Posts tagged with "A.A."

Vaughn Lowery, 360 MAGAZINE

Alcoholics Anonymous

Extending the Hand of A.A.
Alcoholics who are Deaf can access A.A.’s program of recovery in an updated American Sign Language translation of Alcoholics Anonymous

With over 35 million printed copies sold, the book Alcoholics Anonymous is now available in an updated abridged translation into American Sign Language. Commonly referred to as “The Big Book” this basic text of the worldwide Fellowship that bears its name is now available on DVD to the Deaf community, the Hard-of-Hearing community and the hearing community as well.
DVD features:

  • Professional ASL signers and DVD video production
  • Updated translation inspired and reviewed by A.A. members who are Deaf
  • Audio track and subtitles for use among ASL and non-ASL users
  • The basic principles and practices of the Fellowship that have provided a pathway to recovery for alcoholics for over 80 years
  • Can be ordered at www.aa.org or may be available through a local A.A. office near you

A.A. has always been committed to making its program of recovery available to anyone, anywhere who reaches out for help with a drinking problem. This translation has been updated with current language and signing most familiar in today’s Deaf community.

Founded in 1935 on the principle of one alcoholic helping another to achieve sobriety, A.A. is an effective and enduring program of recovery that has changed countless lives. As explained in the book, A.A.’s recovery program of twelve suggested Steps was formulated through the experience of its first 100 members and has reached millions of sufferers around the world.

For more information about A.A. resources for alcoholics who are Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing, please contact the Accessibilities and Remote Communities Coordinator at the General Service Office at Access@aa.org or by phone at 212-870-3344.

*If you’re in the UK and need assistance with substance abuse, check out Abbeycare Foundation Drug Rehab.

Alcoholics Anonymous: Our Great Responsibility

The first original title released by Alcoholics Anonymous in over thirty years, the book Our Great Responsibility: A Selection of Bill W.’s General Service Conference Talks, 1951–1970 is now available in English, French and Spanish.

The book features:

• 16 talks — derived from archival audio recordings — offering fresh perspectives on A.A. in the co-founder’s own words.

• Over 60 archival photos and other images.

• Previously unpublished material from the A.A. General Service Office Archives.

Founded in 1935 on the principle of one alcoholic helping another to achieve sobriety, A.A. has proven to be an effective and enduring program of recovery that has changed countless lives. As explained in the book Alcoholics Anonymous, from which the Fellowship took its name, A.A.’s recovery program of twelve suggested Steps was formulated through the experience of its first 100 members.

With Bill W. as its primary architect, A.A. developed a loosely organized service structure that eventually succeeded the direction and guidance of its founders to provide enduring leadership for the Fellowship as a whole. Launched in 1951 and meeting annually ever since, A.A.’s General Service Conference has been the primary mechanism for an increasingly diverse membership to deliberate and determine its “group conscience” on a wide range of matters affecting A.A. as a whole.

Bill W. addressed the Conference on an annual basis over the course of two decades, prior to his death in 1971, and Our Great Responsibility gathers together many of these talks, capturing Bill’s innovative thinking on myriad A.A. themes. For more information about the book, click here.

What Is A.A.?

Alcoholics Anonymous is an international fellowship of people who have had a drinking problem. It is nonprofessional, self-supporting, multiracial, apolitical, and available almost everywhere. There are no age or education requirements. Membership is open to anyone who wants to do something about their drinking problem.

Sober Houses and the Path to Recovery

The Truth About Sober Houses and the Path to Recovery

by Mallory Neuberger

Wendy Williams made headlines last week when she revealed that she’s living in a sober house; but less than one week later she left work, checked out of the facility, and went on to drink alcohol until she was hospitalized. So, what went wrong?

Sobriety is not something that we can pay for. As a recovering cocaine addict, I had to admit that I was an addict and that I was ready for a drug free life. In essence, I had to hit my bottom. Some people die before they find the willingness to get sober. Others need to end up in prison, homeless, or selling their bodies and souls to feed their disease. And many, like myself, don’t lost their homes, cars, jobs or families, but find themselves spiritually void and miserable, with their drug of choice no longer providing the relief that it once had.

Wendy Williams is going through difficulties in her marriage. Her husband is rumored to be cheating on her, and his mistress is pregnant. Despite appearing on television daily, living in a sober house, and paying a sober coach to keep tabs on her 24/7, she still couldn’t handle her heartbreak and to alcohol to numb her pain. The next day she was back on TV. In my opinion, she isn’t ready.

Ethical sober houses keep residents safe by breathalyzing and drug testing them. They have guidelines to provide structure, including curfews, chore checks, and mandatory attendance at 12-step meetings like A.A. or N.A. There are organizations that certify sober houses as good operators, so it’s important to be sure that you are choosing a place that truly has the residents’ best interests at heart.

Sober houses offer a sense of community. They are filled with residents and staff who are all trying to stay sober and meet life head on. There is always someone to talk to, so we are never alone. In my sober houses we emphasize healthy living, encouraging good eating habits and exercise. We practice yoga and we meditate together. We offer fellowship where we eat, laugh, play games, make crafts, listen to music, and sit by the pool. We celebrate together, helping one another get through birthdays, holidays and anniversaries without picking up. We are houses filled with sober women and we are like a big family filled with surrogate mothers, daughters, sisters, and friends. We cry together, and more importantly, we laugh.

Putting down drugs and alcohol seemed like the only way I could live, but what kind of a life was it going to be? I feared that I would be socially awkward without my expensive wines or a frozen margarita with salt. I didn’t think I would be able to stay awake without my beloved cocaine. I was losing my best friends – drugs and alcohol – how would I ever have fun again?

The sheer happiness that I have found as a sober woman is greater than any high that I ever experienced. I wake up every morning without a hangover or user’s remorse. I dance whenever and wherever I can, even while trying on clothes in stores, or at parties where nobody else has hit the dance floor. I run by the beach, singing out loud, without worrying that I may die of a stroke due to last night’s excesses. I practice yoga and can actually “be” on the mat for ninety minutes, breathing freely through my once stuffed nostrils.

I have a disease, and that disease is called addiction. I am no longer ashamed and hiding behind it. Addiction is not a weakness or a character defect. It is a debilitating disease without a medicine to cure it. Money cannot buy my recovery, but working a daily program can keep me sober, one day at a time. Every day I go to a 12-step meeting. I remind myself that I’m an addict in recovery and I reset my brain and ask for the strength to remain sober just for today. I am of service to others in recovery, showing them that this simple program works. It isn’t always easy, but it is always worth it. My worst day sober is always better than my best day high, because I am authentic and free and living the very best version of myself. I hope that Wendy Williams hits her bottom soon, and without any terrible consequences. I would love her to live in one of my sober houses.

About Mallory Neuberger

Mallory Neuberger, MS, CRRA, author of Sober.House (My Story), is the executive director of The Frog Pad, a safe and structured holistic healing house for women in recovery from drugs and alcohol. After struggling with her own addiction, Neuberger has dedicated her life to helping others find sobriety, volunteering at drug recovery centers including Hazelden IOP, The Addiction Institute in NYC, Gods Love We Deliver, and soup kitchens. She was also employed at Behavior Health of the Palm Beaches before opening her first sober house.