Posts tagged with "abstract"

Dolores Cortés by Dolores Cortés via 360 Magazine

MBFWMADRID × Dolores Cortés

Dolores Cortés is the successor of a family tradition of more than seventy years in the manufacture and design of women’s swimwear, dating back to a time before the existence of current elastic fabrics.

Picking up this tradition, Dolores Font Cortés, began in the 80s to design swimwear collections. She produces her models in her own workshop, adopting the name Dolores Cortés as the signature of her designs, in homage to her mother. This experimental vision is evident in the firm’s swimsuits, whose origins date back to the 1950s, when the designer’s mother, Dolores Cortés, designed and created these pieces by hand.

Thus begins a new stage for the designer, with the aim of assimilating fashion thinking to the technical requirements of the product, creating and designing innovative collections in which the swimsuit is a trend product.

In this new collection presented in pavilion 14 of Ifema within the framework of Madrid Fashion Week, the juxtaposition of graphics and abstract motifs stands out. The designer has presented this new swimwear collection with prints conceived as pictorial fabrics or textile paintings in their most luminous version, as opposed to the mixtures between black and white and the play of shades of warm and cold tones, establishing a rich and varied colorimetry.

The term swim couture is present in the crochet details that adorn many pieces, which achieve a renewed aesthetic. In addition, the accessories (large bracelets and earrings) designed in resin, are colorful and complete the swimwear look, impregnated with a boho aesthetic through the printed scarves that adorn the hair of the models. To see the collection line, click HERE.

Today, Dolores Cortés’s designs are present in the national and international market through warehouses and her own stores. In 2017, the company Dolores Font Cortés S.A was awarded the National Award for Small and Medium Enterprises in the Fashion Industry, given by Queen Letizia of Spain.

BEHIND THE CATWALK

DOLORES CORTÉS FASHION SHOW

For more information click HERE

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Article: Andrea Esteban

art illustration by Gabrielle Marchan for use by 360 magazine

THE MOAD PRESENTS THREE NEW EXHIBITION

MUSEUM OF ART AND DESIGN AT MDC PRESENTS

THREE NEW EXHIBITIONS FOR FALL 2021

Museum of Art and Design (MOAD) at Miami Dade College (MDC) presents three one-person exhibitions for the Fall 2021 season. Exhibitions by the Icelandic artist Hreinn Fridfinnsson, Cuban American Jorge Pardo, and Miami-based Venezuelan American Loriel Beltrán offer viewers comprehensive looks at the practices of three of the most compelling artists—both local and international—working today. The exhibitions will be on view from Nov. 6, 2021, through May 1, 2022.

Hreinn Fridfinnsson: For the Time Being, the first American museum exhibition of the influential Icelandic artist spans six decades and highlights his use of minimal gestures to transform everyday materials into poetic, allusive, and revelatory works of art. Born and raised in Iceland, Fridfinnsson moved to Amsterdam in 1971 and began exhibiting his work in museums and galleries across Europe. His early works align with contemporaneous cutting-edge art movements, such as land art and photo conceptualism, but still suggest the distinctively romantic, lyrical, and wry sensibility that continues to define his practice.

A kind of poetic restraint characterizes many other Fridfinnsson works, which take ordinary materials and objects as their starting point. With a light touch, the artist minimally intervenes to alchemically transmute pedestrian things into allusive and enigmatic artworks—what we might call, in Duchampian terms, “slightly assisted readymades.” Sometimes these works carry a tacit mystical or spiritual charge, such as Sanctuary, 1992–2010, a regular cardboard carton with a sheet of fluorescent paper placed inside. Upended and mounted on the wall, the splayed box makes a cruciform shape and unearthly light seems to emanate from within.

Fridfinnsson’s art is often dependent on vagaries of atmosphere and perception for its effect. Most of his major exhibitions, including this one at MOAD, gather works from across the multiple decades of his career, without regard for chronology or ideas of artistic development. For the Time Being marks a provisional summation of the artist’s achievement, less a traditional retrospective than an assembly of instantiations of his unique sensibility.

Jorge Pardo: Mongrel, a site-specific installation, features a new series of quasi-abstract drawings along with modernist chairs, custom-fabricated chandeliers, and a carpet designed by the artist in MOAD’s expansive Skylight Gallery. The immersive exhibition poetically conjures the artist’s own history and biography, including his childhood memories as a Cuban refugee, processed with his family at MDC’s Historic Landmark Freedom Tower, which now houses the museum.

An untitled series of 25 new drawings created expressly for this exhibition meld a wide variety of images into arresting abstractions of pulsing color and form, while still occasionally revealing their representational sources. The artist emigrated to the United States as a child, passing through the Freedom Tower, which then served as a processing center for Cuban refugees. His memories of the welcoming architectural landmark intertwine with those of displacement, trauma, and loss caused in part by the Cuban regime’s confiscation of the emigrants’ family photographs and documents. Pardo’s drawings use family photos—his own and others’—as their starting point, along with historic photos of the Freedom Tower. He combines these with a vast array of other images, including many artworks crucial to his development as an artist and others meant to evoke the cultural milieu of his formative years.

The artist manipulates his source materials on the computer, resizing, superimposing, colorizing, and otherwise transforming images that recall personal and cultural memories into dazzlingly hued, intricately textured near-abstractions. Pardo translates these into vector graphics, which are then printed on cotton Guarro paper and brilliantly tinted by hand with colored pencils. Pardo has compared the montage and assimilation of source images into the provisionally unified whole of his drawings to the process of assimilation undergone by any immigrant to a new land, including himself. He views his reconstruction of an image from recognizable fragments into a new, often unfamiliar, mixed configuration as analogous to his own hybrid or “mongrel” condition, existing between cultural, ethnic, or racial identities.

Loriel Beltrán: Constructed Color presents recent works by the artist, innovative abstract paintings of dazzling opticality and metaphorical density made by affixing slabs of layered pigment, sliced from blocks hardened in boxlike molds, to panels. Beltrán’s panels appear as stacked structures, assemblages, or objects. But the optical mixing of the colors perceived by viewers also makes the paintings seem somewhat intangible. This contradiction between object and opticality constitutes only one of the works’ paradoxes. Beltrán uses such contradictions to create a tension-filled space within which he explores possible modes for contemporary painting.

Beltrán’s exhibition inaugurates MOAD Projects, a new series of exhibitions that features work by Miami-based artists, including distinguished MDC and New World School of the Arts alumni and faculty. MOAD Projects provides a platform for local artists to realize new projects or exhibit recent bodies of work, as well as for investigations of understudied historical developments in Miami’s cultural past. MOAD Projects expands upon the swing/SPACE/Miami alumni exhibition series that began in 2013.

“We are thrilled to present solo shows by three fascinating artists this fall,” says Rina Carvajal, MOAD’s Executive Director and Chief Curator, who organized all three projects. “Introducing Hreinn Fridfinnsson’s intelligent and poetic work to America is a great honor. And we are proud to host Jorge Pardo’s engrossing semi-autobiographical installation, which engages his own artistic development in tandem with the history of exile, of Miami, and of the Freedom Tower itself. These two projects, combined with the rigorous and brilliant paintings of Loriel Beltrán, produced here in Miami by an alumnus of the New World School of the Arts, give our audiences a view of the vast range of contemporary art’s possibilities.”

Hreinn Fridfinnsson: For the Time Being is curated by Rina Carvajal, MOAD’s Executive Director and Chief Curator, with the assistance of Isabela Villanueva, Consulting Assistant Curator. Jorge Pardo: Mongrel and Loriel Beltran: Constructed Color are curated by Rina Carvajal. All three exhibitions are made possible by the Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs and the Cultural Affairs Council, the Miami-Dade County Mayor and Board of County Commissioners; and the State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Arts and Culture, and the Florida Council on Arts and Culture. For their generous assistance in realizing the exhibition of Hreinn Fridfinnsson, MOAD wishes to thank Hrafnhildur Helgadóttir; Claes Nordenhake and Nadia Heinsohn of Galerie Nordenhake; Börkur Arnarson and Bryndís Erla Hjálmarsdóttir of i8 Gallery; and Elba Benítez and Pamela Cañizo of Galería Elba Benitez. For invaluable assistance in his research, Jorge Pardo wishes to thank the Cuban Heritage Collection and the Cuban Refugee Center Records, both at the University of Miami Libraries, Coral Gables; the Research Center at HistoryMiami Museum; and the Florida International University dPanther Digital Repository.

Brooklyn Art Studio illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Blank Slate Exhibition

Blank Slate’s Inaugural Summer Exhibition Series

Location and Timing

The Series will run from June 10 through July 18, 2021. Gallery hours are Monday – Friday from 6pm – 10pm and Saturday – Sunday from 1pm – 10pm. Artists will be present during the opening reception of each exhibition. Blank Slate is located at 283 47th Street, Brooklyn, NY 11220.

How to Attend

Please contact Jennifer Spencer to make an appointment. To secure tickets, visit Blank Slate Exhibitions.

SCHEDULE

MASKS by Spencer Flores and Maxwell Sykes

June 10 – June 18

MASKS examines the shared experiences and the psychology of hiding behind a mask. The compositions and subject matter of the work speak to communal experiences of feeling disconnected as we emerge from the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.
 

Maxwell Sykes is a Los Angeles-based painter who focuses on oil painting and draws inspiration from color and figure. Maxwell learned basic skills from working with his father’s construction company in South Central LA at the age of 13. His work can be found on Instagram.

Spencer Flores, a Mexican American artist, is influenced by his obsession with music and music videos and an endless fascination with comics, cartoons, and film. Ren & Stimpy is one of his biggest influences when it comes to storytelling and exaggerated art styles. As an artist, he is constantly in search of the nostalgia of his youth. His work can be found on Instagram.

Everyday Goddess by Liliana Rasmussen

June 24 – June 27

Liliana Rasmussen is a Brooklyn-based artist from the West Coast whose work emphasizes feminine energy and agency and seeks to capture the beauty of women of color. A multi-disciplinary artist, she also creates tufted rugs, mirrors, and wall pieces. Her work can be found at Lily & Papaya and on Instagram

Rise of a Movement: BLM by Divine Williams

July 1 – July 10

Divine Williams, a Trinidadian photographer based in Brooklyn, has been documenting the evolving Black Lives Matter movement for more than seven years. This exhibit features her collection “We March for our Brother” (Trayvon Martin, 2013); “Uprising in Ferguson” (Michael Brown, 2014); “Memorial of Sterling” (Alton Sterling, 2016); and “The Last Straw” (George Floyd, 2020). Her work can be found on Instagram.

Faces and Memories by Frida Vargas

July 15 – July 18

Frida’s artwork evokes emotions drawn from experiences in the journey of her life, reflected in colors and abstract shapes. About “Faces and Memories,” Frida has [said / written]:

Sometimes the journey is tough. So much so that as a result of the pandemic, I learned the hard way that people aren´t forever, but art is. Unfortunately, I’ve lost loved ones, I’ve even lost myself. Life, despite everything, is astounding and unexpected, and we must accept it as such. In these difficult events, painting was the only way I could cope with these tragic circumstances, and it has been quite an experience. So, in this collection, I´m taking the human form by a different approach. What does it mean? The rest is up to you.

Born and raised in Chihuahua, Mexico, Frida is an artist and architect. In her works, she experiments with a wide range of different techniques, especially oil on canvas. Her paintings can be described as abstract and colorful compositions. Frida’s work can be found on Instagram.

For more information about the inaugural Summer Exhibition Series, visit Blank Slate.

Myotubes illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Bio-inspired Muscle Growth

Bio-inspired scaffolds help promote muscle growth

Rice University bioengineers adapt extracellular matrix for electrospinning

Rice University bioengineers are fabricating and testing tunable electrospun scaffolds completely derived from decellularized skeletal muscle to promote the regeneration of injured skeletal muscle.

Their paper in Science Advances shows how natural extracellular matrix can be made to mimic native skeletal muscle and direct the alignment, growth and differentiation of myotubes, one of the building blocks of skeletal muscle. The bioactive scaffolds are made in the lab via electrospinning, a high-throughput process that can produce single micron-scale fibers.

The research could ease the burden of performing an estimated 4.5 million reconstructive surgeries per year to repair injuries suffered by civilians and military personnel.

Current methods of electrospinning decellularized muscle require a copolymer to aid in scaffold fabrication. The Rice process does not.

“The major innovation is the ability to prepare scaffolds that are 100% extracellular matrix,” said bioengineer and principal investigator Antonios Mikos of Rice’s Brown School of Engineering. “That’s very important because the matrix includes all the signaling motifs that are important for the formation of the particular tissue.”

The scaffolds leverage bioactive cues from decellularized muscle with the tunable material properties afforded through electrospinning to create a material rich with biochemical signals and highly specific topography. The material is designed to degrade as it is replaced by new muscle within the body.

Experiments revealed that cells proliferate best when the scaffolds are not saturated with a crosslinking agent, allowing them access to the biochemical cues within the scaffold matrix.

Electrospinning allowed the researchers to modulate crosslink density. They found that intermediate crosslinking led to better retention of fiber alignment during cell culture.

Most decellularized matrix for muscle regeneration comes from such thin membranes as skin or small intestine tissue. “But for muscle, because it’s thick and more complex, you have to cut it smaller than clinically relevant sizes and the original material properties are lost,” said Rice graduate student and lead author Mollie Smoak. “It doesn’t resemble the original material by the time you’re done.

“In our case, electrospinning was the key to make this material very tunable and have it resemble what it once was,” she said.

“It can generate fibers that are highly aligned, very similar to the architecture that one finds in skeletal muscle, and with all the biochemical cues needed to facilitate the creation of viable muscle tissue,” Mikos said.

Mikos said using natural materials rather than synthetic is important for another reason. “The presence of a synthetic material, and especially the degradation products, may have an adverse effect on the quality of tissue that is eventually formed,” he said.

“For eventual clinical application, we may use a skeletal muscle or matrix from an appropriate source because we’re able to very efficiently remove the DNA that may elicit an immune response,” Mikos said. “We believe that may make it suitable to translate the technology for humans.”

Smoak said the electrospinning process can produce muscle scaffolds in any size, limited only by the machinery.

“We’re fortunate to collaborate with a number of surgeons, and they see promise in this material being used for craniofacial muscle applications in addition to sports- or trauma-induced injuries to large muscles,” she said. “These would include the animation muscles in your face that are very fine and have very precise architectures and allow for things like facial expressions and chewing.”

Co-authors of the paper are Rice graduate student Katie Hogan and Jane Grande-Allen, the Isabel C. Cameron Professor of Bioengineering. Mikos is the Louis Calder Professor of Bioengineering and Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering.

The National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation and the Ford Foundation supported the research. 

Read the abtract here.

This news release can be found here.

Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter.

Camille Hannah, Olsen Gruin, art, design, 360 MAGAZINE, Australia

Camille Hannah

Olsen Gruin is pleased to present The Sixteen Pleasures, a solo exhibition by Australian artist Camille HannahThe Sixteen Pleasures will be on view at Olsen Gruin from October 9 – November 9, 2019. The exhibition design leads viewers with subtle intensity through a dynamic installation of variously scaled paintings and mirrors. During this journey, reflected glimpses of the self coalesce with Hannah’s paintings, creating spillage between the territories that define body and artwork. Enveloped and embraced within these abstract landscapes, viewers experience a bodily extension: a potent sensation which exceeds rational grasp.

By traversing this alluring amalgamation of imagery, the viewer becomes both witness and participant in the creation of these compelling ‘virtual’ paintings. These seductive, enigmatic images of desire echo the artist’s ongoing explorations around the expansive, unbounded nature of female desire and of the carnal disruption inherent to perceptual experience in the digital realm.

The Sixteen Pleasures also evokes the sensory experience of film, video and the mesmerizing back-lit screens that saturate our modern world. It is richly infused with the artist’s extensive enquiries into art history, philosophy, poetry, sexuality and contemporary culture, filtered through the personal narrative of each individual viewer. With this exhibition Hannah aims to create a boundless, all-encompassing landscape in which the viewer is captivated by an exhilarating and thought-provoking, physiological experience.

Camille Hannah attained a Masters of Fine Art by Research in 2013 and a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) degree in 2010, at the Victorian College of the Arts, University of Melbourne, Australia where she was the recipient of an Australian Postgraduate Scholarship Award. In 2018 she won the Wyndham Art Prize, and in 2017 was selected as a finalist for the Arte Laguna Prize, Nappa Arsenale, Venice, Italy and as winner of the Special Exhibition Prize of a solo exhibition at Galerie Isabelle Lesmeister, Regensburg, Germany in 2018. In 2015 she was selected by an international jury to win the T.I.N.A. Art Prize, Maurizio Caldirola Arte Contemporanea, Milan, Italy, and was a finalist & winner of the People’s Choice Award in the Gold Coast Art Prize, Qld, Australia. Hannah was shortlisted in 2014 for Contemporary Visions V, Beers Contemporary Gallery, London, and in 2012 she won the Kozica-O’Callaghan Award for Painting. Other awards include the Premio Ora Art Prize, Italy 2013 International Catalogue and being shortlisted for the Arte Laguna Art Prize, Venice Arsenale, Italy and the Wynne Prize, Art Gallery of NSW, 2012.

Kevin Bourgeois: Wall Of Sound

Olsen Gruin announces Wall of Sound, an exhibition featuring music-inspired multimedia works by Kevin Bourgeois. The anticipated show comprises a curated selection of collage and acrylic compositions on wood panel.

Music has always been an intrinsic element in Bourgeois’ creative process and daily routine. “I consider it a universal cultural language with many diverse incarnations and forms,” he affirms. Wall of Sound turns its focus toward the visual art that complements the vast lexicon of music.

The phrase “Wall of Sound” was originally devised to describe Phil Spector’s production methods. According to Spector, the aim was “to create a dense aesthetic critical shorthand, mixed well enough that the audience would then perceive each of the different combinations as one distinct sound or form.” This concept mirrors the augmenting process Bourgeois implemented in creating this body of work.

Through collage Bourgeois seeks to transform the literal imagery of each album’s formal narrative. His process of embellishment and jigsaw remixing of multiple record jacket sources results in an alternative visual dialogue and imbues an abstracted or figurative aesthetic to be interpreted by the viewer.

The Untitled Space × Defining Form

DEFINING FORM
A Group Show of Sculpture Curated by Indira Cesarine

RECEPTION: July 11, 2018
VIP + PRESS PREVIEW (by invitation) 4pm – 6pm //
OPENING RECEPTION 6pm – 9pm

EXHIBITION ON VIEW
July 11, 2018 – August 1, 2018

THE UNTITLED SPACE

45 Lispenard Street Unit 1W New York, NY 10013

The Untitled Space is pleased to present “DEFINING FORM,” a group exhibition of contemporary artists exploring 2 and 3-dimensional sculpture opening on July 11, 2018 and on view through August 1st, 2018. Curated by Indira Cesarine, “DEFINING FORM” takes a comprehensive look at the manifestations of contemporary sculpture today, engaging a dialogue of the narratives resonating amongst sculptors through works in mediums such as metal, stone, clay, wood, glass, textiles, recycled and repurposed materials, as well as mixed media.

DEFINING FORM presents figurative and abstract works by over 50 emerging and established artists. The group show investigates progressive themes in sculpture, including contemporary feminism, gender identity and political art, as well as new technologies in digital sculpture, with an emphasis on originality and innovative usage of materials. Technological advances in fabrication and digital sculpture have had a massive impact on the art form over the past few decades. Classic techniques such as chiseling stone and casting in bronze have shifted towards new technologies such as 3-D printing, materials such as silicone, plastics, and textiles as well as found, recycled and re-purposed materials. The domination of large-scale works has given way to delicate and intimate pieces as well as a wave of sculptural installations that deconstruct notions of space and form. Artists are pushing the boundaries of the art form integrating components of sound, video, light and performance as well as painting, photography and other mediums.

As the art form evolves in new directions with the impact of contemporary culture, it has transcended from the conventional portrait to works that challenge the status quo, address gender identity and racial stereotypes, LGBTQ ideologies and queer constructs, explore themes of the resistance movement as well as progressive feminist narratives and activism. Exhibit DEFINING FORM presents the new narrative of sculpture with works that interrogate ideologies of the art form, pushing forward experimental works that engage all of our senses and ignite fresh dialogues.

EXHIBITING ARTISTS

Alexandra Rubinstein, Andres Bardales, Ann Lewis, Arlene Rush, Barb Smith, Christina Massey, Colin Radcliffe, Cristin Millett, Daria Zhest, Desire Rebecca Moheb, Dévi Loftus, Elektra KB, Elizabeth Riley, Emily Elliott, Gracelee Lawrence, Hazy Mae, Indira Cesarine, Jackie Branson, Jamia Weir, Jasmine Murell, Jen Dwyer, Jennifer Garcia, Jess DeWahls, Jocelyn Braxton Armstrong, Jonathan Rosen, Kacy Jung, Kate Hush, Kelsey Bennett, Laura Murray, Leah Gonzales, Lola Ogbara, Maia Radanovic, Manju Shandler, Meegan Barnes, Michael Wolf, Nicole Nadeau, Olga Rudenko, Rachel Marks, Rebecca Goyette, Ron Geibel, Ronald Gonzalez, Roxi Marsen, Sandra Erbacher, Sarah Maple, Seunghwui Koo, Shamona Stokes, Sophia Wallace, Stephanie Hanes, Storm Ascher, Suzanne Wright, Tatyana Murray, Touba Alipour, Whitney Vangrin, Zac Hacmon

CURATORIAL STATEMENT

“What is sculpture today? I invited artists of all genders and generations to present their most innovative 2 and 3-dimensional sculptures for consideration for DEFINING FORM. After reviewing more than 600 artworks, I selected sculptures by over 50 artists that reflect new tendencies in the art form. DEFINING FORM artists defy stereotypes with inventive works that tackle contemporary culture. Traditionally highly male dominated, I was inspired by the new wave of female sculptors making their mark with works engaging feminist narratives. The artworks in DEFINING FORM explode with new ideas, vibrant colors, and display a thoroughly modern sensibility through fearless explorations of the artists and unique usage of innovative materials ranging from fabric, plastic, and foam to re-purposed and found objects including chewing gum, trash and dirt. Recycled materials are celebrated along with works engaging new digital technologies. The exhibit displays works that are politically charged, contrasted with those full of satire and humor. In the investigation of new tendencies, I felt it was important to juxtapose figurative works with the abstract, new materials with the classics, creating an immersive exhibit that defines new trends in sculpture and contemporary constructs of the art form.” – Indira Cesarine

Official Exhibit Website: http://untitled-space.com/defining-form-a-group-show-of-sculpture

The Untitled Space

www.untitled-space.com

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BEYOND THE VEIL × ADAM KNIGHT

BEYOND THE VEIL

CURATED BY ADAM KNIGHT

EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE
EVELYN PULTARA
GABRIELLA POSSUM NUNGARRAYI
GAYLA PWERLE
POLLY NGALE
THE WOMEN’S COLLABORATIVE

Opening Reception:

May 16, 6-8PM

Exhibition:
May 16 – Jul 8, 2018

Emily Kame Kngwarreye
Untitled, 1991
Synthetic polymer paints on Belgian linen
58.8 x 35.2 ”  (149.4 x 89.4 cm)

Evelyn Pultara
Bush Yam, 2015
Synthetic polymer paints on Belgian linen
35.8 x 48.4 ”  (90.9 x 122.9 cm)

Olsen Gruin is pleased to present Beyond the Veil, a group exhibition of Western Desert Paintings curated by the President of the Aboriginal Art Association of Australia, Adam Knight. The anticipated show features select works by Emily Kame KngwarreyeEvelyn Pultara, Gabriella Possum NungurrayiGayla PwerlePolly Ngale, and the Women’s Collaborative comprising Beverly Cameron; Kathy Marinkga, Imitjala Curley, and Tjangili George, and will be on view from May 16 – July 8, 2018.

Beyond the Veil celebrates the divine use of dots by Australian Aboriginal artists. It honors the unique method of layering and the shimmering presence of dots throughout the whole of each canvas by the true inventors of this now praised artistic style. As Aboriginal art further secures its place as a significant movement in the international art world, it is undeniable that non-indigenous artists from around the globe will find inspiration within these prized works.

It is widely accepted that Australian Aboriginals have the oldest continuous culture on the planet. The rise of contemporary Australian Aboriginal art was described by art critic and writer Robert Hughes, as “the last great art movement of the twentieth century.” Whilst the works are considered contemporary, they are derived from a cultural awareness and sacred knowledge that remains preserved by artists such as those exhibited here.

Beyond the Veil aims to remind viewers of the cultural narrative that celebrates the presence of the dot and acknowledges the genius of its use by its originators: the artists from Australia’s first people.

For further information please contact the gallery at info@olsengruin.com or at +1.646.525.6213.  All images are subject to copyright. Gallery approval must be granted prior to reproduction.

Emily Kame Kngwarreye
Untitled, 1993
Synthetic polymer paints on Belgian linen
23.6 x 35 ”  (59.9 x 88.9 cm)

olsengruin.com

Olsen Gruin

30 Orchard St, New York NY 10002

M: +1 646 525 6213

emerald@olsengruin.com

Wednesday–Sunday 11am–6pm

Rilke Guillén

Rilke Guillén 

Artist Plásticomexicanocatalán, spiritually and vitally grown and split between two ways of being, of thinking and feeling. He has exhibited his work in Spain and Mexico for many decades.

Artist statement

I believe to express my vision of this splendor-decadent world that witnesses our existence, to try to move in the emotion of the viewer, to make him see inside yes; by the right and the reverse of the same glove of what is and exists and of what is not and also exists. Like the dream inside the eye and the outside eye. Like the truth and vertigo of the depth of the fractal-cosmic spiral. As a picture, as truth, as the line that springs from my pen. Creating images and sculptures gives meaning to my existence and being me from the inside-out, so I can communicate with others. I am an insatiable explorer of the plastic techniques that I am encountering in my path, such as painting, watercolor, engraving, sculpture, design, etc. My search in these different lands has the same objective: to find the voice that is capable of taking out this animal-human being, who is thronging in my heart. The fine perfume of the flower of my spirit.

Biography

I remember as a child drawing horses and birds obsessively. The representation of images has always seemed to me as a matter that holds great power, as if in representing an object or being, somehow one was made with his skill, with his unique quality. I have always been surrounded by art. My father, in his poetic dimension, attracted artists from all disciplines to the house to share his presence and talent, some of them had a great impact on me. There was a very special one that made me the honor of taking me as a disciple for a short but unforgettable time: The great teacher Rodolfo Zanabria (who in peace rides in infinity with his maidens with long hair and beautiful faces). From him, I learned that the road is long and if you know how to walk you will reach the Magical Domain. Destiny had the willingness to be a Mexican-Catalan artist, spiritually and vitally grown and split between two ways of being, thinking and feeling. This has allowed me to exhibit and share my work on both sides of the Atlantic since my debut on the plastic scene, until today.

For more artworks, visit here.

Joy Moser

Night Cloud #11, Joy Moser

Teachers College, Columbia University to Exhibit Abstract Sky-scapes by Faculty Member Joy Moser
  
WHAT: 

“Night Clouds,” an Exhibit of Abstract Paintings of the Natural World

WHO: 

Joy Moser, Artist and Adjunct Professor, Teachers College, Columbia University

WHEN: 

September 5-28

Monday-Thursday, 11 a.m.-6 p.m.; 

Friday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.


WHERE: 

Teachers College, Columbia University

Macy Gallery
4th Floor, Macy Hall (Room 444)
120th and Broadway, New York City

(Night Cloud #21, Joy Moser)

BACKGROUND: Joy Moser, a painter and longtime adjunct professor at Teachers College, started out as an abstract painter, switched for a time to more naturalistic landscapes, and with the “Night Clouds” exhibit at Teachers College in September, returns to abstraction. “Landscapes are tricky,” Moser says. “If you’re not careful, you can end up painting sappy calendar pictures. What I wanted was the mystery – to take you someplace you want to go but can’t quite figure out. So I’m excited to be going back to abstraction.”
 
Moser’s sky-scapes are anything but sappy. Her clouds are massive, unknown life forms caught in rare close-ups, in motion against often ominous blues. Like an eclipse, you can imagine them causing people across different states and countries to stop on street corners to look up, eyes shaded, with a mixture of awe and dread.
 
“Painting in general, and landscape in particular, has a kind of universality,” says Moser, who came to TC in 1992 at the request of faculty member Judith Burton to teach for a single semester and never left. “Unlike books or film, they don’t need translation. And with all the terrible stuff going on in the world, that’s a good thing.”
 
Admission to the exhibition is free of charge