Posts tagged with "QxA"

Image via Britney Falletta and Intelligent Threads for 360 Magazine

Q×A with Intelligent Threads

By: Matthew Anthenelli

Intelligent Threads is a new brand based from Kerrville, Texas that makes athletic oriented clothing with groundbreaking technology. Their athletic gear is designed to maximize recovery and help with body alignment while still being very modern and fashionable. We got the chance to talk with Intelligent Threads about their mission and what sets them apart in the athleisure fashion world. 

Intelligent Threads is an innovative company that provides clothing that stabilizes bone structure and improves body alignment while also being comfortable. Where did the idea for this product come from?

Synergy release method is a method that I developed to help stabilize the anatomical structure. But peoples muscles when under stress or repetitive motion or pressure will pull the bone structure out of place. I thought to myself if we can get the muscles to stay relaxed that’s going to help keep The anatomical structure in the right position. Which would prevent a multitude of structural problems in the body. So I guess the idea came out of necessity to help people stabilize their body to be able to feel better and perform to their full potential. 

Intelligent threads allow people like professional athletes to train and perform more comfortably. How does the apparel achieve this?

By a technology called Myo Equilibration.  We infuse at a quantum mechanics level Myo E into the fiber of our clothing. When Myo E is in close proximity to the body it will interact with the muscles that hold the structure out of place or pulls the structure out of place, causing the muscle to release. The reason we want this to happen is so now the body can self adjust and correct back into its anatomical neutral position. Helping all kinds of structural problems with the body.

In addition to athletes, Intelligent Threads offers support and comfort to those experiencing the difficulties of pregnancies. What specific issues can Intelligent Threads help prevent? 

The structure starts to shift and change farther into the pregnancies which can cause lots of structural issues. By Keeping the muscles relaxed IT helps the structural  changes before and after pregnancy To help prevent pain and everything else that goes along with it. 

What kind of research went into the design and manufacturing of the clothes made for both athletes and pregnant women?

I spent 15 years studying the body and how it works to come up with Intelligent Threads. The nice part is an athlete’s body and a pregnant lady’s body works the same so the technology crosses over to both. 

What differentiates Intelligent Threads from other athletic apparel brands?

Myo E is the difference. Athletic clothing doesn’t help the structure like Intelligent Threads does. Really the question is why would you want to wear clothes that didn’t have Myo E in it.

Where can we purchase Intelligent Threads and find out about upcoming releases?

Our website also the other social sites.

Make sure to check out Intelligent Threads via Facebook, YouTube and Instagram.

Rarin - credit Marcello Peschiera from James Steers, Press Here Publicity for use by 360 Magazine

Rarin Q×A – Toxic Ends

By: Ally Brewster

Fast-rising artist Rarin has released his liberating, pop-rap debut mixtape Toxic Ends. An aspirational, ambition-fueled introduction which champions human connection and self-growth, inspiring listeners to be themselves free of insecurity, Toxic Ends unites Rarin’s recent string of hard-hitting singles and adds six new tracks to his prolific catalogue.

Originally recording music for fun and continuing to create in his bedroom despite his success, Rarin has racked up over 75 million global streams with his string of viral singles including “GTA” and “YESSIR!” which topped Spotify’s viral charts and trended on YouTube. Adding to his hot streak, and distilling rap, pop, and relatable storytelling into his own unique sound, Toxic Ends will follow his recently released singles: deceptive flex anthems that speak to what is achievable in life if you free yourself from insecurity. “Toxics Ends” imagines what life would be like if we let go of the negative thoughts that hold us back, while Rarin “levels up” to become the most polished version of himself on “Big Spendin’,” a version without heartbreak or self-consciousness, that is excited for the future. “SO WHAT! ft. Brxkenbxy” speaks to brushing off minor issues to find value in mistakes without letting them derail you from seizing big opportunities.

“I think we’re all destined for something greater than our expectations. We just have to let go of what’s holding us back,” says Rarin on the inspiration for the mixtape. “This project is mainly about letting go of our ‘toxic ends.’ People are tempted to commit themselves to things they cannot obtain, especially in relationships, leading their emotions to consume them. Just because you want something, doesn’t mean you need it.”

We had the opportunity to ask Rarin about his career, Toxic Ends, and what’s next for the artist:

How did you get your start into music? When did you know if it was something you wanted to pursue?

I originally got into music because of my parents. They had me learn to play the piano because they wanted me to try out new things when I was younger. I think that really gave me an ear for making music and it helped a lot. Singing and rapping came many years later and that really started out of boredom. Later, with time, I found myself enjoying recording music more and more and eventually I recognized music as something I wanted to pursue professionally.

Who were your biggest inspirations for going into the music industry? How has their careers inspired/impacted your own decisions and direction for your music?

My biggest inspirations are Lil Peep, Travis Scott, and Billie Eilish. The career of Lil Peep has made me see how important fan interaction is, and how being close with your fans can bring a really special connection. I also love Travis Scott’s live performances and seeing him perform made me realize that your fans and listeners will reflect your energy, so you need to show your enthusiasm in everything you do. Billie Eilish inspires me to go out of my comfort zone and to be more confident. In one interview she had said that you should embrace your mistakes in your music and keep them because that’s what makes it unique. That saying has stuck with me for the entirety of my career and has really given me motivation.

How does your new work compare to your other works you’ve done in the past in terms of process, production and message? Do you notice differences in creating singles versus mixtapes?

Overall, the production has gotten much better, but I also have more purpose when I record and write music. Currently, I tend to make faster and happier songs compared to my past music.

What was it like when you realized that your work was connecting with people? Was there a specific moment you remember realizing how your music impacted others?

It was honestly very motivating. I’ve had fans tell me that my music has helped them stay mentally strong in their hardest times, and that really means the world to me. I use music to help myself feel better so being able to provide that for others makes me really happy.

Were you surprised that your work became popular in gaming communities? What has that experience been like as you watched you work be appreciated by many different communities?

I never really expected my songs to blow up through video games. I used to edit gaming montages so it’s crazy to me that my music is being used in videos similar to what I used to edit.

Toxic Ends is a mixtape with “deceptive flex anthems that speak to what is achievable in life if you free yourself from insecurity.” What inspired you to make a mixtape that is vulnerable and honest about overcoming insecurity? Is there anything you hope fans take away from the mixtape?

My life inspires my music and, in my life, I’ve found myself unable to rid myself of toxic relationships and situations because I thought those situations were normal and that I didn’t deserve better. After listening, I hope my fans recognize the importance of loving yourself and what you do. I think it is the key to being successful and happy in life and I wish that upon everyone.

What are you most excited for next once your new mixtape is out?

I’m most excited to start doing live shows and possibly touring.

Toxic Ends Track List

Toxic Ends

Love Fix

Ashes

Had Enough

SO WHAT! (ft. Brxkenbxy)

Skipping Stones

Cash Out (ft. Darius King)

2 Seater

Big Spendin’

See Rarin’s mixtape music videos below:

Toxic Ends album visualizer here.

“Toxic Ends” music video here.

“Big Spendin’” music video here.

Check out Rarin’s debut mix, and keep a look out for what’s next!

Town & Country’s 8th Philanthropy Summit – Pharrell Williams × José Andrés

The 8th annual Town & Country Philanthropy Summit kicked off today with an amazing conversation between Pharrell Williams and José Andrés, moderated by Soledad O’Brien.

See below for highlights from the panel as well as a link to view the interview in its entirety:

Pharrell Williams on how he thinks about philanthropy and what his goals are: 

“When we think about the African diaspora and people of color and what people who are deemed ‘minorities’ – which we are actually not—but that’s just the saying. There are three pillars that affect us the most—disproportionate access to education, disproportionate access to healthcare, and also disproportionate access to legislation. I think the first two are the ones that I want to focus on because they’re the ones that I feel like I can, through my resources and even my likenesses whenever needed, that I can actually make a difference in education and healthcare. These are the things that hurt us the most.”

José Andrés on why he focuses on food insecurity:

“I am one more cook in the universe of people that feed people in America or around the world. But people like me, we only feed the few. I am in the power, when you began thinking, we can also be a part of feeding the many. And where we can join forces to the many around America, and around many places in the world, in the most difficult moments, to be able to bring solutions. For me, food is my way of doing it, but what we do is only a drop of water in an ocean of empathy. It requires a lot of props of empathy to make things happen. Obviously what I do is more focused on emergencies, I don’t like to see people in mayhem; people who, already in the good times forgotten, that are voiceless, that nobody takes care of. It’s even worse when a hurricane, an earthquake, an explosion of fire, a pandemic, hits their communities even further. That’s the moment that I feel the urgency of now being yesterday, and I love to bring my community and try to be nice to as many people as we can in these moments of mayhem. At the end of the day, one plate of food at a time won’t solve every problem but at least you buy time. And you give hope to people who need it the most.”

Pharrell on how he and Jose met and joined forces: 

“Catherine Kimmel – the great connector – took me to an event. Here’s a guy that you really need to meet because, like you, he takes what it is he does and puts it to better usage and thinks about others… [at an event in New York] I was so impressed because there were so many chefs there but this guy – it was different. Yes, he’s a chef and he’s all about his ingredients and recipes, but his greatest meal was his operation and people and his ability to galvanize. It was really apparent that everyone was centered around him and all he wanted to do was feed people and bring people together and help people see that through our differences and our challenges are actually a lot of solutions and we can make the world a better place and I was really blown away… Then we met and we realized there were a lot of things he was doing that I could be instrumental in helping him.”

José on meeting Pharrell and what attracted him to Pharrell:

“I go and meet Pharrell and he’s even better, he’s the better half. What you get is a good vibe – it’s very difficult to describe. You know, you read about people, NBA players, amazing musicians and I’m not only looking for the amazing things they do, which I love, but what’s behind. When you see that behind is something very powerful that they’re putting at the service of others – their power, their money, their contacts but something even more powerful is their brain connecting with their empathy within their hearts… We wouldn’t be able to do what we do without people like them. Pharrell knows and more importantly loves his community. We were able to do it in Virginia Beach and be there because Pharrell opened to us the doors of being that community without being foreigners. We were able to partner with local people, with local restaurants.”

José on how his family impacted his values and his metaphor on life:

“My mom and dad always believed in longer tables, not higher ones. The table will always be ready for whoever showed up… My father would put me in charge of making the fire. I did that since I was young, and I would become very good at making the fire. But my father was very particular, and he would never let me near the chicken… [he would say] ‘My son I know you wanted to do the cooking, but actually doing the fire and controlling the fire is the most important thing, everyone wants to do the cooking without understand the fire. My son you already have the biggest gift. Control the fire, master the fire, and then you can do any cooking you want.’ (I don’t know if my father told me that story with that idea or I’m making it more romantic along the way as the years pass by). My father was giving me a mantra for life itself: find your fire, control your fire, master your fire, and then you can do any cooking you want in your life.”

Pharrell on his foundation YELLOW:

“For us, we want to even the odds. I know that I was a very lucky person who benefitted from my teachers seeing something in me. They didn’t know what they were telling me or which way the way to go but they kept telling me to keep going. I think that had a profound effect on me because essentially education is the toolbox that every human being is going to need out in the world just to function… What we wanted to do is look at a curriculum that could assess these children and figure out how they comprehend information best. Then eventually make a curriculum that is sensory based and not sensory biased. If you learn differently than how the curriculum is being taught, then automatically you’re deemed as remedial… with the YELLOW hub, it’s the space where kids can learn based on their way they process their information.”

Pharrell on the education system:

“I love public school teachers and you know, love the unions as well, but the education the educational system is antiquated. I mean just ask your favorite Fortune 500 CEO – they might not be the best, they might not be well read, but that does not stop their genius. And this is what we want. We want to make sure that we reach every child by properly assessing their learning potential and comprehension preferences, and making sure that they have a curriculum that is based for them. Sensory bias is an issue, but sensory based learning special educational systems is the future. That’s how every child slip through the cracks and we get to eventually even the odds.”

José on how the pandemic affected and influenced his philanthropy:

“I think this year has changed all of us profoundly… Fundamentally has changed me. First, obviously take care of your family. I tried to be a father who took care of his daughters and my wife and trying to keep them safe. Every mother and father tried to do that. But then I began thinking that to take care of my daughters, it’s not putting them behind walls, to take care of my daughters, is bringing down those walls and trying to work as hard to provide for the other daughters and sons of other people I don’t know that they are trying to achieve the same for their children. The way I’m going to keep my daughters safer is not behind walls but with longer tables, where I work as hard to provide for my daughters as I’m going to work to provide for the daughters I don’t know. Fundamentally this is what changed me.”

José on what people get wrong about philanthropy:

“Robert Egger, my favorite food fighter, he said that it seems philanthropy is usually about the redemption of the giver, when philanthropy essentially needs to be about the liberation of the receiver. It’s nothing wrong to give and donate time or money or your brain and feel good about it, but fundamentally in this pandemic, I learned that to give, it’s not good enough, that we must do good, yes, but we must do smart good.”

Pharrell on the changes he has noticed this year:

“Empathy is at an all-time low. It’s not where it needs to be. There’s a lot of sympathy and pity, but there’s not empathy. And we need more of that, we need more empathy, we need more humility, we need more gratitude. I think the pandemic, for me, has taken me to that place where that’s the only thing I can think about.”

View the summit here.

The T&C Summit continues tomorrow (June 22, 2021 @ 12:30-1:30 PM EDT) with a panel between the power media couple Marlo Thomas and Phil Donahue. Register directly here.

Carly Gibert "Interstellar" image via Abby Harari at Def Jam Recordings and 10:22PM for use by 360 Magazine

Carly Gibert QxA

Carly Gibert is a 19-year-old house, R&B, and pop music artist, who recently was signed to 10:22PM/Def Jam Recordings. The bi-lingual, Spanish born singer just released her groovy single, “Interstellar,” which reflects on her move from Spain to LA. The disco-inspired bop appears on NOW Volume 79, and can be listened to HERE. Gibert has been making music since the age of four, and her passion for creating is evident in all of her releases. We sat down with the rising house star to speak about the inspiration behind her latest release, her songwriting process, and whats to come next in 2021.

  1. What inspired you to write “Interstellar?”

“Interstellar” is about trying to make someone care for you as much as you care for them. You would do anything for the other person, but they only think about what’s best for them. When I moved to LA from Spain–where I was born and raised–I kind of started a new life, it felt like living in another universe. “Interstellar” actually means “living between stars,” and that is how LA felt to me. It only took me moving to the other side of the planet to realize that I wasn’t taking care of myself. It also references the movie Interstellar (which is one of my favorite movies of all time) with its theme of leaving your life behind and starting over in an entirely different setting.

  1. How would you describe the sound of “Interstellar” in three words?

Futuristic, disco and progress.

  1. What musicians influence your music style the most?

Not specifically for this song, but I grew up with and have always been very inspired by Beyoncé, Jay-Z, Kanye West, Frank Ocean, Mac Miller and Tyler the Creator. I definitely grew up on house music as well, since my dad would play it at home all the time; and I think you can actually hear that on “Interstellar.” The song has a kind of house vibe to it.

  1. What does your song writing process usually look like? Was this process the same for the writing of “Interstellar”?

I usually start off with one of the 100,000 notes on my phone. I write notes every single day–anywhere, anytime. You never know when the inspiration is going to hit, so this is how I keep track of my thoughts. When I find a lyric idea or a concept that resonates with how I’m feeling, I start writing random lines around it. At first, it honestly doesn’t make any sense and nothing rhymes. At that point, it’s all about placing the right lines in the right places and making them fit into a melody. This was also the writing process of “Interstellar.” I sometimes like to start with the melodies, though, and just build the lyrics based on the melody.

  1. If you could design your dream music festival where you were the headlining act, who would you choose to perform alongside?

If we’re talking about VERY ambitious dreams, I would obviously say Beyoncé, Jay-Z and Kanye. Then, of course, Frank Ocean, Tyler the Creator, A$AP Rocky, Doja Cat, Audrey Nuna, SZA, BIA, Anderson .Paak, Rosalía, Saint Bodhi, Little Simz, Kali Uchis, Kaytranada, Rico Nasty, Tinashe, Ryan Beatty, Daniel Caesar, Miguel, Jorja Smith…there are too many great artists.

  1. What has it been like being signed and working with 10:22PM/DefJam?

If someone told me 3 years ago that I would be working with the people I’m working with today, I wouldn’t believe them. The people I’ve met and am surrounded by are some of the people I look up to the most, and I’m so grateful for everyone who made it possible. I have a very close relationship with everyone on my team. I speak to my A&R literally every day, and I’m so lucky to be able to talk directly to the label if I ever need something. I’m super involved in all aspects of my career, so having a direct relationship with the label is very reassuring.

  1. What is something about you or your music that fans might not expect?

I would definitely say singing in Spanish. It’s something I’ve never done before, and I’m so excited to do it. I don’t have any full songs in Spanish at the moment, but I do have some verses here and there. The next song I’m releasing actually includes Spanish verses. Growing up, I was very insecure about singing in Spanish because I thought my accent was weird. It didn’t flow as naturally as English did, even though Spanish is my first language. Through the years, I’ve been practicing improving my diction and I feel a lot more comfortable now. I guess I just had to make it my own and embrace the “Spanish person who can’t articulate Spanish” aspect of myself.

  1. What is next to come from you in 2021?

I have two more songs that I really love coming out in the next couple of months. Hopefully an EP by the end of the year? (Nobody confirmed that—I just made it up—but I’m putting it out in the world). To be honest, all I want to do this year is release all the music I’ve been working on for the past 2 years. These songs are so special to me, and I can’t wait for everyone to listen to what I have to say.

Carly Gibert "Interstellar" image via Abby Harari at Def Jam Recordings and 10:22PM for use by 360 Magazine

1800 Tequila and Los Angeles Football Club image via Edmund Billings at Exposure America for use by 360 Magazine

LAFC x 1800 Tequila Partnership

1800 Tequila is proud to announce it has been designated as the official tequila of the Los Angeles Football Club (LAFC), marking the brand’s first Major League Soccer partnership.
1800 Tequila joins LAFC’s dynamic and diverse community, bringing the best taste in tequila and in life to soccer gamedays at Banc of California Stadium and at-home celebrations. Throughout the season, 1800 Tequila will grant LAFC fans first-class access to exciting experiences and sweepstakes opportunities like player meet-and-greets, owner & coach Q&A’s, private stadium tours and autographed memorabilia. During LAFC home games, 1800 Tequila will be the presenting partner of Banc of California Stadium’s Sunset Deck and Figueroa Club, with premium featured cocktails from the 1800 Tequila portfolio, such as the refreshing 1800 Reposado “Black and Gold Margarita” inspired by the LAFC Club colors. Additional integration includes Fan Fest activations and LED signage inside and around Banc of California Stadium.
Brooklyn Michelle "Come Here" PR image for use by 360 Magazine

Brooklyn Michelle QxA

By: Emily Bunn

Brooklyn Michelle, a multi-talented recording artist and producer, premieres her highly-anticipated music video for “Come Here” today. Michelle originally recorded “Come Here” five years ago on her Soundcloud. However, the song has blown up in popularity since, so she decided to rerelease the perfected single with a brand new video–which can be viewed here.

Though Brooklyn Michelle is busy taking the world by storm with her upcoming sophomore album, production company, art work, charity festival, streaming and more, she took the time to speak with 360 Magazine about her inspirations for creating music, the story behind Waffledog Productions, and her upcoming projects in 2021.

  1. What are you most looking forward to regarding your upcoming single and music video release of “Come Here”?

I’m looking forward to seeing everyone’s reactions to the music video! This is by far my favorite one I’ve produced yet. Plus, it finally has my Waffledog Productions logo right at the beginning to grab everyone’s interest. I’m hoping this leads to other artists wanting me to produce their music videos! I think I’ll finally have time to start doing that this year.

  1. As compared to your release of “Come Here” five years ago on Soundcloud, what differences can listeners expect when listening to this new version?

Updated vocals, a LOT more harmonies, live saxophone and trumpets, and a beautiful Alex Tumay mix.

  1. In your reimagining “Come Here,” how has your music creation process changed as you’ve developed as an artist?

My style has definitely taken on a more groovy aspect than what it was with my debut album “Lithium”. I’ve realized now that the deciding factor on if I like a song or not is the bass line. So, for my sophomore album, I’ve prioritized producing every song around a bass line that either my bass player Monty or I wrote. So whether the tone of a song is happy or sad, you’re still gonna be able to groove to it a bit.

  1. In addition to performing in them, you direct and edit all of your own music videos. How do you find inspiration for the visuals you create to accompany your music?

I get a lot of my inspiration from watching other music videos, but even more so from movies lately. I’ve noticed Ari Aster tends to do this very long push in or pull away shots in his movies which is what inspired the long hallway shot in the second verse of the “Come Here” music video. I added a little spin to it though too (literally).

  1. Why did you decide to title your upcoming, sophomore album “Placebo”?

I wanted to play off of my debut album’s title “Lithium” while also contradicting it. This is going to be a whole new style from me, yet [it is] still cohesive in a way to know it’s my sound. Lithium was about my struggles with bipolar disorder and looking for an outside answer to make me feel better. Placebo is about my struggles of a failed relationship, and looking within myself for how to feel better.

  1. What inspired you to start Waffledog Productions?

I originally created a YouTube channel with this title in the 4th grade. My friend Joanna and I would make skit videos. I kinda did the YouTube thing up until my senior year of high school. I loved writing scripts, making spoofs and eventually created a music account for cover videos. Once it became time to make my first music video, I realized I’ve been doing this my whole life. I know exactly how to plan everything out and bring my visions to life. I now realize I love making videos more than music itself and want to eventually get into TV and film too. And, c’mon, Waffledog is too cool of a name to not use to this day.

  1. You’re the founder of the Purple Palooza festival, an annual charity event to raise awareness for pancreatic cancer. Where and when does this event take place, and how can readers donate?

This event takes place in San Antonio, Texas. The venues have changed every year, but if Covid seems to be under control by fall, I would like to have 2021’s festival at The Paper Tiger in October. If you’d like to donate to our affiliate, you can go to PanCan.org and search for the San Antonio Purple Stride page. That is our annual 5k that we fundraise for all year.

  1. Do you have any other exciting projects coming up in 2021

I do! But nothing [that] I can tell anyone just yet. You’ll have to follow me to find out hehe.

*Featured image of Brooklyn Michelle shot by Madeline Ritter.

Brooklyn Michelle "Come Here" music video still by Maddie Ritter for use by 360 Magazine

“Come Here” music video still shot by Madeline Ritter.

Brooklyn Michelle "Come Here" music video still by Maddie Ritter for use by 360 Magazine

“Come Here” music video still shot by Madeline Ritter.

Brooklyn Michelle "Come Here" music video still by Maddie Ritter for use by 360 Magazine

“Come Here” music video still shot by Madeline Ritter.

Jamaine Ortiz Illustration for 360 Magazine by Kaelen Felix

Q×A with Jamaine Ortiz

Jamaine “The Technician” Ortiz, an up and coming, 23-year-old boxer, is making his name in the world of boxing. After growing up in Worcester, Massachusetts, the young boxer turned pro in 2016. His amateur record is 100-14 and he has already won many awards for his skill.

During the recent Mike Tyson vs. Roy Jones Jr. fight that was shown on pay-per-view, Ortiz was victorious over Sulaiman Segawa of Silver Spring, Maryland. After scoring a technical knockout in the last 10 seconds of the seventh round, Ortiz gained the WBC USNBC Silver lightweight title. This was his first fight outside of New England and he certainly made himself known in the fighting community. After winning this fight, Ortiz jumped from 76th to 44th in the world for the lightweight division. If he keeps winning, Ortiz is predicted to fight for a major world title by late 2021.

360 Magazine sat down with Ortiz to ask him questions about his professional career, personal life and future.

What was your upbringing like? Was there always a focus on athletics?

I started boxing at seven years old, and I was always an athletic kid, playing sports and outside.

Where did you learn to box?

I learned how to box at the Boys & Girls Club of Ionic Ave.

Why boxing?

I use to get into fights as a kid, I like that its a one on one sport I don’t have to rely on anyone. Over time, I noticed I was winning a lot and kept it going.

Who are your role models, boxing or otherwise?

My role model was my coach Carlos Garcia.

You’re currently the Undefeated World Boxing Youth World lightweight champion. What does this accomplishment mean to you?

I’m actually the former Youth World lightweight champion due to my age since I turned 24 last April, currently, I hold the WBC USNBC Silver lightweight title. The accomplishment is just a stepping stone, I have far more to go and I understand its a process and this is part of the process.

Your nickname is ‘The Technician’ where does this come from?

A technician is a person skilled in an art or craft by dictionary standards and when it comes to boxing, and me being a carpenter, I’m now an active trader. It was a perfect fit since everything I do, including things in my personal life, I’m technical about it. So it’s a name that reflects more than just boxing.

You’ve been boxing competitively for more than a decade. How have you evolved during that time, technique-wise and also personally?

Time is the mother of greatness, practicing repeatedly overtime is only natural; I’m going to get better.

How has your career been impacted by COVID-19 and 2020?

Luckily I was able to get a fight right before the impact of covid came I didn’t get to fight as much as I normally would. I probably would have had about 4 fights in a year but I had two with the last one being a great exposure bout.

Tell us about your interests outside of boxing.

I enjoy nature and I spend most of my time with family. Always working on self-development, a lot of stocks, and trying to find real estate deals.

Do you still have Olympic aspirations? What are your future boxing goals?

Olympics of boxing is an amateur sport but recently I think in 2016, they allowed pros to compete but it is heavily dominated by amateurs. In the next year, I see myself becoming World Champion at the lightweight Division and reaching for that pound for pound list.

What is your go-to move in a fight?

Not sure, probably switching from orthodox to southpaw.

What makes you unique as a boxer?

My ability to switch stances easily and my technique.

BoxRec

Tapology

RingTV

Behind The Ropes

Hunter Sansone Headshot by Leigh Keily

Q×A with Hunter Sansone

By Hannah DiPilato

360 Magazine has the opportunity to sit down with rising star, Hunter Sansone. Hunter is quickly making a name for himself in Hollywood with the characters he portrays on screen.

This winter, Hunter can be seen starring in Disney+’s highly anticipated sports film “Safety,” which was released to Disney+ on December 11. He also stars on CW’s hit series “Stargirl” as Cameron Mahkent also known as Icicle Jr. and is currently in the process of filming season two. We asked Sansone questions about his career, future and aspirations.

What has been your favorite role in your career so far?

Wow. That’s hard to say. Honestly, I don’t have a favorite. They have all been equally fulfilling. I learned different things from each project. I will say I am really into emotionally complex roles that involve a lot of raw emotional work.

What was your favorite part of working on the movie “Safety” for Disney+?

Being a part of an underdog sports film. I grew up watching these types of films, and they partially influenced my dream of becoming an actor one day. I played sports growing up, so to be able to utilize that childhood experience with my career was fun.

Do you have any exciting roles that are upcoming?

I am currently filming Stargirl Season 2, and that should be coming out sometime in 2021 on The CW. Few other things in the works that I can’t dive into at the moment.

I know you support the Stand Up for Pits Foundation, are there any other charities you would like to work with?

Rebecca Corry and the Stand Up For Pits foundation are incredible. They have done so much with ending discrimination towards pit bull type dogs. I have also recently partnered up with Stray Rescue of St. Louis. Their main focus being rescuing abandoned, abused, and neglected animals off the streets. Both incredible organizations that I plan to have my voice attached to for many years to come.

Since you grew up in Missouri, how did you get involved in acting? Did you have other future plans?

My mom has been a professional singer and vocal coach my whole life. She was my influence that led me down this path. She used to say to me that she thought I would be a good actor, but I didn’t think much of it for a few years. One day, I found myself curious and went to an acting class with her and I was hooked.

What is your favorite scene from “Safety” that you think viewers should be on the lookout for?

A combination of a few different scenes where Ray and I are sneaking Fay around the dorms. Definitely had some good laughs with those.

Do you have an idol you respect in Hollywood? What about them inspires you?

I’ve always respected Leonardo DiCaprio and how he attacks a role. He always gives 150%. He commits physically, mentally, and emotionally to every role. I try to approach every single one of my roles with that same tenacity and work ethic.

Tell us more about your character Daniel Morelli in the new movie.

Daniel is Ray’s roommate, teammate and best friend. He is the first person that Ray confides in about his situation with his little brother. You will see Daniel showing up for Ray in more ways than one throughout the film. He is all about family. Also, Daniel is an Italian kid from Long Island with a thick accent. I’m Italian myself so that was fun to be able to honor my Italian heritage on screen.

Tell us about the filming for Season 2 of Stargirl, can you give our readers an inside scoop?

We are working away on Season 2 as we speak. Having a blast while doing it. I can’t give you much, but what I can say is if you loved Season 1, you will definitely not want to miss Season 2. It should be coming out sometime in 2021 on The CW.

Where do you see your career going in the future, are there any goals you have for movies or TV?

I have big goals. I dream big. I recommend that to anyone with a dream. Don’t commit 50%. Set the biggest dreams for yourself as possible and go after them with every fiber in you. I think I’m going to keep them to myself for now and we can regroup down the road once a few of them have been accomplished.

Jarry Lee Q×A

360 MAGAZINE was lucky enough to sit down with Jarry Lee, a model, actress, musician and influencer from the UK. Lee has over 700,000 followers on Instagram, 30,000 TikTok followers and more than 700,000 Spotify streams.

She has also been seen in VOGUE Italia, POPSUGAR, Mic, Elite Daily, NY Daily News, AM New York, Women Fitness Magazine, Cliché Magazine, The New York Times, Thrive Global and more. She will also be featured in two upcoming books, “Tell Her She Can’t” by Kelly Lewis and “The Little Things” by Oliver Charles.

Authority Magazine named her one of 2020’s “Inspirational Women in Hollywood” while StarCentral Magazine called Lee a “rising star to watch in 2020.” You can click right here to see everywhere she has been featured.

360: How did you find a creative outlet in journalism?

Jarry Lee: I’ve always loved writing (everything from poetry to screenplays), and it was my childhood dream to write professionally. I feel lucky that I was able to do so as a paid, full-time job and that I was able to pitch and take on stories I was personally interested in. Writing is a cathartic process for me.

360: What was the biggest hurdle transitioning from writing for BuzzFeed to being in front of the camera?

Jarry Lee: I didn’t have much prior experience beyond taking some acting classes in the past in school and performing in a playwriting festival in prep school that I wrote for, so I did dozens of test shoots with photographers to practice and learn my best angles and posing. Speaking on camera felt natural, but I had to learn how to pose more naturally.

360: How has your experience in telling stories as a journalist and analyzing stories as the Deputy Books Editor helped you to tell the stories of others as an actress and model?

Jarry Lee: It has definitely helped me with more easily imagining the inner lives and motivations of my characters. Every time I interviewed sources for an in-depth piece, I felt that I gained insight into how other people’s minds worked. When I was writing a feature about Instagram in 2017, for example, I interviewed over 30 individuals and a few businesses, and their stories were really fascinating and completely changed my understanding of how people interact with social media.

360: How has being an influencer and online personality changed through the pandemic?

Jarry Lee: There are almost no in-person events, so in that aspect it’s become less interactive, but there are also more people online since everyone’s bored indoors. I’ve adapted to become a lot more self-sufficient — I rarely work with outside photographers anymore and instead have learned to shoot myself. Earlier this year I bought professional lighting and photography equipment, and recently even purchased a green screen! I’ve really enjoyed honing my video production and editing skills this year. Maybe that’s one small silver lining to the pandemic.

360: What is your favorite platform for creating content and why?

Jarry Lee: I love Instagram for being so curated and aesthetic-focused, but Twitter is my favorite platform for sharing thoughts and seeing others’ (as well as for really silly memes). I originally joined Twitter in 2009, way before I joined Instagram (in 2013).

360: How does your time as a model help you as an actress?

Jarry Lee: I think acting helps more with modeling than vice versa, but becoming more comfortable on-camera as a model has definitely helped me act more naturally, as well. Both require drawing your inner emotions out, onto your facial expressions and how you hold yourself generally.

360: How do you use your platform and large reach to influence ideas and actions of your audience?

Jarry Lee: Three topics I try to bring more awareness to via my platform are: Asian representation in entertainment, bisexual/LGBTQ+ representation and anxiety/mental health. All three are still not spoken about enough, so I think it’s important to share my experiences with my audience. I still frequently receive messages about how I came out as bisexual on the Netflix show “Dating Around,” for example, and it has really resonated with some of my followers when I’ve shared my past experiences with panic attacks and anxiety. I try to show the behind-the-scenes of my entertainment career, in part because there were very few Asian public figures in the entertainment industry when I was growing up. I hope that my non-traditional career path inspires others to take a risk and pursue their passions.

You can learn more about Jarry Lee by clicking right here. You can also follow her on Instagram, Twitter, TikTok, Facebook and Spotify.

Isabella Laws

Isabella Laws x Saski QxA

Isabella Laws, the General Manager of Tammy Hembrow’s Saski Collection, shares her insights, experiences, and aspirations related to working in the fashion industry, and particularly with the up-and-coming Saski brand.

  1. How did you first get involved with the fashion industry?

I’ve actually been working in the fashion industry since my first job when I was 14 years old! I worked in retail for 10 years before Tammy hired me to work at Saski Collection. Ever since I was a kid I have been obsessed with fashion and knew it was where I was going to end up career-wise.

  1. What makes the Saski brand unique as compared to other athleisure clothing brands?

Something that’s different about Saski Collection is that all of our collections are limited edition capsules. Whenever we launch a collection it’s only available for a limited period of time and then we move on to the next – Tammy’s constantly designing new pieces for Saski and we launch new collections almost every month.

  1. It’s incredible that the exclusive Saski Collection sold out within 12 hours and it was only launched around 3 years ago. Which factors led to this success?

When Saski launched back in 2017 we did sell out almost immediately! I think the reason for our initial success was Tammy saw a gap in the market and designed pieces she loved that she couldn’t find anywhere else. She was wearing everything for months before the launch and the demand really built up.

  1. What are some of the most pressing issues within the fashion industry, and how do you work to improve them through Saski?

Sustainability is a huge issue facing the fashion industry and is something that we’ve put a huge focus on at Saski Collection. One of the biggest issues is “fast fashion” – clothes that are made cheaply and in bulk to meet consumer demands. Saski prides itself on offering limited-edition capsule collections that are made ethically with our hand-picked ethical manufacturing partners. All our collections are made in limited quantities to ensure there is no wasted product. As well as this, all of Saski Collections’ packaging and post bags are biodegradable. Of course, there is always room for more and we hope to continue to work on improving our environmental footprint as we grow.

  1. What have been some of the key challenges that come with management?

At Saski Collection we have a really close team. We’re all very collaborative and open with one another which makes for a very comfortable environment for everyone. However, a lot of the team are very close friends (including Tammy and I specifically) – and a challenge I’ve had to work through since becoming General Manager is making sure I can differentiate between work and friendship. In saying this, this is something that my team has been very good at, and we are all very transparent with each other which has resulted in us only growing stronger.

  1. Who has/have been the most supportive person/people in your life that has/have allowed you to reach your achievements?

My dad (Brett), my partner (Morgan), and Tammy. My dad was a single parent, he brought me up all alone, drove me to and from school every day, put me through university, and has just overall been the driving force behind my entire life. I’m so lucky to have him.

I’ve been with my partner Morgan for almost 10 years and he has definitely been one of my biggest supporters since the day we met.

And, of course, Tammy, who hired me back in 2017 when I was fresh out of university with no experience. Her guidance and support have been hugely important to me and I never would be in this role now without her believing in me.

  1. What is your favorite or most rewarding part about helping to run an athleisure brand?

Seeing something go from an idea in Tammy’s mind and watching it come to life. My favorite part of my job role is design meetings with Tammy. We have such a similar taste and it’s so exciting to see what she comes up with and then working through the process of fabrics, colors, and sampling to get the final product.

  1. How have the donations from your proceeds sparked real social change in women and children around the world?

We’re so excited to now be working with i=change, which means that $1.00 from every sale on saskicollection.com will go to a life-changing product. Customers can choose from three sustainable charities to donate to when checking out. This gives us a chance to give back to those who need it most.

The three charities we have partnered with are:

  • UN WOMEN, to end violence against women
  • National Breast Cancer Foundation, to prevent women from dying
  • My Room’s Children Centre, support children, and their families

We’re so passionate about these projects and are excited to be able to give our customers the chance to choose where our donation goes when shopping with us.

  1. How do you and your team plan on expanding the Saski brand, and if so, to which kinds of customers?

Tammy has huge plans for Saski Collection and how she wants to expand upon our existing collections and customer base. I don’t want to give too much away at the moment, but we’ve already moved from athleisure to our first swim range in late 2019, as well as our most recent ‘mini’ and ‘unisex’ collection which sold out in less than 2 minutes. There is definitely lots of room for us to continue on expanding Saski and we’re looking forward to showing more of that in the coming months.