Posts tagged with "Rosa Parks"

Gabrielle Archuleta illustrates Black History Month for 360 MAGAZINE

Black History Month

By Hannah DiPilato

February is Black History Month and 360 Magazine would like to recognize some historic people of color who have become a positive influence on society. In 2020, the Black Lives Matter movement skyrocketed and brought attention to the diversity that still exists within our community. Although society has come a long way from the early 1900s when segregation ran rampant, the movement for equality has a long way to go. From inventors to musicians, there are a number of successful people we would like to acknowledge in honor of Black History Month.

Martin Luther King Jr.
Arguably one of the most important leaders in the Civil Rights Movement, Dr. King spent his time preaching for equality in a peaceful way. He will always be remembered for his famous “I Have a Dream” speech and his ability to lead others in this historical movement. Dr. King is one of the most influential

Joseph E. Lowery
Joseph E. Lowery is the grandfather of 360 Magazine’s President Vaughn Lowery and founded the Southern Christian Leadership Conference alongside Dr. King. Throughout his life, Lowery served as vice president, chairman of the board and president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference as well as a leader in the Civil Rights Movement.

George Washington Carver
Many people are familiar with George Washington Carver for his inventive skills. He made over 300 products from peanuts and as an agricultural scientist promoted methods to prevent soil depletion.

Garrett Morgan
Garrett Augustus Morgan, Sr. is to thank for the invention of traffic lights as well as gas masks. Every time you stop at a red light, take a moment to think of Morgan for this essential technology.

Barack Obama
As the first black president of the United States, Barack Obama made an impact as the 44th president and showed young people of color they have representation in politics. He continues to use his voice to connect with the American people.

Kamala Harris
Keeping in the theme of politics, Vice President Kamala Harris is the first woman vice president, the first African American vice president and the first Asian American vice president. She’s giving young women of color everywhere a sense of representation.

Madam C.J. Walker
As the first recorded female self-made millionaire in America, Madam C.J. Walker was an influential entrepreneur, philanthropist and activist of her time.

Frederick McKinley Jones
Frederick McKinley Jones was the co-founder of Thermo King and he brought incredible improvement to long-haul transportation of perishable goods. Jones also won the National Medal of Technology.

Stevie Wonder
Stevland Hardaway Morris, better known as Stevie Wonder, is a musical prodigy that became blind after birth and learned to play the harmonica, piano and drums by age nine. He is now a notable singer, songwriter, musician and record producer.

Lonnie Johnson
Lonnie Johnson is known for his success as an aerospace engineer. He has worked on the U.S. Air Force term of service and has also worked at NASA for twelve years including in the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Patricia Bath
As an ophthalmologist, Patricia Bath was an early innovator of laser cataract surgery. She was also the first woman, African American physician to receive a patent for a medical invention.

Oprah Winfrey
One TV personality almost everyone is familiar with is Oprah. Known for her television show The Oprah Winfrey Show, she has made waves in the world of entertainment. She is also known for co-producing a Broadway musical version of The Color Purple, establishing O, The Oprah Magazine, the Oprah Winfrey Network (OWN) as well as creating Oprah.com.

Harriet Tubman
After being born into slavery, Harriet Tubman was a conductor of the Underground Railroad and helped many enslaved men and women escape. She led many people to freedom with her bravery and connection with antislavery activists.

Rosa Parks
Rosa Parks gained her notoriety as an activist in the Civil Rights Movement and is known for starting the Montgomery bus boycott after refusing to give up her seat to a white passenger. She has been called “the first lady of civil rights” and “the mother of the freedom movement” by the United States Congress.

John Lewis
John Lewis was chairman Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) as well as one of the “Big Six” leaders who organized the 1963 March on Washington. He was an essential part of the Civil Rights Movement and ending legalized racial segregation.

Alexander Miles
If you’ve ever ridden in an elevator, you can thank Alexander Miles for the automatic opening doors; he was awarded the patent for this invention in 1887. Mills was riding in an elevator with his daughter and he deemed an elevator shaft door left open could be dangerous.

Mary Kenner
Mary Kenner was an inventor famous for her development of the sanitary belt, the precursor to the self-adhesive maxi pad. However, due to racial discrimination, the idea wasn’t adopted for thirty years. She has five patents for various household items.

Maya Angelou
Known for her many famous pieces of writing, Maya Angelou was a poet, memoirist and civil rights activist. Over fifty years, she wrote a number of autobiographies, essays, poems, plays, movies and television shows. She also received over 50 honorary degrees as well as awards for her writing.

LeBron James
Along with being considered one of the greatest NBA players of all time, LeBron James also started the LeBron James Family Foundation to help create generational change for the children and families of LeBron’s hometown in Akron, Ohio.

Malcolm X
As a popular spokesperson at the time of the Civil Rights Movement, Malcolm X encouraged Black Americans to protect themselves against racism. He preached a much different lesson than Martin Luther King Jr. who preached nonviolence.

Thurgood Marshall
Thurgood Marshall was the Supreme Court’s first African American justice as well as a prominent civil rights activist. He served on the court for 24 years and helped with influential rulings at the time of the Civil Rights Movement such as the case of Brown v. Board of Education.

Jackie Robinson
Jackie Robinson was the first African American to play in Major League Baseball in the United States during the 20th century. He broke the color barrier of the MLB when he played for the National League Brooklyn Dodgers as second baseman with the jersey number 42.

JOSEPH LOWERY COVERS 360 MAGAZINE

360 Magazine officially launched their most recent issue today. It will be available online, in print, and for tablets. Its cover features an illustration of Rev. Joseph Lowery, and inside there are stories featuring Lubbock, Isabella Fries, Nikki Taylor, LC Convertible, Rolls-Royce, Door County, Elkhart Lake, Toyota Corolla Apex, and Marsha’s House.

A print copy of the magazine can be purchased on blurb.com and is available to everyone around the world. It is also available online to view on their site.

The featured story revolves around Lowery, who passed away on March 27, 2020 at the age of 98. His death did not garner much attention from the public, despite him being a notable American minister and Civil Rights activist. Lowery’s death came right as the coronavirus pandemic descended on the United States. Perhaps this is why his passing did not receive considerable attention.

“His legacy has gone under appreciated,” the article reads. “Swallowed by momentum of the current movement.”

Lowery worked in tandem with his friend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., with whom he founded the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, marched on Selma, and organized the Montgomery Bus Boycott after Rosa Parks was arrested in 1955. As one of the longest surviving members of the Civil Rights Movement, Lowery carried with him King’s legacy. 

With it, he eulogized King’s wife, Coretta Scott King, in 2006. With it, he delivered the benediction of the first Black President of the United States, Barack Obama, at his inauguration in 2009. And, carrying with him the legacy of King and his other compatriots in the Civil Right’s Movement, he was awarded by the same Black President the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

“Born and raised in Jim Crow Alabama, preaching in his blood, the Rev. Joseph Lowery is a giant of the Moses generation of civil rights leaders,” Obama said at the inauguration. “It was just King, Lowery, and a few others, huddled in Montgomery, who laid the groundwork for the bus boycott and the movement that was to follow.”

His death came two months before the Black Lives Movement resurged after the killing of George Floyd, transforming the conversation regarding Black American lives in the nation. Two months later, Lowery’s friend John Lewis, another civil rights leader, also passed at the age of 80. 

In his hometown of Huntsville, Georgia, there is a boulevard memorializing the civil rights icon. His legacy lives on in his notable work as well as his children and grandchildren, including 360 Magazine’s founder and president, Vaughn Lowery.

“Heading into an election season steeped with strife and antagonism, Joseph E. Lowery’s legacy serves as a poignant reminder,” the article reads. “His efforts to strive for a better world, his constant service and activism, and his dedication to both God and uplifting Black Americans all solidify him as a true icon of Civil Rights and American history.”

On top of its focus on Lowery, 360 Magazine profiles creatives like the singer-songwriter Nikki Taylor Vibe (aka Nikki Taylor) (7), singer Isabelle Fries (11), and model, influencer, and musician Don Benjamin (35). The newest models of hot cars debut on its pages, including the Lexus LC 500 Convertible (25), Toyota Corolla Apex (43), and the entirely reimagined Rolls-Royce Ghost (76).

And, lavish lifestyle pieces feature heavily throughout the issue. Elkhart Lake (31), which is a getaway on the east side of Wisconsin, is reviewed by 360 Magazine’s Elle Grant and Vaughn Lowery. The small city of Lubbock, TX (13) and the 212 Photography Istanbul festival (55) are also spotlit, and the articles on all three destinations are paired with stunning images.

Lastly, Marsha’s House is given its due attention. Marsha’s House houses homeless LGBTQ+ young adults, as Marsha P. Johnson did when she was alive. You can read more on page 51 of the issue.

About 360 Magazine

360 is an edgy fashion, lifestyle and culture magazine. It introduces cutting-edge brands, entities and trends to tastemakers within their respective communities. Its founding members have over 30 years of collective experience both as notable talent and uber professionals within the realm of fashion, music, art, design and entertainment. 360 Magazine is more than just a magazine comprised of journalists, representing a movement of social awareness and change.

It is an LGBTQIA friendly publication. The magazine is contemporary in look and appeal. Quality art content is the constant goal. The magazine will be entertaining, newsworthy and thought-provoking. It will appeal to a broad entertainment readership. No magazine like it is available today, constantly celebrating racial and sexual ambiguous talent and artists.

JOSEPH LOWERY, BARACK OBAMA, MEDAL OF FREEDOM, VAUGHN LOWERY, 360 MAGAZINE

REMEMBERING JOSEPH LOWERY

“When black will not be asked to get in back; when brown can stick around; when yellow will be mellow; when the red man can get ahead, man; and when white will embrace what is right.” – Joseph Lowery

Former Co-Founder/President of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), Rev. Dr. Joseph Echols Lowery, transitioned on Friday, March 27, 2020 at 10pm at the age of 98. He was one of the last remaining leaders of the Civil Rights Movement.

Dr. Lowery has assumed and executed a broad and diverse series of roles over the span of his eight decades: leader, pastor/preacher, servant, father, husband, freedom fighter and advocate. FOX 5 Atlanta pays tribute to Lowery HERE.

In 1997,he was dubbed the ‘Dean of the Civil Rights Movement’ upon receipt of the NAACP’s Lifetime Achievement Award. On January 20, 2009, in his inimitable style; Dr. Lowery delivered the Benediction on the occasion of President Obama’s inauguration as the 44th President of the United States. On August 12, 2009 when President Barack Obama awarded him the nation’s highest civilian honor: The Presidential Medal of Freedom, in recognition of his lifelong commitment to the nonviolent struggle for the causes of justice, human rights, economic equality, voting rights, peace and human dignity.

Born in Huntsville, Alabama, on October 6th, 1921, Rev. Dr. Lowery’s legacy of service and struggle is long and rich. His genesis as a Civil Rights advocate dates to the early 1950s where, in Mobile, Alabama he headed the Alabama Civic Affairs Association; the organization which led the movement to desegregate buses and public accommodations. In 1957, with friend and colleague, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. he was a Co-founder of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), where served in an array of leadership positions, including: Vice President (1957-67); Chairman of the Board (1967-77); and as President and Chief Executive Officer from (1977-1998).

In 1961, he was one of four Alabama pastors whose property was seized by the Alabama Courts in an historic, precedent setting libel suit, Sullivan v. NY Times, Abernathy, Lowery, Shuttlesworth, & Seay, because of their civil rights work.The United States Supreme Court vindicated the ministers in a landmark ruling which remains an important element in the protections afforded the free speech rights of the press, and of citizens advocating and protesting for justice and societal change.

In March of 1965, he was chosen by Dr. King to chair the Delegation delivering the demands of the Selma-to-Montgomery March George Wallace, the Governor of Alabama.  As the world witnessed, Wallace ordered the marchers beaten in the incident that came to be known as “Bloody Sunday”, which ultimately led to enactment of the Voting Rights Act.

Throughout his career, Rev. Dr. Lowery’s commitment to human rights and social justice exists on a global scale. His work resulted in the desegregation of Nashville, Tennessee schools, presenting Nelson Mandela with the Martin Luther King Jr. Human Rights Award following his release from prison in 1990, leading a peace delegation to Lebanon and nations in Central America to seek justice by nonviolent means, and securing millions of dollars in contracts for minority businesses in the Southern region of the United States.

His efforts also emphasize the need to uplift and empower historically disenfranchised communities. Ranging from supporting the families affected by the Atlanta “Missing and Murdered Children Crisis” through setting up funds with Citizen Trust Bank, demanding election reform and economic justice as Convener of the Georgia Coalition for the People’s Agenda (GCPA), to advocating for the rights of Black farmers discriminated against by the Department of Agriculture – Rev. Dr. Joseph Lowery remains committed to cultivating the Beloved Community and reminds us to “turn TO each other not ON each other!” Ebony Magazine, in recognizing Rev. Dr. Lowery as one of the nation’s “15 Greatest Black Preachers,” described him as the “consummate voice of biblical social relevancy, a focused prophetic voice, speaking truth to power,” and his strong dedication to faith and inclusion is evident in all of his work.

Joseph Lowery had 5 children from 2 separate marriages.

•Most notable speech can be watched HERE.

Remarks at Coretta Scott King’s funeral.

•His legacy continues with the Lowery Institute.

•According to CNN Lowery was a founder of the SCLC.

BBC remembers Lowery.

Mentioned in The Guardian.

Civil Rights Icon Dies at 98 – NBC News.

•As seen on NPR.

Essence Magazine Instagram Post.

The Shade Room Instagram Post.

Tyler Perry Remembers.

Jamie Foxx Commemorates.

Barack Obama Pays Respect.

OWN Network Tribute

Lowery was laid to rest on Saturday, April 4th which is the same day MLK was assassinated.

Joe Biden Acknowledges.

Official Statement from The Family of Reverend Doctor Joseph E. Lowery

Our entire family is humbled and blessed by the overwhelming outpouring of love and support that has come from around the globe. We thank you for loving our father, Dr. Joseph E. Lowery, and for your continuous prayers during this time.

In lieu of flowers, cards or food, donations may be made to The Joseph & Evelyn Lowery Institute for Justice & Human Rights. Dr. Lowery’s life was driven by a sense of obligation to our global community and desire to champion love over hate; inclusion over exclusion. The Lowery Institute was founded in 2002 to further Dr. Lowery’s legacy of promoting non-violent advocacy among future generations.

Donations can be sent to The Joseph & Evelyn Lowery Institute, P.O. Box 92801, Atlanta, GA 30314, or made on-line by clicking here.

Aligning with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s guidelines on COVID-19 prevention and social distancing, plans are underway for a private family service. A public memorial will be held in late summer or early fall.

Thank you,

The Lowery Family

National Civil Rights Museum

Culture Editor Tom Wilmer reports from the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tennessee

Faith Morris External Affairs Officer at the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tennessee. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

Faith Morris External Affairs Officer at the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tennessee. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

The Lorraine Motel where Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968 serves today as the powerful anchor of the National Civil Rights Museum in MemphisTennessee.

Cick here to listen to the KCBX/NPR podcast with Culture Editor, Tom Wilmer and Faith Morris, External Affairs Officer at the National Civil Rights Museum.

Lorraine Motel-Room 306 where Martin Luther King Jr was assassinated. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

Martin Luther King delivered his last speech at the Mason Temple in Memphis, Tennessee on March 3rd 1968. The next day King was assassinated while standing on the balcony of his room at the Lorraine Motel.

Twenty-three years later, the National Civil Rights Museum was unveiled on the site of the old Lorraine Motel.

Through powerful exhibits and interpretive displays the history and legacy of civil rights is showcased–from the arrival of the first slaves on the shores of America to lynchings, sit-ins, the Freedom Riders, Rosa Parks in Birmingham, Brown Vs. Board of Education, and the perpetuation of Jim Crow today.

 

Freedom Riders Greyhound bus firebombed by white supremacists in Alabama in 1961

Freedom Riders Greyhound bus firebombed by white supremacists in Alabama in 1961

Charred hulk of the firebombed Greyhound bus on display at the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tennessee. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

Charred hulk of the firebombed Greyhound bus on display at the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tennessee. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

The façade of the iconic Lorraine Motel was preserved chillingly intact complete with vintage autos parked out front, but on the inside of the motel rooms, past the curtains, is the massive museum.

Poignant displays include an intact burnt out Greyhound bus that was firebombed by white supremacists during Freedom Summer in 1961, and the original lunch counter from a powerful student sit-in that was captured on film in 1960.

 

School field trip to the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tennessee. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

School field trip to the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tennessee. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

The museum is located on Mulberry Street in the heart of the South Main Arts District in downtown Memphis, six blocks from the Mississippi River.

If you go plan on spending a minimum of two or three hours to experience the highlights, but with dozens of historic films playing continuously, you could easily spend an entire day at the museum.

http://www.civilrightsmuseum.org/

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Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer winner of the Lowell Thomas Award 2017, 2016, 2015, 2013

Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer winner of the Lowell Thomas Award 2017, 2016, 2015, 2013