Posts tagged with "African Americans"

Colin Kaepernick illustrated by Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE.

Colin Kaepernick × Disney

By Mina Tocalini

Civil rights activist and former football quarterback, Colin Kaepernick, partners with the Walt Disney Company via his production company Ra Vision Media. The collaboration will direct their projects towards elevating Black and Brown directors, creators, storytellers, and producers, in an effort to inspire today’s youth, announced Kaepernick on media. The first project will follow Kapernick’s life story in a docuseries.

While playing for the San Francisco 49ers, Kaepernick’s protest of the national anthem became the topic of national debate. Kaepernick began kneeling during the national anthem to draw attention to the social injustice and police brutality faced by African Americans every day in the United States. In light of the recent uproar of activism after the death of George Floyd, Kaepernick’s partnership with Disney will provide the much-needed stories and perspectives that have been denied in our society. 

The Undefeated will be working side by side with Kaepernick to develop future projects committed to create compelling stories that will educate, enlighten and entertain. The Undefeated is a platform established with ESPN that explores the intersections of race, sports and culture. Nonetheless, the partnership will work with all Walt Disney affiliates: Walt Disney Television, ESPN, Hulu, Pixar.

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Limited COVID Race Data

Last month, the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law sent two letters to Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS), Alex Azar, requesting comprehensive national race and ethnic demographic data for tests, cases and fatalities related to COVID-19. The Lawyers’ Committee received a letter in response last week from the director of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), Robert Redfield.

The director’s response, lacking in substance, indicates that it could be weeks, or even months, before HHS provides a true and accurate account of the impact of this devastating this virus.

The coronavirus has been circulating in major U.S. cities since January. And five months into this pandemic, neither HHS nor the CDC has provided a full and complete data set showing the number of African Americans, and other racial and ethnic minorities, who have been tested for, contracted, or died from the virus. However, the limited data that has been released shows communities of color are suffering disproportionately from the pandemic. Robust and comprehensive race and ethnic demographic data is critical to shape effective policy responses that direct resources to African American communities and other communities of color, and to stem community spread of COVID-19.

“How many African Americans have to die before either HHS or the CDC can provide substantive data on the true racial impacts of COVID-19 and provide a clear plan to address the existing disproportionate impacts on African Americans and other communities of color?” said Kristen Clark, president and executive director of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law. “This is a public health emergency that requires a strategic response that directs resources to hot spots and towards African American communities that are suffering at higher rates. We cannot properly address a growing problem if the nation’s top health agencies will not adequately report useful data. Everyday there is a delay costs more lives and causes suffering.” Read the CDC response letter here.

Third Rail with OZY × Racism

The exclusive poll below was conducted in advance of tonight’s episode of the new series Third Rail with OZY, premiering tonight at 8:30 pm ET on PBS and streaming at pbs.org/thirdrail.

Host Carlos Watson (Emmy Award-winning journalist, Editor in Chief of OZY.com) discusses the related topic “Is America Becoming More – Or Less – Racist?” on tonight’s episode with guests: 

Amber Rose (actress/model); Alonzo Bodden (actor/comedian), Michael Williams (GA State Senator, Republican); Vanita Gupta (CEO of the Leadership Conference on Civil & Human Rights) and Carrie Sheffield (Founder, Bold.)

Racism remains a prevalent problem in the United States. But many Americans do not think the responsibility to end racism is exclusive to one race. Rather, the responsibility belongs to both black and white people, according to this Exclusive Third Rail with OZY-Marist Poll, commissioned by WGBH Boston and OZY Media for the new PBS prime-time, cross-platform debate program Third Rail with OZY. 

Americans perceive the solution to lie in the hands of everyone, and do not believe black people need to work harder than others to end racism. The disparity in the perception of societal advancement between blacks and whites has not improved. Although half of Americans assert that both black and white people have an equal chance of getting ahead in today’s society, by more than 10-to-one Americans say white people have a better chance than black people of doing so. And, this disparity has changed little over the past 20 years. 

The national survey was conducted by The Marist Poll in advance of this week’s Third Rail with OZY debate, airing Friday, September 15, 2017 at 8:30pm ET (check local listings) and streaming on pbs.org/thirdrail, which asks: Is America becoming more, or less, racist? Third Rail with OZY, hosted by Emmy Award-winning journalist Carlos Watson, is a seven-part cross-platform series. Each week, expert and celebrity guests engage with Watson to debate a timely, provocative topic, incorporating audience and social media input and exclusive national polls. 

The onus to improve race relations is on everyone, according to 60% of Americans. However, 22% of residents believe the responsibility belongs to white people, and 7% say black people need to work on correcting the problem. 

A majority of residents (56%) do not think people of color need to work harder to end racism while 37% believe people of color need to do more. A racial divide exists. African American, (57%) and Latino (42%) residents are more likely than white Americans (32%) to say that people of color need to work harder to end racism. 

“The survey calls to mind the reflections of Martin Luther King Jr., ‘The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice,’” says Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion. “But, in its totality, the results demonstrate the arc is bending very slowly, at best.”

Half of Americans (50%) think white and black people have an equal chance of getting ahead in today’s society. This is little changed from 46% of U.S. residents who expressed this view in a 1997 CBS News/New York Times survey. Forty-one percent compared to 43% two decades ago say white people have a better chance at advancing. Only 4% think black people have the edge in getting ahead, similar to 5% in the 1997 survey. 

Again, opinions differ by race. While a majority of white Americans (54%) say both black and white residents have an equal chance of advancing, nearly two-thirds of African Americans (65%) and half of Latinos (50%) report white people have the advantage to move ahead in today’s society. 

Americans perceive racism to be a bigger issue in American society than sexism. Fifty-four percent of U.S. residents consider the nation to be more racist than sexist. Twenty-four percent think America is more sexist than racist. One in ten (10%) say the United States is neither racist nor sexist, and 12% are unsure. Both men (48%) and women (61%) think the country is more racist, but interestingly, men (28%) are more likely than women (19%) to consider it to be more sexist.

“Racism continues to be a defining issue for this nation,” says Denise Dilanni, series creator and Executive in Charge of Third Rail with OZY. “The topic has dominated the public and political arenas in the past year, which is why on Friday we’ll debate the question: Is America becoming more, or less, racist?”

The exclusive Marist/Third Rail with OZY poll asked Americans: do President Donald Trump’s comments about people of color such as Muslims, immigrants, or African Americans make it more or less acceptable for people to make racist comments? A plurality (46%) says it makes it more acceptable, including 63% of African Americans and 53% of Latinos. Thirty-six percent of Americans think the president’s remarks make it less acceptable. Nearly one in five (18%) are unsure. 

Democrats (67%) and independents (49%) are more likely than Republicans (20%) to believe President Trump’s comments about people of color make it more acceptable to make racist comments. Fifty percent of Republicans say his statements make it less acceptable.

More than half of Americans (51%) think the anti-immigration movement is simply about securing the country’s borders while 35% believe it is really an anti-people of color movement. Fourteen percent are unsure. Again, Democrats (63%) African Americans (57%) and Latinos (46%) are more likely than Republicans (5%) and white residents, (29%) to think the anti-immigration movement is about race. 

For more on Third Rail with OZY
pbs.org/thirdrail

#ThirdRailPBS
For more on The Marist Poll: 

maristpoll.marist.edu

#MaristPoll

About The Marist Poll 

Founded in 1978, The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion (MIPO) is a survey research center at Marist College in Poughkeepsie, New York. The Marist Poll has conducted independent research on public priorities, elections, and a wide variety of social issues. Through the regular public release of surveys, The Marist Poll has built a legacy of independence, reliability, and accuracy. Its results are featured in print and electronic media throughout the world. 

About Third Rail with OZY

Third Rail with OZY is a co-production of WGBH Boston and OZY Media. Host: Carlos Watson. Executive in Charge: Denise DiIanni. Executive Producers: Eugenia Harvey and Cameo George. Funding is provided by Corporation for Public Broadcasting and PBS. Exclusive Third Rail with OZY poll conducted by The Marist Poll, Marist College. Special thanks to collaborator The Conversation. Social media integration by Telescope.

About WGBH Boston

WGBH Boston is one of America’s preeminent public broadcasters and the largest producer of PBS broadcast and digital content, including Frontline, NOVA, American Experience, Masterpiece, Antiques Roadshow, Arthur, as well as other children’s, primetime, and lifestyle series. WGBH also is a major supplier of programming for public radio, and a leader in educational multimedia for the classroom, supplying content to PBS LearningMedia, a free national broadband service for teachers and students. WGBH is a pioneer in technologies and services that make media accessible to those with hearing or visual impairments. WGBH has been recognized with hundreds of honors: Emmys, Peabodys, duPont-Columbia Awards and Oscars. More information at wgbh.org.

About OZY Media

With 25 million monthly unique users and 2 million subscribers, OZY brings readers “the new and the next,” offering 100% original content, with a focus on the future, via unique OZY News, OZY Magazine, OZY TV and OZY Events products. Called “the new media magnet for the news hungry” by Fortune magazine, OZY’s in-depth and high-quality journalism has attracted a number of high-profile media partners including The New York Times, NPR, PBS NewsHour, TED, The Financial Times, The Huffington Post and many more, as well as guest editors including Bill Gates, President Bill Clinton, and Prime Minister Tony Blair. Founded in 2013 by Emmy award winning journalist Carlos Watson and co-founder Samir Rao, the OZY team is based in Mountain View, CA and backed by leading Silicon Valley investors including Laurene Powell Jobs, Ron Conway, David Drummond, Larry Sonsini and Dan Rosensweig and a significant investment from publishing giant Axel Springer.

TV ONE’S WHEN LOVE KILLS STARRING LIL MAMA × LANCE GROSS

TV ONE’S ORIGINAL FILM, WHEN LOVE KILLS: THE FALICIA BLAKELY STORY, SCHEDULED TO PREMIERE MONDAY AUG. 28 AT 9 P.M. ET 


Directed  by  Tasha  Smith,  the  project stars  Niatia  ‘Lil’  Mama’  Kirkland,  Lance  Gross, and  Tami  Roman  in  a  true  crime  thriller  ripped  from  the  headlines WASHINGTON D.C.  – TV  One’s  latest  original  film,  When  Love  Kills:  The  Falicia Blakely  Story,  will  premiere  Monday,  August  28  at  9  pm  EST.  The  film  marks  the feature-length  directorial  debut  for  Tasha  Smith  (For  Better  Or  Worse,  Empire) and  stars  Niatia  “Lil’  Mama”  Kirkland,  Lance  Gross,  and  Tami  Roman,  with special  appearances  from  Big  Freedia,  Lil  Zane,  and  Floyd  Mayweather. 

The project  is  the  network’s  first original  movie  inspired  by  an  episode  of  TV  One’s original  true  crime  series,  For  My  Man. When Love Kills:  The  Falicia  Blakely  Story  tells  the  tragic  story  of  Falicia  Blakely, a  teen  mom from  Atlanta  who  grows  up  in  the  fast-lane.  When  she  becomes  an exotic  dancer,  she  attracts  the  attention  of  local  pimp  and  predator,  Dino.  His empty  promises  of  a  life  together  turn  Falicia  into  a  pawn  in  his  dangerous games;  and  she’s  forced  to  prove  her  love  for  him  at  the  expense  of  innocent lives. “I  totally  did  not  see  myself  playing  an  exotic  dancer,  but  it  was  so  much  more to  the  story,”  says  Niatia  “Lil’  Mama”  Kirkland  of  taking  on  the  role.  “I  pulled from  the  truth  of  women  all  around  the  world  who  have  been  victims  and  not known  that  they  were  victims  of  society.  This  is  what’s  so  amazing  about  acting –  allowing  myself  to  be  as  vulnerable  as  I  would  be  in  that  moment,  just  to actually  live  through  the  character  and  become  Falicia.  I  want  to  do  her  justice, and  so  I  tapped  into  truth  to  tell  her  story.” In  playing  Dino,  a  modern  day  Dr.  Jekyll  and  Mr.  Hyde  who  uses  Falicia’s  desire to  be  loved  for  his  gain,  Gross  says  he  had  to  “dive  all  the  way  in.” “This  is  a  role  nobody’s  ever  seen  me  in  –  they’re  used  to  me  being  the  nice  guy,” says  the  actor,  who  is  known  for  his  roles  in  Tyler  Perry’s  House  of  Pain  and Temptation.  ”I  want  the  audience  to  know  that  you  really  have  to  be  conscious of  the  decisions  that  you  make,  because  there’s  consequences  that  come  along with  it.”   Tami  Roman  portrays  Stacey,  Falicia’s  alcoholic  mother  who  has  jumped  in  and out  of  her  daughter’s  life,  exposing  her  to  too  much  too  soon.

Roman  said  she  had  to  reflect  back deeply  into  her  own  relationship  with  her mother  as  a  teenager  in  order  to  understand  how  to  play  the  character. “At  the  age  of  13  [my  mother]  sent  me  to  live  with  my  grandmother.  By  15  she came  to  get  me,  and  at  that  point  we  became  best  friends  because  she  had finally  gotten  herself  together,”  she  recalls.  “And  I  think  that  is  where  I  tried  to become  my  mom  [in  this  role].” Each  actor  transforms  into  their  characters  under  the  directorial  leadership  of Tasha  Smith,  whose  goal  was  to  challenge  each  actor  to  dig  deep  to  relate  to their  character,  while  creating  a  suspenseful,  high-stakes  drama  on  screen.  In addition  to  directing  and  producing,  Smith  is  a  multifaceted  actress  whose  work brings  style  and  intensity  to  the  subjects  she  plays  on  the  big  and  small  screens. “I  feel  like  it’s  my  calling  to  inspire  other  actors  to  pursue  their  purpose  in  the heart,  and  that’s  why  to  have  the  opportunity  to  direct  and  to  work  with  actors on  that  level  –  I  love  it.  I’m  in  heaven,”  says  Smith  on  stepping  behind  the camera  for  the  first  time. When  Love  Kills:  The  Falicia  Blakely  Story  is  written  by  industry  veteran  Cas Sigers-Beedles,  who  previously  wrote  and  executive  produced  the  TV  One movies  Welcome  to  the  Family  and  Girlfriends  Getaway  1  & 2.    

The  film  is produced  for  TV  One  by  Eric  Tomosunas,  Keith  Neal  and  James  Seppelfrick  of Swirl  Films.  For  TV  One,  Tia  A.  Smith  is  Sr.  Director  of  Original  Programming  & Production  and  Executive  in  Charge  of  Production;  Donyell  McCullough  is  Senior Director  of  Talent  &  Casting;  Robyn  Greene-Arrington  is  VP  of  Original Programming,  and  D’Angela  Proctor  is  Head  of  Original  Programming  and Production. For  more  information  about  TV  One’s  upcoming  programming,  including original  movies,  visit  the  network’s  companion  website  at  www.tvone.tv .  

TV  One viewers  can  also  join  the  conversation  by  connecting  via  social  media  on  Twitter Instagram and  Facebook (@tvonetv)  using  the  hash  tag  #REPRESENT.

📸  by Tyren Redd 👗 by Michael Mann

Lil Mama, Tasha Smith, Lance Gross

Jamison Harris, Tyren Redd, Jonta Harris – 360 MAGAZINE

Lil Mama’s Style Team: Michael Mann × Tyler Jacob