Posts tagged with "fourth of july"

Image by Samantha Miduri for use by 360 MAGAZINE

HEAT WAVES × THE FUTURE OF CLIMATE CHANGE

By: Andrew Shibuya

It seems as though only months or weeks pass nowadays between environmental global crises. While heat waves, floods, and the like are by no means novel, the twenty-first century has undoubtedly seen an unrelenting torrent of environmental disasters. In the past week alone, a record-breaking heat wave in the Pacific Northwest left nearly one-hundred dead, two separate oil fires burning on the surface of the ocean in both the Gulf of Mexico and the Caspian Sea, and innumerable small fires blazing across the West Coast following Fourth of July celebrations.

The heat wave in the Pacific Northwest impacted Oregon the most, with a total of 95 heat-related deaths on Sunday alone. Temperatures throughout the state reached a record-high of 117 degrees, leaving those without air conditioning or access to a cooler environment the most vulnerable. The Oregon government attempted to mitigate the effects of the heat wave by offering numerous cooling centers and even air conditioners to those at risk of harm.

Of course, the June heat wave that struck the Pacific Northwest was not unusual, nor will it be an outlier in the future by any means. In talking about the heat wave, Oregon Governor Kate Brown most succinctly stated, “This is a harbinger of things to come.” Other Oregon officials echoed this sentiment, with Public Health Director Jessica Guernsey writing the following in a press release for the heat wave: “This tragic event is almost certainly a glimpse into the future for Multnomah County, Oregon, the nation and the world. The impacts of climate change with heat waves, severe winter weather, wildfires, floods, and other rippling effects are happening now and will happen with more frequency for the foreseeable future.”

And while these sentiments are hardly prescient, on the other coast of the United States, a similar heat wave scorched the Northeast. While likewise record-breaking in its own right, the intensity of the East Coast’s heat wave does not come close to matching the Northwest’s. And still, a heat advisory was issued in New York City, and Boston and Philadelphia both issued heat health emergencies.

Of course, this past week was only one of the first weeks of summer, and more heat waves and heat related disasters are likely ensuing. Another heat wave warning has been issued for this coming weekend in California, from the desert to the Bay Area. California also has yet to enter its own “fire season,” which annually typically sees a handful of newsworthy fires that continue for several weeks, ravaging local communities and habitats.

This does not, however, mean that there is a lack of fires. This past Fourth of July weekend saw a marked increase in human caused wildfires. Already under a fire warning, California alone has seen hundreds of fires in the past several days as a result of holiday celebrations gone awry.

And all this is without mentioning the current drought plaguing the West Coast. From 2012 to 2016, California experienced its worse drought in over a millennium. The current drought finds many questioning the future of many essential Californian industries, such as farming, which will undoubtedly affect the largest economy in the United States.

Though one may be curious about the origin of these disasters–namely the drought and heat waves–one needs to look no further for evidence than the two oil fires on the high seas this past week. The fires, one in the Caspian Sea and one in the Gulf of Mexico, were both caused by oil explosions. The former is said to have been caused by the eruption of a “mud volcano,” or possibly a mud volcano interacting with a nearby gas field. They are still investigating the cause of this fire.

The fire in the Gulf of Mexico, however, was solely and indubitably man caused. A gas leak from an underwater pipeline by Mexico-owned gas company Pemex saw the inferno come about just off the coast of the Yucatan Peninsula. A Mexican official has stated that there was no spillage, but there is still no explanation for the blaze.

Given all this, and the increased quantity of these sorts of events yearly, one can only wonder what a solution might be, and if such a solution is even plausible. And as each new catastrophe arises, it seems as though they are becoming normalized, with no action taken besides Twitter outcry. Beside merely pointing fingers at each other and pushing the onus of the responsibility around, the multibillionaires, their corporations, and the government ought to be able to do something.

Of course, it’s not as simple as expecting those groups to fix these global issues, as it is wholly a worldwide effort. As trite as it might seem, solutions to global issues require the actions of whole global populations. But besides recycling, eating with the environment in mind, and similar small (yet important) actions, what is the average person to do? Still, corporations such as Amazon are allowed to pollute and produce millions of pounds of plastic waste annually without consequence. Furthermore, former president Donald Trump once pulled out of the Paris Agreement in the name of America’s economic interests.

And so, just as Robert Frost once pondered if the world would end in ice or fire, the answer to his question seems to be becoming most clear now. As economies and profits seem to be more important than humanity’s future, the world will continue to burn, oceans will continue to rise, and people will continue to die. And as is true with many great problems, the issue is easy to see and difficult to solve–whether humanity will rise to its challenge is another issue entirely.

illustration by Maria Soloman for use by 360 magazine

Over 150 people shot, more than 400 shootings over the weekend

By: Kai Yeo

In June, the total reported number of shootings were at 272. According to data compiled by the Gun Violence Archive (GVA), at least 150 people were killed by gun violence in more than 400 reported shootings across the country as major cities nationwide confront a surge in gun violence during the Fourth of July weekend. The 72-hour data chart includes shooting accidents and gun violence victims and has constantly been updating.

New Yorkers saw 21 shootings that injured 26 people between Friday and Sunday, according to the New York Police Department, is a decrease from the same period last year when 30 people were shot in 25 shootings. On July 4, NYC experienced 12 shooting incidents that involved 13 victims, an increase from last year when there were eight shootings and eight victims.

Gun violence incidents in New York have spiked almost 40% over the same period in 2020, with 767 shootings and 885 victims.

In Chicago, 92 people were shot over the holiday weekend, 16 of whom died. According to the Chicago Sun-Times, the 76 wounded include six children and teenagers, and two Chicago police officers who were dispersing a crown on the city’s West Side.

The homicide rate in Chicago this year is 2% lower than the same period in 2020, but the number of victims is still 14% higher.

Mass Shootings

GVA defines a mass shooting “based only on the numeric value of four or more shot or killed, not including the shooter.”

Eight people were injured in a shooting near a car wash in Fort Worth, Texas, early Sunday morning after a group of men got into an argument. Fort Worth Police released a statement on Twitter than an officer heard gunfire around 1:30am and found eight people with gunshot wounds upon arrival at the scene.

A KTLA report shows that two men were killed and seven people were injured in a neighborhood late Sunday night in North Las Vegas. Police say that victims were chased through Venice neighborhood before deadly car-to-car shooting.

In Norfolk, Virginia, four children were shot on Friday afternoon – a 6-year-old girl, a 14-year-old boy, a 16-year-old girl, and 16-year-old boy – the 6-year-old girl was reported to have life-threatening injuries; however, she is now considered to be in stable condition. Detectives have charged a 15-year-old boy with the following: malicious wounding, attempted malicious wounding, shooting into an occupied building, possession of a firearm by a juvenile, and two counts of use of a firearm.

In suburban Atlanta, police responded to a report on Saturday and found golf professional Gene Siller shot near the green of the 10th hole of the Pinetree Country Club in Kennesaw. This was also where he worked as the golf pro, according to the Cobb County police. Siller was found unresponsive with an “apparent gunshot wound to the head” and pronounced dead at the scene, along with two other gunshot victims on the course.

One juvenile dead and eleven others were injured in a shooting at a block party in Toledo, Ohio on Sunday night. According to Police Chief George Kral, more than 80 rounds were fired from multiple guns. Two victims, a 51-year-old and a 19-year-old, are in critical condition, Kral said, and the other nine people wounded are in stable condition, their ages ranging from an 11-year-old to three 19-year-olds.

Cincinnati police said two males (16 and 19) were killed and three others were injured at a holiday celebration at a park late Sunday night. The two were “engaged in a verbal altercation that resulted in them exchanging gunfire” and the other victims were caught in the crossfire. Two girls (16 and 17) and a 15-year-old boy were wounded in the shooting. According to Cincinnati police Chief Eliot Isaac, the 17-year-old girl is in critical condition while the other two victims suffered gunshot wounds that were not life-threatening.

Dallas police responded to two separate shootings on July 4. A 61-year-old man was killed in the first incident after being shot “multiple times in the street during a disturbance” and died at a local hospital. The second incident involved five men who were shot, and three of the victims were pronounced dead after being transported to a nearby hospital.

Fireworks by Mina Tocalini for use by 360 Magazine

M RESORT SPA CASINO FOURTH OF JULY FIREWORKS

M Resort Spa Casino will host their Fourth of July fireworks and partnership with the City of Henderson’s Star-Spangled Sky 2021. To honor and celebrate the Henderson community and neighboring Las Vegas locals, the resort will offer spectators an extended 15-minute firework display choreographed to music on Independence Day, Sunday, July 4 beginning at 9 p.m.

The 2021 Star-Spangled Sky fireworks will be choreographed to music broadcasted locally from four iHeartRadio stations including Sunny 106.5, 95.5 The Bull, 93.1 The Mountain and Real 103.9 FM. Patriotic music can be heard live on air as well as via stream from the iHeartRadio app available in the Apple App Store or Google Play Store.

While free public viewing of the fireworks will be available from many areas inside and surrounding the resort, M Pool Deck will offer a special reserved firework viewing area offering pool access for guests starting at 8 p.m. through the conclusion of the fireworks. Admission for the M Pool Deck reserved area is priced at $10 a person with limited availability and seating will be first come, first serve the day of the event. Swimming is permitted with proper swim attire.

M Resort became Henderson’s only resort on the famous Las Vegas Strip when it opened its doors in 2009. This place was also recommended by top gambling review sites and listed by best online casinos in New Jersey as one of the most promising gambling venue of the year. Now celebrating its 12th year, the award-winning property is a pillar of the Henderson community and the Official Team Headquarters Hotel of the Las Vegas Raiders.

About M Resort Spa Casino

M Resort Spa Casino, the Official Team Headquarters Hotel of the Las Vegas Raiders, is a Forbes Four-Star resort located on more than 90 acres on the southeast corner of St. Rose Parkway and Las Vegas Boulevard. Situated higher in elevation than other resort-casinos on the Las Vegas Strip, M Resort provides optimal views of the world-famous Las Vegas skyline from its guest rooms, suites, conference center and restaurants. The resort offers 390 guest rooms and suites, over 92,000 square feet of gaming, nine restaurants and bars including the all-new Raiders Tavern & Grill, the Forbes Four-Star Spa Mio, a modern fitness center with floor to ceiling windows overlooking M Pool, the resort’s 100,000 square foot pool and events piazza. M Resort is operated by Penn National Gaming, Inc.

Artwork by Kaelen of 360 Magazine

4th of July Travel Destinations

4TH OF JULY SIGHTS, SOUNDS, AND STOPS, Curated by the American Coach® Brand

Each year, Americans mark the country’s birth with Fourth of July celebrations. The national holiday recognizes the day the Declaration of Independence was adopted during the Second Continental Congress on July 4, 1776, in Philadelphia, PA. 

For RVers and those who love to travel, Independence Day delivers some of the best sights, sounds, and stops of the year. And, while the East Coast is rich with “independence” sites, there are also a plethora of significant museums, attractions, activities, and fireworks displays throughout the country that represent the United States and its independent, bold spirit.

The American Coach recommended road stops begin with some lesser-known sites and end with more traditional ones. All the destinations have been selected based on their historic, patriotic, or All-American flair.

Made in the USA, American Coach is an ultra-luxury brand of recreational vehicles that’s celebrating its 30th anniversary. American Coach motorhomes are known for their exquisite design, lavish touches, and innovative engineering that make a road trip a relaxing and indulgent experience. New models feature such amenities as high-end kitchens with black stainless steel appliances, quartz countertops with waterfall edges and hand-crafted kitchen cabinets; spacious and luxurious master bedrooms and baths with articulating king beds, spa showers and his and her sinks; and superior technology components such as 50” exterior TVs. American Coach is part of the REV Recreation Group (RRG), a subsidiary of REV Group, Inc.

American Coach models have earned numerous industry awards, including “Top RV Debut” and Must See RV. For more information, visit their website.

Please note: each Fourth of July stop has been researched but be sure to call ahead to confirm hours of operation, advance ticketing requirements, and other relevant attendance details.

Lesser Known Fourth of July Stops

Kaboom Town!, Addison, TX

Everything is bigger in Texas, so it is not surprising that on July 3 there’s a “best of” fireworks show that lasts for a solid 30 minutes just outside of Dallas. It is not only locals who brag about the patriotic display, but it’s also received accolades from the American Pyrotechnics Association, too! Spectacular views can be found throughout Addison but one of the best ways to take in the show is to book a watch party at a local restaurant or hotel. The parties typically include live music and special Fourth of July morsels and libations, served with a side of festivities.  

RVers can stay overnight at Sandy Lake MH & RV Resort near Dallas. The resort’s amenities include a dog park, fitness center and swimming pool.

National Museum of the U.S. Air Force, Near Dayton, OH 

For more than a century, the U.S. Air Force has defended the United States in the air, space, and cyberspace through the skill and bravery of American Airmen and Airwomen. Located on the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, the free National Museum of the U.S. Air Force is the world’s largest military aviation museum. The museum features more than 350 aerospace vehicles and missiles and thousands of artifacts. 

One of the historic events showcased at the museum is the moon landing. On July 20, 1969, the United States’ Apollo 11 became the first crewed mission to land and walk on the moon. Touch actual rocks from the lunar surface of the moon and the planet Mars as part of SPACE: A Journey to Our Future, a highly interactive special exhibit that showcases the country’s space exploration program.  

RVers can spend the night at Thousand Trails – Wilmington RV Resort. The resort has 170 acres of premiere camping along with an on-site lake that provides opportunities to fish and canoe.

Let Freedom Sing!, Nashville, TN

Known as America’s home to country music, downtown Nashville is hosting a free Let Freedom Sing! event that includes a concert by three-time, Grammy-winning singer and songwriter Brad Paisley. The city is also putting on its largest fireworks show ever, synchronized to live music from the Nashville Symphony.  

Located on a peninsula with views of Percy Priest Lake, RVers can spend the night at Elm Hill RV Resort, which offers full hook-up sites and a number of other amenities. Guests can also rent boats, kayaks and paddleboards to explore Percy Priest Lake.

Cody Stampede Celebration & Parade, Cody, WY

To truly experience the spirit of America’s Wild West, plan to attend the four-day Independence Day celebration in Cody that runs July 1-4. Since 1919, Cody has been showcasing the toughest and most talented cowboys and cowgirls, legitimately earning its title as Rodeo Capital of the World.

During the holiday, Cody is hosting the PRCA Rodeo where contestants compete for $400,000 in prize money. The weekend also includes three parades where the red, white, and blue will be on full display – a Kiddies’ Parade on July 2 and a Stampede Parade on July 3 and 4. At dusk on July 4, fireworks will explode above the Wyoming River. Cody is also home to the Buffalo Bill Center of the West with five museums under one roof. Explore Plains Indian cultures, trailblazing cowboys and cowgirls, classic and modern western artworks, and more.

Cody is 55 miles from the east entrance of Yellowstone National Park, which became the country’s first national park on March 1, 1872. In addition to its exploding geysers, bubbling paint pots, mesmerizing hot springs, and travertine terraces, Yellowstone is also home to the United States’ national symbol, the bald eagle.

RVers can stay overnight at Ponderosa Camp Ground

Independence Rock Historic Site, Alcova, WY

Travelers who happen to be in southern WY traveling on State Route 220 should keep an eye out for the Independence Rock Rest Area. The granite rock is approximately 130 feet high and was a well-known landmark on the Oregon, Mormon, and California emigrant trails. More than 5,000 names are carved on the rock by 19th century pioneers who traveled treacherous trails and braved tough conditions in search of their American dream in the Western states. One of the earliest names carved into the rock is M.K. Hugh and is dated 1824. Hiking is allowed on and around the rock.

Overnight accommodations aren’t plentiful near Independence Rock Historic Site so it’s best visited along the way to another destination.

Freedom Park, Omaha, NE 

Located along the banks of the Missouri River in the heartland of the country, Freedom Park honors the United States Navy. The free outdoor park and museum showcase two impressive pieces of military hardware – the minesweeper USS Hazard, which received three battle stars for its service during World War II, and the Cold War-era training submarine USS Marlin. 

RVers can spend the night at West Omaha / NE Lincoln KOA Holiday, which offers 85-plus RV sites that are satellite friendly.

AmericaFest, Pasadena, CA

AmericaFest, held at the Rose Bowl Stadium, promises to deliver the largest Fourth of July fireworks display west of the Mississippi. The day-long event is a celebration of all things red, white, and blue and includes tailgating, live entertainment, motorcycle stunt show, and a world-renowned fireworks show.

RVers can stay overnight at Orangeland RV Park conveniently located nearby a number of Anaheim attractions. 

Columbia State Historic Park, CA

While the Gold Rush produced great wealth for some, it also transformed the United States. As miners rushed in, the population of California swelled, helping to accelerate its admission to the Union as the 31st state.

Two years after gold was found in 1848 at Sutter’s Mill, the town of Columbia was established. Today, visiting Columbia State Historic Park is like traveling back in time. Visitors are surrounded by the largest collection of gold-rush-era structures in the state of California. Merchants are dressed in 1850s attire, there is the smell of coal smoke from the blacksmith shop, and the rumble of a stagecoach as it arrives in town. Stroll down Main Street, stop in the vintage shops and eateries or try to strike it rich by panning for gold.

Columbia is one of three gold-rush towns clustered together on the outskirts of Yosemite National Park, which is famous for its giant sequoias, dramatic waterfalls, and granite cliffs.

RVers can stay overnight at Black Oak Casino and Resort – a perfect home base for visiting Yosemite and touring the Gold Country. 

Traditional Fourth of July Stops

Freedom Trail, Black Heritage Trail, and USS Constitution, Boston, MA

Since Boston is considered the birthplace of the American Revolution, a stop in this seminal city is a must. Boston-based events that led up to the Revolutionary War include the Boston Tea Party and Siege of Boston. Naturally, many of the leading American Patriots, James Otis, Samuel Adams, John Adams, John Hancock, and Paul Revere, hailed from Boston.

A 2.5-mile walk along the Freedom Trail includes 16 locations that are significant to the United States’ fight for independence. The trail, most of which is marked by a red brick path, includes the Old South Meeting House, Old State House, and Paul Revere’s House, each of which charge an admission fee. The Boston Common, Granary Burying Ground (the final resting place of John Hancock, Paul Revere, and several other historic figures), Bunker Hill Monument and ground markers that denote a historic site or event round out the stops along the Freedom Trail. Visitors can take their own self-guided tour or book a private tour, many of which feature knowledgeable guides in 18th century garb.

The National Park Service offers free guided tours and brochures for self-guided exploration of the Black Heritage Trail. The trail is a 1.6-mile walking tour of 14 historic sites that explores the history of Boston’s 19th century African American community who primarily lived on the north slope of Beacon Hill. The tour, which is the largest collection of historic sites relating to life within a free Black community prior to the Civil War, includes the Museum of African American History, 54th Regiment Memorial, and the African Meeting House. The trail also features several stations on the Underground Railroad, which escaped slaves used to flee from the South to freedom in the North and Canada. In 1783, Massachusetts was the first state to abolish slavery.

While the USS Constitution (also known as Old Ironsides) was not part of the American Revolution, she is a testament to the honor, courage, and commitment of U.S. sailors to protecting our country. Launched in 1797 from Boston, she fought in the War of 1812 and survived a barrage of cannonballs fired from by British. She remains a commissioned vessel with a crew of officers and enlisted personnel.

RVers can spend the night at Boston Minuteman Campground and take advantage of the nearby hiking and biking trails.

Independence Hall and Museum of the American Revolution, Philadelphia, PA

The Declaration of Independence (a list of grievances against the King of England to justify separation from British rule) and The Constitution (a charter of the United States government ratified by the states) are foundational documents of the United States. Take a guided tour of Independence Hall to see the Assembly Room where both were signed in 1776 and 1787, respectively. Independence Hall, originally known as the Pennsylvania State House, also features an original draft of The Constitution.

Just steps from Independence Hall is the Museum of the American Revolution. Opened in 2017, the museum shares the compelling stories of the diverse people and complex events that sparked America’s path toward liberty, equality, and self-government. Amazing artifacts include an extensive collection of Revolutionary War weapons, diaries, and personal letters. See a replica of the Boston Liberty Tree (where the revolution was first discussed), General George Washington’s tent, and a 13-star flag. Don’t miss the special exhibit, “Flags and Founding Documents, 1776-Today,” that showcases dozens of rare American flags, a copy of the first newspaper printing of the Declaration of Independence, and historic early state constitutions.

RVers can stay overnight at Philadelphia South / Clarksboro KOA Holiday, a peaceful country campground just 20 minutes from Philadelphia.

Statue of Liberty, New York, NY

At a graceful 305’ tall, the Statue of Liberty is a towering symbol of American freedom. The statue was sculpted by French artist Frédéric-Auguste Bartholdi and gifted to the United States by France in 1875 to commemorate the countries’ alliance during the American Revolution. In her right hand, Lady Liberty holds a torch above her head. In her left hand, she carries a tablet inscribed with JULY IV MDCCLXXVI (July 4, 1776 in Roman numerals), the date of the U.S. Declaration of Independence. 

The statue can be viewed from various vantage points along the Hudson River. For an up-close- and-personal look, take the ferry that departs from Battery Park to Liberty Island where the Statue of Liberty stands.

RVers can stay overnight at Liberty Harbor RV, which also delivers views of the Statue of Liberty and is next to Liberty Harbor Marina.

The National Mall, Washington, D.C.

The nation’s capital is packed with patriotic things to do and see – many of which are free. 

To meet all the presidents of our great country, visit the National Portrait Gallery, which showcases the stories and people who shaped America. The America’s Presidents exhibit features the largest, most complete collection of presidential portraits outside of the White House. The gallery also includes paintings of Martha Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Michelle Obama, and several others.

The free Smithsonian museums located on the National Mall include the National Museum of American History (see the flag that inspired the Star-Spangled Banner), National Museum of the American Indian (shares the diversity of culture, language, history, tradition, and futures of indigenous peoples of North and South America), and the National Museum of African American History and Culture, which opened in 2017. It’s the only national museum devoted to the documentation of African American life, art, history, and culture. Significant artifacts include garments worn by slaves, a Bible owned by rebellion leader Nat Turner, Emmett Till’s glass-topped casket, training aircraft used by the Tuskegee Institute, and an invitation to President Obama’s 2009 inauguration. 

RVers can spend the night at Cherry Hill Park that offers full hook-up sites and a number of other amenities.

Arlington National Cemetery, Washington, D.C. area

Just outside of D.C., it’s worth a visit to Arlington National Cemetery. Rich with American history on acres of well-manicured grounds, everyone can deepen their knowledge of our great country.

Visit the gravesites of Presidents Taft and John F. Kennedy at Arlington National Cemetery. Taft, the 27th president, was the first president to be buried in Arlington after his death in 1930. Kennedy, the 35th president, was laid to rest in 1963 after his assassination. Most presidents choose to be buried in their home states.

According to the cemetery website: First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy wanted her husband’s gravesite to be accessible to the American public. In selecting a location, she consulted with the president’s brother, Robert F. Kennedy, and Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara—both of whom are also buried at Arlington.

In addition to the presidential graves, the cemetery is the final resting place for many notable Americans, including veterans of the American Revolutionary War, military leaders, astronauts, Supreme Court Chief Justices, and many others.

RVers can spend the night at Cherry Hill Park that offers full hook-up sites and a number of other amenities.

Mount Vernon, Mount Vernon, VA

Just a short drive from Washington, D.C., is Mount Vernon – an American landmark and the historic home of America’s first president, George Washington, and his wife, Martha. The Washingtons lived in a two-story Georgian mansion overlooking the Potomac River on an estate that was originally 8,000 acres.

Step back into history and tour the Washingtons’ plantation home, a blacksmith shop, stable, smokehouse, slave quarters, and other outbuildings that supported daily life. An extensive museum shares background on Washington’s life prior to becoming president and the legacy he left behind. The site also includes a memorial to the hundreds of enslaved men, women, and children who worked the plantation.

A unique way to visit Mount Vernon is by boat. Families can travel down the Potomac River and see the Washington Monument, United States Capitol, and other historic sites from a completely different vantage point. The boat trip is narrated and takes approximately three hours round trip. Families disembark at Mount Vernon and have four hours to explore the estate. Mount Vernon can also be reached by bike via the scenic Mount Vernon Trail. The ride takes approximately one hour, and bikes can be rented in Alexandria.

RVers can spend the night at Cherry Hill Park that offers full hook-up sites and a number of other amenities.

Colonial Williamsburg, VA

Founded in 1699, Williamsburg was established by England as the capital of the Virginia Colony. Today, Colonial Williamsburg is dedicated to preserving and sharing 18th century colonial life during the time when the United States was being formed. 

Recognized as the world’s largest living history museum, a visit to Colonial Williamsburg is an immersive experience. Costumed and wigged interpreters stroll the streets talking in the language and diction of the 1700s. The city’s colonial shops, taverns, homes, kitchens, and gardens are tended to by weavers, wigmakers, and residents of the time. Watch as blacksmiths recreate weapons and hardware that supplied the armies during the Revolutionary War. Tour the Capitol and Courthouse to learn about the founding principles of Virginia government and justice in the 18th century. Book a carriage or wagon ride and dine at a historic tavern serving Colonial-inspired fare, including Welsh Rarebit, Savory Pasty, and Salet of Snipped Greens. 

Learn about the role American Indians played in creating a new country and the impact of the Declaration of Independence on African Americans in Williamsburg. When the Declaration was written, more than 52 percent of Williamsburg’s population was enslaved. Take in a museum theatre exploration of African American perspectives on the Declaration, the revolutions it inspired, and the ongoing struggle for equality and freedom in America.

To commemorate the Fourth of July, the city is hosting a celebration on historic Duke of Gloucester Street with patriotic festivities, public readings of the Declaration of Independence, musical performances, and a fireworks display. 

RVers can spend the night at American Heritage RV Park with its lush meadows and wooded sites. The park also offers premium sites with patio furniture, an outdoor fireplace and extra space.

Colonial Parkway, VA

An entire Fourth of July can be spent in Virginia’s Historic Triangle of Jamestown, Williamsburg, and Yorktown. The 23-mile Colonial Parkway connects the three towns and has numerous scenic pull-offs with historical markers that provide descriptions of the view. A day-long Liberty Celebration at the American Revolution Museum at Yorktown features outdoor living-history experiences that allow visitors to explore life in Washington’s Continental Army, see artillery demonstrations, and watch performances by the Fifes and Drums of York Town. In the city of Yorktown, evening activities include a bell-ringing ceremony, patriotic concert, and an amazing fireworks display booming over the York River. 

RVers can spend the night at American Heritage RV Park.

Martin Luther King Jr. National Historical Park, Atlanta, GA

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was an African American Baptist minister and one of America’s foremost Civil Rights activists from 1955 until 1968, when he was assassinated. At the age of 35, he was the youngest man to receive the Nobel Peace Prize and donated the $54,123 cash prize to advancing the Civil Rights movement. See Dr. King’s boyhood home, the original Ebenezer Baptist Church, and The Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change (“The King Center”). The National Park Service has restored many of the neighboring buildings to reflect the 1930s and 1940s, the time when Dr. King grew up. Today, visitors can step into that era and imagine themselves walking down the street, hearing the noise of the lively neighborhood, and experiencing what life was like in those tumultuous times.

Mount Rushmore National Memorial, Keystone, SD

This colossal stone edifice in the Black Hills of South Dakota took 14 years to complete from 1927 to 1941 and cost approximately $1 million. The heads of Presidents George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, and Abraham Lincoln are 60 feet tall and were carved into the granite face of Mount Rushmore. The four presidents were chosen to represent the nation’s birth, growth, development, and preservation.

On July 3, presidential reenactors George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, and Theodore Roosevelt will be strolling the grounds, giving talks about their presidency, posing for photographs, and providing autographs. 

And, while Mount Rushmore isn’t hosting its typical Fourth of July fireworks display, many of the surrounding small towns are. Throughout the Badlands and Black Hills, American pride will be on full display with parades, re-enactors, Old West shootouts, cook-offs, car show ‘n shines, live music, ice cream socials, farmers markets, and more.

RVers visiting Mount Rushmore can stay overnight at American Buffalo Resorts or Mount Rushmore KOA Resort at Palmer Gulch in the heart of the Black Hills.

About REV Recreation Group

REV Recreation Group, Inc. (RRG) is a REV Group® company and a leading manufacturer of Class A Gas and Diesel recreational vehicle brands. This company has one of the best and longest standing distribution networks in the industry and boasts some of the industry’s most recognized and iconic brand names such as American Coach, Fleetwood RV, and Holiday Rambler. REV Recreation Group is headquartered in Decatur, IN, which is also its principal manufacturing location. In addition, RRG operates two state-of-the-art service and repair centers and a genuine parts online warehouse.

About REV Group, Inc.

REV Group® (REVG) is a leading designer and manufacturer of specialty vehicles and related aftermarket parts and services. We serve a diversified customer base, primarily in the United States, through three segments: Fire & Emergency, Commercial, and Recreation. We provide customized vehicle solutions for applications, including essential needs for public services (ambulances, fire apparatus, school buses, and transit buses), commercial infrastructure (terminal trucks and industrial sweepers) and consumer leisure (recreational vehicles). Our diverse portfolio is made up of well-established principle vehicle brands, including many of the most recognizable names within their industry. Several of our brands pioneered their specialty vehicle product categories and date back more than 50 years. REV Group trades on the NYSE under the symbol REVG.