Posts tagged with "BHM"

BLM graphic via Mina Tocalini for us by 360 MAGAZINE

HBCU Cultural Heritage Stewardship

Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) have been an integral part of our educational system in the United States. Originally being founded in the 1830s, HBCUs cultivate an environment that was long sought after to ensure educational equality. This nations HBCUs are full of the rich history of African American activism, and their campuses also stand as pioneering pieces of landscaping and architecture.

This is precisely why on February 28, the National Trust’s African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund declared they would be awarding over $650,000 in grant awards to five HBCUs across the country in part with their HBCU Cultural Heritage Stewardship Initiative.

While each HBCU embodies symbolisms of African American brilliance and triumph, the programming guarantees that each campus will collect resources to protect and sustain the historical campuses. These grants aim to preserve and revitalize landmark pieces that grace each HBCU, and to promote leadership on each respective campus.

Two differing forms of grants entail the initiative; the first being a $150,000 grant aiming to expand campus-wide cultural stewardship plans, and the second as a $60,000 developmental grant that will conserve a specific milestone building on or associated with an HBCU campus.

Each grant has the intention to enhance plans to improve and sustain varying architectural campus facilities. Launched through the National Trust’s Action Fund in 2020, the program allies with The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, National Endowment for Humanities, Ford Foundation, The JPB Foundation, J.M. Kaplan Fund and The Executive Leadership Council.

The initiative set in place today entails $3.2 million set forth to the HBCUs grants, seeking influence from the Trust’s extensive years of practice to generate proposals of refurbishment and maintenance at each college or university. The National Trust’s Action Fund links with 13 HBCUs and has financed 6 campus and 7 singular-developing projects modern day.

Brent Leggs, Senior Vice President and Executive Director of the African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund at the National Trust spoke on the impact that these grants would permit, stating, “These grants are significant in light of the recent threat to HBCU campuses. Preservation is the strategic counterpoint to centuries of erasure, and it underscores the critical nature of the African American contribution to our nation.

“Without the doctors, lawyers, engineers and other professionals HCBUs have produced, the American story would not be the same.  The Action Fund’s work to preserve the legacies of intellect, activism, and enlightenment on these campuses will inspire future generations of all Americans to believe that, despite the challenge, they too can overcome.”

The following HBCU recipients include:

  • Florida A&M University (Tallahassee, Florida) aiming to produce stewardship projects across their 422-acre campus (1887)
  • Johnson C. Smith University (Charlotte, North Carolina) to create a conservation strategy for its Historic Quad (1867)
  • Rust College (Holly Springs, Mississippi) aiming to produce stewardship projects across their campus (1866)
  • Shaw University (Raleigh, North Carolina) aiming to produce stewardship projects across their 65-acre campus (1865); and
  • Voorhees College (Denmark, South Carolina) aiming to produce stewardship projects across their 380-acre campus (1897).

Shaw University President Dr. Paulette Dillard spoke on their excitement to be apart of the Trust’s recipients this year, stating, “The Shaw University community expresses its sincerest appreciation to the National Trust for Historic Preservation for awarding the campus a $150,000 planning grant to assist our efforts in preserving African American history.

“From educating the former enslaved to graduating some of the first African American doctors to helping ignite the civil rights movement, the legacy of Shaw University is woven into the fabric of American history. Preserving the treasures of our historic buildings extends the powerful narrative that describes the indelible contributions of this university.”

The planning grant, too, entails that all HBCU beneficiaries gain access to a paid student professional growing opportunity; one student from each individual campus will work with a team of architects, engineers and consultants to grow their campus. This funding comes from the Initiative and grows the field of African American preservationists.

Florida A&M President Dr. Larry Robinson spoke on the behalf of their campus, stating, “Florida A&M University is the third oldest campus in the State University System of Florida. We appreciate the support of the National Trust for Historic Preservation to assist the University in furthering preservation of landmark buildings on our campus.

The planning grant will allow the faculty, staff, and students across the disciplines of architecture, engineering and the humanities to collaborate in ways that highlight the national impact of Johnathan C. Gibbs, Lucy Moten and Andrew Carnegie and the buildings named in their honor. They also will help preserve the history of the Civil Rights Movement on our campus where iconic figures like Booker T. Washington, Mary McLeod Bethune, Marian Anderson and others changed American history.”

BLACK IN COLOR

Provides a Digital Space for Black Artists

Can’t get enough of Black History? 

Check out BLACK IN COLOR, a new online platform that recognizes and celebrates contemporary Black Artists and their works!

Too often artists are not appreciated until they are gone, and BLACK IN COLOR is building a community of Black Artists to help talented creatives increase their visibility and raise awareness around their works, while helping them monetize and build their brands.

Launched in January 2022 by entrepreneurs Lola Wood and Candice Tasker, Black In Color is a collective of Black artists who want to share and showcase their works with the world. 

Through online exhibitions, featured artists highlights and curated walk throughs, Black In Color provides a meaningful access point for the public to view and discover various works of art by Black artists, and in doing so, Black In Color helps Black artists connect with a global network of art collectors and enthusiasts!

About Black In Color:

Black In Color (BIC) is an organization founded by Candice Tasker and Lola Wood created to provide a platform for Black artists and their works. BIC provides a space that identifies and amplifies artists of color so they too can be seen, appreciated, experienced, and valued. BIC highlights remarkable talent with artistic works containing central themes of identity, activism, and cultural influence, working to create a group of art world professionals who empower one another to achieve mutual success, while bringing awareness to important issues that impact the community. To date, BIC has collaborated with various artists, including Maria-Lana Queen, Janet Pickett Taylor, and Robin Holder, to name a few, and the list is only getting longer.

BLM illustration for use by 360 MAGAZINE

ReserveBar’s Black Brands

ReserveBar’s Spirited Change Initiative

Black-Owned Brands

LS Cream Liqueur ($36): LS Cream Liqueur is an award-winning cordial inspired by cremas, an ancestral recipe native to Haiti with notes of coconut, vanilla, nutmeg, and cinnamon mixed with a blend of fresh cream and neutral grain spirits. Since it was impossible to find cremas in stores, husband and wife Myriam Jean-Baptiste and Stevens Charles decided to launch their own cream liqueur, inspired by Stevens’ late grandmother’s handwritten cremas recipe which she left behind and that the family had cherished for decades. 

Sorel Liqueur ($40): Born of the spice trade, versions of sorrel date back to the 1600s, when hibiscus flowers were first imported to the new world from West Africa. Valued for its medicinal properties, Jackie Summer’s grandparents carried this culinary tradition with them when they emigrated from Barbados to Harlem, NY in the 1920s. In 2012, Jack left a 25-year career as a corporate executive to launch his micro-distillery, Jack from Brooklyn. When Jack received his distilled spirits permit (DSP), he was the only Black person with a license to make liquor in America, and the first to hold this license post-prohibition. 

Brough Brothers Bourbon Whiskey ($29): Brough Brothers Distillery is Kentucky’s first African American owned distillery. Kentucky-born co-founders and brothers Victor, Bryson, and Christian Yarbrough started from humble beginnings in Louisville, where they learned early about hard work and dedication. They took those lessons, traveled the globe, and brought their newfound knowledge of the spirits industry back to Kentucky, where the vision for Brough Brothers was born. Through Brough Brothers, the Yarbrough’s plan to make a positive and lasting impact through job creation and economic development within their local and global communities. 

Uncle Nearest 1856 Premium Aged Whiskey ($59): In 2017, Uncle Nearest 1856 Premium Aged Whiskey launched in the United States. Honoring the first African American master distiller, this premium whiskey swiftly rolled out throughout the U.S. and abroad, and can now be found in 50 States, 10 Countries, and shipped to over 148 countries in the world. Uncle Nearest is now the Fastest-Growing Independent American Whiskey Brand in U.S. History.

Loft & Bear Artisanal Vodka ($30): Loft & Bear is the brainchild of Paul Ryan Elliott, an east coast native. Paul founded Loft & Bear in 2014 and continues to work toward fulfilling long-term sustainable success, encouraged by the opportunity to bring inclusivity and diversity to the beverage alcohol industry. Loft & Bear’s commitment to social awareness is seen in its Distill.Drink.Donate program in which 5% of Loft & Bear profits are donated to PATH, a charity aimed at ending homelessness and providing support for distressed families, veterans affairs, and human services throughout Southern California. 

Instrument illustration by Ivory Rowen for 360 Magazine

NBOTB: A Salute to the Battle

Webber Marketing (WM), creators of the National Battle of the Bands (NBOTB), releases a new documentary film titled: National Battle of the Bands: A Salute to the Battle. The film is presented by Pepsi Zero Sugar and will air throughout February in honor of Black History Month.

The new film captures the essence and showcases the spirit of the HBCU band battle, highlighting both the field and stand performances, and features Bethune Cookman University, Marching Wildcats; Langston University, “Marching Pride” Band; North Carolina A&T State University, The Blue and Gold Marching Machine; Norfolk State University, The Spartan “Legion” Marching Band; Southern University, Human Jukebox; Jackson State University, The Sonic Boom of the South; Talladega College, Great Tornado Band, and Tennessee State University, Aristocrat of Bands.

“A Salute to the Battle is a documentary film that brings the action, energy and pageantry of the ‘Battle’ performance to viewers, in an up close and personal perspective, right into comfort of their homes where they can experience the action with their friends and family,” says Derek Webber, Executive Producer & CEO of Webber Marketing. “There is so much pride and prestige that accompanies the HBCU band experience and the long legacy of trailblazers who paved the way for HBCU bands to exist. We are honored to play a part in continuing the celebration and sharing of their stories with the masses through our films and events.”

The eight Historical Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) marching bands appearing in the film participated in the 2021 NBOTB in Houston, Texas. The goal of the documentary is to continue amplifying the importance and impact of the National Battle of the Bands event, the participating bands, and its members and the HBCU community at large.

“At Pepsi, we’ve committed to supporting HBCUs year-round and I’m honored to help shine a light on these talented marching bands with this new documentary release,” said Chauncey Hamlett, VP and CMO of PepsiCo Beverages North America (South Division). “These bands are part of the driving force in the celebrated HBCU culture, bringing the energy, hype, and history to every game.”

The historical significance of HBCU bands is sown into the fabric of society. HBCU marching bands continue to be front and center at some of the biggest moments in history; filling the air with their unified sound while marching proudly and dancing unapologetically in celebration of their ancestors who paved the way for their rhythm to be on display for all to see, hear and feel.

For more information about the NBOTB and its “A Salute to the Battle” documentary film, click HERE and stay updated on social media on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

About the National Battle of the Bands

The event’s mission is to enhance the exposure of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and their marching bands, the roles they play in educating aspiring musicians and developing our future leaders. Event organizers have generated more than $700,000 in scholarships for the participating colleges and universities.

Charles Young via Antonio Tobias Mendez for use by 360 Magazine

Col. Charles Young

By: Charles Blatcher III

One hundred years, one month, and nine days to the date of Colonel Charles Young‘s death in Nigeria on January 8, 1922, February 17, 2022 will mark the day that the United States Army will bestow the rank of Brigadier General of the United States Army on Colonel Charles Young. Also, this promotion serves as an affirmation that perseverance and dedication to a goal have been rewarded. This honor to Brigadier General Charles Young is the result of a 41-year advocacy by the Coalition of Black Veterans headquarters in Oakland, California, and a promise I made to retired Sergeant Samuel Waller.

The advocacy began in 1977 when I met and became friends with retired Sergeant Samuel Waller, the last surviving veteran of the Spanish American War in California. Sergeant Waller had served with then Captain Charles Young in the Philippine Islands (1901) as a member of the 24th Infantry Regiment. Young was the Commanding Officer of the Ninth Calvalry Regiment in the country. According to Waller, Young was the best Officer in the United States Army. He said that Black troops loved and respected Young and would follow him to hell and back. Waller was adamant when he added that the only reason Charles Young was not a General was based upon his color. Sergeant Waller planted a seed that day. As I began learning about Colonel Young, I had to concur with Sergeant Waller that there was only one reason as W.E.B. DuBois said, “There was no place for a Black General in the United States Army.”

In 1978 while consulting with Sergeant Waller regarding the “March for Recognition” Sam made a request: to not let them [Black soldiers] be written out of history. As a young Black man and a veteran, I promised to do my best to honor his request. My promise has been kept with Colonel Charles Young’s promotion to Brigadier General. My sincere thanks to the organizations, associations, and many individuals who have contributed to this milestone.

Young’s promotion is a great day for many people including his descendants as well as to the State of Kentucky. Any day that a nation can face its past mistakes and put forth the efforts to correct those mistakes is a Great Day. It is a sign of growth and hope. Growth in that we have taken steps to mature beyond the foolishness of not understanding that the strength of our Nation resides in our unity of purpose and Hope that we continue to do the necessary work to preserve our Democratic Republic. However, this is not the end of the advocacy for Brigadier General Charles Young.

We have submitted a request for the Department of Interior to consider annexing the General’s birth cabin which is in May’s Lick, Kentucky, into the National Park Service. We are looking at the tourism possibilities of getting the highway between May’s Lick and Wilberforce, Ohio designated the “Brigadier General Charles Young Corridor.” The designation covers the route from his birthplace to his residence at the time of his death. 

In addition to making Young’s birthplace part of the National Park Service, we are leading an effort to erect a bronze statue of Brigadier General Charles Young on horseback in Washington, D.C. This statue will memorialize the General’s 497-mile walk/horseback ride from Wilberforce, Ohio to Washington D.C. in 1917. The trip was to prove his fitness to return to active duty after forced into medical retirement. The statue could welcome visitors to the National African American Museum of History and Culture. Our military involvements are the cornerstone of our claim for Civil Rights. Currently, there are bronze maquettes on public display in the Kentucky Center for African American Heritage, in Louisville, and the Buffalo Soldiers National Museum in Houston. We have called upon Lonnie Bunch, the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institute, for guidance.

The United States Army is in the process of renaming Army bases that currently honor Confederate generals. Army tradition dictates that the rank of General is the qualification for being considered for a base name. Naming a base after a Colonel would represent a break in that tradition. We submitted Colonel Young’s name anyway on the merits of his history. In February 2020, Governor Andy Beshear granted Young a state promotion of honorary Brigadier General in the Kentucky National Guard. However, this honorary promotion was limited to the State. Governor Beshear joined us in writing to President Joe Biden to federalize the State promotion that would qualify Young to be considered a candidate for a base to bear his name. Now, this recent Federal promotion may have a significant impact on our request. 

The Coalition is optimistic that along with Young, we have sent recommendations for four other Generals to be considered: Brigadier General Benjamin O. Davis, Sr., the first Black General in the Regular Armed Forces; General Roscoe Robinson, Jr., the first Black 4 Star General in American History; Brigadier General Hazel W. Johnson, the first Black Woman General in American History; and Major General Charles C. Rogers, the only Black General recipient of the Medal of Honor. The Commission’s decision will be released in October.

Coalition members are in talks regarding an event to mark Young’s promotion. More than likely, the event will be planned for the Spring or Summer in Kentucky or Washington, D.C. It would be appropriate to host a ceremony in Section C of Arlington National Cemetery. The Arlington visit would allow us to have a site visit of the grounds at the National African American Museum of History and Culture. The public will be welcome to join the “Salute”. I end with a personal “Salute” to all of you who contributed toward the promotion. I “Salute” the late Sergeant Samuel Waller, United States Army for giving purpose to my life. Ready & Forward!

BLM illustration for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Black History Month Gift Guide

As Black History Month (BHM) commences, we aim to honor the history and celebrate the successes of Black/African American people. This February, 360 has assembled a list of impeccable products that strive to honor the rich past, present and future of BHM.

Fabletics t-shirt collection

In partnership with Melissa Koby and Rob Lewis, Fabletics announced the launch of their limited edition ‘BHM Tees’ series. Both artists, Koby and Lewis, are devoted to cultivating discussion surrounding Black representation, which is the exact goal for the BHM collaboration.

Including a series of four tees, Fabletics releases the ‘Kindred,’ ‘Harmony,’ ‘Africobra’ and ‘Festac 77,’ that have individual, unique artworks that continue conversation of harmony amongst insufficiently represented groups. Fabletics has promised to donate $50k in support of Community Spring and Imagine Black Futures, organizations that are committed to uplifting and providing power to the Black community.

This unrepeated ‘BHM’ tee collection showcases the timeless Fabletics ‘Go-To’ design showcasing a comfortable, gender-neutral fit available in sizing XS-XXL. The tees can be purchased for $39.95 (VIP price) on fabletics.com and in retail stores, beginning February 1.

BHM Fabletics tees via Carli Bendetti for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Lids historically Black institution partnership collection

In collaboration with The Negro Leagues Museum, Black Fives and Harlem Globetrotters, Lids has produced a new apparel and accessories series that will pay tribute to the three historic Black sports establishments, They Gave Us Game.

The compilation will be sold year-round, showcasing goods that reference vintage pieces worn by iconic African American players throughout the years. Constructed with an innovative, modern touch, the collection still has reminiscent underlines from each property. A piece of all earnings from the collection will be donated to Lids Foundation. The foundation is dedicated to giving back to these groups to further influence youth sports. Pricing ranges from $80 – $100, with headwear varying between $31.99 – $39.99, and They Gave Us Game will be available on Monday February 28

Lids globetrotters collection piece via Lids for use by 360 MAGAZINE

The Crunch

The Crunch allows for the convenience of 7 kitchen electrics in one unit. It replaces a traditional air fryer, grill, rotisserie, dehydrator, toaster oven, roaster, and convection oven to bring you one multifunctional powerhouse. It’s 12.7 Qt. capacity provides more room for more food and better results. It has eight main cooking functions, including fries, meat, seafood, pizza, chicken, vegetables, bake, and dehydrate. You can use it to make both French fries and beef jerky! There’s also a rotisserie function and an e-recipe book with over 20 recipes. 

TIDAL

This Black History Month, TIDAL will be releasing content weekly to celebrate the history and contributions of the Black community across key themes. Week one focused on Health and Wellness (the official theme of Black History Month 2022), and for this second week TIDAL has unveiled 11 playlists honoring the legacy and campus life of HBCUs. Subscribers can enjoy a variety of playlists such as: 

The remainder of February will see Social Justice and Behind The Mic content (spotlighting Black writers, engineers and producers behind the music we love) as well as the popular What’s Going On: Artists Speak Their Truth playlist, where artists discuss the message behind their songs that have become social justice anthems. 

As an added bonus, activist and renowned jazz trumpeter, Keyon Harrold, will be tapping into TIDAL to create an exclusive playlist that will feature a brand-new track. All playlists and exclusive content can be found on TIDAL’s Black History Month hub HERE.

Women is Losers x Latino International Film Festival for use by 360 Magazine