Posts tagged with "domestic abuse"

Elle Canada x FKA Twigs cover illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Elle × FKA Twigs

KO MÉDIA REVEALS AN INSPIRING
MAY ISSUE OF ELLE CANADA

KO Média is proud to unveil the May issue of ELLE Canada featuring FKA twigs. The British singer, dancer and actor shares the story of her ongoing lawsuit against ex-boyfriend Shia LaBoeuf for psychological, verbal and physical abuse, which culminated in a terrifying high-speed car ride. “It’s a miracle I came out alive,” she says in the candid piece, adding that abuse can happen to anyone. “It’s pure luck that I’m not in that situation anymore.” Now she’s speaking out for women who aren’t so lucky. “I hope if I can take little steps and people can see me taking my life back, it will inspire them.“

Other inspiring women in this issue include Crazy Rich Asians star Gemma Chan on Marvel, UNICEF and her upcoming psychological thriller with director Olivia WildeHunter Schafer (the LGBTQ2S+ activist, trans star of HBO hit Euphoria and the new face of Shiseido) on beauty products and designers she’s loving right now; and the rise, fall and reincarnation of high-low fashion emissary Jenna Lyons, the former creative director of J.Crew who helped the company go from rugby shirts and cardigans to designs worn by Oprah, Kate Middleton and Meghan Markle. She also inspired ELLE publisher Sophie Banford: “Lyons’ infallible magic recipe was imprinted on my mind with every page of the J.Crew catalogue, which I devoured season after season.” 

And it’s official! The days of pandemic leisurewear are over. Make way for elegant simplicity with mesh sweaters and boustiers; emerald, green statement pieces; and tennis-friendly knits and silk shirts.

This spring edition also dives into seasonal self-care, with fitness tips that’ll have you thinking outside of the gym. Plus: An haute shopping bag you’ll covet along with the rest of us; an upcoming maximalist Bulgari collab; and redefining “nude” in a beauty industry where Black shoppers spend more than half a billion dollars a year.

The May issue of ELLE Canada will hit stands on April 12th, 2021. The digital issue is available here.

Elle Canada Magazine Cover featuring FKA Twigs
Hiking by Kaelen Felix for 360 Magazine

Tums’ Inappropriate ‘Camping Trip Chili’ Commercial

By: Emily Bunn

Antacid brand, Tums, recently released a commercial for Tums Naturals which features two women camping in the woods. As they heat chili over their campfire, one of the women begins to feel some heartburn. Suddenly, a towering, ominous red pepper appears behind her menacingly. The pepper is noticeably phallic, and dominates the small woman. TUMS announces, “When heartburn takes you by surprise, fight back.” The woman shown suddenly dropping her chili and defenselessly being dragged across the forest floor. As she is hauled away, she flashes the pepper her container of TUMS–almost as if she is wielding off an attacker with pepper spray.

The commercial has stirred associations with sexual assault, as the woman is dragged off without consent from the phallic figure. Tums’ commercial is an insensitive and inappropriate representation of such serious matters. To equate having some temporary heartburn to being assaulted is a far cry, and comparing the two lessens the severity of experiencing life-long trauma from sexual misconduct. TUMs ineffable lapse of judgement in creating this disturbing commercial is unprofessional, and promotes rape culture through joking about assault and brushing off the severity of such.

The commercial represents the woman as an unknowing victim, painting her in the horror trope light of the ‘final girl.’ The final girl trope in horror movies represents the heroine left standing at the end of the movie who fights off the offending villain, the most ‘pure’ woman–oftentimes a virgin–whose obedience rewards her with life. This trope is rooted in misogyny, and is an outdated sentiment of the entertainment industry’s emphasis on the male gaze. Just like in horror movies, the woman in this commercial gets to escape–thanks to her handy Tums– but this resolution begs the question: without her Tums, what would have happened to this woman? What is it that the giant pepper is threatening her life with, and why did Tums find it appropriate to relate a life-or-death situation to mere heartburn? Some may say it’s for laughs, but when situations like this actually occur– not with a giant pepper, but instead with an aggressive abuser who aims to hurt women– it’s no laughing matter. Whereas in a fictitious horror movie–or Tums commercial– the final girl gets to escape with her life, women who experience sexual assault are forced to live every day with the real life horror of their trauma.

Halle Berry Hosts 2018 Imagine Party

51-year-old Halle Berry hosted the 2018 Imagine Cocktail Party in LA on Wednesday for the Jenesse organization. The non-profit organization is a place that gives shelter and a variety of services to men, women, and children who are victims of domestic abuse and violence. For 17 years, Berry has been an ambassador and worked alongside Jenesse to bring awareness to this problem engulfed in our society. It is a huge concern as 1/4 women will experience domestic violence in their lifetime. The goal of Imagine is to increase the conversation of violence around women, girls, and men and influence healthier relationships, peaceful workplaces and home environments. Jenesse has been working towards this cause for 40 years and they are still thriving to bring attention to the impact of violence and how it can affect the lives of children, families, and communities while trying to communicate these messages to individuals, entertainment leaders, governments, businesses, and the media.

TV One’s New Original Film


TV One Unveils Public Service Announcement to Accompany Debut of Original Film, When Love Kills: The Falicia Blakely Story on Monday, August 28
 
Network leverages film to create open dialogue about domestic violence through partnerships with youth organization Saving Our Daughters and the National Domestic Violence Hotline


When TV One’s new original film, When Love Kills: The Falicia Blakely Story premieres on Monday, August 28, the cast, director and producers want the audience to be educated and informed while they are entertained. Based on a popular episode of the network’s true crime series, For My Man, the film depicts the true life tragedy of a teen mom in Atlanta who found herself the victim of psychological manipulation and physical abuse at the hands of a man who claimed to love her. Instead, he encouraged her participation in a life of stripping, prostitution, robbery and ultimately, murder – all in the name of love. 

“When I was 14, I dropped out of school – a lot of people don’t know that. By the age of 16, I was bartending in a strip club, by the age of 20 I was stripping…so I understand how Falicia got there,” says film director Tasha Smith, who signed up for the project as her feature-length directorial debut. “By the grace of God, I ended up here, but she ended up in jail for the rest of her life.”

Yet, before Falicia was convicted of murder, she was a young girl looking for love and validation in all the wrong places. In an effort to reinforce the film’s underlying message that real love doesn’t hurt, TV One, in partnership with the National Domestic Violence Hotline, will air a public service announcement during the film presentation.

“This film is a cautionary tale about everything love shouldn’t be in our communities,” says Lori Hall, TV One SVP of Marketing. “Tasha Smith directs a powerful story that reveals exactly how a teenager can fall victim to a relationship that quickly moves from loving to abusive and unhealthy. We want this film to be a wake-up call for young people and families and we hope it will start a lot of dialogue in homes around the country.” 

The PSA reveals that 1 in 3 women and 1 in 4 men have been victims of physical violence by an intimate partner, according to the National Domestic Violence Hotline. Chief Communications Officer Cameka Crawford joined panel discussions at TV One film screenings in Atlanta, New Orleans, New York and Los Angeles to provide the audience with resources to get help if they know someone who may be in an abusive relationship.

“Your instinct may be to ‘save’ them from the relationship, but it’s not that simple. Abuse is about power and control, so one of the most important ways you can help someone in an abusive relationship is to think about how you might empower them to make their own decisions,” says Crawford. “You can also offer support by listening without judgment and reassuring them that the abuse is not their fault. If you need help starting the conversation, you can contact the National Domestic Violence Hotline 24/7 at 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) or visit www.thehotline.org.”

Additionally, TV One partnered with Saving Our Daughters, an organization whose mission is to empower teenage girls from multicultural backgrounds through theater, music, film and television, to help overcome many obstacles such as bullying (cyber, gossip, face-to-face), dating abuse, domestic violence and other esteem slayers. Young ladies attended the When Love Kills premieres held in Atlanta, New York and Los Angeles to walk the red carpet with the cast and have a dialogue about real love and self-esteem. 

“We are extremely blessed and excited about our new and ground breaking partnership with TV One. We look forward to the positive impact on working together to encourage and change the girls’ lives we serve,” says Curtis Benjamin, Saving Our Daughters Co-Founder & Chief Executive Officer. “TV One’s original movie cast, directors and producers of ‘When Love Kills’ have truly developed a tool for our girls to help create empowering conversations about date abuse, domestic violence and healthy mother and daughter relationships.” 

Lance Gross, who plays Falicia’s abusive and manipulative boyfriend Dino, conducted research and prayed before taking on the role. Gross believes both women and men will see what not to do in relationships and child rearing by viewing this film.

“I want people to learn something from this film because I’m a father,” he emphasized. “Just reading this script and participating in this project makes me want to go home and love my daughter even harder, because who knows who the next Falicia Blakely will be.” 

Still rocked by the experience of undertaking the role, Gross decided to email the real Falicia Blakely in prison and was surprised to receive a response. She thanked Gross and those involved in the film for their willingness to raise awareness against domestic violence. 


When Love Kills: The Falicia Blakely Story premieres Monday, August 28 at 9 p.m. ET on TV One.

Watch the When Love Kills: The Falicia Blakley Story PSA HERE 

Watch the When Love Kills: The Falicia Blakley Story TRAILER HERE

ABOUT THE NATIONAL DOMESTIC VIOLENCE HOTLINE

The National Domestic Violence Hotline is a non-profit organization established in 1996 as a component of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA). Operating around the clock, confidential and free of cost, The Hotline provides victims and survivors with life-saving tools and immediate support. Callers to the hotline 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) can expect highly trained advocates to offer compassionate support, crisis intervention information and referral services in more than 200 languages. Visitors to TheHotline.org can chat live with advocates and they can find information about domestic violence, safety planning, local resources, and ways to support the organization.
The Hotline relies on the generous support of individuals, private gifts from corporations and foundations and federal grants. It is funded in part by Grant Number 90EV0407/03 from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)/ Family Violence Prevention and Services Program, a division of the Family and Youth Services Bureau in the Administration for Children and Families. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Administration for Children and Families or the U.S. Department of HHS.


ABOUT SAVING OUR DAUGHTERS

Saving Our Daughters (SOD), a 501c-3 organization, creates the tools to get teen girls discussing key issues and fired up to take the power away from bullying (cyber, gossip, face-to-face), date abuse, hate crimes, school violence, violence against women, and other esteem slayers. SOD has had the honor of collaborating with key talent in film, television, and music with its celebrity-inspired book series as well as decades of experiential learning programs. With a powerful network of community partners, SOD delivers a revolutionary level of awareness and action to determinedly instigate fiercely confident living.


ABOUT TV ONE

Launched in January 2004, TV One (www.tvone.tv) serves more than 60 million households, offering a broad range of real-life and entertainment-focused original programming, classic series, movies and music designed to entertain and inform a diverse audience of adult Black viewers. The network is the exclusive home of NewsOne Now, the only live daily news program targeting Black viewers. In December 2008, the company launched TV One High Def, which now serves 14 million households. TV One is solely owned by Radio One [NASDAQ: ROIA and ROIAK, www.radio-one.com], the largest radio company that primarily targets Black and urban listeners.