Posts tagged with "Venice Biennale"

Glastress illustration done by Kaelen Felix for 360 MAGAZINE

2021 U.S. Premiere of Glasstress

Some of the world’s leading contemporary artists are invited to breathe new life into centuries-old glassmaking in Venice ― maestros of glassblowing from the legendary Berengo Studio residency help artists manifest their visions.

Among the 34 artists: Ai Weiwei, Fred Wilson, Joyce J. Scott, Jimmie Durham, Ugo Rondinone, Fiona Banner, Vik Muniz, Monica Bonvicini, Jake & Dinos Chapman, Laure Prouvost, Renate Bertlmann, Thomas Schütte, Loris Gréaud, and Erwin Wurm.

  • There is every reason this year to have a world view,” says Irvin Lippman, the Boca Raton Museum of Art’s Executive Director, as South Florida boldly ushers in the new year with the national premiere of Glasstress 2021 Boca Raton.
  • Three years in the making, with 2020 being such a challenging year to coordinate an international exhibition of this size and scope, the effort serves as an important reassurance that art is an essential and enduring part of humanity.”
  • “This is also a tribute to the resilience of Venice’s surviving the floods and continuing to make art through the pandemic,” adds Irvin Lippman.

The new exhibition runs January 27 through September 5, 2021 and the Museum will feature online initiatives for virtual viewing. Watch the video here featuring interviews with some of the artists in the new exhibition. The 34 artists in this new, never before seen edition of Glasstress were all invited by Adriano Berengo to work alongside his master glass artisans at the Berengo Studio on the island of Murano in the Venetian lagoon. Most of these works in glass have never been seen elsewhere, and were handpicked by Kathleen Goncharov, the Museum’s Senior Curator who traveled to Italy in 2019.

With incredible energy, the Studio has brought a new vision on how to stimulate today’s leading artists into thinking how the medium of glass can be made into dramatic and provocative works of contemporary art. Most of these artists have, during their careers, been invited to participate in the Venice Biennale. Some of the works were created during the pandemic lockdowns, with artists collaborating remotely via Zoom with their glass artisan partners after initial on-site work at the studio in Venice.

“Unlike the past and the present, what comes next for our world presents itself as constant possibility, always transforming as we move forward in time,” says Adriano Berengo. This concept of transformation has always held an affinity with glass, a medium which – as the name Glasstress suggests – exists in a state of constant tension. Life needs tension, it needs energy, and a vibrant exchange of ideas.”

The exhibition presents 34 new works that explore some of today’s pressing subjects, including human rights, climate change, racial justice, gender issues and politics. The Boca Raton Museum of Art has dedicated more than 6,500 square feet of exhibition space to this collection. A fully illustrated catalogue is also available.

The mission of Glasstress is to restore the visibility and reputation of Murano glass, after decades of closures of ancient, centuries-old glass furnaces. Instead of creating decorative objects with glass, these artists are invited to create original works, often on a massive scale. They collaborate with glass masters whose expertise has been developed over generations in Venice. Most of these artists have never worked with glass, so they unite their artistic ideas with the technical expertise of their skilled collaborators.

The results are breathtaking. The first installation visitors to the Museum will encounter is Sala Longhi by Fred Wilson. He created this series at Berengo Studio after the Biennale exhibited his work about Black residents of Venice from the Renaissance to the present. This installation features an ornate white chandelier with 29 glass panels that mirror 18th-century Venetian artist Pietro Longhi’s paintings. Instead of canvases, Wilson shows the viewer only the whites of the eyes of his Black subjects through cutouts in black reflective glass.

“We have brought Glasstress to countries around the world for ten years, seeking to expand and enliven international awareness of the variety and richness of contemporary artists using glass in their creative practices,” adds Adriano Berengo. “In the past, its place in the art world might have seemed uncertain. But now in this latest edition of Glasstress, the first after a global pandemic, one thing we know for certain: glass endures. Life is fragile, just as glass is fragile, yet in this fragility there is also strength.”

“It is in this spirit of experimentation that Glasstress Boca Raton 2021 explores the limitless potential of glassblowing. “We realize how far we have come as we approach the 60th anniversary of the American studio glass movement that launched in 1962 through the efforts of Harvey Littleton and Dominick Labino,” adds Irvin Lippman. “This presentation of Glasstress is also a tribute to them.”

This show also unveils the Museum’s new acquisition for its collection, created in the Berengo Studio – Glass Big Brother, a sculpture by Song Dong, one of contemporary Chinese art’s leading figures. The large-scale ceiling installation is 11 feet long and reaches all the way to the floor. Thirty surveillance cameras are ensconced from top to bottom, looking out at all directions around the chandelier.

The installation Rosemarie’s Divorce, by Renate Bertlmann, unites aspects from Rosemarie’s Baby (1983), her multi-part installation about the ambivalent relationship between mother and child, and Discordo Ergo Sum, a field of knife-roses she exhibited at the Venice Biennale in 2019. The monstrously enlarged glass pacifier is an image she has used since the mid-1970s referencing sexuality and motherhood. It is flanked by two knife-roses made of deep black glass.

The Italian artist Monica Bonvicini’s deeply psychological work addresses themes of sexuality, power, and relationships in male-oriented domains. Her visits to sadomasochist nightclubs with Gay male friends are the inspiration for Bonded. She won the prestigious Golden Lion award at the 1999 Venice Biennale. DNA HAS NO COLOR is a new statement from Nancy Burson that is a powerful work about the illegitimacy of racism. This is a continuation of the project that Zaha Hadid commissioned Burson to develop for the London Millennium Dome. Burson is known for biology-related work, including her use of cutting edge facial morphing technology for art that shows what individuals would look like as a different race.

The Pandemic Oculus, (2020), by Tim Tate, whose work explores the worlds of loss, memory, recovery, and hope. As an HIV-positive man, he lived through the worst of the AIDS epidemic during the 1980s and 1990s, and now through the current pandemic. In the Museum’s exhibition catalogue, the artist states that Pandemic Oculus also honors the many unsung heroes around the world: nurses, teachers, essential employees, grandparents caring for children so that parents can work, and so many more. Tate is the co-founder of the Washington Glass Studio in Washington, DC. He is also the co-moderator, along with William Warmus, of the 21st Century Glass group on Facebook, which has shared and discussed over 10,000 images of sculptural glass from around the world.

Erwin Wurm’s wry sense of humor permeates his most famous works and has served him well in creating a poignant cultural commentary throughout his career. Wurm produced this triad in cold hard glass at the Berengo Studio. They are smaller versions of the massive bronze sculpture of a hot water bottle with legs, Big Mutter, that he created for the Venice Biennale in 2020. In the exhibition catalogue, the show’s curator Kathleen Goncharov describes these “mothers” as neither warm nor comforting . . . their stubby little legs imply flight when called upon to be caregivers.

At the Berengo Studio, Jimmie Durham created a series of eight giant cougar heads suspended on metal armatures. Caught in suspension as they gaze at one another, their collective roar remains frozen between them. The cougar is one of the most sacred animals in Cherokee mythology, and the influence of Native-American culture vs. Western rationalism is evident in his work. The artist’s long trajectory includes his work during the civil rights movement and as a political organizer for the American Indian Movement. In 2019, Durham was the recipient of the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement award at the 58th Venice Biennale.

In the Museum’s exhibition catalogue, curator Kathleen Goncharov describes Prune Nourry as no stranger to illness . . . her work always dealing with science and bioethics from a feminist perspective, a focus that has intensified since her breast cancer diagnosis in 2018. At the Berengo Studio, she created River Woman, a transparent skeletal sculpture based on an anatomical drawing of the human vascular system. While its form may be human, the arteries resemble rivers, streams and trees that suffer in their own way too, from human abuse rather than disease.

Ugo Rondinone represented his home country in the Swiss Pavilion at the 52nd Venice Biennale (2007). In this work, the twelve glass horses cast in beautiful shades of blue all face different directions, creating delicate light games with their reflections and shadows in continuous motion. In the context of this installation, the reappearing motif of a horse (which has a long tradition in the history of art), evokes alienation and a subversive twist emblematic of Rondinone’s works.

Ai Weiwei's

DNA HAS NO COLOR, Nancy Burson (2019) for 360 Magazine

Purchase our Glasstress issue HERE.

Artist Pension Trust Announces Art Display

Carefully curated works are featured throughout the New York City building, including in Danny Meyer’s Union Square Hospitality Group’s newest spaces, Manhatta and Bay Room

Artist Pension Trust (APT) is pleased to announce its new project at 28 Liberty Street, a 60-story skyscraper, located in Manhattan’s Financial District. APT artist works will be featured throughout Fosun International’s 28 Liberty building, including at Manhatta, the Danny Meyer-run Union Square Hospitality Group’s (USHG) newly-opened restaurant and bar, as well as Bay Room, USHG’s first-ever event space, both of which occupy the 60th floor of the building.

“Art has always been essential part of our restaurant designs,” says Meyer. “We are thrilled to include over 100 pieces of artwork from Artist Pension Trust in Manhatta and Bay Room, both by top local talent and established international artists. We love APT’s mission of helping artists and fostering a community between them, and we feel privileged to benefit from their meaningful work, and to share it with our guests.”

Featured artists in the space include Logan Grider, an Oregon-based artist and Theresa Hackett, a Los Angeles-based artist, who will both have their works featured inside Manhatta and Bay Room. Hackett’s work incorporates non-conventional materials to create hybrid landscapes while Grider’s pieces showcase an abstract theme.

“This partnership between APT, Fosun, and USHG is an exciting opportunity for our artist community,” says Zohar Elhanani, CEO of Artist Pension Trust. “We constantly seek new and exciting avenues to highlight the works of APT’s artists and the opportunity to showcase selected art throughout 28 Liberty and in both Manhatta and Bay Room, art that has been personally selected by Danny Meyer, will serve as fantastic exposure for our artists.”

Founded in 2004, APT (Artist Pension Trust) is a unique social initiative, designed to bring financial security and international exposure to a select group of emerging and established artists around the world. APT acts as a mutual assurance program, allowing participating artists to benefit from the sale of each other’s work — in essence, ensuring that the big-name artists behind blockbuster shows can support the work of talented peers still gaining art world recognition.

Since its foundation, APT has worked with some of the world’s leading contemporary artists, from Turner Prize winners to recipients of prestigious awards including the Prix de Rome and Deutsche Bank’s Artist of the Year. Works by APT artists have been loaned for exhibitions at the world’s leading institutions and have been prominent features of events including Art Basel and the Venice Biennale.

See some of the works that will be featured here: http://www.mutualart.com/apt/

About Artist Pension Trust

Artist Pension Trust (APT) was established in 2004 to provide artists with added financial security at every stage of their career, through a unique, patented model that allows participants to benefit from one another’s success. The APT model ensures that 72% of the net proceeds from the sale of an artwork goes back to its artist and their peers: 40% to the artist who created the work, and 32% shared among artists in their regional group.

Brighten Life with Color

by Ariela Wertheimer

Ways to incorporate color into your surroundings to help brighten your mood during the cold winter months

With cold weather well underway for most of the North East, the winter blues can be daunting. As days get shorter and darker, some people may find themselves feeling more tired and lethargic than usual.
As an international artist, I’ve been exposed to different climates and cultures, and I understand how easily a mood can change for the better and energy levels can pick up when bright colors are incorporated into your environment.

When I moved to Tel Aviv in 2013, the new atmosphere encouraged me to look for inspiration around me. The city’s urban rhythm invigorated me with energy to create, photograph, and paint, and elements like fences, construction metals, colors and neon lights served as a type of urban art – a pop art that felt young and fresh.
If you’re not in the city, there are other ways to liven up your environment. Whether it be working vibrant hues into key pieces of your home furnishings, or using a brightly colored paint to create an accent wall in your foyer, colors can help break up the monotony of the long winter months and uplift your mood.

Here are a few more ways to brighten your space:

Pick a Bright Piece of Art to Tie Together a Room: Similar to my Light Box Portraits, colorful art pieces are key to brightening a space. Many artists use bright colors in their work, so find a piece that speaks to you and your tastes.
Use Mirrors to Double the Sunlight in a Room: There is no better friend to a small space than a well-placed mirror. For expanding walls, breaking up visual clutter, or amplifying light, let mirrors be the tool that solves your deign dilemmas.
Shiny Paint or Matte Paint? When choosing your favorite kind of paint, remember to check for the level of shine. The higher the shine, the more durable the paint will be. Oddly enough, glossy walls can create a glare while matte surfaces have the ability to reflect light in every direction.
Pick Bright Paint Colors for Your Walls: Whether you’re wondering what color to paint the office or you’re looking to redesign your living space, the colors you choose are important. Studies have shown that colors have a direct impact on human emotion and behavior. Wall color can actually change how a person perceives temperature.

Specific colors you choose to incorporate into your space can evoke emotional responses. When trying to create a calm environment, blue has always been a favorite color of mine. This is a common solution, as blue is generally used as a soothing and relaxing hue because it’s often affiliated with a clear sky or the sea. Don’t be afraid to use blue in the more stressful areas of your life—like your office.
If you’re looking to develop a more creative atmosphere in your space, then green is your color. Research has linked green with broader thinking and happier thoughts. Allow a positive association with nature to affect your décor and the overall mood in your home. Green is especially great for brightening rooms with mostly neutral tones.
Yellow has always been used to represent the sun and brightness. No need to paint every wall yellow, but use your love for the color to pick out a vase or rug for the center of the room. These accents will enhance a livelier vibe to brighten your days.

Give yourself an energy boost with your décor and your surroundings overall. Like your environment, one of the best things about color is that it is ever-changing. If something doesn’t work for your style, change it. Trial and error is used by artists on an everyday basis. Through my experience, I’ve learned what colors I am drawn to and what accents I find to be appealing. Everyone is different. Let light into your life during the darkest days.

Ariela Wertheimer is an international artist based in Tel Avivi, Israel. She is a member of Israel’s most affluent family, as her family sold their company to Warren Buffet’s Berkshire Hathaway in 2013 for over $2 billion. Ariela decided to venture away from business and into the art world, as she recently exhibited a Scope Miami, Venice Biennale and is scheduled to exhibit at Artexpo New York later in the spring. Ariela’s art incorporates a range of bright colors and focus on self-reflection – encouraging the viewer to reflect and improve their outlook.