Posts tagged with "fka twigs"

Kenny Beats Performs at Shrine Expo Hall via GoldenVoice for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Kenny Beats

LOS ANGELES, CA ߝ Tuesday, June 21, 2022

WHO: Kenny Beats

WHAT: Announces Los Angeles, CA show &#a0;

WHERE: Shrine Expo Hall

WHEN: Saturday, November 5, 2022 &#a0;

TICKET INFO: Tickets go on sale Friday, June 24, 2022, at 10am PT via AXS.com

About Kenny Beats:

Kenny Beats is a multi-platinum music producer, artist, and DJ. Over the last few years, he has produced critically acclaimed albums for Vince Staples, Denzel Curry, Rico Nasty and Key!. In addition, he has produced chart topping singles with Ski Mask the Slump God, Lil Baby, Skrillex, Gucci Mane, FKA Twigs, Future, Freddie Gibbs, and many more. Outside of his productions, Kenny Beats is also the creator of the hit YouTube series Éc;The CaveÉd; which has amassed over 50M views and hosted artists such as Thundercat, Mac DeMarco, Doja Cat, 6lack, Danny Brown, Denzel Curry, and many more. By hosting weekly Beat Battles and educating young artists through his Twitch platform, Kenny has created one of the largest music communities on Twitch and the second largest music community in the world on Discord.

Music via 360 Magazine

FKA Twigs × DAB Motors × Burberry

The English singer-songwriter FKA twigs releases her latest single “Papi Bones” as part of her album, Caprisongs. In the unveiled video clip, in collaboration with Shygirl, she features her DAB Motors Concept-E RS Burberry Edition in an all-Burberry dressed decor.

The video clip, taking place in the UK, showcases a Midnight Blue Concept-E RS made in DAB Motors‘ Factory.

The Burberry x DAB Motors Concept-E RS collaboration came from a shared desire to think motorcycle as a true fashion item. DAB Motors, the French motorcycle manufacturer who’s on a mission to challenge traditions through intelligent disruption, aims to thrive well beyond the motorcycle world. All motorcycles are handmaid in France.

The very limited edition of 20 electric motorcycles features:

  • Brushless DC – 10kW nominal
  • Saddle upholstered with Burberry leather
  • Bodywork: Metallic Grey or Midnight Blue
  • Öhlins Suspensions
  • Beringer Brakes

The creative process that blends in the fashion design, music and motorcycle worlds seems to be at the forefront of the current trends. A new way of bringing together these industries has never before been seen.

Illustration by Alex Bogdan for use by 360 MAGAZINE

THE IMPORTANCE OF BLACK MUSIC MONTH

By: Andrew Shibuya

For many, June is a month of celebration. Between Pride Month and the official start of summer, June’s thirty days are chock-full of various festivities and commemorations. And still, one of June’s national designations in the United States is almost wholly overlooked annually: African American Music Appreciation Month.

Though this coining of June as African American Music Appreciation Month was first introduced by President Jimmy Carter in 1979, originally dubbed Black Music Month, its current name was given by President Barack Obama in 2009. From its initiation, this commemoration was intended to serve as most generally as a celebration of all African American music in the United States.

And in a recent official White House press release, President Joe Biden voiced his own sentiments behind the importance of Black Music Appreciation month: “During Black Music Appreciation Month, we honor the innovative artists whose musical expressions move us, brighten our daily lives, and bring us together. Across the generations, Black music has pioneered the way we listen to music while preserving Black cultural traditions and sharing the unique experiences of the Black community.”

It would be premature, though, to celebrate Black Music Appreciation Month by solely celebrating a handful of the most prominent Black artists. Because what is Black music exactly? While many companies and streaming platforms have taken to commemorating various iconic artists or works, the goal of this commemoration ought to be to acknowledge and celebrate the vast influence and impact of African American music in the United States as a whole.

Of course, to even begin to fathom how to track this influence, one must attempt to define Black music itself. And inherently, the phrase, and the genre, if it can be put under a singular one, evade definition. Is Black music music simply made by Black artists? Yes. But is music inspired by or influenced by Black artists Black music? This answer is not so clear.

One of the many issues with the distinction and defining of Black music in the music industry is that oftentimes Black artists are often pushed into genres such as R&B or hip hop, which is both reductive and limiting to the artists and their work. Singer-songwriter FKA twigs spoke about this phenomenon in an interview with the Guardian in 2014: “When I first released music and no one knew what I looked like, I would read comments like: ‘I’ve never heard anything like this before, it’s not in a genre.’ And then my picture came out six months later, now she’s an R&B singer.”

For years, high profile award shows such as the Grammys have only helped to perpetuate this boxing in of Black artists. Take, for instance, the confusingly and formerly titled “Best Urban Contemporary Album” category. It was only last year that the category was renamed to “Best Progressive R&B Album”. The change was born out of the award show’s desire for more inclusivity and to better reflect the fluidity and scope of the category. In the past several years, many in the industry and in the media have called for an end to the use of “urban” in describing music, arguing that the term is a vague and limiting generalization for Black music as a whole.

And even in genres that are considered to be most influenced or dominated by Black artists, there has historically been underrepresentation in the industry. For example, just last year, producer Kaytranada became the first Black artist to win the Grammy for “Best Dance/Electronic Album”, though the genre has been unarguably most influenced by traditionally Black dominated genres such as disco and hip hop.

With these inequalities and failures of the music industry in mind, the necessity for Black Music Appreciation Month is most evident. To celebrate Black music is to acknowledge its importance in the history of American music, with respect to both Black artists and otherwise. It is likewise clear that a rigid distinction between what is Black music and what is not is not necessary–for in reality, so much of contemporary American music has been in some way touched or influenced by so-called Black music. It is an undercurrent that has served as the foundation for all of contemporary American music, and has been, in fact, so integral to all of American music.

Because for centuries now, Black music has been a keystone of the American music identity. Antonin Dvořák, a Czech composer, once cited the late nineteenth century African American spirituals he encountered in America as a great inspiration for his “New World Symphony”.  Even more than simply citing these spiritual hymns as inspiration, Dvořák similarly recognized their power, importance, and place in the future and legacy of American music: “These beautiful and varied themes are the product of the soil. They are the folk songs of America, and your composers must turn to them.”

And just as Black music cannot simply be a subgenre of music, it can likewise never be defined as any one thing. Thus, Black Music Appreciation Month ought to celebrate the protean nature of Black music as well as to acknowledge the historical injustices to Black artists and musicians. From folk to the blues, from jazz to hip hop, the influence of Black music on American music as a whole is both undeniable and wholly remarkable. And just as Dvořák was prescient to recognize, Black music has become the indelible foundation and promising future of American music.

 

Mare Monstrum/Drown in My Magic, a digital exhibition by David Uzochukwu on Artsy for use via 360 Magazine

David Uzochukwu – Mare Monstrum/Drown in My Magic

Mare Monstrum/Drown in My Magic, a digital exhibition by David Uzochukwu on Artsy

2016 – ongoing.
Italy, Senegal, Germany

Artist statement:

Mare Monstrum / Drown In My Magic channels the power of myth by explicitly visualizing Black merfolk. It envisions water as expanse which the characters can cut through, be safe in. No longer are they subject to whims of the tide, or drift into a void that holds the potential for destruction. Instead, the portrayed are equipped to survive and find freedom in the monstrous.

It almost seems as though Blackness is inevitably linked to a passage through the waters of the Atlantic Ocean, the Mediterranean Sea, Evros River, whether historic or recent. The potential of self-actualisation lapping at someone’s feet always calls to mind the blood, sweat and tears of those who have come before them. Can new lore shift the entanglement of Black bodies and their environments, making unquestionably clear that they belong?

About the series:

David Uzochukwu’s photographs deliver you into warm and sensitive worlds where humans and nature entwine in search of belonging. Expanses of sand, water or sky embrace Black bodies emanating strength and resilience. Often their limbs morph into fantastical forms against hyper-real landscapes that offer a space for contemplation or escape. It’s this interplay between the natural and supernatural, between the visible and invisible, that imbues the artist’s images with an arresting presence.

Uzochukwu’s ongoing body of work, Mare Monstrum / Drown In My Magic, uses the central idea of Black mermaids to explore both the historical relationship between the African diaspora and the water, and contemporary politics around illegal migration. A great part of the images were made in Senegal in 2018 and show mermen emerging from the seas protecting and healing one another. The most recent images came together in Germany and introduce a whole community of hybrid merfolk in states of solace and rebirth. An incubated baby, a proud centaur and a tender couple, among others, inhabit a boundless realm.

The Austrian-Nigerian artist was born in 1998 in Innsbruck. His photographic practice began as a teenager with intimate self-portraiture that soon gained recognition. He’s enjoyed collaborations with artists including FKA Twigs, Pharrell Williams, Ibeyi and Iris van Herpen. Since joining Galerie Number 8, he’s exhibited at Bozar, Photo Vogue Festival, Unseen Amsterdam, Off Biennale Dakar and LagosPhoto. He was named ‘One to Watch’ by the British Journal of Photography in 2020, and his first co-directed short film, Götterdämmerung, was selected for Max-Ophüls-Preis in 2021. He is currently studying philosophy at HU Humboldt University of Berlin.

“The long history of oppression experienced by people of color in the West makes an unlikely context for art devoted to the fantastical. All the more so when you consider recent developments such as the racist rhetoric and anti-immigration policies of the Trump administration, the chilling roll call of African-Americans killed by US police (Freddie Gray, Eric Garner, Philando Castile) and the bigotries unleashed in Britain by Brexit (monkey chants at football matches and a spike in xenophobic hate crimes). Under such conditions, it’s worth asking if a turn to the fantastic by black artists is driven by a desire to escape from the charged and painful circumstances of daily life. Yet the opposite seems to be true. What characterizes much of the imagery being produced today is an eagerness to grapple with urgent questions of culture, identity and history– albeit through imagery that accentuates the extraordinary rather than the everyday. (…)

Ultimately, the Berlin-based David Uzochukwu – whose recent Drown in my Magic project situates a panoply of mythical water creatures within arid landscapes – may speak for all the artists currently finding inspiration in fantasy. The goal, as Uzochukwu puts it, is to reclaim the narrative of fantasy’ by embracing ‘the alien otherness projected onto black bodies in a way that could be read as pure empowerment.’”
-Extract of the essay “A Fantastic Turn” by Ekow Eshun for Unseen Magazine.

Drown in My Magic will go live starting April 16th 2021 on Artsy HERE.

Mare Monstrum/Drown in My Magic, a digital exhibition by David Uzochukwu on Artsy for use via 360 Magazine

Mare Monstrum/Drown in My Magic, a digital exhibition by David Uzochukwu on Artsy for use via 360 Magazine

Elle Canada x FKA Twigs cover illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Elle × FKA Twigs

KO MÉDIA REVEALS AN INSPIRING
MAY ISSUE OF ELLE CANADA

KO Média is proud to unveil the May issue of ELLE Canada featuring FKA twigs. The British singer, dancer and actor shares the story of her ongoing lawsuit against ex-boyfriend Shia LaBoeuf for psychological, verbal and physical abuse, which culminated in a terrifying high-speed car ride. “It’s a miracle I came out alive,” she says in the candid piece, adding that abuse can happen to anyone. “It’s pure luck that I’m not in that situation anymore.” Now she’s speaking out for women who aren’t so lucky. “I hope if I can take little steps and people can see me taking my life back, it will inspire them.“

Other inspiring women in this issue include Crazy Rich Asians star Gemma Chan on Marvel, UNICEF and her upcoming psychological thriller with director Olivia WildeHunter Schafer (the LGBTQ2S+ activist, trans star of HBO hit Euphoria and the new face of Shiseido) on beauty products and designers she’s loving right now; and the rise, fall and reincarnation of high-low fashion emissary Jenna Lyons, the former creative director of J.Crew who helped the company go from rugby shirts and cardigans to designs worn by Oprah, Kate Middleton and Meghan Markle. She also inspired ELLE publisher Sophie Banford: “Lyons’ infallible magic recipe was imprinted on my mind with every page of the J.Crew catalogue, which I devoured season after season.” 

And it’s official! The days of pandemic leisurewear are over. Make way for elegant simplicity with mesh sweaters and boustiers; emerald, green statement pieces; and tennis-friendly knits and silk shirts.

This spring edition also dives into seasonal self-care, with fitness tips that’ll have you thinking outside of the gym. Plus: An haute shopping bag you’ll covet along with the rest of us; an upcoming maximalist Bulgari collab; and redefining “nude” in a beauty industry where Black shoppers spend more than half a billion dollars a year.

The May issue of ELLE Canada will hit stands on April 12th, 2021. The digital issue is available here.

Elle Canada Magazine Cover featuring FKA Twigs

645AR – Ride 4 You

645AR RELEASES NEW TRACK “RIDE 4 YOU”

LISTEN TO THE SONG HERE & WATCH THE VIDEO HERE

“645AR has captivated a generation on Tik Tok and beyond with his squeaky flair.” – Office Magazine

His tracks sound like the Chipmunks featuring on underground Atlanta rap beats, which has led to understandable jokes over the past six months. Nevertheless, [on “Sum Bout U”], 645AR has the last laugh.” – Pitchfork

Today, rapper 645AR released his new track “Ride 4 You”. As he continues to tap into his R&B side, “Ride 4 You” features a lovestruck AR as he affectionately squeaks his way into the heart of his lover. This track follows upon his previous release “Sum Bout You” featuring FKA Twigs. Recently, 645AR performed at Rolling Loud where he previewed “Ride 4 You” to positive fan response. “Ride 4 You” is now available on all digital streaming platforms; listen here.

“Ride 4 You” makes me feel like the best singer alive”, says 645AR about the new track.

Keeping within his visual flair, 645AR released an official music video along with the audio. Watch the Jelani Miller directed video here.

Purchase/Stream “Ride 4 You”:
Amazon | Apple Music | iTunes | Soundcloud | Spotify | YouTube Music | YouTube

645AR and FKA twigs illustration done by Mina Tocalini of 360 MAGAZINE.

645AR × FKA twigs

Today, rapper 645AR releases his new track “Sum Bout U” with FKA twigs. “Sum Bout U” is more R&B leaning than his previous tracks “Yoga” and “In Love With A Stripper” and features high pitched vocal interplay between 645AR, affectionately dubbed the squeak rapper, and FKA twigs. “Sum Bout U” is produced by SenseiATL with co-production by El Guincho. “Sum Bout U” was featured as Zane Lowe’s New Music Daily on Beats 1 on Apple Music and is available on all digital streaming platforms; listen here

Says 645AR, “I’m bringing real R&B back. Shout out to FKA twigs.”  

As both 645AR and FKA twigs are visual artists, unsurprisingly, they released the official music video for “Sum Bout U” in addition to the audio. The video was directed by Aidan Zamiri, with concept by FKA twigs.

Follow 645AR: InstagramYouTube

Follow FKA twigs: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | YouTube

Lola Young Shares Official Woman Video

Today, Lola Young released the official video for “Woman.” Directed by Olivia Rose (Jorja Smith, 6lack ft. Future, Skepta and Ty Dolla $ign ft. J Cole), the clip features Young and a cast of women, identifiably different in their features but united by their confidence, as they boldly reclaim the female form.

View Official Video HERE.

Download / Stream “Woman” HERE.

Young also shared a statement about what the video means to her:

“I wanted to make this video because I believe women are all undeniably strong, sexy, free, brave, vulnerable, raw and powerful. And that we do not have to hide away. We do not have to remain unseen, our bodies should never be sexualized or a taboo conversation, or only seen through the male gaze. We have the ability to normalize our bodies being on show, and accept them for their differences, as it’s important to remember those differences are currently often shamed.

I came up with the idea of the women in the video being fully nude. The energy on set was insane, I have never felt more empowered in my life. Nipples, bums, rolls, stretch marks, cellulite, all of these things are beautiful along with the perfect body.

This is my personal experience of being a woman, hopefully other women will have their own take on what it means to them.”

“Woman,” which received its first U.K. play on Annie Mac’s BBC Radio 1 show, comes on the heels of the 19-year-old artist’s Renaissance EP. Co-produced by GRAMMY winner Paul Epworth (Adele, Mumford & Sons) and manuka, “Woman” is available for download/streaming HERE.

Billboard praised the velvet-voiced Lola Young and Clash Magazine hailed her music as touching [and] honest. Q Magazine observed, “Young’s songs bring her open-hearted lyricism and London Twang together with a neo-jazz sensibility with one foot always pointed in the direction of the nearest dancefloor.” Dummy said, “Lola Young has the most powerful and affecting voice we’ve heard in some time. The young singer is gaining ground fast.” Hunger Magazine noted, “The singer-songwriter has her own, uniquely raw take on music.”

With a gift for writing songs that encapsulate and explore the human condition, Young turns extremely personal emotions into songs that resonate with universal truths. As a lyricist, she creates evocative scenes with all the tenderness and sensitivity of a folk artist, while maintaining the sharpness, wit, and attitude of a rapper. She began writing music at age 11. Young is a recent graduate of the Brit School, whose alumni include Amy Winehouse, Adele, Freya Ridings, FKA Twigs, Jade Bird, Jessie J, Leona Lewis, Loyle Carner, and Rex Orange County.

Follow Lola Young: Instagram | Facebook | Website

Lola Young – Woman

Today, Capitol Records released “Woman,” Lola Young’s ode to women everywhere. The song – which received its first U.K. play on Annie Mac’s BBC Radio 1 show – is about female empowerment and also examines the struggles and hardships women face as a result of sexism and entrenched stereotypical roles. Coming on the heels of the 19-year-old artist’s Renaissance EP, “Woman” is another beautiful performance from Young, with the nature of the song bringing out a side to her that has yet to be seen. Co-produced by GRAMMY winner Paul Epworth (Adele, Mumford & Sons) and manuka, “Woman” is available for download/streaming HERE.

“‘Woman’ is a song about female empowerment,” explains Lola Young. “It’s a song about how I feel towards the patriarchy but also an introspective piece that looks at the gender roles and how these can be broken down. This song means a lot to me because it’s something I had never previously written about and it has an honest vulnerability to it that I hope makes people feel an understanding towards us women.”

Billboard praised the “velvet-voiced Lola Young” and Clash Magazine hailed her music as “touching [and] honest.” Q Magazine observed, “Young’s songs bring her open-hearted lyricism and London Twang together with a neo-jazz sensibility with one foot always pointed in the direction of the nearest dancefloor.” Dummy said, “Lola Young has the most powerful and affecting voice we’ve heard in some time…the young singer is gaining ground fast.” Hunger Magazine noted, “The singer-songwriter has her own, uniquely raw take on music.”

With a gift for writing songs that encapsulate and explore the human condition, Young turns extremely personal emotions into songs that resonate with universal truths. As a lyricist, she creates evocative scenes with all the tenderness and sensitivity of a folk artist, while maintaining the sharpness, wit, and attitude of a rapper. She began writing music at age 11. Young is a recent graduate of the Brit School, whose alumni include Amy Winehouse, Adele, Freya Ridings, FKA Twigs, Jade Bird, Jessie J, Leona Lewis, Loyle Carner, and Rex Orange County.

Follow Lola Young: Instagram | Twitter | YouTube

Molly Tuttle × New Album

Compass Records is proud to announce an extraordinary new album from award-winning songwriter-guitarist Molly Tuttle. …but i’d rather be with you arrives everywhere on Friday, August 28. A collection of 10 striking covers recorded during quarantine, …but i’d rather be with you is heralded by her timely version of The National’s epic song “Fake Empire.” Tuttle made a compelling companion video that fiercely challenges the song’s fear of indifference and portrays a society that can no longer afford to be apathetic to the realities of our time. Both are available today.

“I am a huge fan of The National,” Tuttle says. “THE BOXER is probably my favorite album by them. This song has a super cool four-over-three polyrhythm throughout. The piano part is super fun on guitar if you can train your thumb to play in three and your index and middle fingers to play in four!” Watch Tuttle’s cover of “Fake Empire” by The National HERE.

“We created the Fake Empire video by projecting footage of activism in mid 20th century America onto me while I played the song,” Tuttle continues. “We contrasted that footage with forest fires, stars and dreamlike images. We wanted to leave the meaning of the video somewhat up to interpretation, just like the lyrics of the song. Matt Berninger commented that the song is about ‘where you can’t deal with the reality of what’s really going on, so let’s just pretend that the world’s full of bluebirds and ice skating.’ Right now a lot of people in our country are waking up to the realities of police brutality, racism, and bigotry all around us. I hope that people, like myself, who have the privilege to turn a blind eye to these injustices, can maintain this awareness and action to create a better society.”

 In March 2020, the Nashville-based Tuttle experienced the devastating tornado that tore through much of East Nashville, followed by the global pandemic. While sheltering at home, she found solace by revisiting favorite songs in an attempt to “remind myself why I love music.” An idea for an album emerged, to be recorded with Los Angeles-based producer Tony Berg (Phoebe Bridgers, Andrew Bird), despite being over two thousand miles apart.

Tuttle taught herself how to use Pro Tools and then recorded and engineered all of her parts alone at home before sending them to Berg in Los Angeles. The renowned producer enlisted a number of legendary session musicians – including drummer Matt Chamberlain and keyboardist Patrick Warren – to add instrumentation from their respective home studios, with guest vocals contributed by Dawes’ Taylor Goldsmith and Old Crow Medicine Show’s Ketch Secor. “This is how the astronauts do it!” Tuttle recalls Berg saying as they sent the files back and forth.

The result is a surprising and inventive collection of songs that cross the musical spectrum and the decades, from iconic artists spanning FKA Twigs to Cat Stevens, Rancid to Karen Dalton, all united by Tuttle’s clear, true voice, astonishing range, and incredible musicianship. With its remarkable scope and adventurous creativity, …but i’d rather be with you presents a further progression of Tuttle’s distinctive talent and musical ambition while hinting towards what is yet to come.

“I have been working on writing for another original album and am still planning to record that this year,” Tuttle says, “but in the meantime I wanted to share these covers that have lifted my spirits, in hopes that you’ll find some much-needed joy as well.”

A virtuosic, award-winning guitarist with a gift for insightful songwriting, Molly Tuttle has garnered worldwide applause for her amazing flatpicking guitar technique and confessional songwriting. Since moving to Nashville in 2015, the native Californian has been welcomed into folk music, bluegrass, Americana, and traditional country communities – even as her own music pushes against the limits of those genres. A series of awards and accolades followed, including two consecutive International Bluegrass Music Awards as “Guitar Player of the Year” – the first female artist to achieve that historic honor.

Crowned “Instrumentalist of the Year” at the 2018 Americana Music Awards on the strength of her acclaimed RISE EP, Tuttle affirmed her signature sound with last year’s boundary-breaking debut album, WHEN YOU’RE READY.

Produced by Ryan Hewitt (The Avett Brothers, The Lumineers), the album was hailed by NPR for its “handsomely crafted melodies that gently insinuate themselves into the memory,” noting, “Tuttle applies remarkable precision to her pursuit of clarity. That’s even a central theme of her lyrics: consciously reckoning with indecision or intuition, honestly acknowledging incompatibility, cultivating intimacy based on people seeing each other for who they are.”

“The bluegrass virtuoso’s first solo album blends emotional preparedness and long-demonstrated knowhow,” wrote the Wall Street Journal, while American Songwriter raved, “The production, playing and songwriting coalesce into a striking statement that shows an already developed artist well on her way to the next level of her still nascent career.”

Follow Molly Tuttle: Instagram | Twitter | Facebook | Youtube