technology creating a unique look and feel for each event, while also allowing fans to join in and be featured in the stream. Each show will feature exclusive footage from its respective cityscape, as well as past Bayo events and personal footage Michael shot in Haiti.  

These digital performances grew out of Brun’s recent experimentations with his IG streams, which have featured guests like J Perry, Paul Beaubrun and international stars like J Balvin and Jojo. In keeping with the Bayo tradition and Michael’s IG streams, fans can expect surprise guests during the upcoming tour.

Brun has always sought to push boundaries in the music industry. He has served as YouTube Foundry artist, consultant to Spotify, and Beats1 Guest DJ with Apple Music as well performing non-profit work with APJ and The Audio Institute in Haiti. A collaboration with BACARDÍ has been in discussion since last year, and their contribution enabled Michael to create a show that he felt was strong enough to push forward this new model and allow him to continue championing music and artists from the Afro-Caribbean diaspora despite the limitations of social distancing. 

Michael will perform each show from a fully built out production space, featuring state of the art audio visual technology, a full front of house lighting set-up and a multi-camera team. Tickets for each show will be available for sale on Tixr on August 1st at 10am PT starting at $4.99 and each event is 21+. Tixr innovated Bayo’s ticketing plus live-streaming solution, Tixr Play, powering a seamless purchase and viewing experience for fans. Limited edition merch offerings will be available in each city.

Produced in partnership with AWAL, EventCRU, New Epoch Software, Tixr, ToneDen

Follow Michael Brun: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

The Art World in Haiti

AYITI Gallery is pleased to present the works of seven talented Haitian artists carefully selected for their ingenuity, their originality, their narrative and their artistic potential. Our artists represent the new wave of International Inspirational artists that is currently flowing the market. They respond to the rising demand of new art that inspires and educates. They invite the viewer to think deeply and explore a new visionary realm. Our artists are messengers and healers. They express a state of consciousness that transcends a reality. Intuitive, they speak with their soul and push the boundaries commonly known of the art world. Their creative imagination rooted in their identity has preserved the authenticity of their art and freed them from the western norms. Fresh, elegant, avant-garde, colourful and mindful, their art has a unique voice. The quality and originality of their work reminds us Picasso, Dali, Basquiat, Bosch, Breton, or Bruegel the Elder. All are dedicated to an established and mature style and create masterpieces after masterpieces. All have the potential to be the art masters of tomorrow. They are permanently exhibiting in the UK.

AYITI Gallery is a brand name of THE smARTest PROJECT LTD, a certified social art enterprise founded in 2015 that initially supports (isolated) genius artists from Haiti to exhibit and sell their work to a global audience, live and thrive from their art. Over the years, we have pioneered with success the introduction of Haitian art in London. We have increased the visibility of our artists and the value of their art. We have revealed up-and-coming masters and highlighted the emergence of a new trend. We have shown that other form of creativity exist beyond the mainstreamed art. We have created a precedent that revealed a huge niche market for our artists, and furthermore for International Inspirational artists. The potential is significant and the supply of rare and fascinating art is endless. We are present in two thriving markets (African art and its diaspora; and Outsider art) which are triggering a breakthrough in the global art market encouraging collectors to invest now in our artists. We have a long-term vision that goes beyond Haiti, aiming to change the life of thousands through arts, and exploring new collaboration in and beyond the art world to further the vision of our artists and diffuse more Inspirational art in our daily life.

Despite their undeniable talent and their unique sense of creativity, an infinite number of International Artists have limited access to the International Art scene. Their geographic location, their economic situation, their anonymity, the absence of art education background, the nonconformity of their art and their disconnection with the art world isolate these artists from the main international art hubs. The art market has become somehow elitist and conservative. It favours artists who have sufficient financial means to show their work, artists who are able or are enough proactive to market themselves online and offline, artists who have pursued art studies, artists who follow trends and respond to the commercial demand of the market, or artists who live in western countries. It brings artists to compete with one another on an economic basis and rejects a vast majority of talented artists worldwide. It limits the endless variety and originality that International Artists could show to the world, it distorts the true meaning that originates from the creation of art, it narrows the notion of art itself influencing the regard, the taste and the decisions of the general public, and it promotes the duplication of art and artists. The art market has created a replicable business model that runs out of steam and seeks new inspiration. Art is more than a product. It’s a vision, the introspection of a soul, a universal language connecting cultures and individuals together. Art is an invitation to travel. We are meant to bring change and explore alternatives to nurture the infinite potential of International Art and the creative vision of Inspirational Artists.

▪ We believe in artists first

▪ We believe in art as an act of self-expression, with no rules, intuitive, expressive, initiatory, meaningful, and the inner soul as the main driving source of inspiration

▪ We believe in an art that inspires, instructs and provides emotions to people, that opens minds and mentalities, that influences practices and policies, that expresses a message, a feeling, a state of consciousness, that transcends a reality

▪ We believe in equal opportunities for all talented, creative and inspiring artists to show their work worldwide no matter their origin, their background, their status, their renown or their connection to the art world

▪ We believe that the renown of an artist be based on his/her talent, originality, creativity, the aesthetic of his/her work, the deepness and pureness of his/her inspiration

▪ We believe in new technologies to bring the vision of Inspirational Artists to life

▪ We believe in collaboration instead of competition, bringing in diversity into unity, encouraging the collective rather than the individual

▪ We believe in more Inspirational Art in our daily life to stimulate collective consciousness, taking art out of the traditional art premises.

ATHLETIC JUNCTION

​Athletic Junction (AJ) provides comfortable and affordable apparel for sports fans.  As of late, they’ve become vendors for numerous schools, sports leagues, training facilities, sports agencies and emerging businesses throughout Northern America.

Presently, Michael V. Parker II alongside of his partner Justin Harper helm Athletic Junction. Both have participated in NCAA Division I teams as well as played on professional franchises. With a substantial background in sports, they inherently understand what a fan craves. 

Their attire has been proudly worn by dozens of professionals within the entertainment and sports industries. Some of their most recent philanthropic efforts include the following: becoming a strategic brand partner of the National Breast Cancer Foundation, Special Operations Warrior Foundation and aiding disaster relief efforts for orphans in Port au Prince, Haiti. 

They possess an insatiable desire to inspire and expand Athletic Junction’s influence.  “We are a young company with ENORMOUS ASPIRATIONS!,” asserts Parker.  

Justin Harper

Michael Parker

SHOP Athletic Junction.

#EmbraceYourJourney

SHAKIRAS “EL DORADO”

SHAKIRA’S EL DORADO NOMINATED FOR BEST LATIN POP ALBUM AT THE 60TH ANNUAL GRAMMY® AWARDS

EL DORADO WINS BEST CONTEMPORARY POP VOCAL ALBUM AT THE 18th ANNUAL LATIN GRAMMY® AWARDS

SHAKIRA MAINTAINS HER RECORD OF MOST LATIN GRAMMYS WON BY A FEMALE ARTIST

Thirteen-time GRAMMY® Award-winner and international superstar Shakira has been nominated for Best Latin Pop Album at the 60th Annual GRAMMY® Awards for El Dorado. Shakira also took home the Latin GRAMMY® Award for Best Contemporary Pop Vocal Album at the 18th Annual Latin GRAMMY® Awards for El Dorado. Hosted by Jaime Camil and Roselyn Sánchez, the awards took place at the MGM Grand Arena in Las Vegas on November 16, 2017.

 

In addition to its Latin GRAMMY® win, El Dorado has enjoyed huge successes – spending 25 weeks at #1 on Billboard’s Latin Pop charts, 20 of which were consecutive and the latest single “Perro Fiel” is the #1 song on Latin Pop radio this week.

 

With eleven Latin GRAMMY® awards, Shakira is the most awarded female artist of all time. Hosted by James Corden, the 60th Annual GRAMMY®Awards will air live from Madison Square Garden in New York City on January 28, 2018 on CBS at 7:30PM EST.

 

About Shakira

Over the course of her career, Colombian singer-songwriter and GRAMMY® winner Shakira has sold over 60 million records worldwide and has won numerous awards including two GRAMMYs®, eight Latin GRAMMYs®, and several World Music Awards, American Music Awards and Billboard Music Awards, to name a few. She is the only artist from South America to have a number one song in the US, and has had four of the 20 top-selling hits of the last decade. At the age of 18, she founded the Pies Descalzos (Barefoot) Foundation which currently provides education and nutrition to over six thousand impoverished children in Colombia and is expanding its work to other countries, including newly launched projects in Haiti and South Africa. In October 2011, Shakira was named a member of President Obama’s Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for Hispanics.  Shakiraserved as coach on the 4th and 6th season of “The Voice,” NBC’s hit reality vocal competition series that searches for the nation’s best voice. Her tenth studio album “Shakira” was released in 2014, featuring hits such as “Can’t Remember to Forget You,” with Rihanna and “La La La (Brazil 2014)” which she performed at the finals of Fifa’s World Cup 2014 in Brazil. In 2016, she starred as Gazelle in Disney’s record-breaking film “Zootopia,” as well as contributing to its soundtrack with “Try Everything”. In June, she launched “La Bicicleta” with fellow Colombian artist Carlos Vives, which broke records in Colombia when it remained #1 for 18 consecutive weeks and spent 13 weeks at #1 in Spain, as well as reaching #1 on US Latin iTunes. The video, shot in Shakira and Carlos’s hometowns of Barranquilla and Santa Marta, respectively, has over one billion views on Vevo to date. It was followed up by the seductive track “Chantaje” (Blackmail) feat. Maluma. With over 1.9 billion views on YouTube, it is one of the platform’s biggest Latin hits in history. It also reached #1 on the “Latin Airplay” chart and was certified 16x platinum by RIAA. Following “Chantaje,” the music video for “Déjà vu” has reached over 251M views, “Me Enamoré,” co-directed by Shakira has over 484M views, and her most recently released video, “Perro Fiel” featuring Nicky Jam, is at over 300 million views. Shakira recently released her 11th studio album, “El Dorado” which was recorded primarily in Spanish. Upon release, the album charted #1 on iTunes in 37 countries.

 

 

RARE BASQUIAT PHOTOGRAPHS BY ALEXIS ADLER

Cultural venture caribBEING—an organization that illuminates the global Caribbean experience through arts and culture—who is partaking in a one-month residency at Brooklyn Museum, is presenting the exhibition Life With Basquiat, comprised of rare Jean-Michael Basquiat photos from the collection of his friend and ex-lover, Alexis Adler. The exhibition—held in the organization’s mobile shipping container, caribBEING House—depicts an experimental period before Basquiat’s meteoric rise in the art world, when Adler lived with Basquiat on East 12th Street in 1979 and 1980, and is on view through August 28.

Adler’s photographs offer a rare glimpse into the private life of the storied New York painter and street artist, as told through photographs—including images of his high school drawings and graffiti art. Adler met Basquiat in 1979, after she graduated from Barnard with a degree in biology. He was 19; she was 23. During their brief time together, Basquiat used whatever materials he could find to create mixed-media art. He made ends meet by selling sweatshirts on the street. Adler’s collection is a testament to Basquiat’s artistic genius in its formative years. “Throughout his short life, Jean Michael was a prolific artist, working with whatever he could get his hands on to create,” Adler said. “I’m happy to share my collection with the community via caribBEING and Brooklyn Museum as a way to pay tribute to the brilliance of my dear friend.”

Basquiat rose to fame as an artist in his 20s before dying in 1988 at the age of 27. He was a Brooklyn native of Caribbean heritage; his family hails from Haiti and Puerto Rico. “We are thrilled to partner with the Brooklyn Museum to offer this special glimpse into the formative years of an artistic genius,” said Shelley Worrell, Founder of caribBEING. “We are looking forward to connecting with the community to share this chapter of Basquiat’s life story while also drawing attention to a great Caribbean-American artist.” Lauren Argentina Zelaya, Assistant Curator of Public Programs at the Brooklyn Museum, who was a key architect of this residency, states: “Jean-Michel Basquiat is obviously a beloved artist and cultural figure in Brooklyn and we’re excited to honor his Caribbean heritage as a part of our month long celebration of 50 years of the West Indian American Labor Day Parade,” Zelaya said. “He was a junior member of the museum as a young person, so this glimpse into his younger years is a perfect fit. We hope his legacy continues to inspire young artists and creatives who visit us at the museum.”

During the month of caribBEING’s exhibit, visitors are invited to the mobile art center caribBEING House in Brooklyn Museum’s Biergarten to share J’ouvert stories, contribute to a collective Caribbean Newsstand with artist Lizania Cruz in addition to viewing Adler’s collection. Visitors on Saturday afternoons can partake in special storytelling activations on Caribbean cultureCaribbean Artists, and J’Ouvert. Free and open to the public.

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