Posts tagged with "music production"

Insuficiente by Sael and Beele cover art from Black Koi Entertainment via NV Marketing and Public Relations, LLC by Nini Veras for use by 360 Magazine

Sael and Beele – Insuficiente

Sael and Beele join their talents for the release of “Insuficiente”

Available on all digital platforms

Argentina and Colombia come together to give life to “Insuficiente.” The voices of Sael and Beele make the perfect match to this song that brings a positive message into today’s society and is now available on all digital platforms.

Inspired by female empowerment, Sael and Beele wrote this song for all women who, at some point in their lives, have felt “insufficient” next to their partners.

The song was born under the wings of the record label Black Koi Entertainment, with the production of Sael and Taiko and the co-production of Sky Rompiendo. “Insuficiente” begins as a sensual urban ballad that later becomes a powerful reggaeton, with a dynamic and commercial rhythm.

The song premieres with its official music video, shot in the beautiful city of Medellín, Colombia, under the lens of filmmakers Film by Dave and Lucas Emiliani.

Sael is part of the new generation of urban music interpreters. He is currently receiving great support from his fans, allowing him to make his born-country Argentina proud of his talents. So far, Sael has more than 45 thousand subscribers on his YouTube channel and his music videos collect millions of views.

Insuficiente by Sael and Beele cover art from Black Koi Entertainment via NV Marketing and Public Relations, LLC by Nini Veras for use by 360 Magazine

Fritz Michel "Look Out (Botticelli Girl)" artwork via Jon Bleicher at Prospect PR for use by 360 Magazine

Fritz Michel Q×A

Originally from France and currently based in New York City, Fritz Michel is a sensational, international star and storyteller. Michel has previously worked in film, television, and the stage, but is currently taking the music industry by storm. He recently released the highly anticipated single and music video for “Look Out (Botticelli Girl),” which can be viewed HERE. 360 Magazine spoke with Michel about his creative song writing process, the true meaning behind “Look Out (Botticelli Girl)”’s lyrics, and his upcoming debut EP release.

What has the reaction to the release of “Look Out (Botticelli Girl)” been like?

One really great thing to come out of the release of “Look Out (Botticelli Girl)” has been the opportunity to reconnect with artists that I have not had the chance to work with. I just shot a music video for the song in Oregon with a longtime filmmaking colleague. We used analog special effects, like puppets and slide projections, to create a visual story. I feel fortunate that my music is helping me tap into a whole new creative language. The streaming platforms allow you much more global reach as an artist. I’ve made personal connections with listeners and music writers all over the world over the past year, and that’s been amazing.

You’ve described “Look Out (Botticelli Girl)” as a meditation and contemplation of amazing works of art and human history. Have any artists or pieces of art, besides Botticelli’s ‘Birth of Venus,’ inspired your music?

I look for musical inspiration everywhere. I borrowed the image of Ulysses lashed to the mast in Homer’s “The Odyssey” in my song “Stardust”. I use some snaky guitar steel there to speak of my homeward journey across the sprawl of Los Angeles from Hollywood to the PCH and beyond, while pining for my New York roots. 

What was the song writing process for “Look out (Botticelli Girl)” like?

“Look Out (Botticelli Girl)” came to me very fast after a visit to the Metropolitan Museum of Art one afternoon last fall, right after the museum had reopened. I find that the galleries calm me emotionally and transport me creatively. I thought about that tension between permanence and impermanence that I experience [while] looking at a great painting and standing in awe of the flow of history. I also thought about capturing little human moments in music [in] the [same] way a painting does. You see that in the verses. I also thought “Botticelli Girl” had a catchy ring to it and would make a good lyric!

How has the pandemic affected your music creation process?

I really started exploring songwriting out of necessity when the pandemic exploded and put the brakes on performing live with my bands. My world changed on a dime, and that prompted a lot of introspection along with observation. I spent a great deal of time alone in my NYC apartment with my guitar. Fortunately, I discovered the space to learn the basics of music production and found the motivation to reach farther with the process. That’s the been a silver lining to the disruption and tragedy of the last year.

In three words, how would you describe the sound of “Look Out (Botticelli Girl)?”

Atmospheric, reflective, acoustic.

You are multi-talented artist, having shared your skills through music, film, TV, and the stage. Looking ahead, which of these creative avenues are you looking to focus on the most?

I’m very fortunate to have worked in music, film, TV, and stage. Music is a lot like putting on a play in my experience. You have to find or write a script and bring your own colors, sounds, and perspectives to the story. Rehearsal is required and technical elements need to come together. Then, you hope that somewhere there’s an audience that’s interested in what you have to say. Looking ahead, I plan to focus my creative process wherever I find willing collaborators and a game audience that’s open to the story. I’m making videos to go with my other releases (“Darker Now,” “Stardust,” and “King of Corona”).

I’m also thinking about writing a musical set in a family [of] architects with a longtime theater colleague, Oren Safdie. We collaborated closely on the premieres his trilogy of plays about architecture. One of my first acting gigs was performing in Oren’s spoof of “Fiddler on the Roof,” set in modern-day Montreal at La Mama, ETC on East 4th Street. So, in that way, I think I’ll be exploring all those avenues in the year ahead. 

What is something about you or the release of “Look Out (Botticelli Girl)” that fans may not guess or suspect?

I doubt many people who listen to my music would guess that I was born and spent my childhood in France. We’ve also talked about Botticelli a lot in this interview, but much of “Look Out” comes from personal reflection on my own history. Termini’s is an old Italian pastry shop we used to frequent in South Philadelphia. I lived in Tribeca during 9/11 when the towers fell. When I refer to cherubs, I was really thinking of my own daughters there, less than the ones in “Birth of Venus”! Someone might pick up on those details on a closer listen to the song.

Do you have any more releases to come in 2021 that you can tell us about?

I’m finishing up a couple so I can put out my first EP this fall. I want to get back to performing, too. So much of what I know about music, I learned playing bass in a jazz quartet– so I hope we get that going again. For me, music is a good way to tap into our need for bliss, storytelling, and myth in life. I think it’s all about that conversation and listening to one another.

Kailee Sparks image via Jodi Jackson at JJ Entertainment for use by 360 Magazine

Kailee Spark QxA

Indie artist Kailee Spark recently released her song, “Passageways” and is set to release her debut album Savor This come June 2021. The rising starlet’s poignant lyricism and angelic voice are highlighted on her most recent release, earning her nearly 200k followers online and comparisons to Taylor Swift and Jewel. However, Spark’s music is emotive, sensitive, visceral, and completely her own. Here at 360 Magazine, we spoke with Kailee Spark to discuss her background as a musician, inspiration behind “Passageways”, her future musical bucket list, and more.

Who is someone that doesn’t listen to your music that you think should?

So, I’d say my music could be liked by anyone who enjoys poppy radio stations. I think my music is very uplifting for the most part and that younger people would enjoy it.

 What’s your ideal press headline 12 months from now?

Something that talks about my unique style and that it’s playing all over the radio.

 What’s your background?

I grew up in the Bay Area, raised Mormon, left the church at age 22 and moved to Big Island Hawaii shortly after, where I’ve lived since. Finished my bachelor’s degree in anthropology at UH-Hilo, then decided to get my MA just for the hell of it [and] applied cultural anthropology at Humboldt State University in Northern California.

I’ve been primarily self-employed since living in Hawaii. I used to sell crystals at the farmer’s market and then got into the car rental business with an ex-boyfriend.

I love traveling and have spent a lot of time in India and can speak a little bit of Hindi.

What motivates you to get up everyday to do what you do?

Having fun and constantly learning new things. I like thinking that through my music or entertainment I inspire others.  

How has your family inspired you and your music?

My parents are big into classic rock and stuff like Bob Dylan, Cat Stevens, etc. So, I grew up listening to a lot of music. I started piano lessons around age 8 and wrote my first real song at age 12 which I performed at school functions. At age 15, a random man from my church brought over a guitar on Christmas morning for me. I had wanted a guitar for a long time and I was stoked, I began teaching myself right away and writing songs.

Where did you grow up?

I grew up in San Jose, CA. My sister and I spent a lot of time in the backyard climbing trees, or riding our rollerblades around the neighborhood.

What made you move to Hawaii?

I wanted to learn about permaculture and raw food diets and on a forum somewhere I read about a community on the Big Island. So, I first came here to do an internship at this bizarre community for three months – it was clothing optional kind of hippie commune. I decided on my third day in Hawaii I would be moving here – it just felt right.

How does Hawaii inspire your music?

Yes, it definitely inspires a lot of nature themes. Many of my songs include some element of nature in them. I live in a really peaceful setting, and my house is on an acre of mostly jungle. I wake up in the mornings to the sound of birds singing and I fall asleep to a chorus of frogs and crickets. Sometimes the stars are so magnificent and bright, and the lava, the ocean, and the aloha 

Who inspired you to make music?

I can’t think of a specific person, but I just always loved music. At one point I was obsessed with this CD my parents had called “Wacky favorites” which had songs like “The auctioneer boy” and “Tie me kangaroo down sport”. I’d listen to it over and over. I remember sitting on the floor listening to this CD when I decided that I wanted to do music someday, I must have been around 6 or 7.

What or who inspired your song “Passageways”?

When I first started writing the song it wasn’t about anyone specific, just a feeling I had like I knew that someone was out there that I’d feel that way about. A bit later I met someone and I said oh that’s who this song was for, let me finish it.

Talk about your producer on this song?

Bub Pratt is a talented musician and our styles vibe together. I was confident he could produce my song and record with the sound I wanted. The engineer Keli’i is also very talented.

Talk about the lyrics to this song?

This song is about that intense curiosity you get when falling in love with someone. You want to know everything about them, everything that made them who they are today. Who are they? What are the pains they experienced? Wanting to feel them fully and surrender yourself to loving them. The beginning of the song refers to me having traveled around a lot. I’ve traveled and done so many things, but now I want to explore this person and who they are.  

Where do you get your ideas for song writing?

I don’t usually ever think okay today I’m going to write a song about…. Sometimes I’m able to get into a flow and words just come to me. I usually start by messing around with the guitar and humming out melodies, until I come up with something I like. Then I feel the vibe of the song and wait for some words to float into my consciousness while I play it over and over. Sometimes I’ll just record guitar on its own and listen to it while I drive or whatever and come up with words and themes that way.

What’s your ultimate message to your fans?

That you are powerful and can create the life you want for yourself. Don’t take life so seriously.

What charities are you aligned with?

I used to actually work at a nonprofit here on the island that assisted the homeless in finding housing. Wow I had some crazy experiences there!

I was pretty interested in an organization that helps build squat compost toilets in rural parts of India (open defecation is a big issue which ends up resulting in babies with malnutrition and being stunted), but I don’t know if that’s a glamorous thing to talk about.

What projects will you be involved with in the future? 

Would love to write some more songs and start working on another album at the end of the year or next year.

 Who are your biggest influences?

Jewel, Laura Veirs, Bright Eyes, Emily Wells. I love Bright Eyes/Conor Oberst, his songwriting is splendid. He’s a good example of someone who doesn’t really have a great voice, but people love his music because of the emotion and depth to his songs. I love his lyrics “I could’ve been a famous singer if I had someone else’s voice. But failures always sounded better, let’s live it up boys, make some noise!”

How have you developed your career?

As a musician…well, I just only recently started making money off it. I wasn’t really trying to be a musician for a while, and went through some wild depression and didn’t pick up the guitar for long stretches of time.  But recently in the past year I started playing a little bit and was surprised to find that people loved it. People kept asking me to play, and then I kept getting asked where they could download my music. This led to me searching for a place to record and that’s when I found Kukuau Studio (May 2020).

What kind of singer would you classify yourself as?

Not quite sure how to classify it. I have a soprano voice, but I sing kind of like Bob Dylan/Conor Oberst but female. I have my first voice lessons tomorrow, so let’s see what my instructor says. I wouldn’t really call myself a singer, more of a musician singer/songwriter. I don’t have a super great voice.  But I kind of think my unique voice is an asset to me rather than a hindrance, because I don’t sound like everyone else. I try to really convey emotions through my voice, and I think that’s why people like my voice. Oh, but I do love yodeling. Maybe call me a yodeler.

What skills have you learned that will help you in your singing career?

To relax, it’s okay to not be perfect.

What is the best advice you’ve been given?

I’d say that the fun really is in the journey, not the destination…That’s where my idea for the album name came, “Savor This”, it’s like savor the moment. Right now is where all the fun is. The destination is fun too, for a little while. But then I’ll want the next thing…happiness is an inside job.

What advice would you give to a singer starting out?

Keep practicing and writing but don’t be too hard on yourself, it should be fun.

How did you get started with your manager?

It just kind of worked out…he offered to help me by being project manager for my album release. I know I need help with other things too, so I’m like why not just [have a] manager? We get along really well, and he is very good with people.

Which famous musicians do you admire?

Jewel, Katy Perry, Bright Eyes, KT Tunstall, Michelle Branch, Avril Lavigne, Taylor Swift, Laura Veirs, Dolly Parton, and Eminem. 

What would you be doing right now, if it wasn’t for your music career?

Writing, I like to write about my travels and what not.

Do you like that you’re being compared to Taylor Swift?

Sure, she is a talented songwriter.

What’s next for you in 2021?

My album release, making some cool music videos, and I’d like to do some traveling if possible, too.

How do you take care of your voice?

I try not to overdo it; I went through a phase where I was singing and playing online like 4-6 hours a day most days, and I think it strained my voice. I try to give it time to rest and don’t push it if my voice is just not feeling good that day. I also stopped eating dairy for the most part.

What’s your health regime?

I eat pretty healthy and go on regular walks and do stretching and weightlifting a couple times a week. I got my yoga teacher training certificate at a training center in India, but I’ve never taught yoga.

If you could collaborate with another artist, who would it be?

Conor Oberst, Laura Veirs, and Mormon Tabernacle Choir.

 What’s the one take away you want your fans to feel after they listen to your music?

Feel self-empowered and playful.  

What is on your playlist right now?

Bub Pratt’s latest album, I love it, also been listening to Emily Wells.

When did you know you wanted to be an entertainer?

When I was a kid.

What’s on your musical bucket list?

Would love to be on billboard charts, nominated for Grammy someday, would be sweet. Have a song on the radio. It should be pretty cool to get my “Universe at your fingertips” song into an iPad commercial or something.

Any plans for future touring?

Not immediate plans, but it would be great if I had the opportunity to do so. I love traveling. Traveling and music combined sounds awesome.

What is your first musical memory as a child?

A church song “Popcorn popping on the apricot tree”

Do you play any instruments?

Guitar, piano, and kind of drums (haven’t played regularly for a few years). I want to add some more to the list soon.

What’s your typical day like?

Wake up around 8am, have some tea and coffee, listen to inspirational YouTube videos or music, go for a walk with a dog, write in a journal and a to-do list.

What’s your fashion style?

Kind of neutral colors and reds, I love leather boots and my converse sneakers. I don’t know how to describe my style. Sometimes skirts but mostly jeans or leggings.

What do you do to relax?

Take a bubble bath, meditate, listen to self-hypnosis, go on walks, and massage.

What are your hobbies?

Playing instruments, reading about all kinds of things, especially travel memoirs and funny stuff like David Sedaris, hiking, spending time in nature, and traveling.

What’s your favorite type of food? Do you cook?

Thai, Mexican, Japanese, and Korean. I do cook; I like to make a lot of soups and simple but tasty and healthy things.

How has the pandemic impacted your life?

Started making more money. Had to cancel some big travel plans to go to India with a good friend to go shopping for her wedding saree.

 What’s the one thing you think everyone could do to make the world a more positive place?

To not hold anyone else responsible for their happiness, also to follow your passions.

If there was one recording artist you wanted to meet, who would that be?

Dolly Parton seems cool…or Jewel.

What is the best part about being famous?

I’m not famous yet, but I do enjoy having an audience of fans who resonate with my music, and hearing from them how I have positively impacted their lives feels really good.

How To Maximize Productivity In Music Production

Technology continues to change the face of music, affecting how it’s created, produced and recorded.

But whether all musicians working in their studios are getting the most out of the opportunities technology affords them is another question altogether. In many cases, they may be missing out on technological tips – or at least technological shortcuts – that could help them increase their productivity.

“There are so many ways these days that musicians can increase the amount of quality work they are doing, but people sometimes miss basic shortcuts that can significantly improve their workflow,” says Deborah Fairchild, president of Nashville-based VEVA Sound (www.vevasound.com), which verifies and archives projects for clients in the music industry.

But with the right tools, instead of getting bogged down by minutiae, the musician (or producer) can concentrate on the more creative aspects of the work by taking advantage of methods for doing things more directly and more quickly than would be the ordinary procedure without the technological help.

Fairchild says the engineers at VEVA Sound have provided a few tips to increase productivity in creators’ music workflow:

  • Create, and then work from, custom templates. Within a Digital Audio Workstation (DAW), users have the option to create templates that can help speed up the workflow and eliminate repetitive tasks that can drain the creativity out of you. “By creating templates, you gain the ability to start each project from a familiar setup that best accommodates your individual workflow, while keeping best practices in mind,” Fairchild says. “This also fosters continuity between projects so that they will be easier to revisit in the future.”
  • Create custom keyboard shortcuts.  Most DAWs give musicians the ability to create custom keyboard shortcuts.These shortcuts can increase your efficiency exponentially, Fairchild says. “Because there is so much functionality in each of these platforms, creating custom shortcuts will give you quicker access to the functions you use most,” she says. “The result will be that you can produce your desired results with little or no wasted time and effort.”
  • Label everything accurately. Make sure that every track in your project is labeled correctly, Fairchild says. “Is that line an acoustic guitar? Note it,” she says. “The same goes for project files.” Instead of naming something “final mix final final edits 2,” come up with a naming convention that accommodates each improved version of a project in your workflow, such as “My Song_Final Mix_Ready for Master.” Correct labeling can be especially important when you are collaborating because you want everyone involved to know what a track contains without having to guess.

“Ultimately, the right workflow can give musicians a break from fretting over all the little details that slow them down, and allow them to put their imaginations and original ideas front and center in the production process,” Fairchild says. “The result is musicians can be more productive and more creative all at the same time.”

About Deborah Fairchild

Deborah Fairchild, president of VEVA Sound (www.vevasound.com), started her career with the company as an archival engineer in 2004. In the past 16 years she has risen to lead the company in all facets of the business. She has grown VEVA into a global entity servicing major labels in North America and Europe, establishing offices in New York, Los Angeles, and London in addition to the company’s headquarters in Nashville. Fairchild has kept VEVA at the forefront of technology and continues to evolve and adapt VEVA’s services and technology to assist the needs of their extensive client base. She advises many label executives, producers, engineers and artists seeking archival and asset management solutions.

Zonnique, 360 MAGAZINE

T.I. and Tiny: Zonnique QxA

1. How does the influence of your parents’ careers shape your own visions and aspirations?

The making of my own new path and my parents have always been great examples of how to go about things in the industry. They are also both great examples when it’s come to molding myself and presenting myself a certain way. I definitely take after them a lot but I also enjoy it each and every day.

2. What has been the biggest challenge in your artistic career so far?

I would say my biggest challenge so far has been coming out of a group and going through the process of transitioning myself into a solo artist.

3. How did growing up in Atlanta with its huge T.V. and music scene impact where you are today?

I always feel like everything comes from Atlanta. We always set the trend for the culture and just growing up seeing so many legends come out of Atlanta was an inspiration to be a part of.

4. What were some of the major takeaways or skills you learned from working with Producer, J Reid?

I love working with J Reid! He’s always so welcoming and makes me comfortable working with him and expressing myself. As a result, he’s taught me a lot about how to collaborate with someone else and overall helped groom me into the artist I am today.

5. What is your favorite song you’ve worked on and what message does it send to the public?

My favorite song I’ve worked on would have to be the FTCU song I put out because it was just so fun to make! The message is honestly to just enjoy life and when your man is stressing you out, go out and live your best life.

6. Describe some of the struggles as well as the positive experiences that come with starring on “T.I. & Tiny: The Family Hustle?”

The biggest struggle I would say is being under your parents’ shadow and everybody associating me as T.I. and Tiny’s daughter. However, it’s great to have memories with my family, and bringing light to my craft is always a plus.

7. As a new artist, who would you want to work with (male or female) and why?

I would like to work with so many artists, Rihanna Jhene Aiko, SZA, 6lack, and Eric Bellinger because I admire their work. They’re all so extremely creative.

8. What kind of content and which kind of audience do you see yourself approaching in the next 5 years? 

I’m mostly an R&N artist, so in about 5 years I would like to start approaching the pop world.

9. Now that you have released your double single, what are the next steps to promoting your songs?

When corona is all over, I’m going to shoot my videos for both songs. Hopefully, I can do both and I don’t think I’ll be able to do shows so I may just have to wait till next year to do that. On the bright side, I’ll definitely find creative ways to still go out and promote my music.

JEREMIH × TY DOLLA

WATCH THE LYRIC VIDEO FOR “THE LIGHT” HERE

LISTEN TO “THE LIGHT” HERE

DJ Controller 

Roland Displays DJ-505 DJ Controller


Also included are new sample packs, plus limited time bundle featuring 
BPM Supreme membership and Roland Cloud Academy training


Roland (LVCC Central Hall, Booth #17544) is displaying the DJ-505, a new DJ controller for Serato DJ. Equipped with features derived from Roland’s popular DJ-808 DJ Controller, the DJ-505 offers onboard Roland TR drum sounds, dual low-latency platters, Serato DJ integration, vocal FX, and more. Released to wide acclaim in 2016, the DJ-808 DJ Controller is a state-of-the-art creative tool with a four-channel mixer, built-in drum sequencing, vocal processing, and the deepest Serato DJ integration available.

The DJ-505 is a two-channel, four-deck Serato DJ controller that comes with the complete Serato Tool Kit. With its portable design, pro-grade build, and advanced feature set, the DJ-505 is ideal for mobile applications, club DJing, live performance, and music production. Two large, low-latency platters on the DJ-505 provide responsive, lag-free performance for turntable-style scratches, while eight pads with 13 modes offer dedicated controls for Serato DJ. Also included are built-in drum kits from Roland’s classic TR-808 and TR-909 drum machines; each kit contains eight sounds that can be played on the performance pads and triggered from the onboard TR-S sequencer. The sequencer has a dedicated TR-style interface, and TR drum sounds and Serato samples can be adjusted in real time using panel knobs. The DJ-505’s mixer is Serato DVS Upgrade Ready, and can be used standalone with multi-players or turntables connected to the line and phono inputs. The DJ-505 functions as a USB audio/MIDI interface with 24-bit/48 kHz fidelity, high-resolution digital-to-analog converters, a MIDI output for controlling and syncing external devices, and a 1/4-inch mic input with gate, hi-pass, reverb, and echo FX. 

Additionally, the DJ-505 comes standard with four brand-new sample packs. Each pack contains eight high-quality WAV samples newly created by Roland that are ready to load into Serato Sampler, expanding users’ performance options with sounds from popular music genres that can be sequenced and mixed into DJ sets. The four new sample packs cover a number of styles: ‘80s, Drum ‘n’ Bass, EDM and Trap. The sample packs are available at the downloads page for the DJ-505.

For a limited time, Roland is including the DJ-505 as part of an exclusive bundle. The DJ-505 bundle, worth an additional $150.00+, includes a free 90-day BPM Supreme Standard membership ($59.97) and access to free DJ-505 Roland Cloud Academy training ($100+ value per training session).

To learn more, please visit Roland.com.