Posts tagged with "Black Artists"

Cartooning While Black cartoon via Will Brierly for use by 360 Magazine

Cartooning While Black Gallery Exhibit

Black cartoonists from The New Yorker present their work at the Cartooning While Black Gallery Exhibit at ChaShaMa.

Chashama and Art To Ware present Cartooning While Black, a preview of the art from the upcoming One Idea Press title release, The Anti-Racism Activity Book. Art from the volume, written and illustrated by cartoonist and comedian Victor Varnado, will be shown alongside fellow black New Yorker cartoonists, Yasin OsmanAkeem S Roberts, and Jerald Lewis II. This exhibition is curated by Rebecca Mills.

LOCATION: ChaShaMa Gallery, 320 West 23rd Street, NY, NY

WHEN: Thursday, July 15, 2021, to Thursday, August 5th.

The Anti-Racism Activity Book is a social satire created in the style of a children’s puzzle and coloring book. The exhibit will feature crosswords, word finds, and other nostalgic activity book throwbacks, combined with original cartooning work from Varnado, all using humor to illustrate how dumb racism is.

“Traditionally, very few black cartoonists have appeared in the New Yorker, but recent efforts by the magazine and the cartoon editor Emma Allen have made an exhibit like this possible,” said Jason Chatfield, president of The National Cartoonists Society and New Yorker cartoonist.

“Yasin Osman, Akeem S Roberts, Jerald Lewis II, and Victor Varnado’s illustrative works shown together in the same exhibit will be the first time such a presentation has ever happened,” he added.

As a comedian, Victor Varnado has appeared on Late Night With Conan O’Brien and Jimmy Kimmel Live. His writing and cartooning work have been showcased in MAD magazineVICEMarvel Comics and Salon. Varnado was born legally blind and is albinistic. His New Yorker cartoon created in response to the national unrest following the murder of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police was one of the magazine’s most engaging pieces of content in 2020. Like Floyd, Victor also grew up in Minneapolis.

Shining artwork courtesy of Capitol Music Group and Motown Records for use by 360 Magazine

Fire in Little Africa

“SHINING” THE FIRST SINGLE AND VIDEO FROM FIRE IN LITTLE AFRICA IS OUT TODAY VIA MOTOWN RECORDS/BLACK FORUM IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE BOB DYLAN CENTER AND WOODY GUTHRIE CENTER

“Shining” is a celebratory song and video conveying the peak of black excellence that defined the Greenwood District 100 Years Ago. Watch the “Shining” music video here and listen to it here

Fire in Little Africa, a groundbreaking album of original material, written and recorded by a collective of Oklahoma hip hop artists to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Tulsa Race Massacre releases “Shining” today along with a striking visual. It is the first single from the album that will be released on May 28 by Motown Records/Black Forum in partnership with Tulsa’s Bob Dylan Center and Woody Guthrie Center. Watch, post and share the music video here.

“Shining” was produced by Executive Producer Dr. View and features Tulsa area artists Steph Simon, Dialtone, Ayilla and Jerica Wortham. The video was produced and directed by Boomintree Films with Assistant Director avitiuh.

Giving context to the video, Dr. View shares,”’Shining’ is a trip back in time to Tulsa in 1920, just before Black Wall Street was attacked, bombed and burned to the ground in the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre. The video conveys the peak of Black Excellence that defined the Greenwood district 100 years ago and ties it to the Fire in Little Africa movement that is showing the world how Tulsa still shines today.” He continues, “We know that the story of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre is one filled with pain, darkness and trauma for Black people, but the story of Tulsa in 2021 is about the greatness that rose from the ashes. “Shining” humanizes the victims of the Tulsa Race Massacre, taking them out of the history books and showing them on a night on the town living life joyfully. That is what Greenwood was, is, and will always be about.”

ABOUT FIRE IN LITTLE AFRICA

The 21-track collection gets to the truth of what happened on May 31 and June 1, 1921 when a white mob descended on the streets of Greenwood, then a prosperous Tulsa neighborhood known as Black Wall Street, and burned down the business district, destroying roughly 1,500 homes, killing hundreds, and leaving thousands of Black Tulsans homeless. For years, this historic, albeit dire, chapter was left out of classrooms and textbooks as the city attempted to erase this part of its past. The artists heard on Fire in Little Africa get to the truth through urgent songs, recalling stories told and stories lived in hope to usher in a new era for Tulsa as they help the community process this generational trauma through music.

Motown Records Chairman & CEO Ethiopia Habtemariam said, “Fire in Little Africa is a powerful and timely project that will reward listeners with a sense of discovery. Not only does it examine a largely overlooked chapter in our history, the album also pulls the curtain back on the vibrant hip hop scene that has been Oklahoma’s best-kept secret. Like the citizens who created Black Wall Street, the artists of Fire in Little Africa are driven by creativity, love, and an uplifting, ego-free sense of community. The project aligns perfectly with Black Forum’s commitment to introducing the next generation of game changers.”

Stevie “Dr. View” Johnson, PhD, Manager, Education & Diversity Outreach at the Woody Guthrie Center | Bob Dylan Center and the album’s executive producer added, “Fire in Little Africa has evolved into a communal hip hop movement and we’re excited that we get to share the flavor, history and legacy of Black Wall Street with the world, in collaboration with the amazing leadership of the Motown/Black Forum family. We’re grateful for Ethiopia’s foresight in providing us an opportunity to share our important stories with the world. There are Black Wall Streets across the diaspora and we unequivocally know that Fire in Little Africa will inspire many people. In the words of Steph Simon, everything is us.”  

In this feature, Rolling Stones noted, Fire in Little Africa is poised to teach the world about that long-suppressed history, from locals who grew up in a community that still lives with the aftermath of the massacre. Just as important, the artists involved in the project also hope it serves as a launching-pad moment for Tulsa’s hip-hop scene, which has long flown under the national radar

The album was recorded in Greenwood over a five-day period in March 2020. Studios were set up at the Greenwood Cultural Center and other locations, including the former home of 1921 massacre mastermind/KKK leader Tate Brady. The house is now owned by former NFL first-round draft pick and Tulsa native Felix Jones. The Tulsa World was on hand to speak with the artists involved in the historic sessions. Read the article here and check out the accompanying video here

“Fireside with Dr. View” is a weekly podcast featuring “Dr. View” in conversation with thought leaders in activism, academia and culture, centered on the movement behind the Fire in Little Africa music. Listen to “Fireside with Dr. View” here. Hosts Ali Shaw and Doc Free sit down with Fire in Little Africa artists, Tulsa community leaders and national voices for conversations on music and culture in the “Fire in Little Africa” podcast, which can be found here

Located in the Tulsa Arts District, the Woody Guthrie Center opened in 2013. The Bob Dylan Center is expected to open on the same block within the next year. Both are projects of the George Kaiser Family Foundation, the primary funder for Fire in Little Africa. The album is chronicled in a documentary film, which will be released later this year.

Fire in Little Africa marks the first new material released by Black Forum since the label’s relaunch earlier this year. Black Forum originally debuted in 1970 with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s Why I Oppose The War In Vietnam, which won a Grammy Award for Best Spoken Word Album. The label reissued Dr. King’s influential speech earlier this year.

Gabrielle Archuleta illustrates Black History Month for 360 MAGAZINE

Black History Month

By Hannah DiPilato

February is Black History Month and 360 Magazine would like to recognize some historic people of color who have become a positive influence on society. In 2020, the Black Lives Matter movement skyrocketed and brought attention to the diversity that still exists within our community. Although society has come a long way from the early 1900s when segregation ran rampant, the movement for equality has a long way to go. From inventors to musicians, there are a number of successful people we would like to acknowledge in honor of Black History Month.

Martin Luther King Jr.
Arguably one of the most important leaders in the Civil Rights Movement, Dr. King spent his time preaching for equality in a peaceful way. He will always be remembered for his famous “I Have a Dream” speech and his ability to lead others in this historical movement. Dr. King is one of the most influential

Joseph E. Lowery
Joseph E. Lowery is the grandfather of 360 Magazine’s President Vaughn Lowery and founded the Southern Christian Leadership Conference alongside Dr. King. Throughout his life, Lowery served as vice president, chairman of the board and president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference as well as a leader in the Civil Rights Movement.

George Washington Carver
Many people are familiar with George Washington Carver for his inventive skills. He made over 300 products from peanuts and as an agricultural scientist promoted methods to prevent soil depletion.

Garrett Morgan
Garrett Augustus Morgan, Sr. is to thank for the invention of traffic lights as well as gas masks. Every time you stop at a red light, take a moment to think of Morgan for this essential technology.

Barack Obama
As the first black president of the United States, Barack Obama made an impact as the 44th president and showed young people of color they have representation in politics. He continues to use his voice to connect with the American people.

Kamala Harris
Keeping in the theme of politics, Vice President Kamala Harris is the first woman vice president, the first African American vice president and the first Asian American vice president. She’s giving young women of color everywhere a sense of representation.

Madam C.J. Walker
As the first recorded female self-made millionaire in America, Madam C.J. Walker was an influential entrepreneur, philanthropist and activist of her time.

Frederick McKinley Jones
Frederick McKinley Jones was the co-founder of Thermo King and he brought incredible improvement to long-haul transportation of perishable goods. Jones also won the National Medal of Technology.

Stevie Wonder
Stevland Hardaway Morris, better known as Stevie Wonder, is a musical prodigy that became blind after birth and learned to play the harmonica, piano and drums by age nine. He is now a notable singer, songwriter, musician and record producer.

Lonnie Johnson
Lonnie Johnson is known for his success as an aerospace engineer. He has worked on the U.S. Air Force term of service and has also worked at NASA for twelve years including in the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Patricia Bath
As an ophthalmologist, Patricia Bath was an early innovator of laser cataract surgery. She was also the first woman, African American physician to receive a patent for a medical invention.

Oprah Winfrey
One TV personality almost everyone is familiar with is Oprah. Known for her television show The Oprah Winfrey Show, she has made waves in the world of entertainment. She is also known for co-producing a Broadway musical version of The Color Purple, establishing O, The Oprah Magazine, the Oprah Winfrey Network (OWN) as well as creating Oprah.com.

Harriet Tubman
After being born into slavery, Harriet Tubman was a conductor of the Underground Railroad and helped many enslaved men and women escape. She led many people to freedom with her bravery and connection with antislavery activists.

Rosa Parks
Rosa Parks gained her notoriety as an activist in the Civil Rights Movement and is known for starting the Montgomery bus boycott after refusing to give up her seat to a white passenger. She has been called “the first lady of civil rights” and “the mother of the freedom movement” by the United States Congress.

John Lewis
John Lewis was chairman Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) as well as one of the “Big Six” leaders who organized the 1963 March on Washington. He was an essential part of the Civil Rights Movement and ending legalized racial segregation.

Alexander Miles
If you’ve ever ridden in an elevator, you can thank Alexander Miles for the automatic opening doors; he was awarded the patent for this invention in 1887. Mills was riding in an elevator with his daughter and he deemed an elevator shaft door left open could be dangerous.

Mary Kenner
Mary Kenner was an inventor famous for her development of the sanitary belt, the precursor to the self-adhesive maxi pad. However, due to racial discrimination, the idea wasn’t adopted for thirty years. She has five patents for various household items.

Maya Angelou
Known for her many famous pieces of writing, Maya Angelou was a poet, memoirist and civil rights activist. Over fifty years, she wrote a number of autobiographies, essays, poems, plays, movies and television shows. She also received over 50 honorary degrees as well as awards for her writing.

LeBron James
Along with being considered one of the greatest NBA players of all time, LeBron James also started the LeBron James Family Foundation to help create generational change for the children and families of LeBron’s hometown in Akron, Ohio.

Malcolm X
As a popular spokesperson at the time of the Civil Rights Movement, Malcolm X encouraged Black Americans to protect themselves against racism. He preached a much different lesson than Martin Luther King Jr. who preached nonviolence.

Thurgood Marshall
Thurgood Marshall was the Supreme Court’s first African American justice as well as a prominent civil rights activist. He served on the court for 24 years and helped with influential rulings at the time of the Civil Rights Movement such as the case of Brown v. Board of Education.

Jackie Robinson
Jackie Robinson was the first African American to play in Major League Baseball in the United States during the 20th century. He broke the color barrier of the MLB when he played for the National League Brooklyn Dodgers as second baseman with the jersey number 42.

Kaelen Felix illustrates Chadwick Boseman of Black Panther for 360 magazine article

Chadwick Boseman

Although Chadwick Boseman passed earlier this year, his 44th birthday would be coming up on November 29. To commemorate Boseman, National Today has created Chadwick Boseman Day in his honor.

Boseman accomplished many things over his 44 years of life and has inspired people everywhere. He always encompassed black excellence and this shines through in each role he portrayed throughout his career.

As T’CHalla in Black Panther, Boseman gave young people of color a hero to look up to in the Marvel universe. This was a monumental role as the first black superhero for Marvel. He also represented the first African American Supreme Court Justice in the movie Marshall. In the famous film 42, Boseman took on the lead as Jackie Robinson, the first black MLB player. These roles only highlight Boseman’s wildly successful career. He took on powerful roles that gave representation to the African American community and will be remembered for these roles and many others.

Chadwick Boseman passed after a four year battle with colon cancer on Friday, August 28, 2020. In 2016, Boseman was diagnosed with stage three cancer which had progressed to stage four. Boseman was able to pass at home surrounded by family.

Boseman’s passing, whose struggle with cancer was not often in the public eye, came as a shock to a majority. Even Sarah Halley Finn, who casted Boseman for the role of King T’Challa in “Black Panther” did not know he was battling cancer.
According to Vulture, “Finn had no idea the actor had been diagnosed with stage three cancer when cameras rolled on Black Panther in 2017.”

Chadwick Boseman not only was an actor, but a pillar in the black community often playing roles of historical black men, such as Jackie Robinison in “42”. His latest role as King T’Challa in “Black Panther” and the Avengers series was a historical role itself.

The black community had never seen a super hero represent them before and Chadwick Boseman’s adaptation of T’Challa provided many young boys and girls a super hero that looked just like them.

Boseman’s humble spirit was always felt throughout Hollywood. CNN entertainment shared the story of Boseman praising fellow actor, Denzel Washington, for his charity that allowed Boseman to pursue acting.

From pulled quotes from Boseman’s speech at the American Film Institute’s Lifetime Achievement Award in 2019, the story of how Washington paid for Boseman’s tuition at the British American Drama Academy’s Midsummer program after Boseman was accepted but could not attend because he could not afford it. Washington not only helped pay for this program, but helped pay for Boseman to attend Howard University.

 Boseman recounted how the sponsorship was “an offering from a sage and a king is more than silver and gold. It is a seed of hope, a bud of faith.”

“There is no Black Panther without Denzel Washington,” Boseman said. “And not just because of me, but my whole cast — that generation — stands on your shoulders.”

Boseman’s role as T’Challa was much more than that, a role. This role became a national symbol of black power and strength. The “Wakanda Forever” gesture of arms crossed over the chest, became a symbol itself of perseverance and pride. 

CBS New York spoke to people in New York about how Blank Panther made them feel. “Thirteen-year-old Brehima Gueye says watching Boseman in the 2018 Marvel film “Black Panther” gave him purpose and a sense of pride.”

According to CBS, “Family members say Boseman was a true fighter who continued to work while undergoing surgeries and chemotherapy for colon cancer that progressed to stage four.” 

On August 29, 2020 fans in Los Angeles attended a vigil at Leimert Park where they remembered the impact Boseman had within the black community. The Los Angeles Times stated, “Boseman’s death in the midst of so much racial tension in the country serves as reminder to keep fighting for racial justice like he did.”

Fans of the franchise worry about how it will continue on without Boseman but are hopeful that Wakanda and King T’Challa’s legacy will live on.

Boseman’s role in not only Hollywood, but within the black community and as a symbol of black strength will not be forgotten. While his role for the Avengers franchise brought monetary achievements, it brought much more than that. It brought a symbol of power, endurance and hope that will forever be immortalized on screen.

Nicole Salazar Illustration of Jackie Ormes

Google Doodle Celebrates Jackie Ormes

By Catherine Martin

Today, Google Doodle honors Jackie Ormes — the first, and only, Black female newspaper cartoonist during the 1940s. An interactive comic strip slideshow of Ormes replaces the traditional Google logo, with each slide representing stages of her life.

Google chose her due to her incredible activism work, shown through her cartoons, and the profound and positive impact she had for Black women everywhere.

While flipping through the slideshow, you learn Jackie Ormes was born August 1, 1911 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania — where she taught herself to draw at an early age. Ormes progresses into a talented cartoonist that eventually challenges derogatory portrayals of Black female characters through her satirical cartoons.

Patty-Jo ‘n’ Ginger

On September 1, 1945 Ormes released her single-panel cartoon, “Patty-Jo ‘n’ Ginger,” that introduced the groundbreaking Ginger and her 6-year-old sister Patty-Jo. In addition, this single-panel cartoon ran in the Pittsburgh Courier, an African-American newspaper.

Ginger is a fashion-forward pin-up girl and Patty-Jo is a precocious child. The goal of this imagery is to challenge the racist stereotypes that Black women and girls are uneducated and subservient. Following its success, Ormes produced the first positive African-American doll made in the U.S., the “Patty-Jo” doll; therefore, furthering positive depictions of Black women and girls.

Jackie Ormes’ Notable Work and Successes

Previously, Ormes’ published her first comic strip through the Pittsburgh Courier,Torchy Brown in Dixie to Harlem” in 1937. This cartoon reflected the struggles of escaping racism by migrating from the South to the North.

Following her work throughout the years, Ormes continued to challenge relevant issues. Such as, “romantic heartbreak, environmental justice, and gender inequality,” Google says. Regardless of the challenges these characters face, they all preserved as confident, intelligent and independent women.

Ormes retired in 1956, but that did not stop her dedication for activism and stripping away negative labels that too often accompanied Black women and girls. Due to her achievements, the National Association of Black Journalists’ Hall of Fame inducted her in 2014, followed by the Will Eisner Comic Industry Hall of Fame in 2018.

For information regarding Ormes’ life and achievements, visit the Jackie Ormes website HERE.

Sing Illustration by Mina Tocalini

Virtual Music Festival

Cincinnati Music Festival presented by P&G (CMF) won’t skip a beat in 2020. Through a marathon of new and previous music content, consumer engagement opportunities and digital presence, CMF is creating the #FEELSLIKECMF Virtual Weekend Experience, July 23-25. The innovative free event, to be available on cincymusicfestival.com, will focus on celebration, community and local impact and is also supported by AARP.   

“Music provides hope, comfort and determination during uncertain times,” said Joe Santangelo, producer of CMF. “Leading up to and during #FEELSLIKECMF Weekend, we will strategically work to uplift our neighbors, support local black artists and musicians and drive commerce to local Black owned businesses and restaurants. This event promises to grow awareness of regional organizations that support the African American community, and share the positivity and history of our Cincinnati Music Festival presented by P&G.” #FEELSLIKECMF.

Schedule of Events

THURSDAY, JULY 23  

Triiibe recorded live at Corporate  

Aprina Johnson recorded live at Black Coffee 

 DJ Vader recorded live at Revel DJ Ellery    

Special appearance: The State of Black Culture featuring Rev. Al Sharpton from the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center

FRIDAY, JULY 24 

Lauren Eylise recorded live at Paul Brown Stadium 

Kathy Wade & Joe Santangelo 

DJ Baby Rome recorded live at Paul Brown Stadium 

Regina Belle   

Special attraction: Cincinnati Music Festival Outdoor Art Museum at Washington Park    

SATURDAY, JULY 25

DJ DNICE LIVE from Club Quarantine Additional weekend entertainment will include shout-outs from The O’Jays’ Eddie Levert, Biz Markie and more. 

The Cincinnati Music festival presented by P&G returns to Cincinnati’s Paul Brown Stadium, July 22-24, 2021. The lineup features multi-talented singer-songwriter Janet Jackson and will also include an expanded and exciting Thursday lineup at the Andrew J. Brady ICON Music Center at The Banks. Tickets are on sale at CincyMusicFestival.com

Cincinnati Music Festival: Largest Tourism Weekend of the Year in Cincinnati A recent study conducted by the UC Economics Center and commissioned by the Cincinnati USA Convention & Visitors Bureau shows the Cincinnati Music Festival presented by P&G provides a $107.5 million economic impact to the region, making it the largest annual driver of tourism in the tristate. 

Cincinnati Music Festival began in 1962 and is one of the largest music festivals in the United States attracting over 90,000+ people from around the country with its roster of leading R&B, jazz, soul and hip-hop artists creating an economic impact of $107 million for Cincinnati. CMF is held at Paul Brown Stadium in partnership with the Cincinnati Bengals. Procter & Gamble is the presenting sponsor for the Cincinnati Music Festival. 

Follow Cincinnati Music Festival: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

Mali Music Releases New Tracks

RCA Inspiration has partnered with acclaimed three-time GRAMMY® nominated artist, songwriter, and producer Mali Music and will be releasing new music in 2020 starting with the single “Let Go.” In partnership with RCA Inspiration and Mali’s imprint, K Approved Enterprises, “Let Go” is available today on all digital music providers.

Mali Music also released a new lyric visual for “Let Go” via his YouTube channel. Written by Mali Music and produced by David “D1” Grant, Jr., “Let Go” showcases the distinctive blend of contemporary soulful R&B, hip-hop and inspirational conscious lyricism that have garnered Mali critical and widespread acclaim as one of the music industry’s most compelling creators, with Mali speaking on common temptations we face in life and being strong in spirit facing God. Reaching fans across R&B, hip-hop, gospel, and urban contemporary genres, Mali Music has garnered recognition from the GRAMMYs® with nominations in the categories of Traditional R&B Performance for his song “Still,” Urban Contemporary Album for his hit album Mali Is…, and Gospel Performance/Song for “I Believe”.

Delivering powerful performances on numerous stages from the BET Awards to American Idol, Mali Music’s musical versatility has also garnered a Dove Award win for the song “Tell the World” (with Lecrae) and an NAACP Image Award nomination for the song “Gonna Be Alright”. Ron Hill, RCAI’s VP of Artist Development says, “Mali is one of the most talented and creative artists of this era. I’m excited to partner with him and the K Approved Enterprises’ team to usher in the next phase of his career”.

About the venture with RCAI and his new music, Mali says, “The song “Let Go,” along with the opportunity to have partners who believe in me and understand my vision, is beyond a dream come true. This feels like my purpose is being fulfilled. Not only am I excited about what’s coming down the pipeline for me, I’m also proud of how it’s being prepared, and confident in the ability of each individual connected to my success”.

Stream and download “Let Go” by Mali Music:
Spotify
Apple Music
Tidal

To connect with Mali Music, please visit:
Facebook: malimusicnote
Instagram: @malimusic
Twitter: @malimusic

Kanye West Statue Unveiled at Sneakertopia

By Chris Gates x Sam Berman
David Weeks NYC has been a a transcending designer and star in the art world. Recently, he unveiled his latest creation: a 5-foot-tall of Kanye West, showcasing his 4 sides of emotions.
Mr. weeks is the youngest innovative style award recipient and the leader
of a new wave of art. With his new series “Modern day Mount Rushmore”, the artist seeks to bring awareness to cultural legends in the black community who’ve helped shift the culture and provide a path for wealth, success and advocacy. The first in his series is a massive statue of his favorite artist Kanye West. The name of statue is perfect for its four-faced appearance: N.S.E.West.
The statue is now on display at Sneakertopiaa pop-up exhibit and store at HHLA. Inside, you see the restricted sneaker display and will be surrounded by a widespread variety of pricey kicks and very big street art pieces.

Average price to get a view is $20 a person, and you can grab your tickets here. The pop up shoe museum will be on full display with David Weeks NYC’s N.S.E.WEST masterpiece in Los Angeles thru Mar 1st, then will go on to hit other places around the globe.