Posts tagged with "banksy"

Miami Design District Photo via Mission Baia for use by 360 Magazine

Miami Design District’s Current Art Programming

The Miami Design District announces the debut of several new installations and initiatives for their current season of art programming.

SPECIAL SUNSET PUBLIC ART TOURS  

Immerse yourself in the Miami Design District’s rich art and architecture. Experience the neighborhood like never before alongside resident expert Thom Wheeler Castillo. Visit Emmett Moore’s The Grotto, Apollo Projects ‘Landed’, April Bey’s Fringe Project installation, and more. 

LOCATION: Palm Court Plaza 140 NE 39th St, Miami, FL 33137

DATES: Takes place the first and last Sunday of every month at 6 PM

Sunset Public Art Tour Photo via Miami Design District for use by 360 Magazine

 

ARTLIFE GALLERY

ArtLife is an innovative contemporary art gallery and lifestyle brand with a focus on contemporary, pop and street art. The gallery was founded by veteran Art Advisor and Manager, Avery Andon in 2015, as one of the first online-only international Blue-Chip art galleries. Given the high momentum Miami is currently experiencing, the team felt it was the right time to debut this temporary pop-up in the Miami Design District. ArtLife has created a space where visitors can be immersed in works by some of the world’s most celebrated artists including Andy Warhol, Keith Hering, and Banksy. Additionally, ArtLife also provides the opportunity for visitors to experience works by a range of up-and-coming artists such as Cory Van Lew and Jannie Holmes.  ArtLife Gallery will be on view through the end of June.

LOCATION: 180 NE 40th St, Miami, FL 33137
DATES: Month of June 2021 (Sunday – Thursday 11am-6pm/ Friday & Saturday 11am-8pm)

Andy Warhol's Chicken Noodle Soup via ArtLife for use by 360 Magazine

QUINAZ STUDIO’S BAY STORE

Using only materials sourced from Biscayne Bay and the Miami River, artist/designer James Quinaz transforms trash into treasure for BAY STORE. Part exhibition, part performance, BAY STORE invites you to watch the design process as Quinaz navigates the detritus in our waterways to produce thoughtful, functional furniture before your eyes. BAY STORE asks the viewer to consider the cost of excess and reckon with a society that litters its priceless natural landscapes with cheap plastics, foams, and other harmful waste. Visitors will have the opportunity to watch the artist work, learn about the issues facing South Florida’s precious aquatic resources, and purchase one-of-a-kind pieces from the gallery. 10% of the proceeds will be donated to nonprofits working to keep our bay and ocean clean.

LOCATION: Sweetbird South, 92 NE 40th St, Miami, FL 33137

DATES: June 24th – July 25th

James Quinaz Bay Chair Photo via Lauren Gnazzo for use by 360 Magazine

 

NEW WORLD SCHOOL OF ARTS PRESENTS UNSPECIFIC VOID: 2021 BFA EXHIBITION

NWSA presents the 2021 Bachelor of Fine Arts Exhibition. Despite the challenges the pandemic has brought, the students persevered and continued to work in makeshift studios at home and produced an incredible body of work. The work included in the exhibition ranges from documentation of the pandemic to heartbreak to futuristic imagination, among other themes. The exhibition culminates these young artists’ academic training at the school and will present a wide range of media and themes. Twenty-eight recent graduates will participate in the exhibition. 

LOCATION: Moore Building, 191 NE 40th St, Miami, FL 33137

DATES: June 21st – July 11th

NWSA 2021 Exhibition via Lauren Gnazzo for use by 360 Magazine

“THE GROTTO” BY EMMETT MOORE

Part fiction, part reality, The Grotto is an immersive installation comprised of faux coral boulders sculpted into a secluded lounge, inspired by coral rock quarries and the mythology surrounding the fictional identities that form around these places, where the young and the marginalized gather to sequester themselves and share pleasures. The Grotto also takes cues from local sites such as the Coral Castle and the Venetian Pool where the quarrying of coral rock acquiesced to a mystical landscape, and a fantasy Venetian enclave. Each a tropical fantasy created by man in an effort to transport visitors to an otherworldly place. The Grotto is part pavilion, part folly, where one can escape from everyday life. Emmett Moore’s Grotto Lounge is on permanent display.

LOCATION: 3920 NE 2nd Ave., Miami, Florida, 33137

DATES: Permanent display

APOLLO PROJECTS ‘LANDED’

Apollo ‘Landed’ is the initial iteration of the first plant exhibition to take place in Miami Design District. All artists involved were invited to create, with nature as collaborator and muse, bringing attention to a living, shifting climate and all her inhabitants. From May to July, this pop-up will be hosting activations and installations, focused on reconnecting with the environments around us, where locals are invited to create art, with nature as their muse.

LOCATION: 151 Northeast 41st Street, Suite 12, Miami, Florida 33137

DATES: May 2021 – July 2021

JADE ALLEY FILMS 2021

A collaborative year-long art video feature, Jade Alley Films: 2021 features four artist video selections by the District’s key institutions, including Locust Projects, de la Cruz Collection, and ICA Miami. From April 1 to June 30, the Miami Design District will feature ‘Outage’ by Philadelphia-based artists: Jennifer Levonian and Eva Wylie. Originally commissioned and premiered by Locust Projects in 2019, Outage is a video that utilizes Levonian’s signature cut-paper animation technique, which incorporates deftly rendered watercolors into short films that wryly depict prescient social narratives and Eva Wylie’s unique printmaking techniques. The single-channel animation was made from over 3,000 frames and more than 275 screens were used to create pieces for the animation.

Locust Project Photo via Lauren Gnazzo for use by 360 Magazine

BREAKWATER BENCH BY AMLGMTD 

Ideated by design duo AMLgMTD, the Breakwater Bench is a system of individual benches inspired by the lapping ebb and flow pattern of waves. The slight shift in the repetition of a single element creates movement between the open and closed sections within the design. This simple use of geometry causes playful shadows to appear where the light filters through the open structure.

LOCATION: Palm Court, 140 NE 39th Street, 2nd Floor 

DATES: November 25, 2020 – ongoing

Breakwater Bench Photo via Lauren Gnazzo for use by 360 Magazine

Art illustration by Gabrielle Marchan for 360 Magazine

Taby Launches The Digital Street 

The traditionally physical medium comes to an online platform, featuring cutting edge artists from around the world.

Taby, a powerful new digital player in the art gallery scene, is proud to announce the launch of its second exhibition, The Digital Street. Conceived with the pandemic as a backdrop, Taby’s curator Emerson Radisich has carefully selected works from an international group of artists that are vibrant representations of our times. The new exhibition touches on several themes: the emotional reflections of dealing with the post-COVID era, the blending of our everyday lives with the digital realm, and thoughtful geo-political commentary, to name a few surface points.

The Digital Street engages the viewer on several levels, whether it’s the symbols of the collective unconscious tapped into by Polish artist Karifurava, representing our inner world, or the brutal honesty of Judy Rhum’s quarantine series, demonstrating the outward reality of how the structure of our daily lives has changed.

In keeping with Taby’s tradition of exhibitions benefiting charities associated with the theme of each show, CEO Mo Al Khater has selected Street Art For Mankind (SAM) as this exhibit’s recipient. SAM produces large murals, interactive exhibitions and live performances to support human rights and bond communities across the planet. The charity primarily focuses on fighting against child labor & trafficking and funding raid and rescue programs through the Kailash Satyarthi Children’s Foundation.

Show Description

Graffiti and street art is an ever-expanding and popular genre of artmaking that has found an increased role and dedicated significance during the coronavirus pandemic. It is a practice that has evolved entirely within the public realm, and often comes with the capacity to challenge, critique and contort both public places and public knowledge. At a time where museums, galleries and institutions have closed their doors, street artists have remained steadfast in their craft, and many artists from other genres have migrated to the medium to be able to continue to share work publicly.

Muralism today has seeped into many services throughout the art world; significant institutions regularly exhibit street art and graffiti shows, with artists such Banksy and KAWS­–now household names who routinely break sales records at auction houses, and the aesthetic of graffiti is embedded in our society and spans advertising through to technical inclusions in fine artist’s practices, a process often referred to as Post-Graffiti.

Digital artmaking is no exception – several highly stylized comics, illustrators, designers and artists have appropriated the specific aesthetic qualities of graffiti and mark making, as well as the pursuit’s capacity to critique and challenge norms. The Digital Street seeks to examine these qualities through the works of artists globally. It presents an array of artmaking which utilizes digital reproduction in a graffiti-influenced style, and demonstrates a range of artists who openly critique the world around them within this particular practice – ultimately showcasing the beauty and necessity for graffiti in today’s climate.

The Digital Street features 18 works from 6 artists working around the globe:

  • Karifurava, Poland: is a Polish graphic designer, illustrator and fine artist currently based in Warsaw. Influenced by contemporary Eastern graphic designers and illustrators such as Keiichi Tanaami, his bold and colorful works explore mysticism, neo-religion, and the magical. Karifurava has exhibited extensively across the globe at galleries including Backwoods Gallery, Australia, and venues including VIKTAC, Poland.
  • Judy Rhum, Milan: a graffiti artist, illustrator and lecturer currently based in Milan. Her works are lucid and ludic, combining a playful and illustrative feel into the monumental platform that is graffiti. They are slick: graffiti with layered breakdowns, expanded geometric shapes and purposeful abstraction. Rhum is also the co-founder of Drinchendro, a Milan-based arts program.
  • Tom Gerrard, Australia: a graphic designer cum fine artist currently based in Melbourne, Australia. His unique practice involves the painting of simple characters, architecture and nature through a minimal color palette, where his works are often inspired by people he has met and places he has visited. Gerrard has exhibited work extensively across the globe at galleries including Stolen Space, London, RVCA, Tokyo and 1xRUN, Detroit.
  • Morris Vogel, Switzerland: a self-taught fine artist and illustrator currently based in Basel, Switzerland. Vogel examines surreal manifestations of politics, existentialism, awareness and human nature through a highly stylized black and white drawing style. His works have been exhibited at Kunsthallekleinbasel, Switzerland, Cvijeta Zuzorić Art Pavilion, Serbia and YOPE project space, Mexico.
  • Indie184 is a New York-based artist who has been active in graffiti culture for over 2 decades. Influenced by abstract expressionism and pop art, her paintings are raptures of color and textures. Fused with her original graffiti and street art, imagery, and designs juxtaposed with personal messages, Indie’s art has been exhibited in galleries and museums worldwide, including El Museo del Barrio, New York and Völklingen Ironworks Museum, Saarbrücken, Germany.
  • Nini Sum is a mixed-media artist based in Shanghai, China. Her work depicts urban scenery and characters from everyday life in a captivating and surreal setting, which is strongly influenced by modern city life and eastern philosophy. The form of Nini’s work varies from silkscreen prints and mural paintings, to collage on canvas and album art. She is also the founder of IdleBeats, China’s first independent screen-printing studio.

About Taby

Taby is a premium digital art gallery specializing in contemporary art. We provide several rolling digital exhibitions throughout the year which bring together hand-selected quality artworks under a specific curatorial theme. Taby only exhibits exclusive, limited edition artworks, shipped to your door, which are designed and manufactured to the highest quality. Our objective is to provide every customer with an exceptional piece of art that is ready to hang as soon as it is unpacked. Alongside every digital exhibition, Taby also selects a charity related to the theme of that exhibition, which then receives a portion of our revenue.

Taby is a global team. We are artists, curators and seasoned collectors who have developed exhibitions and worked with galleries all over the world. Our mission is to make choosing and collecting contemporary art as simple as possible; this is why we provide ready to hang artworks through our premium printing, stretching and framing service, offering bespoke curatorial services so that every client is able to find an artist and artwork to match their collection, and partner with a range of specialists to select the best artists for each theme and series. We look forward to serving you.

Graffiti and art article illustrated by Gabrielle Archuleta for 360 magazine

Graffiti Art: Hobby, Art, or Political Statement

It is perhaps deliberately that this has been framed as a loaded question, is graffiti art considered to be art? But this takes us directly to the heart of the matter, what constitutes something being art is very truly on the eye of the beholder. But some serious debates are surrounding this topic.

Terminology

The term graffiti itself is problematic. Consider this article about prominent Chicago artist Dont Fret, he is referred to as a street artist. This distinction offers a more constructive spin on the entire artform, as street art is a more creative and acceptable term. You can see how celebrated the artist is from the article as he is lauded by a city official.

Criminality

Should we be considering graffiti, or street art, a crime? Well, technically it is, but only in some circumstances. The crux of the matter comes down to permission. If you paint, draw, or write anything on a surface without permission of the property owner, then by the letter of the law, it would be considered illegal vandalism. Would this result in prosecution in reality? This mainly depends on the owners’ attitude since much of the art is done either with permission or in abandoned spaces, the level of prosecution these days seems to be low in most areas. What of art on publicly owned buildings? This is a subject of hot debate as it brings politics into it (more on that later).

Should we Encourage it?

Is it an art form that should be encouraged? You could encourage young people to use it to express themselves. Take an art class, equip them with some Dang Paint and find an area to let them give it a go. Many art schools and colleges have whole courses on graffiti art as a legitimate medium. Reputation still holds it back for some more conservative folks, but it is steadily gaining momentum as a serious and respected medium.

Part of the City

In many places, grafitti art has become a defining feature of the city and its culture. High-quality street art can be stunningly beautiful and show much of the culture and history of a place when done well. Take the series of stunning murals in Glasgow, Scotland that is now a famous feature that residents and visitors to the city rightly marvel at. 

Politics

Politics often, but not always, plays a big part in street art or graffiti art. Take the world-famous Banksy, no-one even knows who he or she is, but many of the pieces are political, showing a real flavor of social commentary. These pieces have sparked more social debate in the last couple of decades than any traditional artform as they reach ordinary people who would never have considered visiting an art gallery. Other more overtly political examples can be seen in communities with a much more overt political struggle, the murals on display in Northern Irish communities, on both sides, are excellent examples.

DANYSZ GALLERY

Shanghai | Gallery

Alain Delorme

Exhibition Murmuration

January 26 to March 16, 2018

Born in 1979, Alain Delorme lives and works in Paris, France. Graduated from the Gobelins’s school, he then pursued a master’s degree in photography at the University of Paris VIII. The photographic work of Alain Delorme is particularly concerned with depicting the phenomena of normalization and standardization conveyed by our consumer society. The artist delivers photographs in graphic and colorful worlds oscillating between realism and fiction.

A distant rustle, puffs of air : a swarm forms and rises in the breeze, drawing elegant arabesques in a sky full of shimmering reflections of light. At first, the works of Alain Delorme capture the magic of the first fleeting beauty of a flock of birds, a Murmuration. However, this initial charm soon vanishes when the viewer takes a closer look, notices the clever deception, and discovers what is really behind the graceful flocks, the sometimes aquatic, sometimes calligraphic shapes : thousands of plastic bags, meticulously arranged by the artist, their massive presence threatening to asphyxiate the horizon. This work is located at the crossroads between various visual cultures and diverse artistic heritage, primarily cinematic : Murmuration seems like an improbable blend of the sight of the plastic bag which in American Beauty (1999) swirls around almost hypnotically, and the vision of The Birds in Hitchcock’s great classic from 1963. Both play with the reversal of perspective: the Master of Fear builds his plot on the inexplicable aggression of actually harmless animals, while the scene captured by the amateur filmmaker seems to unveil the beauty and delicacy of an otherwise ungainly object.

More generally, Delorme’s digital creations echo land art installations – presenting natural spaces that have been physically transformed in order to question their fate and vulnerability. In this work, Alain Delorme revisits accumulation, a recurrent theme of the new realists also leveraged in Delorme’s previous series – using absurdity to bring attention to the excesses of modern society.

By choosing such a common and universal artifact, the commentary takes on a global relevance. The context of the images is only hinted at, without explicit geographic positioning. The outline of our proud industrial societies, factory chimneys and power lines stand out as shadows playing against a sky that is bathed in a twilight that seems to announce the end of an era. Because the plastic bag poses a truly universal threat : it invades urban surroundings, litters natural habitats, paves seabed, and takes over deserts.

Through this “trompe l’oeil”, Alain Delorme steps away from any militant position, favoring the process of gradual awareness. He cuts out, assembles and arranges the elements of both a fictional and probable reality into one image that projects the sunsets of our tomorrow.

Practical informations

January 26 to March 16, 2018

Danysz Gallery

256 Beijing East Road x Jiangxi Road – Shanghai

Singapore | Curatorial

Exhibition Art From The Streets

at ArtScience Museum

Exhibition since January 13 to June 3, 2018

ArtScience Museum – The world’s most iconic street artists present provocative works for the first time in Southeast Asia. From 13 January 2018, the galleries of ArtScience Museum will be invaded by some of the world’s top street artists in one of the boldest exhibitions to be shown at the museum in years. Art from the Streets traces 40 years of Street Art, from its countercultural beginnings to its extraordinary rise as a major phenomenon in contemporary art.

The show features the world’s best known street artists including Banksy, Shepard Fairey (aka Obey), Futura, Invader, JR, Blek le Rat, Swoon and Vhils among others .

Curated by Street Art expert and gallerist Magda Danysz, Art from the Streets reflects the evolution of street art, charting the diverse artistic techniques employed by artists through the decades and showing how technology has created new expressive avenues for artists.

One of the highlights of Art from the Streets will be a series of live paintings and installations created on – site by iconic names from the field. Nearly a dozen artists, including upcoming new street art sensation, Felipe Pantone from Spain, have been invited to take over the galleries of the museum, creating new art works especially for the show. Illustrating the vitality of and diversity of the movement, the show also includes large – scale mural paintings, installations, videos, prints, archival material, drawings and sketches.

As well as bringing some of the leading international names in Street Art to Singapore for the first time, Art from the Streets also shines a spotlight on urban art in South east Asia. The show includes major new works by local and regional artists, including Speak Cryptic (Singapore), Yok & Sheryo (Singapore) and Eko Nugroho ( Indonesia ) .

“ArtScience Museum is thrilled to be presenting some of the biggest names in Street Art in this daring and provocative new show. What started out as acts of rebellion on the streets of US cities in the 1970s, has since expanded into a major international cultural movement. Art from the Streets shows how street art has evolved beyond the early days of graffiti and tagging, and is now recognised as one of the most important artistic genres of the 21st century. Our visitors will see how artists have restyled the look and feel of cities around the world, through captivating, thought – provoking works that range from small interventions, to massive murals. This is an exhibition that celebrates the energy and dynamism of the streets, by encouraging some of the most exciting artists in the field to transform our galleries into living urban artworks,” said Honor Harger, Executive Director of ArtScience Museum, Marina Bay Sands.

“Street Art is one of the most important art movements to have emerged in the 21st century. This exhibition celebrates the vitality of a movement many of us can witness as part of our everyday experience. It is very important at this stage to mark the 40 year history of the movement and recognize Street Art as a coherent and valuable art movement,” added Magda Danysz, a curator and writer based in Paris and Shanghai. Having witnessed the rise of graffiti and urban art from its beginnings, Magda Danysz became an expert in the movement, writing books about the history of Street Art, curating major institutional group shows and over 50 solo shows with artists including Shepard Fairey (aka Obey), Invader, JR and Vhils.

Practical informations

since January 13 to June 3, 2018

Art Science Museum

6 Bayfront Ave – Singapore

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Rilke Guillén

Rilke Guillén 

Artist Plásticomexicanocatalán, spiritually and vitally grown and split between two ways of being, of thinking and feeling. He has exhibited his work in Spain and Mexico for many decades.

Artist statement

I believe to express my vision of this splendor-decadent world that witnesses our existence, to try to move in the emotion of the viewer, to make him see inside yes; by the right and the reverse of the same glove of what is and exists and of what is not and also exists. Like the dream inside the eye and the outside eye. Like the truth and vertigo of the depth of the fractal-cosmic spiral. As a picture, as truth, as the line that springs from my pen. Creating images and sculptures gives meaning to my existence and being me from the inside-out, so I can communicate with others. I am an insatiable explorer of the plastic techniques that I am encountering in my path, such as painting, watercolor, engraving, sculpture, design, etc. My search in these different lands has the same objective: to find the voice that is capable of taking out this animal-human being, who is thronging in my heart. The fine perfume of the flower of my spirit.

Biography

I remember as a child drawing horses and birds obsessively. The representation of images has always seemed to me as a matter that holds great power, as if in representing an object or being, somehow one was made with his skill, with his unique quality. I have always been surrounded by art. My father, in his poetic dimension, attracted artists from all disciplines to the house to share his presence and talent, some of them had a great impact on me. There was a very special one that made me the honor of taking me as a disciple for a short but unforgettable time: The great teacher Rodolfo Zanabria (who in peace rides in infinity with his maidens with long hair and beautiful faces). From him, I learned that the road is long and if you know how to walk you will reach the Magical Domain. Destiny had the willingness to be a Mexican-Catalan artist, spiritually and vitally grown and split between two ways of being, thinking and feeling. This has allowed me to exhibit and share my work on both sides of the Atlantic since my debut on the plastic scene, until today.

For more artworks, visit here.

BOMBING SCIENCE

At Bombing Science, we wanted to get a sense of what was going on with graffiti this summer and what better way to do that than to explore where people were using the #graffiti hashtag around the world. The world is popping full of colours and artists are making their mark in an expanding list of cities. Rather than pick cities at random, we pulled Instagram data over the summer to deliver to you the Top 99 instagrammable cities for graffiti as brought to you by instagrammers from around the world. It truly is a global experience not to be missed!

Most Instagramed Cities for Graffiti


After talking about it with the team, we decided that we would try and share an observation or two from the big list. Break it down a bit so people could see some of the trends in terms of their own countries or cities. While you see the top 10 chart above, we’ve commented on the top 25 cities across North America, Europe and South America (including Mexico). The 25 cities chose are reflected in the top 99 cities chart below.

North America

In North America, we grouped US cities and Canadian cities together. There weren’t any surprises with New York City talking the top spot on the list in 2017. Followed up by Los Angeles (6), Miami (10), San Francisco (14th), Chicago (21) and sneaking into the last spot in the top 25 was Austin. In Canada, Toronto took the top spot and found itself 12th overall on the list. Followed up by Montreal (13) and no other Canadian cities in the top 25.

 
Europe

Reviewing the European cities showed us that Europe dominated the Top 25 this summer. England, Germany, Italy and Spain all had 2 cities. London took the top spot and 2nd overall on the list. Paris (3), Berlin (5), Barcelona (8), Reykjavik (9), Dusseldorf (11), Moscow (15), Madrid (16), Lisbon (17), Rome (18), Milan (19) and rounding out the European cities was Amsterdam (22).

 

South America and Mexico

Reviewing the South American Cities revealed that San Paulo (4) had top honours and was part of the top 10 cities. Next was Bogotá (7) and Rio de Janeiro (20) with Mexico City coming in (23) and Buenos Aires (24th) rounding out the list.

 

And now… the big list!


Can you find your city on the list?

Cities & Their Relationship to Graffiti

In cities around the world there are examples as to the positive impact of art and how it can be a positive influence on the wellbeing of the people that live in urban areas. What does that really mean? In exactly which ways does art have a positive influence on the wellbeing of cities? Graffiti as an emerging mainstream art form is helping to improve or revitalization depressed areas of cities that otherwise were considered dead zones, people are now traveling to cities they may not have considered traveling to in order to check out art destinations. Artists are finding new venues and outlets to express themselves and earn a living off of their work.
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“Residents, tourists, and high-end boutiques, co-exist with graffiti vandalism in a relatively symbiotic fashion.” 

– Gregory Snyder, author of Graffiti Lives on the NYC graffiti scene.

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Placemaking and the role of graffiti

Looking closer to home, this type of placemaking is having an impact across the United States and Canada. The National Endowment for the Arts has tracked some of the results through their Exploring Our Town program. What emerges out of their research is that it’s not just the big cities that are turning a corner on their use of public space. Several of those project that had a street art/graffiti element were in small and mid-size cities including projects such as Downtown Pathways in El Paso, Texas, Grant Street Global Voice in Buffalo, Revitalizating Station North in Baltimore and The Whittier Neighbourhood Mural Project in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. Each one of these project had a set of anticipated impacts and each reported positive unexpected impacts. Notably these projects brought communities together, increased foot traffic and investments ranging from new restaurants, new retail and new infrastructure spending.

In Canada, there are examples of partnerships that are forming around grafitti art including Toronto’s Graffiti Alley. It has support across non-profits including the laneways project, the city of Toronto’s Heritage Department and most recently was a featured project in the creation of the world’s longest instagram photo created by Toronto photographer Justin Poulsen in collaboration with Havas Worldwide Canada. Tunnel du Rouen is a one of the largest legal walls in Montreal. It’s a dynamic entry to the list in that the artists continually evolve the work that is done both on the wall of the tunnel and nearby. In Vancouver, a by product of their mural festival, there are ongoing activities and walking tours put on in collaboration with the the Mount Pleasant Business Improvement Area with support from local city councillors. Some other cities are starting to recreate and bring back a graffiti culture that had existed in the mid-2000s such as what happened in London, Ontario. This summer – Over 20 local graffiti artists participated in a “graffiti wall jam” put on by Mitch Taylor, the owner of Leisure Surf and Social Club store. All of these efforts contribute to more people being involved in their communities and spending more money in their own cities to support local economies.

Many European cities are taking the lead, among them is Lisbon that has an official office for managing street art that has lead to the promotion of eco-tourism and walking tours. In Lisbon, the Bairro Alto area is one of the more popular places and highlighted by Bohemian Trails plus in an article by Steven P. Harrington and Jaime Rojo aka BrooklynStreet.com. There are the free walls in the Poblenou neighbourhood in Barcelona. This is an area that was once really industrial and now and has now become revitalized and is a thriving go-to destination point in any visit to the city. Another great example is the European Cultural Capital city of Aarhus with a graffiti Facebook group of over 15,000. Others include Pigneto (Rome) and Berlin which will see the opening of the The Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art.


Let’s really just pause for a moment to consider that we now even have graffiti hotels including “The Walled Off Hotel” created by Banksy in the Palestinian West Bank city of Bethlehem, We have graffiti installations at Art Basel Miami and festivals popping up in countries that we haven’t seen before such as India. The area in Mumbai known as the Lodhi Colony was turned into India’s first public art district. The 2nd edition of St+art India will be happening between October to December 2017. All of these efforts are contributing to the rise in the percentage of art in public spaces. Adding to this, a new book on street art by Ed Bartlett and published in spring 2017 by Lonely Planet. It’s no surprise that there are some of the top livable countries in 2017 with thriving graffiti communities including Germany, Netherlands, Iceland, United States, Canada and the United Kingdom.

The 2016 Street Art Festival by St+art India Foundation Video 

Festivals

Along with the cities that have the most posts for #grafitti, we also wanted to highlight the festivals that make it happen for a lot of these artists. More and more festivals are popping up around the world and each bring their own distinct take on graffiti or street art. In no particular order some of the top festivals in our mind include Upfest (Bristol), City Leaks (Cologne), The Crystal Ship (Ostend), Bloop (Ibiza) , Santurce es Ley (San Juan), Mural Project (Richmond, USA), Mural Festival and Under Pressure in Montréal, Mural Festival Vancouver, Art Basel Miami (off-events) and WonderWalls (Adelaide). They represent 1 million+ fans and 100s of graffiti artists with the top group of festivals having substantial indirect and direct financial benefits topping $5 million+ and counting.

POW! WOW! Hawaii 2017 Official Video

One that really stands out for us is the POW!WOW! Festival series coming out of Hawaii. Founded by Justin Wong and the main event being held each February with the support of the Hawaii Tourism Authority. It’s gone from a simple show to offering educational opportunities with their mural art schools, gallery exhibitions, and most recently connecting with SXSW creating murals around Austin, Texas. In the future, the festival has plans to expand to cities and countries such as Taiwan, Long Beach, Israel, Singapore, Jamaica, Washington D.C., Guam, New Zealand, Germany and more.

The next step in the rise of #graffiti in the mainstream is the fact that brand names are now associating themselves with the festivals which brings in revenue and exposure for the artists. While some of the festivals were able to report attendance or revenue results back for 2016, many of them are just putting measurements in place and simply haven’t the time nor the resources given the logistics of managing artists, suppliers, sponsors and audiences. A lot of these festivals have completed their 2017 editions and already planning for 2018.
 
Our Methodology

Our team made the decision to focus on the #graffiti hashtag and determined that Instagram would be the most appropriate social media platform given the obvious appeal to photography and visuals. Instagram as a platform now has over 700 million active users worldwide and so we took it upon ourselves to build out our own tool to collect specific data. The criteria was pretty simple – We set out to capture the hashtag info plus the geographical data during the summer of 2017.