Posts tagged with "Colin kaepernick"

Rita Azar Illustrates a Video Games Article for 360 MAGAZINE

Colin Kaepernick x Madden 21

by Justin Lyons

Colin Kaepernick is officially back in Madden.

For the first time since 2017, football fans and Colin Kaepernick fans will have the chance to use the ex-49ers quarterback in the signature football game from EA SPORTS.

The announcement came from EA SPORTS themselves, saying, “Colin Kaepernick is one of the top free agents in football and a starting-caliber quarterback. The team at EA SPORTS, along with millions of Madden NFL fans, want to see him back in our game.”

Though Kaepernick is not signed to a team in real life or in Madden, he is available to sign to any team in Franchise mode. He’s also available in Play Now mode.

His jersey is also available in The Yard, a mode new to Madden this year that allows users to express themselves creatively. His signature celebration, which is available upon scoring with Kaepernick, depicts the quarterback raising his fist in the air to signify Black Power.

Kaepernick has been rated 81 overall, which is good for the 15th best quarterback in the league, tied with Ben Roethlisberger of the Pittsburgh Steelers.

According to EA SPORTS, that number was determined using data-driven simulations. They did take into account the fact that Kaepernick has not played since 2016, but his mobility and big play ability earned him the 81 overall rating.

EA SPORTS also said players looking to have complete control over their Franchise mode can change his rating however they see fit, including bringing him up to 99 overall. Adjusting his stats to 99 overall would make his only company the likes of Aaron Donald, Christian McCaffrey, Michael Thomas, Stephon Gilmore and the only 99 rated quarterback in the game, Patrick Mahomes.

Kaepernick was among the first in professional sports to kneel during the American National Anthem in protest of police brutality. Kaepernick opted out of his contract after the 2016 season, and not one of the 32 NFL teams has made a move to acquire him.

Largely suspected of being a victim of blackballing, Kaepernick has since worked as an activist in the community, especially with children. He has led rights campaigns and camps and was the face of a Nike campaign in 2018 that carried the slogan “Believe in something. Even if means sacrificing everything.”

Roger Goodell encouraged teams to sign Kaepernick in a conversation on ESPN in June, just weeks after George Floyd was killed in Minneapolis.

The killing of George Floyd seemed to awaken large corporations throughout the United States, leading many to make statements, including the NFL.

Though criticized for not speaking out sooner, the NFL and Commissioner Goodell released a statement via Twitter on June 5 saying, “We, the NFL, condemn racism and the systematic oppression of Black People. We, the NFL, admit we were wrong for not listening to NFL players earlier and encourage all to speak out and peacefully protest. We, the NFL, believe Black Lives Matter.”

NFL teams cancelled practices and scrimmages in the past month after the shooting of Jacob Blake by police in Kenosha, Wisconsin.

Action taken after these events could remove the stigma NFL owners appeared to have when it came to signing Kaepernick, and fans who believe in his message and talent would love to see him on the field again soon.

Colin Kaepernick illustrated by Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE.

Colin Kaepernick × Disney

By Mina Tocalini

Civil rights activist and former football quarterback, Colin Kaepernick, partners with the Walt Disney Company via his production company Ra Vision Media. The collaboration will direct their projects towards elevating Black and Brown directors, creators, storytellers, and producers, in an effort to inspire today’s youth, announced Kaepernick on media. The first project will follow Kapernick’s life story in a docuseries.

While playing for the San Francisco 49ers, Kaepernick’s protest of the national anthem became the topic of national debate. Kaepernick began kneeling during the national anthem to draw attention to the social injustice and police brutality faced by African Americans every day in the United States. In light of the recent uproar of activism after the death of George Floyd, Kaepernick’s partnership with Disney will provide the much-needed stories and perspectives that have been denied in our society. 

The Undefeated will be working side by side with Kaepernick to develop future projects committed to create compelling stories that will educate, enlighten and entertain. The Undefeated is a platform established with ESPN that explores the intersections of race, sports and culture. Nonetheless, the partnership will work with all Walt Disney affiliates: Walt Disney Television, ESPN, Hulu, Pixar.

Follow Colin Kaepernick: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

Follow Disney: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

Follow The Undefeated: Facebook | Twitter

Swag Single Art

YG – Swag

Compton Rapper YG drops his new single and video for “Swag”

Despite the fun beat and lyrics of “Swag,” the music video has a political undertone to it. In the video, fans can spot Tyga and Snoop Dogg dancing along to YG’s bop, continuing the energetic message of the song. But, the video also shows YG honoring Colin Kaepernick as YG kneels in a jersey. This homage follows YG’s intertwining of the BLM movement and police brutality with his music, as seen earlier this summer in his song “FTP.” “FTP” includes lyrics about racism in the U.S. and the music video was shot at a BLM protest in LA. “Swag” and “FTP” demonstrate a powerful connection between art and politics, which YG proudly delivers and listeners eagerly await to stream.

Follow YG: Instagram | Twitter | Facebook

NBA and China

The American public strongly supports the Houston Rockets general manager’s tweet regarding Hong Kong and China’s rights conflict. (Daryl Morey, the GM, tweeted support for the Hong Kong protesters seeking freedom from Chinese oversight.  The Chinese reacted with disdain and business with the NBA was threatened).Only 9 percent of the public thought the Rockets GM, Daryl Morey, should be fired, with 77 percent saying the Rockets should keep him and defend his freedom of speech.  14 percent said they did not know or had no opinion.

In addition, 54 percent of the nation feels Daryl Morey should be applauded for taking a stand supporting the Hong Kong protesters, with only 19 percent saying he should not have sent the tweet because it risked valuable relationships over a foreign domestic issue.  27 percent did not know or had no opinion.
These are the findings of a Seton Hall Sports Poll, conducted this week among 703 adult Americans across the country on both landlines and cellphones.  The Poll has a margin of error of +/-3.8 percent.
NBA Commissioner Adam Silver first apologized for the tweet but later backtracked and showed support for freedom of speech.  46 percent of the public felt he handled it well, and 36 percent say he did not, with 18 percent saying they did not know or had no opinion.

52% Say Lebron James’ Comments were out of self-interest

LeBron James tweeted condemnation of Morey, claiming “he wasn’t educated on the situation” and endangered people “not only financially but physically.”  Only 28 percent thought his reaction was sincere, with 52 percent saying he acted out of financial self-interest.

69% expressed concern that China has so much influence over an American professional League, with only 23 percent saying they are not concerned.

Morey’s Tweet vs. Kaepernick’s Kneeling

Comparing Morey’s tweet to Colin Kaepernick’s kneeling during the national anthem, 47 percent said both actions should be defended as free speech, with 16 percent saying that it only applied to Morey and 5 percent saying it only applied to Kaepernick.

There are big differences between Democrats and Republicans on this comparison.  59 percent of Democrats and only 29 percent of Republicans say that they should both be defended as free speech, while 7 percent of Democrats and 21 percent of Republicans say that it only applies to Morey.

“The fundamental right of free speech seems to have carried the day in favor of Daryl Morey’s tweet,” noted Rick Gentile, director of the Seton Hall Sports Poll, which is sponsored by the Sharkey Institute within the Stillman School of Business. “It is much clearer when applied to a foreign power than to a domestic one.”

For more information, visit here.  (Questions and results breakdown below, an online version of this release may be found here.

 

Despite NFL Settlement, Nation Evenly Divided on Kaepernick Impact

The confidential settlement of Colin Kaepernick’s lawsuit against the NFL finds the nation evenly divided on its impact on his protests.

In a Seton Hall Sports Poll conducted this week, by a margin of 44-42%, the public says the settlement has not diminished the impact of his protest.

By 45-40%, the public believes the settlement is an admission by the NFL that collusion by NFL teams against him took place.

When the question of approval for Kaepernick was asked in September 2017, his support was only 32%, with disapproval at 44%.

While white respondents are evenly divided on whether the settlement diminished the impact of the protests, by 2 to 1 African-Americans believe that it does. Whites are also evenly divided on whether it the settlement is an admission of collusion by the NFL, but African-Americans believe it is by 3 to 1.

794 adult Americans were polled on both landlines and cellphones, a margin of +/- 3.5%.

Despite a fairly close overall division on whether or not the settlement was an admission of collusion on the part of the NFL, by more than a 3-1 margin (41-13%), respondents believed that Kaepernick’s chance of being signed to a new NFL contract has decreased because of the settlement.

“People remain divided regarding the message of his kneeling during the national anthem,” noted Rick Gentile, director of the poll, which is sponsored by the Sharkey Institute in the Stillman School of Business. “But there certainly seems to be a feeling that doors are not going to open for the renewal of his career.”

Disapproval of U. of Mississippi Basketball Protesters

In a related matter, by a 42-29% margin, people disapproved of the University of Mississippi basketball players kneeling last weekend to protest an on campus rally honoring Confederate soldiers. That margin draws a close comparison to the September 2017 Kaepernick findings. However, 12 out of 13 African-Americans offered support of the protest.

Results breakdown can be found online at http://blogs.shu.edu/sportspoll/2019/02/28/despite-nfl-settlement-nation-evenly-divided-on-kaepernick-impact/

The Official Seton Hall Sports Poll podcast discussing this topic with Seth Everett and Rick Gentile can be found at http://itunes.apple.com/mt/podcast/seton-hall-sports-poll/id1053266467.

Kaepernick Madden Lyrics

By Reid Urban

While Colin Kaepernick made news on Thursday when he was featured in a Nike commercial on Sunday Night Football, he also made news in the video game industry.

Back in early August, EA Sports had edited out a lyric that featured Kaepernick’s name on the Madden 19 soundtrack. It led to outrage and condemnation towards EA Sports. Eventually, they put his name back into the lyrics.

Here is what the lyrics said, courtesy of Big Sean, “feed me to the wolves now I lead the pack and s—, you boys all cap, I’m more Colin Kaepernick.” Where that name was supposed to be said, it was edited out as if it were a profanity.

EA Sports came out with a statement that it was “an unfortunate mistake,” by taking Kaepernick’s name out of the song “Big Bank” by YG on that soundtrack.

This isn’t EA Sports’s first debacle featuring his name. The Madden 18 soundtrack had a song by Mike WiLL Made-It which featured his name, but was removed as well.

Both YG and Big Sean, whose song had Kaepernick’s name in the Madden 18 soundtrack, took to Twitter to express their displeasure with removing his name.

EA Sports also said about the name, “Members of the team misunderstood the fact that while we don’t have the rights to include Colin Kaepernick in the game, this doesn’t affect the soundtrack.”

Bobby Sessions New MV

BOBBY SESSIONS PLANS A REVOLUTION IN NEW MUSIC VIDEO “PICK A SIDE”

WATCH HERE:
http://BobbySessions.lnk.to/PickASideVideo

LISTEN TO “PICK A SIDE” HERE:
http://BobbySessions.lnk.to/PickASide
BOBBY SESSIONS IS TRYING TO START A DIALOGUE
WATCH THE DALLAS RAPPER’S NEW VIDEO FOR “PICK A SIDE.”
http://www.thefader.com/2018/06/13/bobby-sessions-pick-a-side-video-interview?utm_source=tftw

When Bobby Sessions released the video for his major label debut single “Like Me” with Def Jam Records in April, viewers witnessed a visceral, charged statement. With a noose around his neck, the Dallas rapper drew parallels between lynchings and modern day police killings with a captivating intensity in his delivery and lyricism. By the end of the record Sessions defies the oppression that systemic injustice meant to induce in him.

Today, Bobby Sessions’s latest single “Pick A Side” premieres on The FADER and the artist’s mission continues to unfold. With “Pick A Side,” Sessions sets his sights on controversial black figures, equating the behavior of Candace Owens, Jason Whitlock, Ray Lewis, Omarosa and more, who are addressed in the track and music video, to house slaves informing on the subversive activity of slaves in the field. “The same way a person would sacrifice his or her relationship with the people on the field in order to get in good with the master, we have the same thing happening today where there are black people in positions of power and positions of influence that have opportunities to shed light on real situations affecting their own people,” Sessions says. “Instead, they dismiss them in the pursuit of getting the acceptance of white people in positions of power and it needs to be called out.”

The video showcases how a revolution happens. It starts small with pictures of the people Sessions believes need to pick a side while speaking to his people and as he’s delivering the information he’s posing to them, which side are you on?

In February, when it was announced that you signed with Def Jam you mentioned quitting your job in 2015 and dedicating yourself to becoming a great rapper and manifesting this current success. Can you explain that process a little more?

When you’re working a job, after you pay all your bills, you’re broke anyway. At least at my pay rate I was. I was spending all my money on music. I would go to work from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., I would sit in traffic in a car with no AC in record hot Texas summers from 5:30 to 6:30 maybe eat from 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., and I would would record from 7 p.m. to 2 a.m. at the Dojo every single day. That was my thing. By the time I got done paying for that and paying for my bills, I was broke anyway. I thought, I’m either gonna stay here and be a hamster in the wheel or I can be out there and go for my dreams. I’m in my early twenties making these decisions. I can go back and still get a job later if that’s really what I want to do but the real fear and real danger is not doing it because I was scared of me being 50 and 60 living with “what if?” It was super easy to leave and that’s the reason I mentioned quitting my job.

How did signing to Def Jam fit into the vision you had yourself and your career?

I always fantasized about how it would feel to sign with Def Jam and then I got signed by Eminem’s manager (Paul Rosenberg, now the CEO of Def Jam), and the way I always thought that that would feel… it didn’t feel any different than how much I peacocked my chest out when I walked out of my old job. When I signed my contract in New York it felt the same way when I imagined that I signed the contract. That’s the main message that I try to get out to people. The reality that I lived in is that I’m the greatest rapper that ever came from Dallas. I don’t think of any other reality other than that in regards to Dallas in particular. And since that’s true, then, of course, I’ll have the right energy to attract my deal going through to when I shot my first video. Of course I came out of that, because that was my mentality before that was a consensus with everybody else.

What are you trying to manifest through your music?

I want to make material that’s way bigger than me. I’ve been talking about race in particular on all my projects. Go back to Law of Attraction and my album cover is a gorilla that’s literally shredding its outer. The gorilla represented the negative image that white people have on black people. So you saw me as an animal but I’m shattering your view of me with this art and through the law of attraction. My broad mission is to empower all black people around the world. That’s my main mission.

I feel like there’s a lot of psychological damage, psychological trauma that we inherited that never got addressed and it’s still never been addressed. It’s been quiet, it’s taboo to even be talking about. It’s a bunch of things that need to be addressed globally. The effects of white supremacy all around the world and [I want to] do as much as I can to get us as a people to manifest and be our best self. My individual goal, I want to make sure that when we look back at the history of the greatest rappers ever, I want my name to be mentioned at the top of the list. As I’m getting older, I’m realizing that individual goal is subjective. The impact that I really have in the booth that’s what I want to be measured by.

Tell us about the new single, “Pick A Side.”

The song is talking about field and house niggas and how you have to pick a side. This is a different time and this is not a time where you can straddle the fence. Our generation’s done a good job of, “let’s try to see all sides of everything.” OK, after you evaluated … pick a side. Don’t be scared of what side you’re standing on.

Even thinking back to slave times, you had the field negroes outside picking the cotton, manning the land and then you had the house negro, who was inside the house, typically lighter skinned, and he had a bunch of temporary privileges over the black people in the field. When the master and the master’s family is done eating, you get the scraps at the end. You also notify me if there’s some people on the field doing something they’re not supposed to be doing you come tell it to me. We have the same thing happening today where there are black people in positions of power and positions of influence that have opportunities to shed light on real situations affecting their own people but instead they dismiss them in the pursuit of getting acceptance of white people in positions of power and it needs to be called out.

In the video that would be Candace Owens, Jason Whitlock, Ray Lewis, right?

There’s two people in particular I call out on the record: Jason Whitlock and Ray Lewis. [Lewis] is someone I really idolized as a football player, and, when I heard his comments on Colin Kaepernick, how he should only worry about football, I felt like he was trying to appease the white people at his network as opposed to shedding light on our community. So it’s not to say he is a house nigga, it’s to say that I need you to pick a side and don’t think that these white people love you for having these opinions. If the white people you work with truly care about humanity they will let you say that. You don’t have to throw your community under the bus in order to get cool with another community. If we’re all supposed to be one community it should make a white person sick to their stomach that black people are getting murdered for no reason if we’re really all one race.

“Pick A Side” was a bit of a hometown affair featuring production from Sikwitit and video direction from German Torres, two creatives you’ve worked with for a long time in Dallas. Why was it important to keep it close to home?

It’s important to take care of home first. We have some great content from both of those guys so we wanted to give them the first dibs on creating content for us now that we have this new platform. Sickwitit and I have done a lot of great records together and I think we’ve crafted a song together and I think I’m excited for everybody to experience it for the first time. This one is different because the style of these songs as compared to the other songs are very different. We’re definitely two different people than when we first started. The sound now is a lot more disruptive.

84% Support NFL Players Right

84% Support NFL Players’ Right to Protest, But Vary on How to Carry that Out;Only 16% Say Protesters Should Be Dropped from Teams

A poll conducted this week by the Seton Hall Sports Poll has found that 84% of American support the NFL players’ right to protest, with only 16% saying the players should be ordered to stand for the anthem or be dropped from the team if they refuse.

Of the 84% supporting the players’ right to protest, 49% felt they should find a different way to express their political opinions, and 35% felt that not standing for the anthem is an acceptable way to protest. There was a wide racial gap in those saying it was an acceptable form of protest.with 70% of African-American choosing that option only 28% of whites doing so.

The poll of 845 adults (on both landline and cellphone) was conducted across the US on Monday-Tuesday-Wednesday of this week. It has a margin of error of 3.4%.

An identical question was asked a year ago about just Kaepernick. At that time, 80% supported the right to protest and 20% believed they should be dropped from the team if they refused an order to stand.

Asked specifically this week about players not standing during the playing of the anthem, 44% of all respondents disapproved, 32% approved, and 25% had no opinion or did not know. The responses to the same question about just Kaepernick a year ago were 47% disapproval and 27% approval.

“These attitudes are remarkably stable given all that has happened in this past year and the recent spike in attention being paid to the subject. , noted Rick Gentile, Director of the Seton Hall Sports Poll, which is sponsored by the Sharkey Institute.

Respondents were asked whether they agreed more with President Trump who called on NFL owners to fire any players who refuse to stand or with Commissioner Roger Goodell and several NFL owners who called the president’s comments divisive

Trump received the support of 28% and Goodell received 50%. Among African-Americans Trump received 6% vs 78% for Goodell, and whites were 32% to 47%.

Asked about Kaepernick’s lack of a contract by an NFL team, 47% felt it was because of his protests and 19% because he wasn’t good enough. 81% of African-Americans felt it was because of his protest with only 7% saying it was because he was not good enough, while among whites the ratio was 41% (protest) and 22% (ability).

“This is an emotional issue for many people with obvious differences between whites and African-Americans,” said Gentile. “The overall support for the players’ right to protest – in some form – is heartening especially considering some of the divisive rhetoric we’ve heard revolving around this issue.”

The protests can be very damaging to the NFL’s popularity. 29% of respondents said they were watching fewer games this season, and of that group, 47% cited the player protests during the national anthem.

In an identical question asked in November 2016, 25% said they were watching fewer games because of the anthem protest.
 

To view the full release, visit here.

ABOUT SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

One of the country’s leading Catholic universities, Seton Hall University has been a catalyst for leadership — developing students in mind, heart and spirit — since 1856. Home to nearly 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and offering more than 90 academic programs, Seton Hall’s academic excellence has been singled out for distinction by The Princeton Review, U.S.News & World Report and Bloomberg Businessweek.

Seton Hall, which embraces students of all religions, prepares its graduates to be exemplary servant leaders and global citizens. Its attractive main campus is located in suburban South Orange, New Jersey, and is only 14 miles by train, bus or car from New York City, offering a wealth of employment, internship, cultural and entertainment opportunities. The university’s nationally recognized School of Law is prominently located in downtown Newark.

For more information, visit www.shu.edu.

About the poll:

This poll was conducted by telephone September 25-27 among 845 adults in the United States. The Seton Hall Sports Poll is conducted by the Sharkey Institute.

Phone numbers were dialed from samples of both standard landline and cell phones. The error due to sampling for results based on the entire sample could be plus or minus 3.8 percentage points. The error for subgroups may be higher. This poll release conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

The Seton Hall Sports Poll has been conducted regularly since 2006.
(Photo credit —Tampa Bay Times)