Posts tagged with "graphic Designer"

Dolce & Gabbana x Gianpiero D’Alessandro collection via Cara Forte Diaz D&G PR & Editorial for use by 360 Magazine

D&G × Gianpiero D’Alessandro

Dolce & Gabbana join forces with cartoon designer Gianpiero D’Alessandro to debut their brand-new limited-edition T-shirt collection launching TODAY!

The exclusive selection of tees was created by the renowned designer, writer, artist, graphic designer and visionary Gianpiero. His work pulls inspiration from the likes of Walt Disney and Andy Warhol, with bright and animated references.

Having worked with esteemed individuals and brands such as Snoop Dogg, Justin Bieber, Nike and Netflix, its only right that Gianpiero teams up with Dolce & Gabbana for the new collection.

Regarding the alliance, he stated, “For me, Dolce&Gabbana represents everything that’s beautiful about Italy. I still remember the first time I met Stefano and Domenico and I gave them some drawings I had made for them. During that meeting, they began to tell me about their story and how it all began.

I remember the passion in their eyes. It’s a pleasure for me to collaborate with the brand that has written and continues to write the story of the fashion world.

“Proudly made in Italy”. I chose to create these graphic elements for the collection because in my imagination, Dolce&Gabbana is a happy “place” and I wanted these designs to incorporate certain emotional virtues for people to experience, such as a carefree childhood. The “Sweety Bunny” character is accompanied by “Baby Carrot” and together they represent the concept of family. Of love. Values that Dolce&Gabbana has always infused into in every single one of its projects.”

Dolce & Gabbana x Gianpiero D’Alessandro collection via Cara Forte Diaz D&G PR & Editorial for use by 360 Magazine
Dolce & Gabbana x Gianpiero D’Alessandro collection via Cara Forte Diaz D&G PR & Editorial for use by 360 Magazine
Dolce & Gabbana x Gianpiero D’Alessandro collection via Cara Forte Diaz D&G PR & Editorial for use by 360 Magazine
Images courtesy of Dolce & Gabbana

Gaming illustration by Gabrielle Marchan for 360 Magazine

How Graphic Design is Used for Online Gaming

When most individuals are asked what graphic designers do, they are likely to say they create logos, business cards, t-shirts, or other 2D images. Even though we engage with visual designers’ work every time we choose which games to play online, few people will mention their importance in game design. 

However, graphic design has taken on new dimensions in the twenty-first century, and with the growing online digital environment, it now plays a more critical function than ever before. Graphic design may be seen everywhere on the digital screen, from building web interfaces to online marketing, social media to online games.

The gaming industry is perhaps one of the most challenging fields in digital design. Of course, you need motion graphics, but you also need to pay attention to detail for credible elements and gaming instructions. Nevertheless, it’s safe to conclude that the gaming industry has progressed significantly. This article will look at how graphic design is vital in online gaming.

Marketing

Because many graphic designers work in marketing, their ability to create appealing visuals could benefit video games. Design specialists will capture people’s attention and enhance revenue long term by developing gorgeous banners. As users’ attention spans have shrunk dramatically in recent years, a visual approach gradually takes over written content.

User Interface

A graphic designer creates a game’s user interface (UI). The user interface is a collection of visual elements that allow the player to interact with the game and access various tools and settings. Several user interfaces are frequently found in a single game. When you initially start a game, the first UI you see is usually the launch screen, which sends you to the Menu, which is another UI. Each menu item opens to its own UI, which uses components like volume sliders and mouse sensitivity to assist you in navigating through each setting.

A graphic designer is responsible for selecting where all of these visual components and text should be placed so that they do not obstruct the player’s main view. Therefore, an excellent understanding of visual hierarchy is one of the most crucial skills a graphic designer possesses.

Gaming

So far, we’ve looked at how graphics are utilized in online games to attract attention and convey instructions, but what about the game itself? The motion graphics are well-articulated to guarantee that they achieve their full potential in terms of authenticity. Because online games are frequently adaptations of real-life games, such as casino games, getting them as similar to the real thing as possible is critical to ensure the gamer has a good time. Some of the most well-known gaming studios have reaped the benefits of advances in graphic design and computer technology, producing games that are as immersive as they come.

Video games are multi-faceted bodies with a semiotic landscape as one of them. Signs, display panels, visual announcements, and various other features distinguish games. These graphic objects are frequently employed in real life, such as in ads and the in-game world. As a result, it’s critical to pay close attention to them, enlisting a graphic designer’s help.

Graphic designers’ responsibilities do not end with the elements mentioned above. These designers will always be in demand for a variety of projects. In addition, graphic design is an integral part of gaming since it allows you to fully immerse yourself in the experience. We may take the technology employed in the graphical design component of games for granted, still, it has taken a long road of experimentation in line with general advances in computer technology to get to where we are now.

Overall, graphic design has become an essential part of many industries. It has been established via the study of online gaming that graphic design is critical to the success of the digital game. Consider this: without design in marketing, fewer people will be drawn to the game; without design in instructions, people may be confused about how the game works; and without design in the game itself, people may be dissatisfied with the game they have played.

Zara Biggs, Nike Communications, for use by 360 Magazine

BOMBAY SAPPHIRE HOLIDAY DISPLAYS LIGHT UP NYC

BOMBAY SAPPHIRE hosted its inaugural holiday window display to honor and rejuvenate imagination and creativity in New York City. The BOMBAY SAPPHIRE holiday windows gain inspiration from the traditional 5th Avenue holiday window displays while serving a greater purpose. The intention of the displays is to revive the creativity that has been deprived of downtown Manhattan since the beginning of the pandemic.

The storefront series was held in SoHo through December 19, in partnership with artist Shavanté Royster, fashion designer Romeo Hunte and NYC dancer Nicole von Arx.

Shavanté Royster

The Brooklyn-based Shavanté Royster is a graphic designer and illustrator, working in the creative industry since 2009. Growing up in a military family, often having to travel during her life motivated Shavanté’s innovation. Through her art, Shavanté often takes inspiration from travel, expressing this through shapes and rich colors. Shavanté’s work is comprised of digital illustration, painting and mixed media.

Romeo Hunte

Romeo Hunte New York is a lifestyle apparel brand designed in NYC for consumers who appreciate sophisticated details. The edgy aesthetic that the collection radiates mixes both feminine and masculine characteristics. Romeo Hunte pieces blend lavish outerwear with contemporary apparel. The Romeo Hunte woman and man can be described as a “dynamic duo” that appreciates the arts and pop culture with a modern flare.

Nicole von Arx

Nicole von Arx (NVA) studied Ballet, Contemporary and Hip Hop in Geneva, Switzerland at Dance Area, shortly after traveling to New York in 2008 to attend school at the Alvin Ailey School, graduating in 2011. Currently based among NYC and Geneva, NVA is a dancer and choreographer in both dance scenes. NVA has collaborated with the most notable choreographers in New York as a creator, dancer and teacher. Continuing her career, NVA has also worked independently as a choreographer with musicians, film directors and photographers.

The visionaries that were created through the course of the display aimed to fill the empty storefronts with avant-garde ‘windows of art.’ The pandemic has transformed the lives of creatives, small businesses and retail in New York and all over the world. BOMBAY SAPPHIRE worked to ensure that the artistic society would be celebrated and uplifted this holiday season with their holiday displays.

Each window highlighted a winter dreamscape created by artist Shavanté Royster. Both Shavanté and Romeo Hunte’s creative point-of-views joined forces to emulate the holiday magic of 5th avenue. Live models were seen wearing Romeo’s winter apparel upon Shavanté’s backdrops, with performances by NYC dancers.

Romeo’s devoted window showcased people draped in his designs that were created personally for the display. Romeo set the scene of a holiday celebration before a show over cocktails. The garments were designed with inspiration from Shavanté, with the backdrop and fashion coinciding throughout the display.

Romeo spoke on the experience of designing for the holiday displays, stating, “It’s been a joy to work on BOMBAY SAPPHIRE’s Holiday Storefront Series which pays homage to exciting young creative talents everywhere and the tenacity of New York City coming back after the pandemic. It was refreshing to collaborate with artist Shavanté Royster and the dancers as mixed media has always been an important part of my work, so it was cool to build and see the narrative of the holiday windows come to life with them through different facets, such as the dancers wearing some of my designs. I hope everyone can leave the windows feeling a burst of creativity and inspiration for the holidays, and hope for the year ahead!”

art illustration by Gabrielle Marchan for use by 360 magazine

Seven Powerful Graphic Design Tips

Being a graphic designer is so much more than what meets the eye. It’s about visual communication; it uses typography, images, textures, colors to transmit specific messages to social groups, with specific objectives.

Although every designer is not just a portrait hanging on the wall, is a specialist who has their own style and specialties, there are some principles of design and basic concepts that seem to span across all areas of design.

Accordingly, I asked graphic designers what design principles they follow and what they would share with their peers-designers.

By gathering a variety of different opinions and fundamentals of graphic design, I rounded up ten essential design tips that can help you create a better-looking design in no time.

What things can you do to help refine your skills and prepare for a career in graphic design? Keep reading for insights from professional graphic designers. 

1. Explore different learning methods

There are tons of resources out there for learning the fundamentals of graphic design – beyond books and traditional academic routes. You can learn so much from practicing on your own and checking out case studies from other designers.

Here are a few great resources:

  • Behance –Behance is one of the best sources of inspiration. But you can also learn a lot from the community by sharing and receiving feedback from other designers.
  • Skillshare – Watching tutorials is a smart addition to your learning process. Just remember it’s not all about learning color theories, or font hierarchy — tutorials on how to train your mind to think like a graphic designer and understanding customer’s wants and needs are also key.
  • Networking – Networking is a fantastic way to communicate with people with a common profession and special interest and with potential clients — this is equally important as the work you produce.

2. Look for inspiration outside of your niche

When making up a logo, it makes sense to look at other logos for inspiration, right? It does. But it also makes sense to look for inspiration elsewhere.

For instance, you might look to fashion for texture inspiration or paintings for color palette ideas. Look at the shape of furniture or the way various textures interact with one another for ideas on how to combine elements together effectively.

Looking for inspiration outside of your niche allows you to understand the core principles of what makes a design “good” without the boring conceptions you have about how a design should look.

3. The typography is a king

Typography has a profound impact on the way individuals perceive a product. The right typography creates an enjoyable experience, while a type that’s hard to read or doesn’t match the message of the product can negatively impact. That’s why it’s absolutely worth spending the time and effort to find just the right typographic fit.

If you want to learn how to choose the right fonts for your product, 3 most important considerations:

  1. Don’t overdo the number of fonts
  2. Use contrasting fonts to stand out
  3. Give each letter its personal space

Keep in mind that choosing the right typography for your product projects takes experimentation — expect to try different options until you find the perfect option. That said, the investment’s completely worth it: don’t underestimate the impact that thoughtfully selected type will make on your work.

4. Colors are powerful – especially in graphic design

When it comes to designs, selecting a stunning color palette is no easy feat—and it’s certainly one that any designer or illustrator could spend hours achieving excellence.

Here’s a brief rundown of insights and tricks:

  • Start with a limited color palette. When you’re just starting out, stick to 3 to 4 colors. With a limited color palette, you can see whether the colors work well or make your eyes bleed. Then explore more complex combinations as you go along.
  • Use contrasting colors. When your colors don’t have the right amount of contrast, your customers will not know where or how to look at your illustration. Worse, your audiences’ eyeballs could get strained, especially if your chosen colors all fight for attention. To check if your illustration has the right amount of contrast, add a black-and-white adjustment layer on your illustration. That helps you adjust the brightness and darkness, play around with the colors and see what works.

5. Understand color psychology

This is a well-known fact: color impacts a user’s perception and interaction with your design. Believe it or not, the right color can keep the customers returning, while the wrong one can scare the audience away.

These are the commonly accepted meanings in most of the Western countries for the most common colors (or hues):

  • Red: love, passion, anger, courage
  • Orange: joy, warmth, sunshine, creativity
  • Yellow: happiness, enlightenment, spring
  • Green: freshness, growth, wealth, balance, health, youthfulness.
  • Blue: freedom, imagination, inspiration
  • Purple: spirituality, the subconscious, dignity
  • Black: power, elegance, sophistication
  • White: purity and innocence

It’s worth mentioning that different cultures interpret color meaning differently.

6. Hierarchy

Visual hierarchy is a vital component of good design. If everything on your page looks like it has the same importance, that’s not a good sign. You need to use visual cues to tell people what to pay attention to first, second, third, etc.

Create visual hierarchy through things like size, perspective (that creates an illusion of depth), or color. Typographic hierarchy can be created by using different typefaces, sizes, and font weights.

The point is to give visual importance to some elements over others.

7. Practice, practice, practice

So what is one biggest piece of design advice for newcomers and veteran creatives alike?

No matter the size or scale of the project, or the trajectory of your career: “You’ve got to do the work.”

Practice makes perfect! Take time every week to create designs exceptionally for the practice. Pick a type of design, a brand, or a concept you want to scrutinize, and then make a design or two.

Consider redoing existing designs to see what you might do differently or enhance. This can be an excellent exercise in figuring out why designs work the way they do and exploring your own creativity.

Looking For Some Stunning Mockups?

Looking for some high-quality mockups to make your designs shine? We’ve got you covered.

Head on over to the site for a complete collection of beautiful mockups – for more details check ls.graphics, to find mockups – made for designers, by designers.

Whether it be for a client presentation or to enhance your design portfolio, use these mockups to present your designs in the best possible light.

Wrapping Up

Like everything else, skills take time to hone and sharpen. Trust your gut, go down a rabbit hole of researching things you like, use those things for your design content, and follow these 7 graphic design tips.

5 Essential Skills of a Graphic Designer

Are you thinking of pursuing a career in graphic design? Be sure to master these essential skills of a graphic designer.

If you have a passion for art and would like to earn money from it, look no further.

Graphic design is something that many businesses invest in because it allows them to create customized advertisements. Aside from that, they can use graphic design for logos, essentially helping them make a name for themselves as a brand.

Most of the job skills of a graphic designer aren’t that hard to obtain, but they require a lot of patience and determination. Graphic design is an art, so you’ll have to spend time practicing before you’re ready to sell your work.

Keep on reading to learn about 5 essential graphic designer skills!

1. Creativity

One of the most important skills a graphic designer must have is creativity. As a graphic designer, you must be able to come up with new ideas on the fly. No graphic designer works with one client and all projects are unique.

When working with multiple clients, you’ll need to give them ideas that will help them achieve whatever their goals are. While it’s acceptable to have a certain style, you don’t want one client’s designs to look similar to another’s. This can create branding problems because consumers might confuse one client for another.

With creativity comes the ability to draw sketches, brainstorm, balance artistry with technique, and pay attention to detail. If you’re not a creative person, you’ll have a hard time coming up with ideas and helping clients see through theirs.

2. Communication

Communication is the most important skill after creativity. Graphic designers don’t pay themselves. Instead, they work with clients that pay them to complete projects. When working with clients, a graphic designer must be able to portray their ideas and give visual representations of what a client wants.

Graphic design skills revolve around being able to multi-task and work with a team, and communication will play a role in almost every task. Any time you make something, you’ll need to communicate it to your client.

Whenever a client makes a request, you must be able to fill in the gaps to understand what exactly they want.

This skill is especially important if you’re working remotely because it’s much harder to work with a client when you can’t see them in person. When working remotely, most of your communication will take place over video chats.

Without being able to quickly sketch something for a client, you need to know how to explain what you’re thinking about.

3. Time Management

Most graphic designers work with multiple clients at once because the work usually doesn’t take up an entire day. Because of this, a graphic designer must be able to effectively manage their time if they’d like to earn a decent income.

This line of work revolves around completing projects within a set period. When working with multiple clients, you must keep track of when projects are due. Most designers will allot certain hours to a client so that they can stay consistent while working.

Knowing when to prioritize a project is also important. For example, a project that has a deadline in 2 weeks should be focused on more than a project that’s due in 2 months. However, you can’t neglect anything as you must ensure that all projects are steadily progressing.

4. Technology

Understanding how to use technology is necessary when becoming a graphic designer because most of your work will take place on the computer across various programs.

You’ll need to know how to make something on a program and transfer it to another location while preserving its quality.

The most important thing to focus on is learning how to use the programs that you’ll be designing on. Programs like Photoshop provide users with a plethora of tools and features that allow them to manipulate their projects to their liking.

You’ll also need to know how your computer functions because Windows and Mac have many differences. For example, knowing how to remove icons from top bar Mac will give you more space to work on projects, something that many people are unaware of.

Tech skills will come in handy when working with clients remotely. You’ll have a better understanding of what kind of things you can get done and what will require in-person exchanges. You can then provide clients with this information so that they understand what needs to be done.

5. Typography

Typography is the skill of making text look visually appealing. This is often done with copywriting and it has a major role in graphic design. Typography skills typically come with creativity, but they’re something that most people should focus on because many clients will want text in their designs.

Keep in mind that most people looking for graphic designers are trying to create ads and build a brand. When you come up with a good font, your client can build off that and start getting recognized more often.
Now You Know the Skills of a Graphic Designer

Graphic design skills revolve around being artistic and knowing how to associate with clients. After obtaining the skills of a graphic designer, you can start working for clients and earn a decent income. Graphic design is something that will never go away, so you can get started whenever you’re comfortable.

We encourage you to start brushing up on your art skills. If you can’t draw but know how to design things on the computer, start focusing on that. When you’re ready to start taking clients, you simply need to find them on a job board or you can apply to companies.

Browse our articles to learn more about a variety of topics!

Jeff Langlois, 360 MAGAZINE, The Mill, LA, photography, fine arts

Jeff Langlois

It took a one-way road trip for Jeff Langlois to cultivate a passion for photography. The adventure to LA brought forth stunning deserts and mountainous peaks, as he drove from Minneapolis through the Rockies – in a 2002 Honda Civic; eager to jumpstart a career at a commercial house called The Mill. The best way to balance out the fast-paced, unpredictable, and ever-changing environment that is advertising, was to break away and see what the west coast really looks like. Traveling solo allowed him to arrive in beautiful destinations and wait for these locations to unveil their scenic characteristics. Jeff notes that the best shots always come unexpectedly. Now while still mainly shooting the outdoors, he plans just enough to get him out and moving around, but his best and most memorable shots come unexpectedly. It’s about showing up and being patient and receptive to what’s going on. 

Erich Strenger × Porsche

No one has shaped the image of Porsche quite as much as Erich Strenger. Introducing a new book, “Erich Strenger: A Graphical Report” from publishers Delius Klasing that is the first ever comprehensive collection of Erich Strenger’s work with Porsche between 1951 and 1988.

Strenger left his mark on Porsche with a design language that continues to bear his signature to this day.
This book showcases a first-ever comprehensive collection of Strenger’s work, created over the course of his collaboration with Porsche between 1951 and 1988. Strenger was instrumental in influencing and molding the image of the Porsche brand as we know it today 
Erich Strenger (1922-1993), an author, photographer, designer, and illustrator, left his mark on the look of Porsche during the company’s formative years in the early ’50s and ’60s with a design language that, for the most part, continues to bear his signature to this day. He also created countless print products for this successful sports car maker, including Christophorus Zeitschrift für die Freunde des Hauses Porsche, the brainchild of Erich Strenger and Richard von Frankenberg. Over the course of a collaborative relationship with Porsche spanning more than thirty years, the graphic artist, who started out working alone, founded an advertising agency in the heart of Stuttgart with a staff of up to eleven permanent employees. There, Strenger would later create countless racing posters, much like those he had designed in his early days working for Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche AG as a freelancer in the early ’50s. 
Strenger was instrumental in influencing and molding the image of the Porsche brand as we know it today. This book showcases a first-ever comprehensive collection of his work, created over the course of his collaboration with Porsche between 1951 and 1988. This monographic and monothematic publication brings the noteworthy highlights of his work to the forefront, focusing attention on the designer’s approaches and methods.

Purchase here