Posts tagged with "structure"

ZAZ10TS Artistic Billboards

ZAZ10TS has curated and presented a new concept of art called “In Between.”

This new exhibition can be seen on ZAZ Corner, right in the heart of Time Square. LED billboards are being used to display the artwork for 15 seconds at a time with commercial messages every two minutes. The display will showcase a new artist each month beginning September.

Tzili Charney, the founder of ZAZ Corner, is undertaking this project to display art different from the urban environment. Different artists, organizations, universities and cultural institutions will work together to achieve that goal by providing different art styles.

The initial featured artist will be Ben Hagari, whose “About Face” video series was shot entirely at home during the pandemic. Quarantine protocols forced Hagari to get creative with colors, space, subjects and composition. The result uses a faceless protagonist whose expressions are completely concealed by household items. The subject lacks features and stands and wears clothes backwards.

“The scenarios portray a mundane existence in a world whose marks have been erased. Books have no titles or words, photographs are blanked out, labels are removed; we are left with data. It generates a binary structure: backward and forward, front and rear, serious and funny,” Hagari said.

Artists who would like to participate in “In Between” can submit their art right here, and anyone looking for more information on the project can click right here.

California Dips to 43rd in Highway Report

California Dips to 43rd in the Nation in Highway Performance and Cost-Effectiveness The 24th Annual Highway Report, based on data that states submitted to the federal government, ranks each state’s highway system in 13 categories, including traffic fatalities, pavement condition, congestion, spending per mile, administrative costs and more. California’s highway system ranks 43rd in the nation in overall cost-effectiveness and condition, according to the Annual Highway Report published today by Reason Foundation. This is a one-spot decrease from the previous Annual Highway Report, where California ranked 42nd overall.

In safety and performance categories, California ranks 18th in overall fatality rate, 19th in structurally deficient bridges, 48th in traffic congestion, 47th in urban Interstate pavement condition and 45th in rural Interstate pavement condition. On spending, California ranks 40th in total spending per mile. “The traffic congestion in California’s large cities hurts the overall ranking, but, in addition to reducing congestion, the state could significantly improve its ranking by reducing fatalities on rural highways, improving its pavement conditions, and lowering its administrative costs,” said Baruch Feigenbaum, lead author of the Annual Highway Report and assistant director of transportation at Reason Foundation. “Compared to nearby states, California’s overall highway performance is worse than Arizona (ranks 29th), Nevada (ranks 27th) and Oregon (ranks 12th). Compared to the other most populated states in America, California ranks ahead of New York (45th), trails Florida (40th), and ranks well behind Texas (ranks 23rd).”

California’s best rankings are in overall fatality rate (18th) and structurally deficient bridges (19th). California’s worst rankings are in urban arterial pavement condition (49th) and urban area congestion (48th). California’s state-controlled highway mileage makes it the 15th largest highway system in the country. Utilizing data that states submitted to the federal government, Reason Foundation’s 24th Annual Highway Report measures the condition and cost-effectiveness of state-owned roads in 13 categories, including pavement condition on urban and rural Interstates, deficient bridges, traffic fatalities, administrative costs, and spending per mile on state roads.

North Dakota ranks first in the Annual Highway Report’s overall performance and cost-effectiveness rankings for the second year in a row. Virginia and Missouri, two of the 20 most populated states in the country, are second and third in overall performance and cost-effectiveness. Maine and Kentucky round out the top five states. The highway systems in New Jersey (50th), Alaska (49th), Rhode Island (48th), Hawaii and Massachusetts rank at the bottom of the nation in overall performance and cost-effectiveness. The full Annual Highway Report, complete rankings in each category, and historical data from previous editions are available here.

California’s Complete Results Ranking (out of 50 states)   

Overall Rank (*see explanation below): #43

Overall Rank in Previous Report: #42

Ranking in Each Category  

Total Disbursements per Mile – #40

Capital-Bridge Disbursements per Mile – #30

Maintenance Disbursements per Mile – #44

Administrative Disbursements per Mile – #44

Rural Interstate Percent in Poor Condition – #45

Urban Interstate Percent in Poor Condition – #47

Rural Other Principal Arterial Percent in Poor Condition – #35

Urban Other Principal Arterial Percent in Poor Condition – #49

Urban Area Congestion* – #48

Structurally Deficient Bridges, Percent* – #19

Overall Fatality Rate – #18

Rural Fatality Rate – #47

Urban Fatality Rate – #21

*The Annual Highway Report is based on spending and performance data submitted by state highway agencies to the federal government for 2016 as well as urban congestion data from INRIX and bridge condition data from the Better Roads inventory for 2017. For more details on the calculation of each of the 13 performance measures used in the report, as well as the overall performance measure, please refer to the appendix in the main report. The report’s dataset includes Interstate, federal and state roads but not county or local roads. All rankings are based on performance measures that are ratios rather than absolute values: the financial measures are disbursements per mile, the fatality rate is fatalities per 100 million vehicle-miles of travel, the urban congestion measure is the annual delay per auto commuter, and the others are percentages. For example, the state ranking first in structurally deficient bridges has the smallest percentage of structurally deficient bridges, not the smallest number of structurally deficient bridges.

Reason Foundation’s transportation experts have advised four presidential administrations, along with numerous state and metro transportation departments and planning organizations. Baruch Feigenbaum is lead author of the Annual Highway Report and his bio information is available here.

Sober Houses and the Path to Recovery

The Truth About Sober Houses and the Path to Recovery

by Mallory Neuberger

Wendy Williams made headlines last week when she revealed that she’s living in a sober house; but less than one week later she left work, checked out of the facility, and went on to drink alcohol until she was hospitalized. So, what went wrong?

Sobriety is not something that we can pay for. As a recovering cocaine addict, I had to admit that I was an addict and that I was ready for a drug free life. In essence, I had to hit my bottom. Some people die before they find the willingness to get sober. Others need to end up in prison, homeless, or selling their bodies and souls to feed their disease. And many, like myself, don’t lost their homes, cars, jobs or families, but find themselves spiritually void and miserable, with their drug of choice no longer providing the relief that it once had.

Wendy Williams is going through difficulties in her marriage. Her husband is rumored to be cheating on her, and his mistress is pregnant. Despite appearing on television daily, living in a sober house, and paying a sober coach to keep tabs on her 24/7, she still couldn’t handle her heartbreak and to alcohol to numb her pain. The next day she was back on TV. In my opinion, she isn’t ready.

Ethical sober houses keep residents safe by breathalyzing and drug testing them. They have guidelines to provide structure, including curfews, chore checks, and mandatory attendance at 12-step meetings like A.A. or N.A. There are organizations that certify sober houses as good operators, so it’s important to be sure that you are choosing a place that truly has the residents’ best interests at heart.

Sober houses offer a sense of community. They are filled with residents and staff who are all trying to stay sober and meet life head on. There is always someone to talk to, so we are never alone. In my sober houses we emphasize healthy living, encouraging good eating habits and exercise. We practice yoga and we meditate together. We offer fellowship where we eat, laugh, play games, make crafts, listen to music, and sit by the pool. We celebrate together, helping one another get through birthdays, holidays and anniversaries without picking up. We are houses filled with sober women and we are like a big family filled with surrogate mothers, daughters, sisters, and friends. We cry together, and more importantly, we laugh.

Putting down drugs and alcohol seemed like the only way I could live, but what kind of a life was it going to be? I feared that I would be socially awkward without my expensive wines or a frozen margarita with salt. I didn’t think I would be able to stay awake without my beloved cocaine. I was losing my best friends – drugs and alcohol – how would I ever have fun again?

The sheer happiness that I have found as a sober woman is greater than any high that I ever experienced. I wake up every morning without a hangover or user’s remorse. I dance whenever and wherever I can, even while trying on clothes in stores, or at parties where nobody else has hit the dance floor. I run by the beach, singing out loud, without worrying that I may die of a stroke due to last night’s excesses. I practice yoga and can actually “be” on the mat for ninety minutes, breathing freely through my once stuffed nostrils.

I have a disease, and that disease is called addiction. I am no longer ashamed and hiding behind it. Addiction is not a weakness or a character defect. It is a debilitating disease without a medicine to cure it. Money cannot buy my recovery, but working a daily program can keep me sober, one day at a time. Every day I go to a 12-step meeting. I remind myself that I’m an addict in recovery and I reset my brain and ask for the strength to remain sober just for today. I am of service to others in recovery, showing them that this simple program works. It isn’t always easy, but it is always worth it. My worst day sober is always better than my best day high, because I am authentic and free and living the very best version of myself. I hope that Wendy Williams hits her bottom soon, and without any terrible consequences. I would love her to live in one of my sober houses.

About Mallory Neuberger

Mallory Neuberger, MS, CRRA, author of Sober.House (My Story), is the executive director of The Frog Pad, a safe and structured holistic healing house for women in recovery from drugs and alcohol. After struggling with her own addiction, Neuberger has dedicated her life to helping others find sobriety, volunteering at drug recovery centers including Hazelden IOP, The Addiction Institute in NYC, Gods Love We Deliver, and soup kitchens. She was also employed at Behavior Health of the Palm Beaches before opening her first sober house.

Joy Moser

Night Cloud #11, Joy Moser

Teachers College, Columbia University to Exhibit Abstract Sky-scapes by Faculty Member Joy Moser
  
WHAT: 

“Night Clouds,” an Exhibit of Abstract Paintings of the Natural World

WHO: 

Joy Moser, Artist and Adjunct Professor, Teachers College, Columbia University

WHEN: 

September 5-28

Monday-Thursday, 11 a.m.-6 p.m.; 

Friday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.


WHERE: 

Teachers College, Columbia University

Macy Gallery
4th Floor, Macy Hall (Room 444)
120th and Broadway, New York City

(Night Cloud #21, Joy Moser)

BACKGROUND: Joy Moser, a painter and longtime adjunct professor at Teachers College, started out as an abstract painter, switched for a time to more naturalistic landscapes, and with the “Night Clouds” exhibit at Teachers College in September, returns to abstraction. “Landscapes are tricky,” Moser says. “If you’re not careful, you can end up painting sappy calendar pictures. What I wanted was the mystery – to take you someplace you want to go but can’t quite figure out. So I’m excited to be going back to abstraction.”
 
Moser’s sky-scapes are anything but sappy. Her clouds are massive, unknown life forms caught in rare close-ups, in motion against often ominous blues. Like an eclipse, you can imagine them causing people across different states and countries to stop on street corners to look up, eyes shaded, with a mixture of awe and dread.
 
“Painting in general, and landscape in particular, has a kind of universality,” says Moser, who came to TC in 1992 at the request of faculty member Judith Burton to teach for a single semester and never left. “Unlike books or film, they don’t need translation. And with all the terrible stuff going on in the world, that’s a good thing.”
 
Admission to the exhibition is free of charge