Posts tagged with "Crackle"

Markice Moore image by Starz for use by 360 Magazine

Markice Moore Q&A

By: Emily Bunn

The most sought-after ‘bad guy’: Markice Moore is a rising force to be reckoned with in Hollywood’s entertainment industry. Most notably recognized for his role as Ray Ray on the hit seriesSnowfall,” Moore is continuing to flesh out his acting resume with his upcoming involvement with 50 Cent’s show on Starz, “Black Mafia Family.” “Black Mafia Family” tales place in the late 1980s and is based on the story of two brothers, Demetrius “Big Meech” Flenory and Terry “Southwest T” Flenory, who had been involved in money laundering and drug trafficking schemes. We sat down with the rising star to discuss the relevance of “Black Mafia Family”’s themes in the present, Moore’s method acting experiences, upcoming music releases, and more.

Where were you when you received the call to join the cast of “Black Mafia Family”?

I was in Las Vegas at the craps table and I just lost $200. So when my manager called it was the best news ever!

What are you most excited about regarding your involvement in “Black Mafia Family”?

I’m most excited about working with 50 Cent again after working on “The Oath” with him for Crackle. His name rings bells in Hollywood now, so it’s an honor to be attached to his brand.

How do you feel about being popularly cast into roles as antagonists or villains?

Wow! I’m popularly casted! That’s kind of cool. I fucking love it! I love playing the bad guy, I mean, I think we all kind of relate to the bad guy. Some of us just don’t have the balls to do what he does, you know. To commit to antagonizing is a skill set.

What has been your favorite role you’ve ever played, and why?

Ryan Payne on The Paynes was my favorite character because he was so goofy and a nitwit. Even my mother called and told me, “You’re really acting now, Ryan is a dumb ass.”

Both “Snowfall” and “Black Mafia Family” revolve around crime and drugs in the 1980s. Can you speak on the relevance of these themes within the shows as still existing today?

Well if we may go a little deep, I believe it’s important to touch on these topics because our culture, African American culture, has been systematically targeted so heavily by oppressors using tactics like drugs and violence as conduits to control our narrative. It’s important that we take some of that power back and tell our sides of those stories. They use their mediums to paint a picture of us as only drug dealers, instead of humanizing us like they do their heroes.

How did your experience living in Atlanta compare to the experiences illustrated in your involvement with the film, “ATL”?

It was literally the same. At the time of filming I was hustling, bootlegging liquor, and playing with guns. My Austin character kept me out of trouble.

Following your 2020 release of “Nervous,” are you looking to put out any more music soon?

Yes. Absolutely. I am one half of a rap group called Pool Boys.  We are releasing more new music this summer. Right now, we have “Nervous,” “Cold,” and another record called Clubhouse that’s going crazy!

Are there any other upcoming acting projects you’re working on to come in 2021 that you can tell us about?

Yes! I have a production company called, “TABLE READ PRODUCTIONS” and we are working on a movie made by people in the clubhouse called, “Green Bean Me.” So, be on the lookout for that.

Streaming, tv, film, Nielsen story illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 MAGAZINE

STREAMING PLATFORMS LEADING THE WAY 

IN ON-SCREEN DIVERSE REPRESENTATION

Diversity at all-time high due to growing television landscape but notable disparities persist

The explosion of new television platforms across broadcast, streaming and cable has led to an increase in on-screen representation of diverse identity groups, according to Nielsen’s latest Diverse Intelligence Series report: Being Seen on Screen: Diverse Representation and Inclusion on TV. 

Among the 300 most-viewed programs in 2019, 92% had some level of diversity in the cast (i.e. women, people of color or LGBTQ+). Whites, African Americans and LGBTQ+ had the largest overall share of screen while Women, Hispanics, Asians and Native Americans were underrepresented relative to their population estimates. The report uncovers notable differences in identity group representation across different platforms; with streaming over-indexing on representation for certain identity groups versus traditional broadcast and cable.

In this report, Being Seen on Screen: Diverse Representation and Inclusion on TV, Nielsen reports on scripted, reality, variety and news programming on key metrics: 

  • Share of Screen (SOS): composition of the top 10 recurring cast members in a program
  • Inclusion Opportunity Index (IOI): compares the SOS of an identity group (e.g. women) to their representation in population estimates
  • Inclusion Audience Index (IAI): compares the SOS of an identity group to their representation in a program’s audience.

The report is powered by Gracenote Inclusion Analytics, a new solution delivering cutting-edge metrics created from Gracenote content metadata and Nielsen audience measurement data, providing the industry with consistent and reliable measurement of granular viewing. The report also leverages Gracenote Video Descriptors, metadata relating to story, mood, character, theme and scenario in each program. 

Key insights from the report include:

Overall, representation of diverse identity groups in on-screen programming is low across all media platforms. Streaming fares better for inclusion followed by broadcast and cable. Viewing audiences are increasingly seeking content that tells their stories. As a result, people are migrating to platforms that have broad and more diverse content offerings. 

  • Representation by platform (Broadcast, Cable, Streaming): Nearly one-third of the content on cable doesn’t have parity representation of Indigenous, People of Color (Black, Native American, Asian & Pacific islander, Hispanic/Latinx, Middle eastern/ North African, Multiracial), Women or LGBTQ talent. 
  • Subscription video on demand (SVOD) programming represents several identity groups e.g. Blacks, Hispanic and Asians well, helping us understand, in part, why more diverse audiences are subscribing to streaming services than the general population.
  • Representation of identity groups by genre (e.g. comedy, drama, news): 
    • While women are not well represented in any single genre, the highest representation for women is in science fiction, drama, comedy and horror. 
    • Women have the lowest representation in news. 
    • People of color representation is at parity in music and drama, followed by science fiction and action and adventure.  
    • People of color have least relative representation in news. 
    • News does prominently feature LGBTQ talent on-screen. 
    • Reality and horror programming also prominently feature LGBTQ talent. 

All audiences, regardless of how they identify, like to see diversity in the content they view on TV. Programs that represent multiple identity groups evenly yield higher overall audience ratings for all viewers when compared to shows that have a significant over or under representation of any one identity group.  

Quality of representation matters too. The themes and narratives depicted on-screen can contribute to identity formation and social perceptions. As the industry seeks to improve diversity on-screen, content creators and publishers should consider the context in which women, people of color, and LGBTQ+ talent are presented. Equally important is investing in marketing those diverse programs so that they are watched.

  • Women insights
    • Comprise 52% of the U.S. population; show up on screen only 38% of the time
    • Women 50+ years old 
      • 60% less likely to see themselves in programming than in the general population, and 2x the representation of men 50+
      • Women 50+ comprise 20% of the population and 20% of all TV viewers, but have a SOS of less than 8%
      • Men 50+ years old are 17% of the total population and have SOS of 14%
  • LGBTQ+ insights
    • 1 out of 4 top performing programs across cable, broadcast and streaming have relative representation of LGBTQ+ cast members 
    • Total SOS for LGBTQ was 7%. LGBTQ people are 4.5% of the population so across all platforms we see fair representation
    • The highest level of representation is on SVOD (8% SOS), followed by cable (7%) then broadcast (5%). 

Aligning representative casting and content themes is an area of opportunity. In the programming where identity groups see themselves represented at parity, these are the themes that are most present: 

  • Latinas: dysfunction, emotional, suspenseful, melodramatic, police stations
  • Black women: emotional, personal relationships, sons, investigation, rivalry
  • Black men: investigation, thrilling, streets, pursuit, teamwork, discovery
  • East Asians: challenge, courage and bravery, justice, sons, discovery
  • South/Southeast Asian males: thrilling, awakening, offices, courtrooms
  • White women: friendship, family, love, husbands, daughters

Nielsen’s findings aim to show media owners the degree to which their programming is inclusive, coupled with the diversity of the audience they draw. Additionally, brands and agencies will now be able to measure their advertising investment and alignment to inclusive content. The identity groups measured included: Female, Male & Expansive Gender Identities, Black/African American, Hispanic, Asian & Pacific Islander, Middle Eastern/North African, Multiracial, White, Native American/Native Alaskan, and Sexual Orientation. The data, which was both intersectional and granular, enables Nielsen to look at specific identity subsegments like Afro-Latino or Southeast Asian. 

“At Nielsen, we believe that the audience is everything and that inclusion is a prerequisite of a healthy media ecosystem, ensuring all communities and individuals are heard and seen,” stated Tina Wilson, Nielsen EVP, Media Analytics and Marketing Outcomes. “The call for inclusive programming that breaks traditional stereotypes and gives a voice to underrepresented groups has never been louder.”

“This work underscores the essential importance of on-screen representation in an increasingly diverse audience landscape,” said Sandra Sims-Williams, Nielsen SVP, Diversity, Equity and Inclusion. “Not only is the business case for inclusion made but it also provides practical recommendations on how media companies can address inclusion gaps. This is a must-read for any media professional who wants to be part of the change that today’s television viewers demand.”

For more details and insights, download Being Seen On Screen: Diverse Representation & Inclusion on TV. Please visit nielsen.com/inclusionanalytics to learn more. Join the discussion on Facebook (Nielsen Community) and follow us on Twitter (@NielsenKnows).

ABOUT NIELSEN 

Nielsen Holdings plc (NYSE: NLSN) is a global measurement and data analytics company that provides the most complete and trusted view available of consumers and markets worldwide. Our approach marries proprietary Nielsen data with other data sources to help clients around the world understand what’s happening now, what’s happening next, and how to best act on this knowledge. For more than 90 years Nielsen has provided data and analytics based on scientific rigor and innovation, continually developing new ways to answer the most important questions facing the media, advertising, retail and fast-moving consumer goods industries. An S&P 500 company, Nielsen has operations in over 100 countries, covering more than 90% of the world’s population. For more information, visit www.nielsen.com.

SuperMansion × NY Comic Con

**SAVE THE DATE**
 
CRACKLE BRINGS EMMY-NOMINATED SERIES ‘SUPERMANSION’ TO NEW YORK COMIC CON WITH PANEL FEATURING CO-CREATORS ZEB WELLS AND MATTHEW SENREICH PEGGED TO ORIGINAL SPECIAL ‘SUPERMANSION: DRAG ME TO HALLOWEEN’

 
PANEL IS SET FOR THURSDAY, OCTOBER 5TH AT 6:45 PM

 
 

In the all-new stop-motion animated Crackle original special “SuperMansion: Drag Me to Halloween,” premiering Thursday, October 5th on the free streaming network, the League of Freedom experiences all the fun and adventures of Halloween. It’s Titanium Rex’s (voice of Bryan Cranston) least favorite night of the year, fraught with beautiful ghosts, demonic spirits, evil dentists, and even some unforeseen attractions mixed in. Special guests include comedians Lake Bell (“Childrens Hospital”) as Millicent and Phil LaMarr (“Futurama”). In addition to Cranston, the special guests join “SuperMansion” stars Keegan-Michael Key (voice of American Ranger), Jillian Bell (voice of Viking Woman, Clown Girl), Tucker Gilmore (voice of Black Saturn), Zeb Wells (voice of Robobot) and Heidi Gardner (voice of Cooch). Get all the scoop on what goes down in the making of the hit Emmy-nominated series from Stoopid Buddy Stoodios. Be prepared for ghost stories, surprises, and more. Don’t be afraid.
WHO: The show’s co-creators Zeb Wells (“Robot Chicken”) and Matthew Senreich (“Robot Chicken”). 

 
WHEN: Panel: Thursday, October 5th from 6:45 pm – 7:45 pm in Room 1A10

 

 
About “SuperMansion:” 

In “SuperMansion,” Titanium Rex is the aging leader of the League of Freedom, a once-proud assembly of super heroes that isn’t what it used to be. Together, they harness their super powers and fight for justice, liberty … and the need to stay relevant to society. From the creators of Robot Chicken, “SuperMansion” S1 & S2 are available to stream on Crackle.

 
Bryan Cranston, Seth Green, John Harvatine, Eric Towner and James Degus are executive producers of “SuperMansion.” Matthew Senreich and Zeb Wells are the series’ creators, writers and executive producers. The series is a twice nominated 2016 Emmy Awards contender for “Outstanding Character Voice-Over Performance” – one for Keegan-Michael Key, the other for Chris Pine.