Posts tagged with "Cat Stevens"

Mary McGuinness "Gonna Feel It Again" cover from Mackenzie Breeden, Jay Wilson, for use by 360 Magazine

Mary McGuinness New Single – Gonna Feel It Again

Today singer/songwriter Mary McGuinness released a new song titled, “Gonna Feel It Again” accompanied by a visualizer. Press here to watch. When McGuinness sings that “better days are coming” in “Gonna Feel It Again,” the first post-pandemic track among five new songs she plans on releasing through the end of the year, her soaring vocals cut straight to the heart, assuring us everything is going to be alright.

After releasing her album Prodigal last year (press here to listen) followed by stand-alone covers of Kenny Rogers’ “The Gambler” and Bread’s “If” (press here to listen to both) when the lockdown hit, McGuiness returned to the studio, this time with producer Joel Shearer (Dido, Annie Lennox, Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeroes, Joe Cocker, Damien Rice, Michael Buble, Sarah McLachlan).

“Singing and songwriting is very healing for me,” McGuinness says. “I don’t know if I’d be here without music. Thankfully, I’ve always had that to keep me somewhat on the rails.”

McGuinness’ voice is a force of nature, at once combining Joni Mitchell’s multi-octave range, the warmth and heart of Karen Carpenter and the earthy purity of Emmylou Harris. Her vocals and music have been praised on DittyTV, The Bluegrass Situation, and Americana Highways which said, “an exhilarating vocal – sprung from and old-word seed.”

Born in Fort Hood, TX, to an Irish-Scottish Green Beret Father, and Korean Mother, McGuinness spent time in Korea and Texas, surviving a harrowing childhood, and grew up with her Grandparents in Long Island, NY. A high school music teacher took McGuinness under her wing and encouraged her to pursue singing. She studied classical voice at the prestigious Manhattan School of Music – which she put herself through with commercials, waitressing, and a stint on Broadway.

McGuinness has toured through the US and supported the likes of Train, Kenny Loggins, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, Shawn Colvin, Counting Crows, and Gavin DeGraw. She has written chart topping singles on Billboard and released four studio albums under another project.

These upcoming new songs shine a light on her influences, everyone from The Eagles, Bill Withers, Fleetwood Mac, and Linda Ronstadt to Cat Stevens, Willie Nelson and The Beatles. Her eclectic musical tastes show in her cover material, which can range from Peter Gabriel (“Washing of the Water”) – (Press here to watch the video directed by McGuinness herself) to Kris Kristofferson (“Please Don’t Tell Me How the Story Ends”).

““Gonna Feel It Again” is what I told myself during the lockdown,” she says. “I just kept reminding myself, life is a cycle. Sometimes you have to push through the dark times, to get to the light on the other side. The good times always come back around. It’s how we choose to look through the lens, always looking for the beauty in the people and world around us. I did a lot of soul searching and introspection over the past year like a lot of people. I feel like I grew a great deal. And I’m really grateful for the positive things that came out of this time.”

Mary McGuinness’ music and songs being at the top of that list.

Kailee Sparks image via Jodi Jackson at JJ Entertainment for use by 360 Magazine

Kailee Spark QxA

Indie artist Kailee Spark recently released her song, “Passageways” and is set to release her debut album Savor This come June 2021. The rising starlet’s poignant lyricism and angelic voice are highlighted on her most recent release, earning her nearly 200k followers online and comparisons to Taylor Swift and Jewel. However, Spark’s music is emotive, sensitive, visceral, and completely her own. Here at 360 Magazine, we spoke with Kailee Spark to discuss her background as a musician, inspiration behind “Passageways”, her future musical bucket list, and more.

Who is someone that doesn’t listen to your music that you think should?

So, I’d say my music could be liked by anyone who enjoys poppy radio stations. I think my music is very uplifting for the most part and that younger people would enjoy it.

 What’s your ideal press headline 12 months from now?

Something that talks about my unique style and that it’s playing all over the radio.

 What’s your background?

I grew up in the Bay Area, raised Mormon, left the church at age 22 and moved to Big Island Hawaii shortly after, where I’ve lived since. Finished my bachelor’s degree in anthropology at UH-Hilo, then decided to get my MA just for the hell of it [and] applied cultural anthropology at Humboldt State University in Northern California.

I’ve been primarily self-employed since living in Hawaii. I used to sell crystals at the farmer’s market and then got into the car rental business with an ex-boyfriend.

I love traveling and have spent a lot of time in India and can speak a little bit of Hindi.

What motivates you to get up everyday to do what you do?

Having fun and constantly learning new things. I like thinking that through my music or entertainment I inspire others.  

How has your family inspired you and your music?

My parents are big into classic rock and stuff like Bob Dylan, Cat Stevens, etc. So, I grew up listening to a lot of music. I started piano lessons around age 8 and wrote my first real song at age 12 which I performed at school functions. At age 15, a random man from my church brought over a guitar on Christmas morning for me. I had wanted a guitar for a long time and I was stoked, I began teaching myself right away and writing songs.

Where did you grow up?

I grew up in San Jose, CA. My sister and I spent a lot of time in the backyard climbing trees, or riding our rollerblades around the neighborhood.

What made you move to Hawaii?

I wanted to learn about permaculture and raw food diets and on a forum somewhere I read about a community on the Big Island. So, I first came here to do an internship at this bizarre community for three months – it was clothing optional kind of hippie commune. I decided on my third day in Hawaii I would be moving here – it just felt right.

How does Hawaii inspire your music?

Yes, it definitely inspires a lot of nature themes. Many of my songs include some element of nature in them. I live in a really peaceful setting, and my house is on an acre of mostly jungle. I wake up in the mornings to the sound of birds singing and I fall asleep to a chorus of frogs and crickets. Sometimes the stars are so magnificent and bright, and the lava, the ocean, and the aloha 

Who inspired you to make music?

I can’t think of a specific person, but I just always loved music. At one point I was obsessed with this CD my parents had called “Wacky favorites” which had songs like “The auctioneer boy” and “Tie me kangaroo down sport”. I’d listen to it over and over. I remember sitting on the floor listening to this CD when I decided that I wanted to do music someday, I must have been around 6 or 7.

What or who inspired your song “Passageways”?

When I first started writing the song it wasn’t about anyone specific, just a feeling I had like I knew that someone was out there that I’d feel that way about. A bit later I met someone and I said oh that’s who this song was for, let me finish it.

Talk about your producer on this song?

Bub Pratt is a talented musician and our styles vibe together. I was confident he could produce my song and record with the sound I wanted. The engineer Keli’i is also very talented.

Talk about the lyrics to this song?

This song is about that intense curiosity you get when falling in love with someone. You want to know everything about them, everything that made them who they are today. Who are they? What are the pains they experienced? Wanting to feel them fully and surrender yourself to loving them. The beginning of the song refers to me having traveled around a lot. I’ve traveled and done so many things, but now I want to explore this person and who they are.  

Where do you get your ideas for song writing?

I don’t usually ever think okay today I’m going to write a song about…. Sometimes I’m able to get into a flow and words just come to me. I usually start by messing around with the guitar and humming out melodies, until I come up with something I like. Then I feel the vibe of the song and wait for some words to float into my consciousness while I play it over and over. Sometimes I’ll just record guitar on its own and listen to it while I drive or whatever and come up with words and themes that way.

What’s your ultimate message to your fans?

That you are powerful and can create the life you want for yourself. Don’t take life so seriously.

What charities are you aligned with?

I used to actually work at a nonprofit here on the island that assisted the homeless in finding housing. Wow I had some crazy experiences there!

I was pretty interested in an organization that helps build squat compost toilets in rural parts of India (open defecation is a big issue which ends up resulting in babies with malnutrition and being stunted), but I don’t know if that’s a glamorous thing to talk about.

What projects will you be involved with in the future? 

Would love to write some more songs and start working on another album at the end of the year or next year.

 Who are your biggest influences?

Jewel, Laura Veirs, Bright Eyes, Emily Wells. I love Bright Eyes/Conor Oberst, his songwriting is splendid. He’s a good example of someone who doesn’t really have a great voice, but people love his music because of the emotion and depth to his songs. I love his lyrics “I could’ve been a famous singer if I had someone else’s voice. But failures always sounded better, let’s live it up boys, make some noise!”

How have you developed your career?

As a musician…well, I just only recently started making money off it. I wasn’t really trying to be a musician for a while, and went through some wild depression and didn’t pick up the guitar for long stretches of time.  But recently in the past year I started playing a little bit and was surprised to find that people loved it. People kept asking me to play, and then I kept getting asked where they could download my music. This led to me searching for a place to record and that’s when I found Kukuau Studio (May 2020).

What kind of singer would you classify yourself as?

Not quite sure how to classify it. I have a soprano voice, but I sing kind of like Bob Dylan/Conor Oberst but female. I have my first voice lessons tomorrow, so let’s see what my instructor says. I wouldn’t really call myself a singer, more of a musician singer/songwriter. I don’t have a super great voice.  But I kind of think my unique voice is an asset to me rather than a hindrance, because I don’t sound like everyone else. I try to really convey emotions through my voice, and I think that’s why people like my voice. Oh, but I do love yodeling. Maybe call me a yodeler.

What skills have you learned that will help you in your singing career?

To relax, it’s okay to not be perfect.

What is the best advice you’ve been given?

I’d say that the fun really is in the journey, not the destination…That’s where my idea for the album name came, “Savor This”, it’s like savor the moment. Right now is where all the fun is. The destination is fun too, for a little while. But then I’ll want the next thing…happiness is an inside job.

What advice would you give to a singer starting out?

Keep practicing and writing but don’t be too hard on yourself, it should be fun.

How did you get started with your manager?

It just kind of worked out…he offered to help me by being project manager for my album release. I know I need help with other things too, so I’m like why not just [have a] manager? We get along really well, and he is very good with people.

Which famous musicians do you admire?

Jewel, Katy Perry, Bright Eyes, KT Tunstall, Michelle Branch, Avril Lavigne, Taylor Swift, Laura Veirs, Dolly Parton, and Eminem. 

What would you be doing right now, if it wasn’t for your music career?

Writing, I like to write about my travels and what not.

Do you like that you’re being compared to Taylor Swift?

Sure, she is a talented songwriter.

What’s next for you in 2021?

My album release, making some cool music videos, and I’d like to do some traveling if possible, too.

How do you take care of your voice?

I try not to overdo it; I went through a phase where I was singing and playing online like 4-6 hours a day most days, and I think it strained my voice. I try to give it time to rest and don’t push it if my voice is just not feeling good that day. I also stopped eating dairy for the most part.

What’s your health regime?

I eat pretty healthy and go on regular walks and do stretching and weightlifting a couple times a week. I got my yoga teacher training certificate at a training center in India, but I’ve never taught yoga.

If you could collaborate with another artist, who would it be?

Conor Oberst, Laura Veirs, and Mormon Tabernacle Choir.

 What’s the one take away you want your fans to feel after they listen to your music?

Feel self-empowered and playful.  

What is on your playlist right now?

Bub Pratt’s latest album, I love it, also been listening to Emily Wells.

When did you know you wanted to be an entertainer?

When I was a kid.

What’s on your musical bucket list?

Would love to be on billboard charts, nominated for Grammy someday, would be sweet. Have a song on the radio. It should be pretty cool to get my “Universe at your fingertips” song into an iPad commercial or something.

Any plans for future touring?

Not immediate plans, but it would be great if I had the opportunity to do so. I love traveling. Traveling and music combined sounds awesome.

What is your first musical memory as a child?

A church song “Popcorn popping on the apricot tree”

Do you play any instruments?

Guitar, piano, and kind of drums (haven’t played regularly for a few years). I want to add some more to the list soon.

What’s your typical day like?

Wake up around 8am, have some tea and coffee, listen to inspirational YouTube videos or music, go for a walk with a dog, write in a journal and a to-do list.

What’s your fashion style?

Kind of neutral colors and reds, I love leather boots and my converse sneakers. I don’t know how to describe my style. Sometimes skirts but mostly jeans or leggings.

What do you do to relax?

Take a bubble bath, meditate, listen to self-hypnosis, go on walks, and massage.

What are your hobbies?

Playing instruments, reading about all kinds of things, especially travel memoirs and funny stuff like David Sedaris, hiking, spending time in nature, and traveling.

What’s your favorite type of food? Do you cook?

Thai, Mexican, Japanese, and Korean. I do cook; I like to make a lot of soups and simple but tasty and healthy things.

How has the pandemic impacted your life?

Started making more money. Had to cancel some big travel plans to go to India with a good friend to go shopping for her wedding saree.

 What’s the one thing you think everyone could do to make the world a more positive place?

To not hold anyone else responsible for their happiness, also to follow your passions.

If there was one recording artist you wanted to meet, who would that be?

Dolly Parton seems cool…or Jewel.

What is the best part about being famous?

I’m not famous yet, but I do enjoy having an audience of fans who resonate with my music, and hearing from them how I have positively impacted their lives feels really good.

Molly Tuttle × New Album

Compass Records is proud to announce an extraordinary new album from award-winning songwriter-guitarist Molly Tuttle. …but i’d rather be with you arrives everywhere on Friday, August 28. A collection of 10 striking covers recorded during quarantine, …but i’d rather be with you is heralded by her timely version of The National’s epic song “Fake Empire.” Tuttle made a compelling companion video that fiercely challenges the song’s fear of indifference and portrays a society that can no longer afford to be apathetic to the realities of our time. Both are available today.

“I am a huge fan of The National,” Tuttle says. “THE BOXER is probably my favorite album by them. This song has a super cool four-over-three polyrhythm throughout. The piano part is super fun on guitar if you can train your thumb to play in three and your index and middle fingers to play in four!” Watch Tuttle’s cover of “Fake Empire” by The National HERE.

“We created the Fake Empire video by projecting footage of activism in mid 20th century America onto me while I played the song,” Tuttle continues. “We contrasted that footage with forest fires, stars and dreamlike images. We wanted to leave the meaning of the video somewhat up to interpretation, just like the lyrics of the song. Matt Berninger commented that the song is about ‘where you can’t deal with the reality of what’s really going on, so let’s just pretend that the world’s full of bluebirds and ice skating.’ Right now a lot of people in our country are waking up to the realities of police brutality, racism, and bigotry all around us. I hope that people, like myself, who have the privilege to turn a blind eye to these injustices, can maintain this awareness and action to create a better society.”

 In March 2020, the Nashville-based Tuttle experienced the devastating tornado that tore through much of East Nashville, followed by the global pandemic. While sheltering at home, she found solace by revisiting favorite songs in an attempt to “remind myself why I love music.” An idea for an album emerged, to be recorded with Los Angeles-based producer Tony Berg (Phoebe Bridgers, Andrew Bird), despite being over two thousand miles apart.

Tuttle taught herself how to use Pro Tools and then recorded and engineered all of her parts alone at home before sending them to Berg in Los Angeles. The renowned producer enlisted a number of legendary session musicians – including drummer Matt Chamberlain and keyboardist Patrick Warren – to add instrumentation from their respective home studios, with guest vocals contributed by Dawes’ Taylor Goldsmith and Old Crow Medicine Show’s Ketch Secor. “This is how the astronauts do it!” Tuttle recalls Berg saying as they sent the files back and forth.

The result is a surprising and inventive collection of songs that cross the musical spectrum and the decades, from iconic artists spanning FKA Twigs to Cat Stevens, Rancid to Karen Dalton, all united by Tuttle’s clear, true voice, astonishing range, and incredible musicianship. With its remarkable scope and adventurous creativity, …but i’d rather be with you presents a further progression of Tuttle’s distinctive talent and musical ambition while hinting towards what is yet to come.

“I have been working on writing for another original album and am still planning to record that this year,” Tuttle says, “but in the meantime I wanted to share these covers that have lifted my spirits, in hopes that you’ll find some much-needed joy as well.”

A virtuosic, award-winning guitarist with a gift for insightful songwriting, Molly Tuttle has garnered worldwide applause for her amazing flatpicking guitar technique and confessional songwriting. Since moving to Nashville in 2015, the native Californian has been welcomed into folk music, bluegrass, Americana, and traditional country communities – even as her own music pushes against the limits of those genres. A series of awards and accolades followed, including two consecutive International Bluegrass Music Awards as “Guitar Player of the Year” – the first female artist to achieve that historic honor.

Crowned “Instrumentalist of the Year” at the 2018 Americana Music Awards on the strength of her acclaimed RISE EP, Tuttle affirmed her signature sound with last year’s boundary-breaking debut album, WHEN YOU’RE READY.

Produced by Ryan Hewitt (The Avett Brothers, The Lumineers), the album was hailed by NPR for its “handsomely crafted melodies that gently insinuate themselves into the memory,” noting, “Tuttle applies remarkable precision to her pursuit of clarity. That’s even a central theme of her lyrics: consciously reckoning with indecision or intuition, honestly acknowledging incompatibility, cultivating intimacy based on people seeing each other for who they are.”

“The bluegrass virtuoso’s first solo album blends emotional preparedness and long-demonstrated knowhow,” wrote the Wall Street Journal, while American Songwriter raved, “The production, playing and songwriting coalesce into a striking statement that shows an already developed artist well on her way to the next level of her still nascent career.”

Follow Molly Tuttle: Instagram | Twitter | Facebook | Youtube

Beat Bugs: Season 3 Soundtrack Set For Release

The soundtrack to the third season of Josh Wakely’s animated Netflix original series Beat Bugs released on November 16th as announced by Republic Records. The soundtrack release comes after the Beat Bugs Season 3 debut on Netflix which premiered back in November 9th.

Beat Bugs: Season 3 soundtrack is available now at this link

Check out the trailer for Beat Bugs Season 2 HERE.

Following the success of the first 2 seasons and a 48-minute special on Netflix, Season 3 attracted a myriad of talent to reimagine classics by The Beatles for a new generation. Yusuf/Cat Stevens recorded “Here Comes The Sun,” while rising Vermont indie pop troubadour Noah Kahan delivered a show-stopping rendition of “You Won’t See Me.” Samantha Gongol of Marian Hill takes on the classic “Let It Be,” Chloe Kohanski adds millennial sunshine to “A Day In The Life,” and Welshly Arms amplify the rock ‘n’ roll gusto of “Revolution.”

Wakely’s Beat Bugs stands out as the perfect gateway for kids to experience the canon of The Beatles.

Beat Bugs Season 3 Tracklisting:

  1. Yusuf/Cat Stevens– “Here Comes The Sun”
  2. Noah Kahan– “You Won’t See Me”
  3. Samantha Gongol– “Let It Be”
  4. Welshly Arms– “Revolution”
  5. The Beat Bugs– “Hey Jude”
  6. The Beat Bugs– “Baby You’re A Rich Man”
  7. The Beat Bugs– “Paperback Writer”
  8. The Beat Bugs– “I’m Only Sleeping”
  9. Chloe Kohanski– “A Day In The Life”
  10. The Beat Bugs– “Yesterday”
  11. The Beat Bugs– “Mother Nature’s Son”
  12. The Beat Bugs– “Good Morning, Good Morning”
  13. The Beat Bugs– “Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da”
  14. The Beat Bugs– “Oh! Darling”
  15. The Beat Bugs– “The Long And Winding Road”

The Emmy®-winning series and its music have garnered widespread critical praise. The New York Times wrote, “Like most enduring animation series, the writing in Beat Bugs is crafted to appeal to children as well as thier parents, with plenty of allusions to lyrics.” In its piece on the show, Rolling Stone said that by engaging with Beat Bugs kids are “experiencing the music of the Beatles in a way their parents and grandparents never imagined.” The Wall Street Journal also ran an in-depth piece, while Variety covered the project in this article, calling the covers in the series “richly orchestrated.”

Beat Bugs was created by Wakely, following a groundbreaking deal with Sony/ATV Music Publishing, and is produced by his Grace: a storytelling company. Wakely personally selected each of these songs for his integration into the series’ episodes and was closely involved in the music’s production, arranging and mixing. Melodia was formed by the principals of Beat Bugs’ production entities to release music from this series, as well as future film, television, and theatrical endeavors, in conjunction with the company’s partners.

About Grace: a storytelling company:

Grace is a global independent film and television development and production banner led by filmmaker Josh Wakely. Grace’s output is distinguished by innovation, and imaginative creative and business partnerships, combined to cultivate transformative storytelling. Based out of Australia and the US, Grace is committed to producing intelligent, elevatedm talent-driven film and television projects to the worldwide audience.