Posts tagged with "New York University"

Fashion high heel graphic via 360 Magazine

The White House Fashion Exhibit

The White House Historical Association has announced a new virtual fashion exhibit exploring overlooked designers and seamstresses for first ladies: “Glamour and Innovation: The Women Behind the Seams of Fashion at the White House.” The exhibit is the result of an inaugural academic partnership with New York University’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. The partnership with NYU began in January and will continue in 2023, with the next fellow chosen this fall through a competitive application process.

The Association’s first Digital Exhibit fellow, MA/MS Costume Studies student Maegan Jenkins, envisioned the exhibit. Through research, she built the project in collaboration with the Association’s David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History’s Digital Library team.

“People are always interested in what the first lady is wearing, and what kind of message it conveys,” said Jenkins. “With this exhibit, I wanted to move beyond the major fashion houses to tell the lesser-known stories of the women behind some of those dresses and the incredible contributions they’ve made to American history.”

Glamour and Innovation: The Women Behind the Seams of Fashion at the White House” explores the work of a diverse group of seamstresses, designers, and couturiers responsible for some of the iconic first ladies’ fashions.

The exhibit highlights the eight entrepreneurial women who forged ahead despite racial discrimination, demonstrated that American designs could rival Parisian fashion and designed across the aisle for first ladies of both parties.

“Maegan’s extensive research has brought to light stories of hidden figures we hear little about, yet in their day were revered talent by first ladies and other social figures. It’s through their craft we are spurring further discussion about White House history,” said Stewart McLaurin, President of the White House Historical Association.

Through a mix of archival photography, portraits, biographies and press clippings, Jenkins’ exhibit will cover over more than a hundred years in fashion history. The display begins with Elizabeth Keckley, Mary Lincoln’s dressmaker who was born enslaved, to Mary Matise, who designed Rosalynn Carter’s 1977 inaugural gown.

The exhibit features high-resolution interactive photos with a zoom feature, allowing viewers to explore the intricacies of the designs up close. Jenkins, too, details the first ladies’ unique tastes and economic considerations, giving insight into the relationships built between each designer and first lady.

“We are delighted with Maegan Jenkins’ project. With its focus on the combination of creativity and labor, this initial collaboration between the Costume Studies graduate program and the White House Historical Association adds significantly to the story of White House fashion,” said Nancy Deihl, Chair of the Department of Art and Art Professions at NYU Steinhardt. 

The eight designers featured in this exhibit include:

  • Elizabeth Hobbs Keckly, designer of many dresses for First Lady Mary Lincoln
  • Sally Milgrim, designer of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt’s 1933 inaugural gown
  • Nettie Rosenstein, designer of First Lady Mamie Eisenhower’s 1953 and 1957 inaugural gowns
  • Ann Lowe, designer of First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy’s wedding gown
  • Ethel Frankau, designer of First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy’s inaugural gown
  • Karen Stark, designer of First Lady Patricia Nixon’s 1969 inaugural gown
  • Mary Matise, designer of First Lady Rosalynn Carter’s inaugural gown
  • Frankie Welch, designer of gowns and scarves for First Ladies Patricia Nixon, Lady Bird Johnson, Betty Ford, and Rosalynn Carter

Other items featured in the exhibit include Mrs. Lincoln’s checked gown and cape, along with other samples of designers works accomplished throughout their careers.

The project illuminates the Association’s 2022, “Tastemakers & Trendsetters” theme that showcases the fashion, cuisine, social traditions, and individuals who lived, visited, and worked at the White House, and through their talent influenced American culture beyond its gates. Programming such as this is supported by the sale of the Official White House Christmas Ornament.  

About Maegan Jenkins

Formally trained in fine art with an emphasis on fiber and textiles, Jenkins is currently an MA/MS candidate in the Costume Studies and Library and Information Sciences dual degree program at NYU’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development. She is also a graduate at the Gardiner Foundation, contributing to the digitization of their museum archives and meta data.

About The White House Historical Association

First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy envisioned a restored White House that conveyed a sense of history through its decorative and fine arts. In 1961, the White House Historical Association was established to support her vision to preserve and share the Executive Mansion’s legacy for generations to come.

Support entirely by private resources, the Association’s mission is to assist in the preservation of the state and public rooms, fund acquisitions for the White House permanent collection and educate the public on the history of the White House.

Since its founding, the White House Historical Association has contributed more than $50 million in fulfillment of its mission. To learn more about the White House Historical Association, please visit HERE.

CTA Winners via BreakWhiteLight for use by 360 Magazine

College Television Award Winners

The Television Academy Foundation announced the winners of the 41st College Television Awards, which recognizes and rewards excellence in student-produced programs from colleges nationwide, during a global livestream.

The 2022 winners were presented awards remotely by television stars including Dove Cameron (Schmigadoon!), Rick Glassman (As We See It), Harvey Guillén (What We Do in the Shadows), Sam Heughan (Outlander), Jordan L. Jones (Bel-Air), Rose McIver (Ghosts), Sue Ann Pien (As We See It), Danielle Pinnock (Ghosts), Logan Shroyer (This Is Us) and Hannah Zeile (This Is Us). Albert Lawrence, correspondent for CBS’ The Henry Ford’s Innovation Nation and Television Academy Foundation alumnus, hosted the event.

Emulating the Emmy Awards selection process, entries for the College Television Awards were judged by Television Academy members. Top honors and a $3,000 cash prize went to winning teams in five categories:

Animated Series

Stowaway (Brigham Young University – UT)

Tyler Bitner, Producer

Ethan Briscoe, Director/Writer

Commercial, PSA or Promo

Life’s Journey (Brigham Young University – UT)

Rebekah Baker, Producer

Campbell George, Writer

Asher Huskinson, Director

Tyler Richardson, Director

News and Sports

SportsDesk (University of Miami)

Danyel De Villiers, Producer

Julia Hecht, Director

Michelle Ng-Reyes, Writer

Brendan Reilly, Writer

Gianna Sanchez, Producer

Maxwell Trink, Writer

Jenna Weiss, Producer

Josh White, Writer

Nonfiction or Reality Series

Eagles Rest in Liangshan (New York University)

Bohao Liu, Producer/Director/Writer

Scripted Series

Our Side (Savannah College of Art and Design)

Emily Dillard, Producer/Writer

Nicola Rinciari, Director/Writer

Two special awards were also announced during the program: The Loreen Arbus Focus on Disability Scholarship was presented to Taylor University students Chad Veal and Brendan Wallace for their production: 20 Over. The $10,000 scholarship celebrates student storytellers whose work sheds light on people with disabilities and is underwritten by the Loreen Arbus Foundation.

The Seymour Bricker Humanitarian Award, a $4,000 cash prize given to a College Television Award-winning project that best highlights a humanitarian concern, was awarded to New York University’s Eagles Rest in Liangshan by Bohao Liu. This award was created over 20 years ago by the late entertainment attorney Seymour Bricker.

The 41st College Television Awards show is available for VOD viewing HERE.

“Congratulations to all of this year’s winners in television’s most prestigious student competition,” said Cris Abrego, chair of the Television Academy Foundation. “Showcasing the exceptional work of young, diverse talent to help launch careers is a top priority for the Foundation. Our sincerest gratitude to the presenters and sponsors who made this event an unforgettable experience for students.”

The 41st College Television Awards is supported by philanthropists and corporate partners including Creative Artists Agency, Johnny Carson Foundation, Kia America, PEOPLE, Roku, STARZ, The Loreen Arbus Foundation, United Airlines and WarnerMedia.

About the Television Academy Foundation

Established in 1959 as the charitable arm of the Television Academy, the Television Academy Foundation is dedicated to preserving the legacy of television while educating and inspiring those who will shape its future. Through renowned educational and outreach programs, such as The Interviews: An Oral History of Television Project, Student Internship and Fellowship Programs and the Faculty Conference, the Foundation seeks to widen the circle of voices our industry represents and to create more opportunity for television to reflect all of society.

Health clipboard graphic via Rita Azar for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Interview with Jonathan Scheiman

By: Skyler Johnson

If you’re an active person that’s ever wanted to increase your performance, you should check out Fitbiomics. They’re a small company helping athletes and health-driven people into a better lifestyle by improving gut health with a small, daily capsule. 360 was able to interview their CEO Jonathan Scheiman. Scheiman is a St. John’s and NYU graduate, who did his postdoctoral fellowship at the George Church’s lab at Harvard University. 

Can you tell me about your mission?

Our mission is to empower, educate, and elevate. We’re working to inspire and build a world where greatness is possible for everyone by driving transformation from the inside out to maximize human potential. FitBiomics is simultaneously bridging the gap between sports and science, bringing communities together, and inspiring the next generation of scientists. The new frontier of human health & wellness is Nella–a daily capsule of next-gen performance probiotics designed to help anyone pursuing a healthy and active lifestyle to a new frontier of personal best, from the inside out. Nella gives you the guts to defy your limits.

 Can you tell me about your probiotic?

With a new subscription price of $59, our daily capsule, Nella, is now easier than ever to add into a daily routine and positively impact health and wellness resolutions for 2022. The one-time purchase price remains at the current price of $75.

The product is manufactured using probiotics sourced from the microbiome of elite endurance athletes. FitBiomics supports that the source of the probiotic strains matters when it comes to athletic performance. The American-made, gluten-free, vegan probiotic is certified by Informed Sport, a service which identifies banned substances. 

The Nella probiotic supplement is trusted by elite competitors across the country, including Olympic medalists, professional athletes, and USA record holders. Additionally, FitBiomics is in partnership with and serves as the official probiotic of Fordham University Athletics and St. John’s University Athletics. 

What can we expect from your company in the next 6 months? What are your plans?

We have a lot planned as far as partnerships as well as new products in the pipeline. I can sum up the latter in one word: Veillonella. Yes, the lactic acid-eating probiotic that improves endurance and was published in Nature Medicine is in the commercial queue…so stay tuned.

What’s something about your company that people might not know about?

At our heart, we are a biotechnology company focused on continued microbiome R&D. We’re expanding our discovery platform for continued decoding of elite phenotypes to develop additional next-generation probiotics. Our mission is to improve human health and performance, holistically, across multiple functional applications.

20 Over via Break White Light for use by 360 Magazine

Forty First College Television Awards

The Television Academy Foundation today announced nominees for the 41st College Television Awards, which recognizes excellence in student-produced programs from colleges nationwide, and the recipient of the $10,000 Loreen Arbus Focus on Disability Scholarship.

The awards ceremony will be held in conjunction with the Foundation’s College Television Summit, a three-day educational event featuring panel discussions with media-industry leaders. Originally presented just for College Television Awards nominees, the summit is an enriching opportunity that is also made available virtually and free of charge to media arts students across the country. Panels and panelists will be announced in 2022. Next year’s College Television Awards ceremony and the summit will be held March 24-26.

Fifteen student-produced programs are nominated from 185 entries submitted from 58 colleges and universities nationwide. Designed to emulate the Emmy Awards, student entries are judged by Television Academy members; three projects are nominated in five categories. Criteria for the College Television Awards reflect industry standards of excellence, imagination and innovation. Each winning project will receive a $3,000 cash prize.

The nominees for the 41st College Television Awards are listed below:

Animation Series

Beyond the Line (School of Visual Arts)

Jinuk Choi, Producer/Writer/Director

Son & Moon (Savannah College of Art and Design)

Lex Cooper, Producer

Saiya Lin, Writer/Director

Stowaway (Brigham Young University – UT)

Tyler Bitner, Producer

Ethan Briscoe, Director/Writer

Commercial, PSA or Promo

Asking for It (Brigham Young University – UT)

Lauren Finlinson, Writer

Edgar Garcia, Director

Amy Hauck, Producer

Allie Jones, Writer

LA Times – Decisions (Brigham Young University – UT)

Connor Dean, Producer

Quinn Frehner, Writer

Enoch Lui, Writer

Cam Tribe, Director

Life’s Journey (Brigham Young University – UT)

Rebekah Baker, Producer

Campbell George, Writer

Asher Huskinson, Director

Tyler Richardson, Director

News and Sports

Coronavirus: Pandemia Mundial – Al Dia (California State University, Fullerton)

Samantha Aguilar, Writer

Dolores Alvarez, Writer

Edwin Flores, Writer

Jorge Flores, Writer

Gabriela Martinez, Producer

Giselle Martinez, Producer/Director

Stephanie Mejia, Writer

Janelli Pedroza, Writer

Marina Rodriguez, Writer

Daisy Tornel, Writer

Rita La Vau, Producer/Director

Angie Zubia, Writer

SportsDesk (University of Miami)

Danyel De Villiers, Producer

Julia Hecht, Director

Michelle Ng-Reyes, Writer

Brendan Reilly, Writer

Gianna Sanchez, Producer

Maxwell Trink, Writer

Jenna Weiss, Producer

Josh White, Writer

UMTV NewsVision (University of Miami)

Spencer Askinazy, Producer

Jackson Dill, Writer

Ben Ezzy, Director

Jesse Lauck, Writer

Michelle Ng-Reyes, Writer

Tyler Walsh, Writer

Jenna Weiss, Producer

Nonfiction or Reality Series

The Castle Builder (Florida State University)

Thomas McDonald, Producer/Director/Writer

Tristan Owen, Producer/Director/Writer

Eagle Rest in Liangshan (New York University)

Bohao Liu, Producer/Director/Writer

Finding Freedom (New York University)

Fiqah Rahman, Producer/Director/Writer

Scripted Series

Our Side (Savannah College of Arts and Design)

Emily Dillard, Producer/Writer

Nicola Rinciari, Director/Writer

Over My Dead Body (New York Film Academy)

Meital Cohen Navarro, Producer/Director/Writer

Spaceship (American Film Institute)

Jorge G. Camarena, Director/Writer

Victor Gabriel, Writer

Roxanne Griffith, Producer

image from Derek Sherron for use by 360 Magazine

RENCE — “AWOOO!”

“Rence is in his own lane, defying the stigma that an artist has to be bound by any one genre.” – FLAUNT

“In a way that few artists can, Rence has redefined his sound with every new release.” – ONES TO WATCH

“Rence is one of the most promising vocalists in the music industry right now.” – LYRICAL LEMONADE

Critically acclaimed, buzzing singer, songwriter and produce Rence is back today with the heartfelt new single “AWOOO!” Get it HERE via Epic Records.

Hopeful and romantic on the surface, the breakout star’s latest release is actually a breakup song, even if not immediately apparent in the lyrics. “I love when you howl at the moon, I wanna lay here watching you,” the 23-year-old coos over dreamy guitars. “Til I’m howling too, like AWOOO!”

“I actually wrote it as a bookend to a relationship,” Rence says. “But it turned into a love song even as a goodbye.” Somber but full of life and color, “AWOOO!” became about the realization that even true love can fade. It covers the kind of complex emotional territory that Rence has tread since bursting onto the pop music scene while still studying at NYU.

“AWOOO!” follows the exuberant anthem “Endless,” which was released at the top of 2021 and showcases his trademark vulnerability and emotional nuance. With more new music on the horizon, he continues to create a kaleidoscopic pop sound, while experimenting with everything from electro to hip hop.

Over the last few years, Rence has established himself as one of pop’s most unguarded young stars. When he isn’t crafting transparently emotional singles like “Strawberry Blonde” and “Type 2,” he’s lifting the veil on his artistic process in a series of TikTok videos. At the same time, the artist/producer has also stayed busy with collaborations, recording music with Sarah Barrios, Alex Port, Chloe Lilac and Johan Lenox. Since debuting, Rence has amassed more than 50 million cumulative streams and continues to expand his fan base with each release. “AWOOO!” further builds out the emotional complexity and intricate instrumentals at the core of his songs, reminding listeners that there are poignant messages behind every infectious melody.

ABOUT RENCE:

Sharing real life snapshots in song, Rence magnifies his personal perspective through a genre-less palette, bordering pop, alternative, electro, indie and hip-hop all at once, yet never dipping into one for too long. He first introduced himself on the breakthrough independent project, Pink, featuring standout single “Baby Blue.” In 2019, after signing to Epic Records, he followed with the release of “Expensive” [feat. Noah Cyrus] and his major label debut EP, FALL 2019. Over the last year, his consistent output continued with the bold and buzz-y “hate u, btw,” “Type 2,” “Tears in December,” “Sometimes Things Just Fall Apart,” “Strawberry Blonde” and “Endless.” With over 50 million streams and counting, Rence has received acclaim from the likes of Pigeons and Planes (who named him “Best New Artist” Dec 2019), The FADER, Lyrical Lemonade, Nylon, Billboard, V Magazine, Paper, i-D, Wonderland, Flaunt and Zane Lowe.

Rodney Ramlochan image via Vaughn Lowery for use by 360 Magazine

Rodney

Rodney Ramlochan is an executive, entrepreneur, and global business generator who has dedicated his career to empowering others, identifying strategic relationships, and building world-class organizations. Driven by his passion for technology, fashion, lifestyle, and culture, he serves as 360 Magazine’s global business manager. Rodney builds market position for 360 by locating, developing, defining, and closing business relationships with leading brands.

Alongside his role at 360 Magazine, Rodney serves as the President and Chief Executive Officer of Dev-Byrne & Company, a national technology expense management firm serving premier clients ranging from global not-for-profits to Fortune 500 firms. He is a highly accomplished leader known for laser-like vision in formulating and executing cutting-edge strategies to achieve business goals.

Over the years, Rodney has held multiple roles within the business sector over the past two decades. As Vice-President and co-founder of an award-winning telecom auditing firm, he garnered an elite list of clients, taking the startup from obscurity to highly profitable in under three years. At Verizon, he oversaw large business units responsible for service delivery for enterprise clients.

Rodney completed both undergraduate and graduate degrees, with honors at New York University. He is a published contributing author who has written papers on service delivery and Total Quality Management. In addition, he has served on the Alumni Board Committee of New York University and the chairman of the board for St. Frances Cabrini Academy in Brooklyn, NY.

Kelly Dooley shot by Baz for 360 Magazine

Kelly Dooley QxA

Here at 360 Magazine, we were honored to speak with the athleisure pioneer and cannabis queen, Kelly Dooley. With her impressive, luxurious brands–Luxe Branding Haus and BodyRock Sport–Dooley stays busy revolutionizing how athletic wear can empower her customers. When she isn’t designing her avant-garde, fabulous pieces, Dooley can be found working with lifestyle and luxury cannabis brands, as well as involving herself with several real estate and technology projects. Dooley is a trailblazer who sets forth on her dreams with determination and undeniable spunk. We sat down with Kelly Dooley to speak about her recent sports bra design for Britney Spears, her best solutions for combatting stigma surrounding the cannabis industry, and how she finds inspiration.

What was it like creating a bra for superstar Britney Spears? How did you feel when you first found out about the project?

When I first launched BodyRock Sport in January 2010, I had an insatiable desire to beautify activewear for like-minded women that combined fitness and fashion in a way that had not been done before.

The moment that I found out that Britney Spears was rocking my $20,011 Eternal Love Sports Bra from my most popular Zip’ Up collection with the Jessica Moto leggings from my Show ‘Em Some Swagger collection in her comeback “Twister” music video was absolutely surreal. My baby, BodyRock Sport, was on fire. I was breaking all the rules and taking names–one celeb at a time. I was empowering women to love the skin they’re in, while pursuing my dream with reckless abandonment in the heart of New York City.

I neither made the sports bra nor the leggings specifically for her, but due to the intricacy of the design­–which included black and silver French silk and a diamond-eyed skull tassel attached to a solid gold zipper pull–and based on the purposely inflated price, I knew that the design would inevitably adorn an A-List celebrity. Britney was on my manifestation list and my dream came true with Godspeed. I was honored and proud of myself for achieving my goal. 2012 represented a dramatic turning point in the overwhelmingly lackluster world of athleisure, and I–the avant-garde, fabulous, over-educated and extremely quirky SoCal girl–was being heralded as one of the pioneers of the activewear industry.

I knew that my Dad was beaming down at me from heaven with pride. I recall getting hundreds of Google alerts because the music video went viral–not only because of the extravagant sports bra that she wore– but also because Britney Spears finally returned to the stage with a vengeance after overcoming her former hardships. She was also often seen out and about in Los Angeles rocking some of my other sports bra designs and booty shorts. Every now and then, I spot her in the tabloids or online wearing a design that I created a decade ago. The surge of gratitude never dissipates.

At the time, luxury activewear was virtually impossible to find so I felt passionate about innovating the industry that so desperately needed to evolve. Believe it or not, the first sports bra EVER was not even invented until 1977. The design looked as though it had been produced solely for hospital patients–not for vivacious women, like me, who prioritize both their inner and outer beauty. If wanting to look and feel my best makes me narcissistic, then I will unapologetically own that title. My entire squad of customers, all of whom represent a constellation of stars, are stellar in their own ways.

What is your artistic process in creating a new piece? More specifically, how did you come up with the design for the iconic bra?

My creative process is very Faulknerian in nature. I instinctively follow a stream-of-consciousness approach for everything in life when it comes to creativity­­–whether that be a sports bra design, a customized piece of furniture or a lavish dinner for a loved one. I go with, and grow with, the flow. My overarching objective in creating extravagant sports bras was two-fold.

On the one hand, I knew that I capitalize on the white space in the activewear industry by targeting my demographic, which had been egregiously disregarded for so long. I could not comprehend why bras like the one I envisioned in my head had not yet existed!

On the other hand, because I got my M.A. in Media, Culture and Communication Studies with an emphasis in social media and luxury consumption from New York University in 2008, I knew that I could strategically leverage social media at a time when Instagram was still in its infancy and when Facebook was ubiquitous, still existing as the epicenter for digital communication. Therefore, my ridiculously expensive, bespoke sports bra designs had viral appeal that would boost my website traffic; thereby introducing customers to my other eclectic, yet more affordable, designs that ranged from $44-$85. At the time, these prices were considered outrageous since the median, high end sports bra price industry wide was around $30.

Each design that launched was inspired by women who have inspired me. These woman include my Mom, who is my hero; my bestie Jasmine Kingsley, who is a queen in her own right currently dominating as a lawyer for HUDL in Lincoln, Nebraska and raising two beautiful mixed children with the love of her life. Further, the ZuZu Bra was named after my beautiful hair stylist and make-up artist, Zuleika Acosta. She now owns hair salon in Brooklyn called ZuZu Studio. I am so proud of all of the dreams that she manifested with unwavering intention since the second I met her while getting my hair styled at Bumble and Bumble’s styling bar at Bloomingdales on 59th in New York City back in 2010. Even Angelina Jolie, when she starred in Tomb Raider sexily clad in black leather [has been an inspiration].

Every creation that I created was different, just like the plethora of exceptional women who inspired the design. [These creations] empower women to love the skin they’re in. [The designs] encourage them to fully embrace their femininity with just enough bite to remain authentic in a society that has successfully brainwashed females into idealizing an unrealistic standard of beauty. [This unrealistic standard of beauty] exacerbates mental health issues worldwide by diminishing self-esteem, which has proven globally to be utterly detrimental.

There were seven staple collections based on women’s respective needs, dubbed: (1) Dim Your Headlights; (2) Keep ’em in; (3) Lock ’em Down, (4) Show ’em Off; (5) The Empower ’em Collection, which was marketed as the world’s most fashionable mastectomy bra endorsed by Giuliana Rancic; (6) Yogansita; and (7) Zip ’em Up. I also had an assortment of booty shorts, capris, cycling shorts, gloves, leggings, moto-jackets, swimwear, and tops.

The Zip ’em Up Collection was hands down the most popular collection. From that collection came The Sophia Bra: a pink, ditsy, floral Supplex adorned with a gold zipper. [The Sophie Bra], embellished with a combination of gold studs and Swarovski crystals on the piping, was the star of the show. The same month that Britney Spears reminded the world of who she was by wearing The Eternal Love Bra, The Sophia Bra got confirmed for Oprah’s O List, which was another goal that I was determined to manifest.

Where do you usually find inspiration for designing with your company Luxe Branding Haus? 

The world is my playground. I’ve had the unique privilege of living in Southern California, Boston, New York City, and studied abroad in 8 different countries, from middle school through graduate school . I travel all over the world as an explorer.

This montage of vivid experiences has helped me develop a global perspective and a sophisticated eye that is heavily influenced by architecture and interior design. Luxury fashion from the world’s most reputable brands, [including] Louis Vuitton, sets the precedent not only for customer service. [Vuitton’s] artful, fashion-forward yet elegant design, and overall quality [sets the standard].

[Dooley finds inspiration] by being a voracious reader with a monomaniacal desire to eternally innovate, whilst blazing a purposeful trail in every industry that I strut my fancy feet into while living a life of purpose. More than anything, it’s my heart and hustle that sets me, as the founder, apart. Coupled with the juxtaposition of luxury design, social media marketing, and postmodernism, that is what makes Luxe Branding Haus such an avant-garde and purpose-driven company.

Rather than thinking outside-the-box, as many creatives are naturally inclined to do, I design as if there is no box– because the norm does not interest me. Basic [fashion]–such as Coach, Lululemon and Michael Kors, for example– are of no interest to me. In a world of disempowering monotony, standing out is an absolute anomaly and is a surefire way to create positive change in a world that is controlled with fear, rather than trusted with faith. Why blend in when I was born to stand out?

We all live in the same world, but not on the same frequency. Luxe Branding Haus follows the same luxury strategies invented in Europe and [has been] developed worldwide by predominantly French and Italian brands. We have several lifestyle and luxury cannabis brands launching in California this year as well as several game-changing real estate and technology projects. [They] are going to influence each respective industry indefinitely through integrated, cause-based marketing and other non-traditional strategies. [Through these projects, Dooley aims] to create positive change in a world that so desperately needs authenticity, genuine inspiration and a resurgence of utilitarian principles that will make the world a better place.

Is your personal style reflected in the pieces and styles you do for other people, or are the designs more-so dependent on the individual?

My designs are, often, heavily dependent on the individual. I have styled countless men and women over the last 13, years and I treat each project differently. To me, the human body is the equivalent of a blank canvas to an artist. Take, for example, Johannes Vermeer’s famous painting, “Girl with a Pearl Earring” from 1665. The combination of paint that he used and the brushes that he chose to create that world-renowned masterpiece is the same refined yet free-flowing process that I utilize when it comes to my designs. The only difference is that consumer products and humans are my canvas, and luxury design is the vehicle through which my visions come to life in full form.

How can the stigma surrounding the cannabis industry be best combatted?

Clinical trials, the decriminalization of cannabis, education, and luxury branding­, in my opinion, will play the most fundamental roles in de-stigmatizing the cannabis industry. Luxe Branding Haus is revolutionizing the cannabis industry. I am so excited for the slow trickle of our diverse assortment of brands, all of which will resonate with different demographics. At the same time, [these brands will aid in] educating and enhancing the lifestyles of our vast clientele and hopefully helping them achieve true bliss through holistic health via cannabis­–which is THE TRUTH–the universal panacea for virtually every ailment. All our brands are tied to a cause with the intention of boosting morality by imbuing the industry with pay-it-forward principles that will help mitigate some of the issues that have been so detrimental to humanity. My most fervent philanthropic passions are domestic violence awareness, mental health awareness, social equity, and suicide prevention.

How do you see the LA cannabis industry evolving in the next few years?

The LA cannabis industry will gradually commoditize and therefore become ubiquitous and normalized. Once cannabis goes federally legal, consumers will need to be more educated than ever to avoid being manipulated by the sociopaths who lead big pharma, one of the most evil juggernauts in the world. [Big Pharma] takes more lives than it saves lives, and that does more harm than good.

Do you have any other exciting projects coming up in 2021?

2021 is stacked with a vast array of blessed projects, and I could share all my secrets, but I’d rather wet your palates. All I can say is to be sure to prepare your tastebuds for the most luxurious branding and the most superb quality in the cannabis industry.

Film illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Unforgettable Foreign Films

10 Foreign Films with the Most Unforgettable Love Stories

By Roberta Seret, PhD

I have two loves – literature and film. The most powerful love stories jump off the pages or off the screen, narrating different types of love turmoil, journeying through danger and obstacles to find love. The best love stories occur when love triumphs over evil. 

In the past twenty years, I have taught film through my NGO at the United Nations and at New York University. It is a love story that captures my students the most. Their 10 favorite love stories in foreign films deceit different ways of loving, but they all try to overcome these obstacles to find it. Although they may not always get their happy ending, it’s always worth the risk:

1.     JOJO RABBIT – (New Zealand) 2019, director Taika Waititi. During World War ll, ten-year-old Jojo is being brainwashed as a Hitler Youth. Strangely, his mother allows this, for it is her only way to protect him. We see how deeply a mother loves her son as she prepares him to be independent. Simultaneously, the director expresses his love for the future of children to do what’s right.

2.     HONEYLAND – (Republic of Northern Macedonia) 2019, directors Tamara Kotevska and Ljubomir Stefanov. Nominated for an Oscar for Best Documentary and Best Feature Film, this story recreates a Paradise Lost and its destruction by a greedy man. Love for beauty and nature, and the desire to recapture it, is represented by honey – becoming extinct – and man’s inhumanity to lose it.

3.     NEVER LOOK AWAY – (Germany) 2018, director Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck. Based on the life of the famous painter, Gerhard Richter, the director recreates the artist’s search for Truth. It is only through love for Art that the artist can find peace. It is this tumultuous search that pushes him/her to create.

4.     CAPERNAUM – (Lebanon) 2018, director Nadine Labaki. Lost children, abandoned, hungry, and forced to go against their conscience, are victims of war-torn Lebanon and Syria. The director opens her heart by using her hand-held camera to capture how children suffer in their struggle to survive. It is through her love for these children that we understand and want to help. 

5.     FACES PLACES – (France) 2017, directors Agnes Varda and JR. At 89-years-old and one year before her death, famed filmmaker, Agnes Varda embarks on a road trip to show her appreciation to the people of France. As a token of her deep love, she offers them a new type of art – photos of themselves – while she is making a film of their acceptance. Photography mixes with cinematography, the moving image fuses with still art, to show the director’s love for people and give them Art. 

6.     LION – (India/ Australia) 2016, director Garth Davis. The true story of 5-year-old Saroo, who gets lost on a train in India and cannot communicate in a different dialect to return home. He is placed in an orphanage and adopted by a couple from Tasmania, Australia. Twenty-five years later, his obsession to find his biological mother is proof of his filial love.

7.     TONI ERDMANN – (Germany / Romania) 2016, director Maren Ade. A father loves his ambitious, modern daughter and wants to help her understand what happiness and love are. But the generational gap proves to be stronger than his quest. Despite his struggles and sacrifices, she answers when she sings Whitney Houston’s song, “Learning to love yourself is the greatest love of all.”

8.     PHOENIX – (Germany) 2014, director Christian Petzold. Nelly survives World War II because she is obsessed at Auschwitz to be loved again by the man she loves. She does return to him but disfigured, and he does not recognize her. Deceitfully, he schemes to help her survive the traumas of her past. But as she learns the truth, will her love forgive him?

9.     IDA – (Poland) 2013, director Pawel Pawlikowski. Ida embarks on a spiritual journey to choose between a life of love and family, or God and religion. As she voyages toward the answer, she learns about her history and what the material world can offer. But she keeps repeating, “And then?” She realizes it is love for God and the spirit that can offer her the truest love.

10.  CASABLANCA – (USA/ Morocco) 1942, director Michael Curtiz. This is the best love story of all. For those who will see this film for the first time, I am jealous. This is an American movie made in Morocco with an anti-Hollywood ending. It shows and answers what is true love? What we see on the screen is a love that hurts – for all of us. And yet, love must be experienced, and this film must be seen!

Roberta Seret, Ph.D., is the director of Advanced English and Film at the United Nations for the Hospitality Committee and Founder of the NGO at the United Nations, International Cinema Education. She is the author of the Transylvanian Trilogy, with Love Odyssey releasing March 23, 2021. Visit her website for more information.

Bard College Appoints Marcus Roberts

Bard College announces the appointment of award-winning pianist and composer Marcus Roberts as Distinguished Visiting Professor of Music for the 2020–21 academic year. A highly acclaimed modern jazz pianist, composer, and educator, Roberts is known throughout the world for his development of an entirely new approach to jazz trio performance as well as for his remarkable ability to blend the jazz and classical idioms. Hailed as “the genius of modern piano,” Roberts’s life and career were featured by the CBS news magazine 60 Minutes in a 2014 episode, “The Virtuoso,” in which he was interviewed by Wynton Marsalis. In addition to his renown as a performer and composer, Roberts is the founder of The Modern Jazz Generation, a multigenerational ensemble that is the realization of his long-standing dedication to training and mentoring younger jazz musicians. Roberts will teach a series of master classes to Bard music students this fall and spring.

Pianist/composer Marcus Roberts has been hailed “the genius of the modern piano”. His life and career have been featured on an episode of the CBS News television show, 60 Minutes, called “The Virtuoso.” The show traced his life from his early roots in Jacksonville and at the Florida School for the Deaf and Blind to his remarkable career as a modern jazz pianist, composer, and educator. Roberts grew up in Jacksonville, FL where his mother’s gospel singing and the music of the local church left a lasting impact on his own musical style. While he began playing piano at age five after losing his sight, he did not have his first formal lesson until age 12. Despite that late start, he progressed quickly and at age 18, went on to study classical piano at Florida State University with the great Leonidas Lipovetsky. Roberts has won numerous awards and competitions over the years, but the one that is most personally meaningful to him is the Helen Keller Award for Personal Achievement.

Roberts is known throughout the world for his development of an entirely new approach to jazz trio performance as well as for his remarkable ability to blend the jazz and classical idioms to create something wholly new. His critically acclaimed legacy of recorded music reflects this tremendous artistic versatility with recordings ranging from solo piano, duets, and trio to large ensembles and symphony orchestra. His popular DVD recording with the Berlin Philharmonic showcases his groundbreaking arrangement of Gershwin’s “Concerto in F for Piano and Orchestra”. One of Roberts’ more recent musical projects is the founding of a new band called The Modern Jazz Generation. This multigenerational ensemble is the realization of Roberts’ long-standing dedication to training and mentoring younger jazz musicians. Roberts is also an associate professor of music at the School of Music at Florida State University and he holds an honorary Doctor of Music degree from The Juilliard School.

In addition to his renown as a performer, Roberts is also an accomplished composer who has received numerous commissioning awards from such places as Chamber Music America, Jazz at Lincoln Center, ASCAP, the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and the Savannah Music Festival, Seiji Ozawa and the Saito Kinen Orchestra (who commissioned him to write his second piano concerto, “Rhapsody in D for Piano and Orchestra”), and most recently, the American Symphony Orchestra.

Face Transplant Surgery: A New Case Study

A new case study out of New York University’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Developmentfinds that face transplant surgery in patients who have experienced severe facial trauma can improve speech production.

Face transplantation is one of the most extensive facial reconstructive procedures available. The procedure involves the partial or total replacement of nerves, muscles and skeletal structures of the face, head, and neck using donor tissues. With only 41 facial transplant procedures performed worldwide to date, this case study adds to the very limited literature documenting speech production outcomes post-facial transplant. The surgery – which was the first in New York State – was performed by experts at NYU Langone Health’s Face Transplant Program, led by Eduardo Rodriguez, MD, DDS, the Helen L. Kimmel Professor of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery and chair of the Hansjörg Wyss Department of Plastic Surgery.

“Our findings provide a window into the complex recovery process following major facial reconstruction and serve as an important foundation from which we can begin to understand how facial transplant can improve speech production preoperatively to postoperatively,” said Maria I. Grigos, the study’s lead author and associate professor of communicative sciences and disorders at NYU Steinhardt. “Among the many remarkable patterns observed, we found that the patient displayed more flexible control of facial movement as he adapted to the transplanted structures.”

Research Method

Using optical tracking, a form of motion tracking technology, Grigos and her team were able to examine first-hand how the facial transplant procedure alters movement of the face and contributes to improved speech production. Researchers compared data from the case study patient – a male victim who suffered third- and fourth-degree burns and major soft tissue loss in a fire – against four adult males who had not experienced severe facial trauma.

The patient’s speech production and facial movements were examined once before the procedure and four times in the 13 months following the procedure. Movements of the patient’s lips and jaw, as well as the intelligibility of his speech, were compared pre- to post-tranplant and then tracked across the recovery period.

“The remarkable changes that we captured in this patient reflect the multiple processes involved in the reintegration of neuromuscular control and in the learning of new strategies over the recovery period. Such adaptability is a positive indicator that treatment to improve speech production can be effective post–facial transplant surgery,” continued Grigos.

In addition to Grigos, the study’s co-authors include Eduardo D. Rodriguez, Étoile LeBlanc, J. Rodrigo Diaz-Siso and Natalie Plana of the Hansjörg Wyss Department of Plastic Surgery at NYU Langone Health, as well as Christina Hagedorn of the College of Staten Island, City University of New York.

NYU and its affiliated medical center, NYU Langone Health, continue to be pioneers in face transplant surgery and research.

About the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development

Located in the heart of New York City’s Greenwich Village, NYU’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development prepares students for careers in the arts, education, health, media and psychology. Since its founding in 1890, the Steinhardt School’s mission has been to expand human capacity through public service, global collaboration, research, scholarship, and practice. To learn more about NYU Steinhardt, visit steinhardt.nyu.edu.