Posts tagged with "Jose andres"

Restaurant via Tara Ink PR for use by 360 Magazine

Miami Restaurants Celebrating National Hispanic Month

Hispanic Heritage Month is officially in full effect in the 305, reinvigorating the appreciation and education of Hispanic cultures. What better way to celebrate the flavors and energetic spirit of Hispanic Heritage Month than with the most iconic Latin and Spanish dining destinations in all of Miami—Salvaje, Chotto Matte, and The Bazaar by José Andrés!
These unique culinary hotspots offer curious and bold diners an experience of a lifetime, providing top-tier service, immersive ambiances, attractive designs, and, of course, over-the-top dishes and cocktails whose enticing flavors and presentations will surely have you dancing out of your seat, shakin’ to the stimulating Latin beats!

Salvaje
Spain’s famous restaurant group makes its US-landfall on the shores of Miami in the middle of our Wynwood Arts and Design District, Midtown. World-renowned for its eccentric menu offerings, expansive rooftop cityscape views, and dynamic energy, Salvaje lives up to its name, translating from Spanish to the word “wild.” Every hour on the hour, Salvaje professional salsa dancers perform eye-catching choreography, engaging with diners and encouraging them to dance along. Don’t be surprised when your beautifully hand-crafted concoction is served in an unorthodox tusk or bee glass! And as if we needed another reason to visit, Salvaje’s ‘Sunset Sessions’ are sure to provide some ease for your energetic spirit, offering incomparable views of the sun-bathed cityscape and specially priced menu items Monday through Thursday from 5-7 PM.

Chotto Matte
Selecting the best of Peruvian cuisine and pairing it perfectly with Japanese flavors, Chotto Matte is a must-do for Hispanic Heritage Month. Nestled just off of South Beach’s main pedestrian thoroughfare, Lincoln Road, Chotto Matte embraces the very best of Nikkei (Japanese—Peruvian) cuisine, with bold eye-catching natural colors and mouth-watering taste sensations. This unique combination of culinary traditions has amassed international esteem, as both share a deep appreciation for fresh fish and seasonal ingredients, with Japanese sushi and sashimi, and Peruvian ceviche central to their gastronomy. Chotto Matte is known for its delicious marriage of these two unique cultures’ cuisines, hip and intriguing guests, and a playlist curated by some of South Florida and Europe’s top DJs.

The Bazaar by Jose Andres
The Bazaar by José Andrés is a groundbreaking culinary experience from the innovative artistry of the award-winning Spanish master chef José Andrés paired with the prodigious mind of visionary designer Philippe Starck. The Bazaar takes visitors on a wild sensory adventure, blending Old World delicacies with avant-garde delights in a bold, multifaceted atmosphere where anything is possible. A vibrant mix of sophisticated cuisine, artful service, and playful theatrics where dining transcends into fête extraordinaire, The Bazaar by José Andrés invites you to explore a collection of magical dining experiences, with each new location adding a fresh, distinctive dimension to the world of The Bazaar.

Town & Country’s 8th Philanthropy Summit – Pharrell Williams × José Andrés

The 8th annual Town & Country Philanthropy Summit kicked off today with an amazing conversation between Pharrell Williams and José Andrés, moderated by Soledad O’Brien.

See below for highlights from the panel as well as a link to view the interview in its entirety:

Pharrell Williams on how he thinks about philanthropy and what his goals are: 

“When we think about the African diaspora and people of color and what people who are deemed ‘minorities’ – which we are actually not—but that’s just the saying. There are three pillars that affect us the most—disproportionate access to education, disproportionate access to healthcare, and also disproportionate access to legislation. I think the first two are the ones that I want to focus on because they’re the ones that I feel like I can, through my resources and even my likenesses whenever needed, that I can actually make a difference in education and healthcare. These are the things that hurt us the most.”

José Andrés on why he focuses on food insecurity:

“I am one more cook in the universe of people that feed people in America or around the world. But people like me, we only feed the few. I am in the power, when you began thinking, we can also be a part of feeding the many. And where we can join forces to the many around America, and around many places in the world, in the most difficult moments, to be able to bring solutions. For me, food is my way of doing it, but what we do is only a drop of water in an ocean of empathy. It requires a lot of props of empathy to make things happen. Obviously what I do is more focused on emergencies, I don’t like to see people in mayhem; people who, already in the good times forgotten, that are voiceless, that nobody takes care of. It’s even worse when a hurricane, an earthquake, an explosion of fire, a pandemic, hits their communities even further. That’s the moment that I feel the urgency of now being yesterday, and I love to bring my community and try to be nice to as many people as we can in these moments of mayhem. At the end of the day, one plate of food at a time won’t solve every problem but at least you buy time. And you give hope to people who need it the most.”

Pharrell on how he and Jose met and joined forces: 

“Catherine Kimmel – the great connector – took me to an event. Here’s a guy that you really need to meet because, like you, he takes what it is he does and puts it to better usage and thinks about others… [at an event in New York] I was so impressed because there were so many chefs there but this guy – it was different. Yes, he’s a chef and he’s all about his ingredients and recipes, but his greatest meal was his operation and people and his ability to galvanize. It was really apparent that everyone was centered around him and all he wanted to do was feed people and bring people together and help people see that through our differences and our challenges are actually a lot of solutions and we can make the world a better place and I was really blown away… Then we met and we realized there were a lot of things he was doing that I could be instrumental in helping him.”

José on meeting Pharrell and what attracted him to Pharrell:

“I go and meet Pharrell and he’s even better, he’s the better half. What you get is a good vibe – it’s very difficult to describe. You know, you read about people, NBA players, amazing musicians and I’m not only looking for the amazing things they do, which I love, but what’s behind. When you see that behind is something very powerful that they’re putting at the service of others – their power, their money, their contacts but something even more powerful is their brain connecting with their empathy within their hearts… We wouldn’t be able to do what we do without people like them. Pharrell knows and more importantly loves his community. We were able to do it in Virginia Beach and be there because Pharrell opened to us the doors of being that community without being foreigners. We were able to partner with local people, with local restaurants.”

José on how his family impacted his values and his metaphor on life:

“My mom and dad always believed in longer tables, not higher ones. The table will always be ready for whoever showed up… My father would put me in charge of making the fire. I did that since I was young, and I would become very good at making the fire. But my father was very particular, and he would never let me near the chicken… [he would say] ‘My son I know you wanted to do the cooking, but actually doing the fire and controlling the fire is the most important thing, everyone wants to do the cooking without understand the fire. My son you already have the biggest gift. Control the fire, master the fire, and then you can do any cooking you want.’ (I don’t know if my father told me that story with that idea or I’m making it more romantic along the way as the years pass by). My father was giving me a mantra for life itself: find your fire, control your fire, master your fire, and then you can do any cooking you want in your life.”

Pharrell on his foundation YELLOW:

“For us, we want to even the odds. I know that I was a very lucky person who benefitted from my teachers seeing something in me. They didn’t know what they were telling me or which way the way to go but they kept telling me to keep going. I think that had a profound effect on me because essentially education is the toolbox that every human being is going to need out in the world just to function… What we wanted to do is look at a curriculum that could assess these children and figure out how they comprehend information best. Then eventually make a curriculum that is sensory based and not sensory biased. If you learn differently than how the curriculum is being taught, then automatically you’re deemed as remedial… with the YELLOW hub, it’s the space where kids can learn based on their way they process their information.”

Pharrell on the education system:

“I love public school teachers and you know, love the unions as well, but the education the educational system is antiquated. I mean just ask your favorite Fortune 500 CEO – they might not be the best, they might not be well read, but that does not stop their genius. And this is what we want. We want to make sure that we reach every child by properly assessing their learning potential and comprehension preferences, and making sure that they have a curriculum that is based for them. Sensory bias is an issue, but sensory based learning special educational systems is the future. That’s how every child slip through the cracks and we get to eventually even the odds.”

José on how the pandemic affected and influenced his philanthropy:

“I think this year has changed all of us profoundly… Fundamentally has changed me. First, obviously take care of your family. I tried to be a father who took care of his daughters and my wife and trying to keep them safe. Every mother and father tried to do that. But then I began thinking that to take care of my daughters, it’s not putting them behind walls, to take care of my daughters, is bringing down those walls and trying to work as hard to provide for the other daughters and sons of other people I don’t know that they are trying to achieve the same for their children. The way I’m going to keep my daughters safer is not behind walls but with longer tables, where I work as hard to provide for my daughters as I’m going to work to provide for the daughters I don’t know. Fundamentally this is what changed me.”

José on what people get wrong about philanthropy:

“Robert Egger, my favorite food fighter, he said that it seems philanthropy is usually about the redemption of the giver, when philanthropy essentially needs to be about the liberation of the receiver. It’s nothing wrong to give and donate time or money or your brain and feel good about it, but fundamentally in this pandemic, I learned that to give, it’s not good enough, that we must do good, yes, but we must do smart good.”

Pharrell on the changes he has noticed this year:

“Empathy is at an all-time low. It’s not where it needs to be. There’s a lot of sympathy and pity, but there’s not empathy. And we need more of that, we need more empathy, we need more humility, we need more gratitude. I think the pandemic, for me, has taken me to that place where that’s the only thing I can think about.”

View the summit here.

The T&C Summit continues tomorrow (June 22, 2021 @ 12:30-1:30 PM EDT) with a panel between the power media couple Marlo Thomas and Phil Donahue. Register directly here.

SBE, Vaughn Lowery, 360 Magazine

SBE Ribbon Cutting

Commemorating the reopening of its portfolio in Miami, SBE Entertainment hosted a blue ribbon cutting ceremony at SLS Brickell with Area Vice President Marco Selva and Commissioner Eileen Higgins as well as an evening ceremony at SLS South Beach with Area Vice President Simon Sorpresi and Commissioners Michael Gongora and Mark Samuelian.

The hospitality company’s luxury-lifestyle portfolio includes SLS Brickell, SLS LUX Brickell, SLS South Beach, Hyde Midtown Miami and Shore Club as well as restaurants and bars such as The Bazaar by José Andrés, Katsuya, Fi’lia, SAAM Lounge, Diez y Seis, Hyde Beach and Sky Bar.

SBE, Vaughn Lowery, 360 Magazine
SBE, Vaughn Lowery, 360 Magazine

JOSE ANDRES × AMEX ICON AWARD 2019

JOSE ANDRES WINS AMERICAN EXPRESS ICON AWARD 2019 AS PART OF THE WORLD’S 50 BEST RESTAURANTS PROGRAM

US-based Spanish chef and humanitarian José Andrés has been awarded the American Express Icon Award 2019. This prestigious honor is part of The World’s 50 Best Restaurants and celebrates an individual who has made an outstanding contribution to the restaurant industry worthy of international recognition and who has used the platform that his profile as a chef provides to raise awareness and drive change.

Chef Andrés will officially receive his award at The World’s 50 Best Restaurants 2019 ceremony, heldat Sands Theatre within the iconic Marina Bay Sands in Singapore on the evening of Tuesday 25th June. The award reflects his overall career as a pioneering chef and restaurateur as well as his more recent humanitarian work, both of which have brought him to the status of a global culinary icon.

“José Andrés is more than just a superb chef and restaurateur,” says William Drew, Director of Content for The World’s 50 Best Restaurants. “Not only has he brought fantastic, authentic, forward-thinking Spanish food to the US, but through his World Central Kitchen project he has helped feed millions of people denied access to nutritious food as a result of natural disasters. Chef Andrés embodies a character that has used his talent in the kitchen and subsequent position of power and access for a wider good, which makes him the perfect winner of the first global American Express Icon Award.”

Jose Andrés says: “I’m very humbled to receive this award, to make sure that I will give voice tothose who are voiceless. I will try to make sure that we bring hope, one plate of food at a time.”

Born in Asturias, northern Spain, Chef Andrés is the man credited with bringing both authentic tapas and innovative contemporary Spanish cuisine to the US. After spending two years with Ferran Adrià at legendary modernist restaurant El Bulli, in 1991 he packed his bags for the States with just $50 in his pocket.

Today, his ThinkFoodGroup includes more than 30 restaurants, including the two Michelin-starred minibar by José Andrés in Washington, DC, which serves some of the most avant-garde cuisine in the world. His array of restaurants ranges from experimental tasting-menu-only counter dining experiences to authentic regional cuisines and fast-casual concepts, which are focused on impeccably sourced ingredients served simply, often in a small-plate or tapas style.

“We are thrilled to recognize the incredible culinary and humanitarian work of our American ExpressGlobal Dining Collection partner and overall visionary, José Andrés, with the American Express IconAward,” said Chris Cracchiolo, Senior Vice President, Global Loyalty and Benefits, American Express.“Chef Andrés truly embodies what this award stands for, as his work both in the kitchen and outsidehave shown the power and impact that food can have in bringing individuals and communities together and helping them thrive and grow together.”

Twice awarded Time Magazine’s 100 Most Influencial People in the World, Andrés’ humanitarian workhas received widespread recognition. In 2016 he was awarded a National Humanities Medal at the White House by President Obama, and in 2018 he was named Humanitarian of the Year by the James Beard Foundation for the role of his non-profit organization, World Central Kitchen, in providing nearly 4 million meals to the people of Puerto Rico in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. His book recounting his experience in Puerto Rico, We Fed An Island, is a New York Times bestseller.

He has recently broadened his restaurant reach with a new location of Jaleo, his first restaurant, at Disney Springs at the Walt Disney World Resort in Florida, as well as the 35,000-square foot MercadoLittle Spain in New York’s Hudson Yards development, which combines a variety of Spanishrestaurants, bars and food and retail kiosks under one roof. Described as “a veritable love letter to Spain”, the project, inspired by the mercados central to social life in Spain, was developed withcreative collaboration from brothers Ferran and Albert Adrià, with whom he worked at El Bulli at the start of his career.