Posts tagged with "appearance"

Phantom Orchid press photo via Roll-Royce Motor Cars for use by 360 MAGAZINE

ROLLS-ROYCE PHANTOM ORCHID

Rolls-Royce recently announced their latest inspirational piece, the Rolls-Royce Phantom Orchid. Designed specifically with Singapore in mind, the Phantom is extremely rare as just one singular model has been produced. Looking to the orchid for motivation, the team chose this reference to serve as a representation of beauty and strength. Serving as a withstanding focal point in the history of art, this marks the first instance of an orchid being incorporated into a Rolls-Royce commission. Exemplifying the attributes of elegance and glamour with a light but edgy flow comes to Rolls-Royce Phantom Orchid.

BESPOKE COLLABORATION

The new commission comes as a partnership with the Bespoke Collective and the withstanding Rolls-Royce team. This imperative duo saw the likes of top designers and artists coming together to create a work of art.

Michael Bryden, Lead Designer, Rolls-Royce Bespoke, spoke on the Phantom and how it came to its full loveliness. He stated, “[the] Phantom Extended, our pinnacle motor car, was chosen to be the ‘blank canvas’ for this commission. Our concept envisaged a balanced yet progressive design, which echoes the values of the Singapore region. The orchid is seen in many facets of Asian life, a reminder that the resilient adapt and thrive regardless of the evolving environment. Phantom is the only motor car in the world to feature the Gallery, a space that enables one to exhibit art, sculptures, or objects of self-expression in the sanctuary of Phantom’s interior. For Phantom Orchid, we collaborated with award-winning artist Helen Amy Murray to create a unique, hand-sculpted silk artwork. The delicate materials and techniques that were deployed in the creation of this piece are protected behind an application of pure glass, that runs uninterrupted across the fascia of Phantom. Finished in an elegant blend of Grace White, Havana and Smoke Grey with Dark Olive stitching, the interior evokes the calm and serene nature which is inherent to the character of Phantom.”

HAND-SCULPTED ART

Through the association with Helen Amy Murray and her team, a new wave of work with Phantom’s Gallery has been generated. Their fresh and innovative design transformed the interpretation of a motor car’s presence.

Helen found creativity from the orchid, often referencing the Singapore Orchid, hence as to why the commission was constructed with the location as muse. She worked around the clock, totaling over 200 hours of subtlety refining her designs with her team of six.

The design came to initially through Helen’s hand drawings and sketches, before moving to a digital media that would ensure the success of the piece. Through the virtual enhancements, the team was able to print the art directly onto the silk crepe satin. More handwork came into play for the final part of the layout process, where they hand-molded the flowers to stimulate a 3D force.

ORCHID SANCTUARY

Rolls-Royce Bespoke Designer Yohan Benchetrit worked his magic on the interior of the Phantom. He started with an orchid-motivated Picnic Table Inlay through the rear of the suite. Moving on, Bespoke treadplates were an addition that mimicked a like theme sans text to all who hopped into the motor car. Natural colors finished out the interior of the Phantom, adding to the luxurious experience imitated.

GLORIOUS EXTERIOR

To add to the exclusivity of this Phantom, a distinct paint was crafted using advanced, modern paint technology. The color started with a base of Arctic White with a light tint of violet was laid over, motivated by the main inspiration for the piece, orchids. The addition of fine glass particles within the paint color establishes a dazzling aura.

Phantom coachline press photo via Roll-Royce Motor Cars for use by 360 MAGAZINE
Phantom flower interior press photo via Roll-Royce Motor Cars for use by 360 MAGAZINE
Phantom press photo via Roll-Royce Motor Cars for use by 360 MAGAZINE
Phantom picnic table press photo via Roll-Royce Motor Cars for use by 360 MAGAZINE
Colin Kaepernick created by Rumnik Ghuman at 360 Magazine use by 360 Magazine

Colin in Black & White – Limited Netflix Series

By: Rumnik K Ghuman

Colin in Black & White is a new limited Netflix series recently released in October. This series is following Colin Kaepernick through his journey in high school as he had to face multiple issues as a black child who had white parents. During high school, Colin was a straight-A student who also played football, basketball, and baseball all year round. This 6 episode series attacked multiple issues a black child sees, but it was even harder since his parents didn’t understand how to explain to Colin why he was treated differently or had to work twice as hard to prove himself to the world. 360 Magazine is pleased to write something regarding this series as this is only available for a certain time period and is accessible only in a few states. 

To begin with some history why is this series so special to watch. It’s about ex-football player, Colin Kaepernick, who had kneeled in protest to police brutality and racial inequality during the national anthem back in 2016. Since then Kaepernick was not drafted by any team which quickly ended his career. This series truly shows what a black child goes through in a huge population of white superiority. Kaepernick played six seasons for the San Francisco 49ers in the NFL with 13 rushing touchdowns. It’s crazy to even think that a kneel would affect a football player’s entire career, but he wasn’t the only one to do it. The reason why he got so much hate was that he was the first. 

Each episode had an individual topic or issue brought up and focused on. Some topics were about appearances, as the braids were a big symbol of being a Thug apparently, which if you looked up what a thug actually means it’s defined as a violent person, especially a criminal. This includes no definition of how a thug looks like. This is the black culture that was given a label to place black people into a box of judgment. The next episode was the introduction of discrimination that made Colin realize he was going to be treated very differently compared to his peers. As a scene of him going out of town to witness how he was being watched as he was the only black person in the hotel for a baseball game. This kept going into how the world viewed black people in general. Colin was always told to take the easy way out, never really challenge himself. He had a great arm in baseball, but something about being rejected for football made him want to do it more than anything. This idea of rejection and always being the second choice came for him since day one from his birth parents. Colin was given up for adoption as a 5-week baby, and for his adoptive parents, he wasn’t the first choice either. Some other topics brought up were the standard of beauty and how black beauty was looked down upon compared to white people. There were certain acts that were very questionable of Colin’s parents that you can see in the show. Some more topics were of acceptance and perseverance to be the greatest. 

One aspect that really stood apart from this series was that it was not just a biopic. It was narrated by Colin Kaepernick and he would compare some situations that happened to him to the history of black people or even black athletics. One thing brought up was the idea of being perfect as black people. This goes back to slavery when slaves were bought based on how perfect they were body-wise to achieve good work and worth in a buyer’s eye. Colin compared this to how black athletics were examed so deeply to make sure they are in good shape and perfect. Multiple other athletics came up and what they had to go through in order to bring to light that this isn’t the first time something had happened. Allen Iverson, a Basketball player for the NBA, was attacked for his braids and the way he dressed. Romare Bearden, a baseball player for the National League, was told to play like a white man and had to fit in.  Ava DuVernay, Director of Colin in Black & White, brought a big aspect of history for children to understand what racism is about. This show was so simple and lighthearted that all kids of any age will understand and learn something much better than what they are taught in schools. 

This show has gotten a mixed reaction as most supporters of Kaepernick’s have been on his side from the moment he had kneeled. This series does attack multiple parts of the government and certain names and photos have been shown of the previous United States President, Donald Trump. It was interesting to hear that this was a limited series and only available to watch in a certain number of states. In the history of streaming services, no movie or series has been limited for no reason. This is a very controversial topic as it includes Colin Kaepernick’s entire story and he had received a huge amount of hate. Many still think that the racists in America got a platform to become more vocal of their opinion was because of President Donald Trump which led to the end of Kaepernick’s football career. The amount of risk that went into this series is huge, but the love and support of the audience had this show rated in the top 10 on Netflix. 

To end off this article, some phrases that Colin Kaepernick used to express what this world uses against black people were for example, “groomed in a system……always the second choice…..intensional built this way…..a white man’s stamp of approval.” You can see how much of government, history, and judgment goes into the way people don’t change their perspective about black people. After being an athlete all his life, Colin Kaepernick finally found what he was truly born for to be a civil rights activist

Image courtesy of Big Hassle Media for use by 360 Magazine

Amythyst Kiah Joins Salute the Songbird Podcast

AMYTHYST KIAH JOINS MAGGIE ROSE FOR A CANDID CONVERSATION IN THE LATEST EPISODE OF SALUTE THE SONGBIRD PODCAST HIGHLIGHTING WOMEN IN MUSIC

LISTEN HERE

LISTEN TO SALUTE THE SONGBIRD WITH MAGGIE ROSE FEATURING AMYTHYST KIAH

For the first 10 years I played music it was sort of like an escape for me. Music was one of the only instances where I could be in my own little world and not have to worry about being rejected or not being liked – AMYTHYST KIAH

In the newest episode of Salute The Songbird, Maggie is joined by singer/songwriter Amythyst Kiah to talk about her new album and the experiences that led to her success. Amythyst shares stories from growing up in Tennessee, how support and encouragement from her parents helped her overcome issues with identity and anxiety, and the impact music and writing have had on her personal journey.

Amythyst Kiah’s Rounder Records debut, Wary + Strange, marks the glorious combination of two vastly different worlds: the iconoclastic alt-rock that first sparked her musical passion and the roots/old-time music scene where she’s found breakout success in recent years, including recognition from Rolling Stone as one of Americana’s great up-and-coming secrets. With an unforgettable voice that’s both unfettered and exquisitely controlled, the Tennessee-bred singer/songwriter expands on the uncompromising artistry she most recently revealed as part of Our Native Daughters, an all-women-of-color supergroup whose Kiah-penned standout Black Myself earned a Grammy Award nomination for Best American Roots Song and won Song of the Year at the 2019 Folk Alliance International Awards.

Salute the Songbird features candid conversations with Rose’s female musical heroes about their lives in and out of music, challenging the status quo, and with a desire to offer guidance for young artists starting their careers. Season Two will feature guests such as Grammy nominee Hannah Hooper of Grouplove, Noelle Scaggs of Fitz And The Tantrums, Kelly McCartney host of Record Bin Radio, singer-songwriter Shannon McNally, Grammy nominee Amythyst Kiah, singer-songwriter Valerie June and other female musicians, songwriters, producers, and industry mavens who detail their triumphs, struggles and how they continue to succeed as women in the music industry.

Osiris Artist Spotlight shows include Moods & Modes with Alex Skolnick; Comes A Time, with Oteil Burbridge and Mike Finoia; Eric Krasno Plus One; Inside the Musicians Brain, with Chris Pandolfi; Touchdowns All Day with Jon Barber.

About Osiris Media

Osiris Media is transforming how music fans connect with the music they love. We deepen the connection between artists and fans through the power and intimacy of audio storytelling and bring people together for unique musical experiences. Our 40+ podcasts reach 250,000 listeners per month and include podcasts that feature high-profile artists, stories about music and music culture, key moments in music history, and exclusive live performances. Deepen your connection at Osiris Pod.

Salute the Songbird is brought to you by Osiris Media. Hosted by Maggie Rose. Produced by Austin Marshall, Maggie Rose, Kirsten Cluthe and Brad Stratton. Production assistance by Revoice Media. Music by Maggie Rose. Artwork by Katherine Boils (Revoice MEdia). Show logo by Premier Music Group.

african, art, spiritual, museum, exhibition, Phyllis Galembo, rituals,

African Masquerade Exhibition

Major photography exhibition (Now on view until May 31). Meet the artist on May 17 at 3:00 p.m. at the Museum for a special appearance (lecture and book signing)

Museum goers will be spellbound by the transformative power of the African masquerade, as the Boca Raton Museum of Art presents Phyllis Galembo:Maske. Her striking photographic series of contemporary mask rituals has drawn national and international critical acclaim. These large-scale images are nearly life-size and explore spiritual realms with brilliant, mesmerizing colors.For more than 30 years, the artist has traveled around the world to photograph participants in contemporary masquerade events that range from traditional, religious ceremonies to secular celebrations.

The exhibition is now on view through May 31. Galembo will visit the museum on May 17 at 3:00 p.m. to share personal stories about her work and her travels, the ritual mask ceremonies, and will sign two of her books at this personal appearance–Maske (published by Aperture), and Mexico, Masks and Rituals (by Radius Books and DAP). Her portraits are celebrated by the world’s leading fine art photography editors for their stunning resonance, setting her work apart from documentary and anthropological studies.

Galembo’s Art Work:

Otoghe-Toghe, by Phyllis Galembo. Aromgba Village, Nigeria, (2005), Ilfochrome

Awo-O-Dudu (A Spirit They Saw), by Phyllis Galembo. Freetown, Sierra Leone, (2008), Ilfochrome.

Akata Dance Masquerade, by Phyllis Galembo. Cross River, Nigeria (2004), Ilfochrome

They will be shown in concert with the Museum’s historical collection of more than 40 African tribal artifacts and indigenous masks in the gallery across from Galembo’s show, for a complementary perspective.

Through her lens, the viewer gains special access to the rarely seen other-worlds, as she captures the raw and sometimes frightening aspects of ceremonial garb. Masking is a complex, mysterious and profound tradition in which the participants transcend the physical world and enter the spiritual realm.

In her vibrant images, Galembo exposes an ornate code of political, artistic, theatrical, social, and religious symbolism and commentary. She has made over twenty trips to sites of ritual masquerades, capturing cultural performances with a subterranean political edge. Her photographs depict the physical character, costumes, and rituals of African religious practices and their diasporic manifestations in the Caribbean and Mexico. Galembo’s images reflect both the modern and ancient worlds.The fifteen portraits by Galembo that were selected for this exhibition reveal the meticulous detail and creative imagination of mask-making.

Affianwan, by Phyllis Galembo. Calibar South, Nigeria, (2005), Ilfochrome

“The tradition of masquerading is universal and timeless, and continues today in most cultures, including western societies,” says Irvin Lippman, the Executive Director of the Boca Raton Museum of Art.

“Bringing together the Galembo photographs and masks from the Museum’s African collection underscores the cross-cultural complexity of meaning and purpose. However, what they have in common is their vitality, power, and boldness of humanity.”

Aye Loja (The World is a Market Place that we Visit), Gelede Masquerade, by Phyllis Galembo. Agonli Village, Benin, (2006)

The costumes in Galembo’s photographs are worn in several types of modern-day rituals. They are created to summon ancestral spirits and deities during a range of events, including agricultural hardships,
land disputes, rites of passage, funerals, harvests, moments of gratitude and celebration. Galembo’s large-scale portraits in this exhibition capture the mask-oriented cultural traditions of Nigeria, Benin, Ghana and Sierra Leone.

Banana Leaf Masquerade, EkongIkon Ukom, by Phyllis Galembo. Calabar, Nigeria (2005), Ilfochrome

While traveling and embedding herself for long periods in these societies, Galembo works with local assistants and translators.They negotiate the terms with elders, so that she may be granted permission
to make photos of these masqueraders.

“The translators often find that gaining permission from community leaders can sometimes be quite helpful during these painstaking negotiations,”says Galembo. “Once an agreement has been struck, I set my own lighting and place the subjects in front of a neutral backdrop that enables the eye to focus on the diversity of materials in each costume.”

Two in a Fancy Dress, Red Cross Masquerade Group, by Phyllis Galembo. Winneba, Ghana, (2010), Ilfochrome

The masks and costumes in these photographs are made from a wide variety of surprising materials ─ leaves, grass, patterned fabrics, burlap sacks, full-bodied crocheted yarns, colored raffia, quills, shells, and even lizard excrement. All of her photographs are shot as portraits rather than during the act of ritual. She is allowed to photograph her subjects at the very moment right before their rituals and festivities commence. Galembo prefers her colors to be brightly saturated, enhancing the spiritual and transformative powers of these garments. “I never see my subjects out of costume, although the masqueraders are always men, often paying homage to women,” adds Galembo.

Ekpeyong Edet Dance Group, by Phyllis Galembo. Etikpe Village, Nigeria, (2005), Ilfochrome

Despite secularization and fading traditions, masquerading in Africa is abundant, robust, and far from disappearing. Most of the photographs in this exhibition reflect sacred rituals, the spiritual aspect of masquerading rather than secular celebrations.By donning garments, the masqueraders gain access to traditional knowledge, enabling them to relay critical messages to the community.

Egungun, by Phyllis Galembo. Adandokpodji Village, Benin, (2006), Ilfochrome

“I like the way viewers can grasp the real stories behind each image. Every mask, costume and fiber of material can represent so much to the people in these portraits. Many of these subjects created these ritual costumes because a spirit inspired them. These are people who make masks and costumes that are very spiritually motivated,” says Galembo. The modern world also finds its way into these costumes and masks with the usage of plastic bags, cardboard, and found objects.

Ringo (Big Deer) Masquerade, by Phyllis Galembo. Kroo Bay, Sierra Leone,(2008)

Awo-O-dudu (A Spirit They Saw) reveals a ghost- like shape summoning ancestral spirits during the dry months or times of crisis, when spirits are called to bless the deceased and entire villages.Ko S’Ogbon L’Ate (You Can’t Buy Wisdom at the Market) is a tribute to mothers, goddesses and ancestors. The wooden headpieces represent an animal and a human, each sings a different song during the ritual. Affianwan (“white cat woman”) represents spirit and transparency. The stunning headdress of this work is crocheted from one long flowing piece of fabric. Two in a Fancy Dress and Rasta illustrates the cross of African and European traditions (fancy dress).

More About the Artist: Phyllis Galembo

Phyllis Galembo’s photographs are included in numerous public and private collections including the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the New York Public Library. She is represented by Axis Gallery. She was born 1952 in New York, where she continues to live and work. Galembo graduated with a Master of Fine Arts from University of Wisconsin at Madison in 1977 and has been a Professor Emeritus at Albany, State University of New York since 1978. Using a direct, unaffected portrait style, she captures her subjects informally posed but often beautifully attired in traditional and ritualistic dress.

Attuned to a moment’s collision of past, present and future, Phyllis Galembo is recognized for her ability to find the timeless elegance and dignity of her subjects.She highlights the creativity of the individuals morphing into a fantastical representation of themselves, having cobbled together materials gathered from the immediate environment to idealize their vision of mythical figures.

While still pronounced in their personal identity, the subject’s intentions are rooted in the larger dynamics of religious, political and cultural affiliation. Establishing these connections is the artist’s hallmark. Her work has appeared in Tar Magazine, Damn Magazine, Photograph and Harpers. She has been profiled on CNN, NPR Radio and NBC Today.

Other collections that feature her work include: Oceania and the Americas, Photography Study Collection (New York); the Philadelphia Museum of Art; the Houston Museum of Art; the International Center for Photography(New York); the British Art Museum, Yale University; Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library; Polaroid Corporation (Boston); and the Rockefeller Foundation, among many others.

MORE ABOUT THE MUSEUM’S AFRICAN COLLECTION

Complementing Galembo’s exhibition are more than 40 African tribal artifacts from the Museum’s collection, including headdresses and masks, each pertaining to masquerades and ceremonies. These are exhibited in an adjacent gallery, across from the Galembo show.

Pictured above are some of the historic African masks from the Museum’s collection that complement Galembo’s contemporary photographs. More than 40 African tribal artifacts will be shown in an adjacent gallery across from Galembo’s exhibition.

The two Kuba masks in the collection (Kuba Bwoom Mask and Kuba Ngaady-A Mwash Mask) are both from the Democratic Republic of Congo, recreating the Kuba dynastic history.

Another work in the museum’s African collection, a Bamana Headdress (Chiwara), represents a mythical character who taught humans to turn wild grasses into grain.

A Mossi Nakomse Headdress (Zazaido), is used in secular and religious rituals by young men. The Zazaido masquerade honors male and female elders at funeral ceremonies, and blesses survivors.

A Yoruba Crown from Nigeria is worn on state occasions, and reflects the spiritual connections of the ruler. The face represents his royal lineage and ultimately the god Oduduwa, who remained on earth and became their first king.

The collection also includes a Dan mask (Deangle), an Ogoni Mask (Nigeria), a Toma Mask (Landai), a Senufo Mask (Kpelie), a Guru Mask (Gu), an Igbo Crest Mask (Nigeria), and a Yoruba Oro Efe Gelede Mask (Nigeria/Republic of Benin).

ABOUT THE BOCA RATON MUSEUM OF ART

Celebrating our 70th anniversary in 2020, the Boca Raton Museum of Art
encompasses a creative campus that includes the Museum in Mizner Park,
Art School, and an Artists Guild. As the “Official Art Museum of the City of
Boca Raton, “the Museum has provided seven decades of cultural and artistic service to the community, and to many visitors from around the world. Open–10:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Fridays; 10:00 a.m.-8:00 p.m. on Thursdays; and 12:00-5:00 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays.

Visit HERE for more information.

African, Art, Museum, Phyllis Galembo, Spiritual, Realm, tradition, African, Art, Museum, Phyllis Galembo, Spiritual, Realm, tradition,

Anita Baker’s Farewell Concert Series

Just recently, Anita Baker announces a Los Angeles performance at the iconic Greek Theatre for September 13th as a part of her farewell concert series.

Baker is an American singer and songwriter who has had a passion for music since the 1970s. As you can see, she is a true legend.

This is the only Southern California appearance so you don’t want to miss this.

The Greek Theatre is located at 2700 North Vermont Avenue in Los Angeles, CA.

The performance will take place at the theatre at 8 PM.

Tickets go on sale August 10th at noon through AXS.com. Ticket prices range from $59.50 to $149.50, plus applicable service changes.

Clinic of Kohll’s

Preventative Medical Clinic of Kohll’s Pharmacy … Non-Surgical Beauty is on the Rise for Patients on the Go!

Study: On average, women spend more than $313 a month on their appearance. For millions of Americans, it’s not just products, but procedures keeping them looking good.”It’s addicting. You start with Botox, you want a little more you realize how fast and easy it is” said Bobbie Vetock, clinic director at Preventative Medical Clinic of Kohll’s Pharmacy and HomeCare.

Treatments like Botox helped to boost business at the clinic off 114th & Dodge. Vetock says sales have doubled in the past two years.According to a study done by One Poll for Groupon, the average woman spends about $313 a month on her appearance.That adds up to $3,756 a year, and more than $225,300 over a lifetime.​Vetock tells me the most popular procedure at her office is Botox because of the quick results and minimal amount of time spent on the procedure.”People are coming on their lunch breaks, scheduling appointments over lunch. You can be in and out of here in 15-45 minutes, and look different,” said Vetock.

Another popular service available at Preventative Medical Clinic of Kohll’s Pharamacy: Many of us can point to any part of our body to find some unwanted fat. And for those who have extra fat on their chin, you’re in luck. Preventative Medical Clinic of Kohll’s are using treatments, such as Kybella, to tighten the chin area. Preventative Medical Clinic of Kohll’s Pharmacy was one of the first in the Nebraska to offer Kybella, a drug that helps to dissolve fat below the jawline in order to minimize the appearance of a double chin.​”It really revolutionized the treatment for saggy chin, or chin that has unwanted fat” said Justin Kohll V.P.  Patients don’t go under the knife. Kybella is injected into the chin area to get rid of the unwanted fat.​​

SculpSure is another popular procedure drawing patients to clinics around the Omaha metro area,It’s a non-surgical fat-reduction treatment that uses controlled cooling to eliminate stubborn fat that resists all efforts through diet and exercise.