Posts tagged with "New York University"

Kelly Dooley shot by Baz for 360 Magazine

Kelly Dooley QxA

Here at 360 Magazine, we were honored to speak with the athleisure pioneer and cannabis queen, Kelly Dooley. With her impressive, luxurious brands–Luxe Branding Haus and BodyRock Sport–Dooley stays busy revolutionizing how athletic wear can empower her customers. When she isn’t designing her avant-garde, fabulous pieces, Dooley can be found working with lifestyle and luxury cannabis brands, as well as involving herself with several real estate and technology projects. Dooley is a trailblazer who sets forth on her dreams with determination and undeniable spunk. We sat down with Kelly Dooley to speak about her recent sports bra design for Britney Spears, her best solutions for combatting stigma surrounding the cannabis industry, and how she finds inspiration.

What was it like creating a bra for superstar Britney Spears? How did you feel when you first found out about the project?

When I first launched BodyRock Sport in January 2010, I had an insatiable desire to beautify activewear for like-minded women that combined fitness and fashion in a way that had not been done before.

The moment that I found out that Britney Spears was rocking my $20,011 Eternal Love Sports Bra from my most popular Zip’ Up collection with the Jessica Moto leggings from my Show ‘Em Some Swagger collection in her comeback “Twister” music video was absolutely surreal. My baby, BodyRock Sport, was on fire. I was breaking all the rules and taking names–one celeb at a time. I was empowering women to love the skin they’re in, while pursuing my dream with reckless abandonment in the heart of New York City.

I neither made the sports bra nor the leggings specifically for her, but due to the intricacy of the design­–which included black and silver French silk and a diamond-eyed skull tassel attached to a solid gold zipper pull–and based on the purposely inflated price, I knew that the design would inevitably adorn an A-List celebrity. Britney was on my manifestation list and my dream came true with Godspeed. I was honored and proud of myself for achieving my goal. 2012 represented a dramatic turning point in the overwhelmingly lackluster world of athleisure, and I–the avant-garde, fabulous, over-educated and extremely quirky SoCal girl–was being heralded as one of the pioneers of the activewear industry.

I knew that my Dad was beaming down at me from heaven with pride. I recall getting hundreds of Google alerts because the music video went viral–not only because of the extravagant sports bra that she wore– but also because Britney Spears finally returned to the stage with a vengeance after overcoming her former hardships. She was also often seen out and about in Los Angeles rocking some of my other sports bra designs and booty shorts. Every now and then, I spot her in the tabloids or online wearing a design that I created a decade ago. The surge of gratitude never dissipates.

At the time, luxury activewear was virtually impossible to find so I felt passionate about innovating the industry that so desperately needed to evolve. Believe it or not, the first sports bra EVER was not even invented until 1977. The design looked as though it had been produced solely for hospital patients–not for vivacious women, like me, who prioritize both their inner and outer beauty. If wanting to look and feel my best makes me narcissistic, then I will unapologetically own that title. My entire squad of customers, all of whom represent a constellation of stars, are stellar in their own ways.

What is your artistic process in creating a new piece? More specifically, how did you come up with the design for the iconic bra?

My creative process is very Faulknerian in nature. I instinctively follow a stream-of-consciousness approach for everything in life when it comes to creativity­­–whether that be a sports bra design, a customized piece of furniture or a lavish dinner for a loved one. I go with, and grow with, the flow. My overarching objective in creating extravagant sports bras was two-fold.

On the one hand, I knew that I capitalize on the white space in the activewear industry by targeting my demographic, which had been egregiously disregarded for so long. I could not comprehend why bras like the one I envisioned in my head had not yet existed!

On the other hand, because I got my M.A. in Media, Culture and Communication Studies with an emphasis in social media and luxury consumption from New York University in 2008, I knew that I could strategically leverage social media at a time when Instagram was still in its infancy and when Facebook was ubiquitous, still existing as the epicenter for digital communication. Therefore, my ridiculously expensive, bespoke sports bra designs had viral appeal that would boost my website traffic; thereby introducing customers to my other eclectic, yet more affordable, designs that ranged from $44-$85. At the time, these prices were considered outrageous since the median, high end sports bra price industry wide was around $30.

Each design that launched was inspired by women who have inspired me. These woman include my Mom, who is my hero; my bestie Jasmine Kingsley, who is a queen in her own right currently dominating as a lawyer for HUDL in Lincoln, Nebraska and raising two beautiful mixed children with the love of her life. Further, the ZuZu Bra was named after my beautiful hair stylist and make-up artist, Zuleika Acosta. She now owns hair salon in Brooklyn called ZuZu Studio. I am so proud of all of the dreams that she manifested with unwavering intention since the second I met her while getting my hair styled at Bumble and Bumble’s styling bar at Bloomingdales on 59th in New York City back in 2010. Even Angelina Jolie, when she starred in Tomb Raider sexily clad in black leather [has been an inspiration].

Every creation that I created was different, just like the plethora of exceptional women who inspired the design. [These creations] empower women to love the skin they’re in. [The designs] encourage them to fully embrace their femininity with just enough bite to remain authentic in a society that has successfully brainwashed females into idealizing an unrealistic standard of beauty. [This unrealistic standard of beauty] exacerbates mental health issues worldwide by diminishing self-esteem, which has proven globally to be utterly detrimental.

There were seven staple collections based on women’s respective needs, dubbed: (1) Dim Your Headlights; (2) Keep ’em in; (3) Lock ’em Down, (4) Show ’em Off; (5) The Empower ’em Collection, which was marketed as the world’s most fashionable mastectomy bra endorsed by Giuliana Rancic; (6) Yogansita; and (7) Zip ’em Up. I also had an assortment of booty shorts, capris, cycling shorts, gloves, leggings, moto-jackets, swimwear, and tops.

The Zip ’em Up Collection was hands down the most popular collection. From that collection came The Sophia Bra: a pink, ditsy, floral Supplex adorned with a gold zipper. [The Sophie Bra], embellished with a combination of gold studs and Swarovski crystals on the piping, was the star of the show. The same month that Britney Spears reminded the world of who she was by wearing The Eternal Love Bra, The Sophia Bra got confirmed for Oprah’s O List, which was another goal that I was determined to manifest.

Where do you usually find inspiration for designing with your company Luxe Branding Haus? 

The world is my playground. I’ve had the unique privilege of living in Southern California, Boston, New York City, and studied abroad in 8 different countries, from middle school through graduate school . I travel all over the world as an explorer.

This montage of vivid experiences has helped me develop a global perspective and a sophisticated eye that is heavily influenced by architecture and interior design. Luxury fashion from the world’s most reputable brands, [including] Louis Vuitton, sets the precedent not only for customer service. [Vuitton’s] artful, fashion-forward yet elegant design, and overall quality [sets the standard].

[Dooley finds inspiration] by being a voracious reader with a monomaniacal desire to eternally innovate, whilst blazing a purposeful trail in every industry that I strut my fancy feet into while living a life of purpose. More than anything, it’s my heart and hustle that sets me, as the founder, apart. Coupled with the juxtaposition of luxury design, social media marketing, and postmodernism, that is what makes Luxe Branding Haus such an avant-garde and purpose-driven company.

Rather than thinking outside-the-box, as many creatives are naturally inclined to do, I design as if there is no box– because the norm does not interest me. Basic [fashion]–such as Coach, Lululemon and Michael Kors, for example– are of no interest to me. In a world of disempowering monotony, standing out is an absolute anomaly and is a surefire way to create positive change in a world that is controlled with fear, rather than trusted with faith. Why blend in when I was born to stand out?

We all live in the same world, but not on the same frequency. Luxe Branding Haus follows the same luxury strategies invented in Europe and [has been] developed worldwide by predominantly French and Italian brands. We have several lifestyle and luxury cannabis brands launching in California this year as well as several game-changing real estate and technology projects. [They] are going to influence each respective industry indefinitely through integrated, cause-based marketing and other non-traditional strategies. [Through these projects, Dooley aims] to create positive change in a world that so desperately needs authenticity, genuine inspiration and a resurgence of utilitarian principles that will make the world a better place.

Is your personal style reflected in the pieces and styles you do for other people, or are the designs more-so dependent on the individual?

My designs are, often, heavily dependent on the individual. I have styled countless men and women over the last 13, years and I treat each project differently. To me, the human body is the equivalent of a blank canvas to an artist. Take, for example, Johannes Vermeer’s famous painting, “Girl with a Pearl Earring” from 1665. The combination of paint that he used and the brushes that he chose to create that world-renowned masterpiece is the same refined yet free-flowing process that I utilize when it comes to my designs. The only difference is that consumer products and humans are my canvas, and luxury design is the vehicle through which my visions come to life in full form.

How can the stigma surrounding the cannabis industry be best combatted?

Clinical trials, the decriminalization of cannabis, education, and luxury branding­, in my opinion, will play the most fundamental roles in de-stigmatizing the cannabis industry. Luxe Branding Haus is revolutionizing the cannabis industry. I am so excited for the slow trickle of our diverse assortment of brands, all of which will resonate with different demographics. At the same time, [these brands will aid in] educating and enhancing the lifestyles of our vast clientele and hopefully helping them achieve true bliss through holistic health via cannabis­–which is THE TRUTH–the universal panacea for virtually every ailment. All our brands are tied to a cause with the intention of boosting morality by imbuing the industry with pay-it-forward principles that will help mitigate some of the issues that have been so detrimental to humanity. My most fervent philanthropic passions are domestic violence awareness, mental health awareness, social equity, and suicide prevention.

How do you see the LA cannabis industry evolving in the next few years?

The LA cannabis industry will gradually commoditize and therefore become ubiquitous and normalized. Once cannabis goes federally legal, consumers will need to be more educated than ever to avoid being manipulated by the sociopaths who lead big pharma, one of the most evil juggernauts in the world. [Big Pharma] takes more lives than it saves lives, and that does more harm than good.

Do you have any other exciting projects coming up in 2021?

2021 is stacked with a vast array of blessed projects, and I could share all my secrets, but I’d rather wet your palates. All I can say is to be sure to prepare your tastebuds for the most luxurious branding and the most superb quality in the cannabis industry.

Film illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Unforgettable Foreign Films

10 Foreign Films with the Most Unforgettable Love Stories

By Roberta Seret, PhD

I have two loves – literature and film. The most powerful love stories jump off the pages or off the screen, narrating different types of love turmoil, journeying through danger and obstacles to find love. The best love stories occur when love triumphs over evil. 

In the past twenty years, I have taught film through my NGO at the United Nations and at New York University. It is a love story that captures my students the most. Their 10 favorite love stories in foreign films deceit different ways of loving, but they all try to overcome these obstacles to find it. Although they may not always get their happy ending, it’s always worth the risk:

1.     JOJO RABBIT – (New Zealand) 2019, director Taika Waititi. During World War ll, ten-year-old Jojo is being brainwashed as a Hitler Youth. Strangely, his mother allows this, for it is her only way to protect him. We see how deeply a mother loves her son as she prepares him to be independent. Simultaneously, the director expresses his love for the future of children to do what’s right.

2.     HONEYLAND – (Republic of Northern Macedonia) 2019, directors Tamara Kotevska and Ljubomir Stefanov. Nominated for an Oscar for Best Documentary and Best Feature Film, this story recreates a Paradise Lost and its destruction by a greedy man. Love for beauty and nature, and the desire to recapture it, is represented by honey – becoming extinct – and man’s inhumanity to lose it.

3.     NEVER LOOK AWAY – (Germany) 2018, director Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck. Based on the life of the famous painter, Gerhard Richter, the director recreates the artist’s search for Truth. It is only through love for Art that the artist can find peace. It is this tumultuous search that pushes him/her to create.

4.     CAPERNAUM – (Lebanon) 2018, director Nadine Labaki. Lost children, abandoned, hungry, and forced to go against their conscience, are victims of war-torn Lebanon and Syria. The director opens her heart by using her hand-held camera to capture how children suffer in their struggle to survive. It is through her love for these children that we understand and want to help. 

5.     FACES PLACES – (France) 2017, directors Agnes Varda and JR. At 89-years-old and one year before her death, famed filmmaker, Agnes Varda embarks on a road trip to show her appreciation to the people of France. As a token of her deep love, she offers them a new type of art – photos of themselves – while she is making a film of their acceptance. Photography mixes with cinematography, the moving image fuses with still art, to show the director’s love for people and give them Art. 

6.     LION – (India/ Australia) 2016, director Garth Davis. The true story of 5-year-old Saroo, who gets lost on a train in India and cannot communicate in a different dialect to return home. He is placed in an orphanage and adopted by a couple from Tasmania, Australia. Twenty-five years later, his obsession to find his biological mother is proof of his filial love.

7.     TONI ERDMANN – (Germany / Romania) 2016, director Maren Ade. A father loves his ambitious, modern daughter and wants to help her understand what happiness and love are. But the generational gap proves to be stronger than his quest. Despite his struggles and sacrifices, she answers when she sings Whitney Houston’s song, “Learning to love yourself is the greatest love of all.”

8.     PHOENIX – (Germany) 2014, director Christian Petzold. Nelly survives World War II because she is obsessed at Auschwitz to be loved again by the man she loves. She does return to him but disfigured, and he does not recognize her. Deceitfully, he schemes to help her survive the traumas of her past. But as she learns the truth, will her love forgive him?

9.     IDA – (Poland) 2013, director Pawel Pawlikowski. Ida embarks on a spiritual journey to choose between a life of love and family, or God and religion. As she voyages toward the answer, she learns about her history and what the material world can offer. But she keeps repeating, “And then?” She realizes it is love for God and the spirit that can offer her the truest love.

10.  CASABLANCA – (USA/ Morocco) 1942, director Michael Curtiz. This is the best love story of all. For those who will see this film for the first time, I am jealous. This is an American movie made in Morocco with an anti-Hollywood ending. It shows and answers what is true love? What we see on the screen is a love that hurts – for all of us. And yet, love must be experienced, and this film must be seen!

Roberta Seret, Ph.D., is the director of Advanced English and Film at the United Nations for the Hospitality Committee and Founder of the NGO at the United Nations, International Cinema Education. She is the author of the Transylvanian Trilogy, with Love Odyssey releasing March 23, 2021. Visit her website for more information.

Bard College Appoints Marcus Roberts

Bard College announces the appointment of award-winning pianist and composer Marcus Roberts as Distinguished Visiting Professor of Music for the 2020–21 academic year. A highly acclaimed modern jazz pianist, composer, and educator, Roberts is known throughout the world for his development of an entirely new approach to jazz trio performance as well as for his remarkable ability to blend the jazz and classical idioms. Hailed as “the genius of modern piano,” Roberts’s life and career were featured by the CBS news magazine 60 Minutes in a 2014 episode, “The Virtuoso,” in which he was interviewed by Wynton Marsalis. In addition to his renown as a performer and composer, Roberts is the founder of The Modern Jazz Generation, a multigenerational ensemble that is the realization of his long-standing dedication to training and mentoring younger jazz musicians. Roberts will teach a series of master classes to Bard music students this fall and spring.

Pianist/composer Marcus Roberts has been hailed “the genius of the modern piano”. His life and career have been featured on an episode of the CBS News television show, 60 Minutes, called “The Virtuoso.” The show traced his life from his early roots in Jacksonville and at the Florida School for the Deaf and Blind to his remarkable career as a modern jazz pianist, composer, and educator. Roberts grew up in Jacksonville, FL where his mother’s gospel singing and the music of the local church left a lasting impact on his own musical style. While he began playing piano at age five after losing his sight, he did not have his first formal lesson until age 12. Despite that late start, he progressed quickly and at age 18, went on to study classical piano at Florida State University with the great Leonidas Lipovetsky. Roberts has won numerous awards and competitions over the years, but the one that is most personally meaningful to him is the Helen Keller Award for Personal Achievement.

Roberts is known throughout the world for his development of an entirely new approach to jazz trio performance as well as for his remarkable ability to blend the jazz and classical idioms to create something wholly new. His critically acclaimed legacy of recorded music reflects this tremendous artistic versatility with recordings ranging from solo piano, duets, and trio to large ensembles and symphony orchestra. His popular DVD recording with the Berlin Philharmonic showcases his groundbreaking arrangement of Gershwin’s “Concerto in F for Piano and Orchestra”. One of Roberts’ more recent musical projects is the founding of a new band called The Modern Jazz Generation. This multigenerational ensemble is the realization of Roberts’ long-standing dedication to training and mentoring younger jazz musicians. Roberts is also an associate professor of music at the School of Music at Florida State University and he holds an honorary Doctor of Music degree from The Juilliard School.

In addition to his renown as a performer, Roberts is also an accomplished composer who has received numerous commissioning awards from such places as Chamber Music America, Jazz at Lincoln Center, ASCAP, the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and the Savannah Music Festival, Seiji Ozawa and the Saito Kinen Orchestra (who commissioned him to write his second piano concerto, “Rhapsody in D for Piano and Orchestra”), and most recently, the American Symphony Orchestra.

Face Transplant Surgery: A New Case Study

A new case study out of New York University’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Developmentfinds that face transplant surgery in patients who have experienced severe facial trauma can improve speech production.

Face transplantation is one of the most extensive facial reconstructive procedures available. The procedure involves the partial or total replacement of nerves, muscles and skeletal structures of the face, head, and neck using donor tissues. With only 41 facial transplant procedures performed worldwide to date, this case study adds to the very limited literature documenting speech production outcomes post-facial transplant. The surgery – which was the first in New York State – was performed by experts at NYU Langone Health’s Face Transplant Program, led by Eduardo Rodriguez, MD, DDS, the Helen L. Kimmel Professor of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery and chair of the Hansjörg Wyss Department of Plastic Surgery.

“Our findings provide a window into the complex recovery process following major facial reconstruction and serve as an important foundation from which we can begin to understand how facial transplant can improve speech production preoperatively to postoperatively,” said Maria I. Grigos, the study’s lead author and associate professor of communicative sciences and disorders at NYU Steinhardt. “Among the many remarkable patterns observed, we found that the patient displayed more flexible control of facial movement as he adapted to the transplanted structures.”

Research Method

Using optical tracking, a form of motion tracking technology, Grigos and her team were able to examine first-hand how the facial transplant procedure alters movement of the face and contributes to improved speech production. Researchers compared data from the case study patient – a male victim who suffered third- and fourth-degree burns and major soft tissue loss in a fire – against four adult males who had not experienced severe facial trauma.

The patient’s speech production and facial movements were examined once before the procedure and four times in the 13 months following the procedure. Movements of the patient’s lips and jaw, as well as the intelligibility of his speech, were compared pre- to post-tranplant and then tracked across the recovery period.

“The remarkable changes that we captured in this patient reflect the multiple processes involved in the reintegration of neuromuscular control and in the learning of new strategies over the recovery period. Such adaptability is a positive indicator that treatment to improve speech production can be effective post–facial transplant surgery,” continued Grigos.

In addition to Grigos, the study’s co-authors include Eduardo D. Rodriguez, Étoile LeBlanc, J. Rodrigo Diaz-Siso and Natalie Plana of the Hansjörg Wyss Department of Plastic Surgery at NYU Langone Health, as well as Christina Hagedorn of the College of Staten Island, City University of New York.

NYU and its affiliated medical center, NYU Langone Health, continue to be pioneers in face transplant surgery and research.

About the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development

Located in the heart of New York City’s Greenwich Village, NYU’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development prepares students for careers in the arts, education, health, media and psychology. Since its founding in 1890, the Steinhardt School’s mission has been to expand human capacity through public service, global collaboration, research, scholarship, and practice. To learn more about NYU Steinhardt, visit steinhardt.nyu.edu.

Hidden Content

Hidden Content launches with world premiere of The Caretaker at Tribeca Film Festival developing slate of VR films.

Filmmakers Jacob Wasserman, Adam Donald and Ant Gentile announced today the formation of Hidden Content, a full-service virtual reality. Their first project was unveiled yesterday at the Tribeca Film Festival with the world premiere of their narrative 360 Cinema project The Caretaker, the first installment of an original horror anthology series.

Created by Wasserman and Donald as well as filmmaker Nicolas Pesce (The Eyes Of My Mother, Piercing), The Caretaker stars Adelaide Clemens, Tom Lipinski, Clara Wong and Diana Agostini, was produced by Max Born and Schuyler Weiss and executive produced by Gentile and Kimberly Parker. The pilot was a co-production with RealMotion Inc. and audio services were provided by Hobo Audio.

Hidden Content has also teamed with film producer and financier Max Born to produce and acquire a slate of VR films and series, as well as develop a VR/AR distribution platform.

Wasserman, Donald and Gentile have been working in the virtual reality and 360 cinema space for some time, having produced high profile VR commercials and branded content experiences, including Samsung’s “Anatomy of Ski” 4D VR Experience for the 2018 Winter Olympics, featuring Olympic gold medalist downhill skier Bode Miller and “360 Meals,” a journey inside celebrity chef Daniel Boulud’s Michelin-starred flagship restaurant, Daniel.

The trio’s first narrative effort, the interactive VR thriller Broken Night
starring Emily Mortimer and Alessandro Nivola, premiered at Tribeca Film Festival 2017 and was also featured at Cannes NEXT 2017.

Hidden Content and Max Born are currently in development on three additional VR genre series, and are in talks with outside creators to acquire new content to build out their 2018 project slate.

* * *

The Hidden Content Team

Jacob Wasserman

Jacob Wasserman has produced notable and critically acclaimed films including James White
(Winner of Sundance NEXT Audience Award, AFI Audience Award), The Eyes of My Mother (Sundance NEXT 2016 Official Selection), virtual reality film Broken Night (2017 Cannes NEXT) with his latest feature films TYREL and Piercing premiering at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival. His most recent VR narrative film The Caretaker , which he co-wrote and directed alongside horror director Nicolas Pesce (The Eyes Of My Mother, Piercing), will have its premiere at the 2018 Tribeca Film Festival.

Wasserman has also produced and directed several award winning commercials, music videos and virtual reality films for clients including The North Face, Gatorade, The Wall Street Journal, Sony Music and Samsung. He a founding partner of Virtual Reality production company, Hidden Content and is currently based in Los Angeles, California.

Adam Donald

Adam Donald is a director who continues to expand his work and collaborations across all genres from Film and Television to Virtual Reality. He is a founding partner in Hidden Content, and is currently based in Brooklyn, New York. Donald has worked with the world’s top agencies and directed story-telling campaigns for many global brands, including The North Face, Gatorade, Sony, SKYY Vodka, NBA, Budweiser, and American Express, featuring world class artists and athletes Jay Z, Pharell, Diplo, Courtney Love, Venus Williams, Usain Bolt and Elton John, among others.

He is the recipient of several industry awards, including The New Directors Showcase, Clio Advertising Awards, D&AD Awards, as well as VMA nominations. In addition to his commercial work, Donald recently directed a television pilot for TruTV and co-directed the experimental VR dance film, The Gate. This is the second year he has had a film selected for both Tribeca and Cannes Film festivals.

Ant Gentile

Ant Gentile has worked in audio and video production for over 10 years, serving as creative director and producer for clients including Samsung, ABC, Interscope Records, Atlantic Records, CenturyLink, McGraw-Hill Education, Clearasil, Cengage, 451 Media, and Sun Chemical. Wanting the ability to offer full-service production, Gentile opened a state-of-the-art audio production facility in midtown Manhattan, allowing him to score, mix and sound design projects for his clients, as well as start a music publishing and podcast division.

In addition, Gentile has executive produced two feature length documentaries and has raised significant strategic funding for both entertainment projects and tech start-ups. With a passion for storytelling in new media, as well as relationships tech and VC companies, Gentile joined with commercial and narrative filmmakers Adam Donald and Jake Wasserman and producing VR content under a new banner, Hidden Content.

Nicolas Pesce

Nicolas Pesce’s debut feature The Eyes Of My Mother
was one of the most critically acclaimed horror films of 2016. It premiered at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival in the NEXT section and was released theatrically in the U.S. by Magnolia Pictures.

In 2013, Pesce developed an animated series starring Malcolm MacDowell, J.K. Simmons, and Colin Quinn and most recently he completed his second feature film Piercing ,
based on the Ryu Murakami novel by the same title. Piercing premiered at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival in the Midnight section and stars Christopher Abbott, Mia Wasikowska, Maria Dizzia, and Marin Ireland. Nick is writing and will direct the upcoming The Grudge for Good Universe and Ghost House Pictures.

Pesce is a graduate of New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts and currently lives in Los Angeles.

Max Born

Born is a film producer and financier and his production of Josh Mond’s James White was the start of what would be a successful collaboration with Borderline Films, with whom he went on to produce Nicolas Pesce’s debut feature The Eyes Of My Mother. Shortly thereafter he developed
Piercing with Pesce and Borderline, which Pesce directed and premiered at Sundance 2018.

In 2017, Born collaborated with Sebastián Silva on his film TYREL,
which premiered in competition at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival. He is currently developing both adapted and original content with Pesce, Silva, and Antonio Campos of Borderline. More recently, Born has refocused on development financing and has already started to build a small library of IP to adapt with more filmmakers.

Also in 2018, Born produced a VR short called The Caretaker,
which will have its world premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival and screen in Cannes NEXT. Along with production and post-production partners in this emerging medium, Born is looking to create what would essentially be a small VR studio.