Posts tagged with "sports poll"

graph via Mina Tocalini for use by 360 Magazine

Russian Athletics Poll

The Russian invasion of Ukraine features death, destruction, a refugee crisis reminiscent of World War II and worldwide condemnation. But beyond the bombs and acts of inhumanity lay multiple levels of lesser significance than the human toll, including the desire for reprisals and boycotts of all things Russian.

Included in that discussion are matters from the world of sports, and a Seton Hall Sports Poll has found that a clear majority of Americans say that governing bodies around the world should use their platforms to sanction national governments and their athletes for hostile actions against other nations and/or human right violations.

The Poll found that by a margin of 61 to 17 percent the general population of the U.S. supports such sanctions, with 67 percent of sports fans and 71 percent of avid fans in agreement. Those who said no to sanctions numbered just 16 percent of sports fans and 15 percent of avid fans. The remainder did not know or held no opinion.

The Seton Hall Sports Poll was conducted on March 11-14 across the United States using a national representative sample weighted according to gender, age, ethnicity, education, income and geography, based on U.S. Census Bureau figures. The Poll featured 1,528 adult respondents with a margin of error of +/- 3.2 percent. 

Daniil Medvedev and Grand Slam Tennis

Asked specifically whether Russian tennis star Daniil Medvedev should be banned from upcoming Grand Slam tournaments, the general population said yes by a 43-30 percent margin (27 percent “don’t know/no opinion”). Among sports fans, the margin for banning him was 44-33 percent (23 percent don’t know/no opinion) and among avid fans, it was 48-30 percent in favor of a ban, with 22 percent saying “don’t know/no opinion”. Medvedev has been ranked number one in the world, but will lose that position when the new rankings are issued on Monday.

“What is happening in Ukraine is a human tragedy that is significantly more important than sports,” said Professor Charles Grantham, Director of the Center for Sport Management within Seton Hall’s Stillman School of Business, which sponsors the Poll. “Banning one of tennis’ top players from a Grand Slam tournament may seem punitive but not compared to Russia’s actions on the world stage.”  

Ice Skating

The support for banishment grew even stronger when respondents were asked whether the International Skating Union (ISU) got it right in excluding Russia from the World Figure Skating Championships later this month. That action bars, among the team, Olympic gold medalist Anna Shcherbakova and 15-year old Kamila Valieva, who made headlines earlier this year after a doping controversy. Among the general population, 54 percent supported the ban with only 20 percent opposing it (26 percent said “don’t know/no opinion”). Among sports fans, the ban was supported by a 59-21 percent margin (20 percent “don’t know/no opinion”), and among avid fans, support was 63-20 percent with 17 percent in the “don’t know/no opinion” category.

World Cup Soccer

FIFA, the governing body of world soccer, has banned Russia from the 2022 World Cup competition, and this too was heavily supported by the American public. The general population favored the ban by 64-15 percent, a greater than 4 to 1 margin (21 percent said “don’t know/no opinion”). Among sports fans, support for the ban was even greater, with 69-16 percent favoring sanctions (15 percent said “don’t know/no opinion”). Among avid fans, support rose again to 71-15 percent (14 percent said “don’t know/no opinion”).

Moving Soccer Championship from Russia

Support was similarly overwhelming for UEFA, the governing body of European soccer, for dropping St. Petersburg, Russia as the site of its Champions League final (relocating it to Paris). The general population of the U.S. approved of this move and sanctions by 69-10 percent. Among sports fans, that approval rose to 74-10 percent (a greater than 7 to 1 margin). Among avid fans, an even greater margin approved of these sanctions, with 79-8 percent (nearly 10 to 1) in favor. The “don’t know/no opinion” on this was 21, 16 and 13 percent respectively.  

“Soccer is the world’s most popular sport and FIFA’s World Cup and UEFA’s Champions League are its prestigious tournaments,” said Seton Hall Marketing Professor and Poll Methodologist Daniel Ladik. “The exclusion of Russian athletes, teams, and venues sends a small but important message that the world does not approve and will not abide the actions of the Russian state.” 

Despite NFL Settlement, Nation Evenly Divided on Kaepernick Impact

The confidential settlement of Colin Kaepernick’s lawsuit against the NFL finds the nation evenly divided on its impact on his protests.

In a Seton Hall Sports Poll conducted this week, by a margin of 44-42%, the public says the settlement has not diminished the impact of his protest.

By 45-40%, the public believes the settlement is an admission by the NFL that collusion by NFL teams against him took place.

When the question of approval for Kaepernick was asked in September 2017, his support was only 32%, with disapproval at 44%.

While white respondents are evenly divided on whether the settlement diminished the impact of the protests, by 2 to 1 African-Americans believe that it does. Whites are also evenly divided on whether it the settlement is an admission of collusion by the NFL, but African-Americans believe it is by 3 to 1.

794 adult Americans were polled on both landlines and cellphones, a margin of +/- 3.5%.

Despite a fairly close overall division on whether or not the settlement was an admission of collusion on the part of the NFL, by more than a 3-1 margin (41-13%), respondents believed that Kaepernick’s chance of being signed to a new NFL contract has decreased because of the settlement.

“People remain divided regarding the message of his kneeling during the national anthem,” noted Rick Gentile, director of the poll, which is sponsored by the Sharkey Institute in the Stillman School of Business. “But there certainly seems to be a feeling that doors are not going to open for the renewal of his career.”

Disapproval of U. of Mississippi Basketball Protesters

In a related matter, by a 42-29% margin, people disapproved of the University of Mississippi basketball players kneeling last weekend to protest an on campus rally honoring Confederate soldiers. That margin draws a close comparison to the September 2017 Kaepernick findings. However, 12 out of 13 African-Americans offered support of the protest.

Results breakdown can be found online at http://blogs.shu.edu/sportspoll/2019/02/28/despite-nfl-settlement-nation-evenly-divided-on-kaepernick-impact/

The Official Seton Hall Sports Poll podcast discussing this topic with Seth Everett and Rick Gentile can be found at http://itunes.apple.com/mt/podcast/seton-hall-sports-poll/id1053266467.

Nation ‘Tired’ of Seeing Patriots in Super Bowl

Nearly half of Americas say they are tired of seeing the New England Patriots in the Super Bowl, according to a Seton Hall Sports Poll conducted this week.

46% said they were “tired” of seeing them, with only 25% finding their appearance making the game “more interesting.”

Among those who follow the NFL closely or very closely, the number rises to 62% who are tired of seeing them against only 27% who believe their appearance makes the game more interesting.

The poll received 985 adult responses across the country, using both landlines and cellphones, with a margin of error of +/- 3.2%.

Tom Brady
The numbers are not very good for New England quarterback Tom Brady either, whose favorable rating has fallen to only 29% after a high of 61% in February 2015, when the Poll first asked about him.  That was before the penalty for “Deflategate” was instituted, and his favorable rating fell to 34% by that October. 

Brady’s favorable rating was only 24% among women and 35% among men. While the overall rating is 29% favorable to 23% unfavorable, among those that follow the NFL closely it is even.

Bill Belichick
Patriots’ coach Bill Belichick had only a 20% favorable rating in this poll, about even with his standing in October of 2015 in the wake of “Deflategate.”

“Despite his brilliance on the field, it appears the effects of ‘Deflategate’ and the suggestion that Brady was a cheater may linger for the remainder of his career,” noted Rick Gentile, director of the poll, which is sponsored by the Sharkey Institute of the Stillman School of Business at Seton Hall.  “As for ‘Patriots Fatigue’ it will be interesting to see how it effects the ratings.”

Legal Sports Betting
Meanwhile, as legalized sports betting begins a growth period on a state-by-state basis, Americans had a strong feeling that it will inevitably lead to scandal.  Asked if they believe legal betting can lead to cheating or fixing of games by players, 81% said yes, and 79% said it can lead to cheating or fixing of games by referees or umpires.

What is music to a network ear however, is that 71% say they would be more likely to watch a broadcast of a game on which they bet. Even better news is by more than 5 to 1, people 18-29 are more inclined to watch a game they bet on. This is similar with Seton Hall Sports Poll’s finding when the question was first asked last fall.

WEIGHING IN ON RULE CHANGES IN WAKE OF POST-SEASON CONTROVERSIES

Replay for Pass Interference
Asked if replay review should be allowed for judgment calls like pass interference, 82% said yes, with only 10% saying no, a result consistent with those who follow the NFL closely.  

Overtime Possession Rule
And on the question of each team getting at least one possession in overtime, even if the first team scores a touchdown, 58% said both teams should have the ball, with only 33% saying the rule (a touchdown on first possession ends the game), should be left alone.

This release may be found online at http://blogs.shu.edu/sportspoll/

The Official Seton Hall Sports Poll podcast discussing this topic with Seth Everett and Rick Gentile can be found at http://itunes.apple.com/mt/podcast/seton-hall-sports-poll/id1053266467.