Posts tagged with "teaching"

Rolls-Royce Apprentices

Rolls-Royce announced Monday that a brand new intake of apprentices would be welcomed into the company.

18 new minds hailing from all across the UK will join the luxury vehicle titan at its home in Goodwood, West Sussex. They will be known as the “Class of 2020” in a program that began in 2006.

More than 150 aspiring engineers have entered the apprenticeship learning high-level practical and technical skills over the course of two to four years. They learn from Rolls-Royce specialists, gaining knowledge from the best minds in the company.

Of the 18 members of the “Class of 2020,” seven are candidates for the Sir Ralph Robins Degree Apprenticeship scheme, a four-year apprenticeship that grants students a degree from the University of Chichester upon completion.

Rolls-Royce is also providing placements in the industry for over 50 students. The placements last from six to 12 months. It also has a graduate program that makes new positions available every year.

music Ivory Rowen illustration for 360 Magazine.

Music Educators Teaching Online

K-12 musical instruction and performances may look different this fall, but the beat will go on thanks to creativity and music-making technologies, says a Purdue University expert.

“There are so many online tools out there that music educators can use to bring students together during the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Christopher Cayari, assistant professor of music education in the Patti and Rusty Rueff School of Design, Art, and Performance at Purdue. “One option is for programs to host online concerts or performances through the recording and mixing of virtual ensembles and individual performances.”

Platforms like Soundtrap by Spotify and Protools are great resources for sound editing. Other softwares like Flipgrid and Adobe Premiere do video editing, while Acapella by PicPlayPost and BandLab are compilation apps available for mobile devices to create musical productions amid the pandemic. Cayari encourages music educators to experiment with these softwares to make music with their students, and the skills they develop while distance learning can then be carried into physical classrooms after the pandemic is over.

 “Putting together a virtual ensemble can be difficult, but I have seen many tech-savvy educators or sound engineers helping music educators create virtual performances,” Cayari said. “Students can also collaborate with one another to create anything from karaoke videos to vlog projects. The great thing about technology is that students can collaborate with others without geographical restraint.”

For the last 10 years, Cayari has researched online music making and virtual performances, focusing most of his attention on YouTube and how the platform has changed the way people create, consume and share music. According to Cayari, online music-making projects, research, technologies and literacies occur within three dispositions:

  • Do-it-yourself: “There are many avenues for do-it-yourself projects thanks to social media or audio recording websites like SoundCloud or Bandcamp. This method is great for students because it allows them to learn for themselves about the aspects that go into music recording projects.”
  • Do-it-with-others: “Online music making isn’t a new concept. For many years, people have been collaborating with others to create music and connect with one another through the production of music.”
  • Do-it-for-others: “These type of performances are organized projects where individuals submit their own performances and someone else pulls it all together. Everyone from the organizer to the performers to the editors have a hand in creating something for the enjoyment of others.”

This week, a special issue of the Journal for Popular Music Education, co-edited by Cayari and Janice Waldron from Windsor University in Ontario, Canada, was released that focuses on learning, performing and teaching, which includes international research about how music teachers are using the internet to teach students.

About Purdue University

Purdue University is a top public research institution developing practical solutions to today’s toughest challenges. Ranked the No. 6 Most Innovative University in the United States by U.S. News & World Report, Purdue delivers world-changing research and out-of-this-world discovery. Committed to hands-on and online, real-world learning, Purdue offers a transformative education to all. Committed to affordability and accessibility, Purdue has frozen tuition and most fees at 2012-13 levels, enabling more students than ever to graduate debt-free. See how Purdue never stops in the persisten

HACK Is Here To Help

Hack, a full-stack laptop designed to teach kids to code by enabling them to hack games, settings and apps, is announcing the launch of its pre-release beta.
Hack is the only laptop designed for everyday use that has a unique superpower – the benefit of inspiring kids to learn how to Hack. Using the flip-to-hack feature, kids can edit parameters, immediately see their changes and develop familiarity with basic coding in an authentic and safe environment. Built on the Linux-based Endless Operating System, kids access source code and use a real sandbox for learning how to code.
The award-winning ASUS laptop comes with all the apps and tools families need for everyday use, including Chrome, Calculator, Skype, Office Suite, Scratch, Spotify, Steam and more. Recognizing that many parents are eager to introduce STEM to their children and give them a computer of their own, Hack is a dual-purpose laptop great for everyday use and STEM education, for $299. What’s more, it is a safe, ad-free and virus-resistant computer with parental controls. Hack is the screen time that parents should feel good about for their kids.
“As a parent and passionate tech executive I am excited to empower the next generation with digital literacy, creative problem-solving skills and an understanding of how to engage consciously with the world. In turn, we hope to enable and inspire children to create innovative and exciting opportunities for themselves and others,” stated Roberta Antunes CEO of Hack.
Hack characters, based on computer science luminaries including Ada Lovelace and Mary Jackson, guide players through immersive adventures and provide them with new coding challenges every month. For $9.99 per month, Hack families will access an unfolding adventure story and learning quests, and hackable levels that unlock as the player’s skills improve. As the child evolves, so does the product. The first 12 months of the content subscription are free for launch customers.
To participate in the Hack beta, visit hack-computer.com and signup for the waitlist. Pre-orders for the public release on January 24th are also available on Amazon.