Posts tagged with "Airlines"

Traveling illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 Magazine

11 Travel Safety Tips

By: Doug Parisi, Director of Training

With many starting to travel again, there are new safety precautions people should take given COVID.

Here are 11 tips to ensure your long-awaited travel plans aren’t interrupted.

  1. COVID Enforcement Isn’t Your Responsibility

If you find someone not following the mask rules, inform someone who is in charge. Don’t risk being detained or removed due to an altercation with a stranger.

  1. Don’t Rely On Technology For Your Itinerary

We are dependent on our smart phones for almost everything. Low batteries, lost phones or no signal can disrupt your plans. Before you leave home, print your dates, times, confirmation numbers, locations, and contact information for all your travel. Rental cars, airlines, hotels, and tourist attractions can help you recover lost information.  Share this information with friends and family.

  1. Don’t Risk Your Safety For The Perfect Photo

Selfies have resulted in unnecessary injuries.

  1. Don’t Make Your Vacation Public Until You Return Home

Posting on social media announcing a trip informs people your home is vulnerable, since no one is around.

  1. Let Your Financial Institution Know You Are Traveling

Monitoring charges on credit cards is common today. If your credit card company/financial institution doesn’t know you are traveling, it could result in extra scrutiny on your account due to out of state charges. If your financial institution can’t contact you about out of state charges, it might result in charges being declined while you’re away.

  1. Back Pockets Are Horrible Place For Valuables

Wallets, passports and valuables should be kept in secure spots, such as cargo or in front pockets. Minimize your wallet or have an alternate wallet just for travel.

  1. Travel With A First Aid Kit

A small one for air travel or a larger one for road trips.  Don’t rely on emergency services in the short term.  Secure wraps, tourniquets, bandages, and hemostatic agents, which can all save lives. This is a must for any cross-country travel.

  1. Be Aware of State Laws

If you are driving through a state, make sure you know the state laws for securing your weapon or speaking to an officer if you are stopped. Violations can be met with fines, confiscation of the weapon or even arrest.

  1. Have Cash On Hand For Emergencies

Don’t use unfamiliar ATMs. Many travelers have been scammed by recording devices or card readers.  When possible, use credit cards to minimize the amount of cash on your person.

  1. Secure Your Items In The Hotel Room Safe

Too many people hide belongings in suitcases. This is a known practice that is easily thwarted.  Instead, secure your treasured items in the hotel room safe to be extra safe.

  1. Be Aware Of Your Surroundings

Situational awareness is critical when traveling.  Be aware of cars or people who may be following you. Trust your instincts when you start to feel unsafe.

Passport illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Airlines Urged to Issue Refunds

Consumer Reports & PIRG Urge Airlines to Provide Full Refunds for Flights Canceled During Pandemic as Voucher Expiration Dates Approach

Groups Call for Airlines to Extend Voucher Expiration Dates Through At Least End Of 2022

With the one-year anniversary of the nationwide COVID-19 lockdown approaching, Consumer Reports and U.S. PIRG sent a letter to ten domestic airlines today calling on them to provide full refunds to consumers whose flights were canceled or affected by the pandemic.  At the very least, the consumer groups are urging airlines to extend the expiration dates for vouchers they issued for canceled flights to the end of 2022 or longer.

“Millions of Americans who booked flights in good faith in 2020 were prevented from flying because of government lockdowns and safety concerns brought on by a once-in-a-century global pandemic,” said William J. McGee, Aviation Adviser to Consumer Reports.  “The airline industry has received very generous support from taxpayers while stiff-arming its customers and treating their hard-earned dollars as interest-free loans.  It’s time to provide consumers with the long-overdue refunds they rightfully deserve.”

The consumer groups’ letter notes that complaints to the U.S. Department of Transportation about airline refunds have jumped dramatically over the past year.  In 2019, consumers submitted a total of 1,574 complaints about refunds to the DOT.  Last year, that number increased 57-fold to 89,518 refund complaints.

Consumer Reports has been contacted by numerous customers frustrated that they couldn’t get a refund during lockdowns and who are concerned that they might not be able to travel before vouchers expire. An analysis by TripAction, a travel management company for businesses, found that 55 percent of vouchers for unused tickets will expire in 2021, and 45 percent will expire in 2022.

Many passengers were prevented from flying because of government restrictions, public health notices, or serious medical conditions that made flying during the pandemic unsafe. Far too many of the trips they booked will never happen, due to the cancellation (not postponement) of conferences, conventions, weddings, graduations, and family reunions.

While passengers on flights canceled by airlines are entitled to a full refund under federal law, a congressional analysis found that some carriers offered vouchers as the default option, requiring passengers to take extra steps to get a cash refund. Many airlines waited until the last minute to cancel scheduled flights, prompting concerned passengers to cancel their tickets and forfeit their legal right to a refund.

“It’s insulting and unfair that airlines haven’t offered refunds to all customers affected by the pandemic,” said Teresa Murray, Consumer Watchdog Director for U.S. PIRG. “Consumers certainly couldn’t have foreseen a once-in-a-lifetime global crisis. Our research has shown that travelers whose plans got canceled have to wade through refund policies likely written by a team of lawyers. They’re faced with figuring out the difference between a flight credit or a trip credit or a travel voucher and similar offers the airlines make to avoid giving people easy-to-understand cash in their pocket.”

A Consumer Reports review of airline voucher policies found nine different policies among ten different airlines.  Many of these policies are hard to find on airline websites, and the airlines’ descriptions of their policies can be quite confusing and at times contradictory, based on conflicting rules for various dates of booking, travel, and cancellation. The consumer groups’ letter was sent to the CEOs of the following scheduled airlines: Alaska Airlines, Allegiant Air, American Airlines, Delta Air Lines, Frontier Airlines, Hawaiian Airlines, JetBlue Airways, Southwest Airlines, Spirit Airlines, and United Airlines.

Emotional Support Animal Airline Laws Changing January 11th

In 2020, the Department of Transportation made a new determination that only service dogs would continue to be protected under the American’s with Disabilities Act, thus categorizing emotional support animals as pets.

So far, only Southwest Airlines have stated that they will continue to accept ESA’s at no charge. Both Alaska and American Airlines have stated that they will no longer accept emotional support animals on flights. However, several airlines accept pets for a fee. Those who have already booked flights this year with their ESA should look into each airline policy, as some will still be accepting ESA’s from existing reservations.

“Basically what it comes down to is the animal’s training. They are saying an individual with PTSD who has a trained dog can have the animal with them during air travel, but if the individual has PTSD and doesn’t have the luxury of being gifted a service dog, or can’t afford the costs of obtaining a service dog which can run upwards of $50,000, then their PTSD doesn’t qualify/isn’t valid,” said licensed mental health professional Prairie Conlon. Prairie Conlon, LPC, NPC  and Clinical Director of CertaPet was disheartened about the news.

“That’s textbook discrimination on several levels. I’m honestly astonished that they pushed this through. There are so many other options, such as tightening restrictions and requiring basic training, that could have solved the issue,” continued Conlon.

“So many news sources keep referring to the peacock incident of 2018 and of course they are saying good riddance, as am I. But what they fail to realize is that that incident did cause a lot of change and those types of animals haven’t seen ESA status for air travel since then. Stop referring to the peacock. It’s not a valid argument anymore. Nobody is fighting for the peacock to be an ESA.” 

CertaPet, an emotional support letter service, released this statement:

“We at Certapet think this is a great disservice to those facing mental health challenges that get emotional support from their animal.  We understand that there have been incidents that have discredited emotional support animals and the service they provide, but those situations could be prevented by increased regulation.  We think emotional support peacocks are ridiculous too.  Providing clear guidelines for certification and vetting companies in the industry would have been simple steps to solve this challenge for all stakeholders. Certapet is a trusted telehealth platform that has been providing real mental health services for many years. These imposter companies exploiting individuals with mental health issues should be penalized.

Eliminating emotional support animals altogether is a quick, cheap fix that disregards those who really need and use the treatment appropriately. The DOT has chosen the easy and harmful path over the correct one. We hope to have continued discussions with airlines as they make choices on their own company policies and encourage them to make the right decisions. Mental health is a serious issue and removing access to a researched and proven treatment is a disgrace.”

ABOUT PRAIRIE CONLON

Prairie is a licensed mental health professional and is considered the world’s leading expert on Emotional Support Animals. She is the Clinical Director of Therapeutic and consults for CertaPet, one of the largest telehealth companies in the nation. Prairie has a Master’s Degree in professional counseling and a Postgraduate Degree in Military Behavioral health counseling. She is certified as an equine-assisted psychotherapist. Prairie is a certified Accelerated Resolution Therapist and helps train future trauma therapist in this modality. She consults for several nonprofits for veterans and first responder trauma, including The Lone Survivor Foundation and Horses that Heal. She is the founder, developer and lead researcher of emotional support animal Assisted Therapy (ESAAT) which is a set of techniques utilized to decrease anxiety, panic attacks, depressive symptoms, and sleep difficulties with the use of an Emotional Support Animal.

ABOUT CERTAPET

We are the #1 Emotional Support Letter Service, and we make sure your letter is 100% compliant with state and federal regulations.

COVID-19 Airline Safety

New COVID-19 safety recommendations for airlines issued today by the Department of Transportation are inadequate, Consumer Reports said. Any such guidelines should be mandatory to ensure passengers are protected from coronavirus risks. The DOT issued guidelines for airlines and airports to follow to address safety concerns during the pandemic, but the agency provides too much leeway to industry and is not using its authority to require industry to follow them.

“Americans are rightfully concerned that they may be putting their health and safety at risk if they choose to fly during a global pandemic,” said William J. McGee, Aviation Advisor for Consumer Reports. “The DOT shouldn’t leave it up to the airlines and airports to decide which COVID-19 safety precautions they will follow to keep passengers safe. These guidelines are a first step, but not enough. Secretary Chao should make any public health standards mandatory to ensure passengers are protected when they travel during this unprecedented crisis.”

Consumer Reports noted that Secretary Chao has the authority to make the COVID-19 safety precautions mandatory using the same authority that past Transportation Secretaries used when requiring airlines to adopt stronger security measures following the September 11th terrorist attacks, and when requiring airlines to include all fees in advertised fares.

In June, Consumer Reports called on Secretary Chao to work with other key administration officials and take an active role in establishing requirements for airlines, airports, and travelers to protect against the transmission of COVID-19 during air travel, including:

· How and whether to screen passengers and employees for COVID-19 before travel
· Appropriate social distancing in airports and airplane cabins
· Use of face masks and other personal protective equipment for passengers and employees
· Appropriate airport and airline cleaning procedures
· Effectiveness of airplane cabin air circulation systems

Consumer Reports is an independent, nonprofit membership organization that works side by side with consumers to create a fairer, safer, and healthier world. For 80 years, CR has provided evidence-based product testing and ratings, rigorous research, hard-hitting investigative journalism, public education, and steadfast policy action on behalf of consumers’ interests. Unconstrained by advertising or other commercial influences, CR has exposed landmark public health and safety issues and strives to be a catalyst for pro-consumer changes in the marketplace. From championing responsible auto safety standards to winning food and water protections, to enhancing healthcare quality, to fighting back against predatory lenders in the financial markets, Consumer Reports has always been on the front lines, raising the voices of consumers.

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How to Get Compensated for a Delayed Flight

Flight delay is not uncommon, as many travellers must have experienced it at some point. No one likes to be delayed, especially when it spans many hours and you are left stranded at the airport. If this ever happens to you, do you let go or ask for compensation? Most often than not, when travellers are delayed, they get upset and think of the many possible ways to get comforted from this. This could come in the form of an apology from the airline but that is not always enough, which is why some seek out for some sort of compensation.

Not everyone is aware that they can get compensation for a delayed flight, so they end up complaining, accept a simple apology and move on. However, the delayed flight had probably cost you more. This includes your time, as you most likely dashed out of your house as early as you can without eating. It could also cost you money, as you would have to spend on edibles at the airport. If you had another flight to catch, you might also miss it because the current one has been delayed. All these, when added together, shows you deserve to be compensated for such discomfort.

The question now is HOW?

1. Know When You Are Eligible

Before you can claim your compensation right, you need to know if you are eligible for one. The EC 261 gives you the right to claim compensation of up to €600 cash under these conditions:

  • You arrived at your destination 3 hours later than you should have.
  • Departure was from the EU or the airline is with the EU.
  • You checked in on time.
  • The reason for the delay was within the airline’s control. 

2. Contact the Airline

Take it upon yourself to reach the airline directly and lay down your complaints about the delay. The easiest way to go about this is by sending an email. This should include details of your flight, a description of what happened, how much money you claim for the delay, and most importantly, a quote from the EC 261 guiding this rule. 

3. What if you got a NO?

It is not uncommon for airlines to deny passengers of compensation and lie about what happened. If you have your claims and would love to press further, here’s what to do:

  • Reach out to a National Enforcement Body (NEB) or an Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) scheme. While the decisions made by ADRs schemes are binding, that of the NEB are not binding.
  • Try small claims court. This option should come last if you were not compensated appropriately after trying other means.

Conclusion

The process of getting compensation for a delayed flight might look daunting but there’s no harm in giving a try before quitting. If you don’t have all the time to go through the process, you could get the service of AirHelp to do it on your behalf and in no time, you will cash out. The next time your flight gets delayed, you now know what to do,

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JETBLUE × ARCHER ROOSE

Wheels Up for Canned Wine JetBlue and Archer Roose Team Up for Formal Partnership 


Archer Roose’s Sauvignon Blanc Will Be the First-Ever Canned Wine Served on JetBlue 


Wine lovers, prepare for take-off: Archer Roose Collective, the Boston-based wine brand that produces worldly wines for the curious in planet-friendly formats, is excited to announce that it has formally partnered with JetBlue to serve its wine onboard flights nationwide – making Archer Roose the first-ever canned wine served inflight on JetBlue. Launching with Sauvignon Blanc on flights this month and transitioning to Provence Rosé in the late spring, travelers will get to experience two top demand offerings from Archer Roose.  


Archer Roose and JetBlue’s partnership is a seamless fit given the core values and natural synergy between the two brands. Archer Roose’s mission is to deliver high-quality wine varietals imported from the world’s most iconic winemaking regions to consumers at an accessible price point via eco-friendly alternative packaging formats, with the brand’s most popular format being aluminum cans. The brand also partners exclusively with winemakers that implement all-natural growing techniques and boasts an end-to- end, fully sustainable supply chain, from before the grapes are even harvested to the moment cans hit shelves. What Archer Roose delivers to market is a quality-driven wine in a sustainable vessel that has an undeniably positive impact on global wine consumption. Every single Archer Roose can is the product of previously recycled aluminum, a process proven to be significantly more efficient than recycling glass from both a time and energy perspective. The global recycling rate on aluminum cans is 69%, and aluminum is infinitely recyclable – meaning cans can be recycled over and over, and in Archer Roose’s case, back in the hands of wine lovers in just 60 days. Whereas contrary to popular belief, glass is recycled in less than 40% of municipalities around the U.S. and wine bottles are rarely made of recycled materials.  


“Archer Roose brings you and delicious wines in sensible packaging. We carefully source our grapes from specific growers, working with winemakers who focus on sustainability, organic growing methods, and natural wine making practices… from around the world,” shares Marian Leitner, co-founder and CEO at Archer Roose. “We are thrilled to be partnered with JetBlue who have consistently demonstrated a dedication to bringing their customers a premium experience at an accessible pricepoint which is core to Archer Roose’s values. With their support of the can format they’ve shown their desire to be sustainable in every area of their offerings.”  


Archer Roose joins JetBlue’s diverse roster of inflight food and beverage offerings available for purchase, alongside the airline’s always complimentary, unlimited brand-name snacks. The addition of Archer Roose is the latest from the airline that’s dedicated to inspiring humanity by 
embracing consumer trends, allowing customers to enjoy the products they love on the ground, while they’re in the air.  


“At JetBlue, we want traveling to be an enjoyable experience from takeoff to touchdown, which is why we’re always looking to bring new and unique products onboard for our customers to enjoy,” shares Mariya Stoyanova, director of product development at JetBlue. “We are thrilled to toast our new partnership with Archer Roose and offer our customers delicious, premium wine in an exciting new format.”  


Archer Roose Sauvignon Blanc, a bright, citrus-forward classic from Chile’s revered Casablanca Valley, is now officially available for purchase on all flights for a price of $8 per can. In late Spring, JetBlue customers will have an opportunity to enjoy Archer Roose Provence Rosé inflight as Sauvignon Blanc transfers to Rosé on all flights during this period.  

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AIR ITALY UNVEILS SPECIAL 6-DAY

BLACK FRIDAY CAMPAIGN

Air Italy offers up to 25% discount on flights to entire network with unique Black Friday promotion

Air Italy has unveiled a spectacular range of offers across its entire network lasting a full six days to celebrate “Black Friday”.

Until December 2nd, the airline is offering up to 25% discount off all flights operated from the United States and Canada to Italy from December 5th 2019 to October 24th 2020.

Dream destinations are just a click away, offering all travelers the chance to discover new and unexpected destinations at great prices from New York, Miami, Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Toronto such as Milan, Rome, Naples Palermo and Catania (Sicily), Cagliari and Olbia (Sardinia) and Lamezia Terme (Calabria).

All Air Italy flights from North America are operated by Airbus A330-200, equipped with 24 seats in the exclusive Business Class cabin, which allows you to fly with maximum comfort on fully reclining seats, accompanied by the excellent hospitality of the cabin crew and an exclusive service with typical Italian menus and wines, Wi-Fi service and a wide programme of in-flight entertainment.

The 228-seat Economy Class cabin offers Air Italy’s guests a very comfortable flight, highly personalised service, a new in-flight menu with the recently launched and dedicated “Le Delizie” brand, Wi-Fi service and a wide choice of movies and music.

For more details and information visit www.airitaly.com

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Revamped Crew Scheduling Model Cuts Airline Delays by as Much as 30%

INFORMS Journal Transportation Science New Study Key Takeaways:

  • Researchers introduce slack times distributed across a crew schedule to plan ahead of any delays or disruptions.
  • The approach can reduce extreme delays by as much as 20–30% on average.
  • The buffers in scheduling cost airlines less than 5%.

Delays and disruptions in airline operations annually result in billions of dollars of additional costs to airlines, passengers and the economy. Airlines strive to mitigate these costs by creating schedules that are less likely to get disrupted or schedules that are easy to repair when there are disruptions—new research in the INFORMS journal Transportation Science has found a solution using a mathematical optimization model.

The study, conducted by Vikrant Vaze of Dartmouth College and David Antunes and Antonio Pais Antunes, both of the University of Coimbra, looks at data from Virgin America airline from 2014, that is 94 daily flights connecting 14 continental U.S. airports.

Using this data, researchers determined that introducing buffers or slack times that are distributed in an intelligent way across a crew schedule can reduce extreme delays by as much as 20–30% on average, with only a 2–3% increase in crew salary costs.

“Our model can lead to significant overall benefits, fewer flight delays, more importantly fewer worst-case delays, fewer crew infeasibilities, and lower passenger delays and disruptions,” said Vaze, a professor in the Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth.

This research allows airlines and airline managers to seek the best trade-off between the goals of reducing delays and disruptions while not being overly conservative in buffer placement.

“If you err on one side, you will have large delays/disruptions. If you err too much on the other, you will have to pay the crew for sitting around doing nothing. Neither is quite a good situation to be in. So, we optimize the buffer placement in crew schedules,” continued Vaze. “Paying the crew a little extra ahead of time and then using that extra time as buffers strategically located throughout their work schedules can provide big gains in terms of delay reductions, if we use our optimization model.”

About INFORMS and Transportation Science

Transportation Science is a premier peer-reviewed scholarly journal focused on research about all modes of transportation, present and prospective, and looks at planning and design issues and the related economic, operational, and social concerns. It is published by INFORMS, the leading international association for operations research and analytics professionals. More information is available at www.informs.org or @informs.

As Airline Satisfaction Climbs to Record Highs, Line Blurs Between Low-Cost and Traditional Carriers, J.D. Power Finds

Alaska Airlines Ranks Highest among Traditional Carriers for 12th Consecutive Year; JetBlue Airways and Southwest Airlines Tie for Highest Rank among Low-Cost Carriers

Is this the golden age of air travel? According to the J.D. Power 2019 North America Airline Satisfaction Study, SM a combination of newer planes, better ticket value and improved customer touchpoints have driven overall satisfaction with airlines to its highest point in history, up 11 points (on a 1,000-point scale) from last year’s record-setting performance. The surge is driven by significant improvements among traditional carriers, while satisfaction slowed with low-cost carriers.

“Airlines continue to deliver on the operational side of air travel,” said Michael Taylor, Travel Intelligence Lead at J.D. Power. “New technology investments have dramatically improved the reservation and check-in process. Fleets are newer and travelers generally feel that they are getting great value for their money. These improvements have been most profound in the traditional carrier segment, where customer satisfaction has climbed considerably.

“While low-cost carriers have historically had the highest levels of customer satisfaction in our study, due to a strong sense of value for money among customers, that line is starting to blur as traditional carriers improve their services and operations,” Taylor added. “The one area where both traditional and low-cost carriers can still improve, however, is in in-flight services. It continues to be the lowest-ranked factor in the study, as many airlines still struggle with in-flight entertainment, connectivity, in-seat power, and food service.”

Following are some of the key findings of the 2019 study:

  • Record-high customer satisfaction: Overall satisfaction with airlines increases 11 points to 773, continuing an eight-year trend of satisfaction improvement.
  • Improvement is driven by traditional carriers: This year’s significant gains in customer satisfaction are driven by the traditional carriers, whose segment satisfaction score improves 22 points from 2018. The low-cost segment—while still having higher overall satisfaction than the traditional carrier segment—declines 6 points from 2018, thus driving a segment convergence in satisfaction.
  • Tech investments in reservation and check-in systems pay off: The reservation and check-in experiences are the most satisfying portions of the airline experience, driven by investments in digital check-in technologies, self-service kiosks and a concerted effort among airlines to improve the efficiency of the pre-flight process.
  • In-flight service remains a stumbling block: In-flight services, such as seatback entertainment, food service, and Wi-Fi continue to be the lowest-ranked part of the air traveler experience. Specific in-flight amenities that have the greatest positive effect on customer satisfaction are fresh food, seatback games and seatback live television.

Study Rankings

Among traditional carriers, Alaska Airlines ranks highest for the 12th consecutive year, with a score of 801. Delta Air Lines (788) ranks second and American Airlines (764) ranks third.

Among low-cost carriers, JetBlue Airways (817) and Southwest Airlines (817) rank highest in a tie. For Southwest, this is the third consecutive year at the top of the J.D. Power ranking.

Among Canada-based airlines, Air Canada (729) saw its customer satisfaction score declined 5 points from 2018. WestJet (758) saw its score increase 11 points but remains below the low-cost carrier average.

The North America Airline Satisfaction Study, now in its 15th year, measures passenger satisfaction with airline carriers in North America based on performance in seven factors (in order of importance): cost and fees; in-flight services; aircraft; boarding/deplaning/baggage; flight crew; check-in; and reservation. The study measures passenger satisfaction among both business and leisure travelers and is based on responses from 5,966 passengers who flew on a major North American airline between March 2018 and March 2019. The study was fielded from April 2018 through March 2019.

For more information about the North America Airline Satisfaction Study, visit http://www.jdpower.com/business/resource/jd-power-north-america-airline-satisfaction-study.

Join the conversation on social media using #AirlineStudy and follow J.D. Power on FacebookTwitter, and LinkedIn.

J.D. Power is a global leader in consumer insights, advisory services, and data and analytics. These capabilities enable J.D. Power to help its clients drive customer satisfaction, growth, and profitability. Established in 1968, J.D. Power has offices serving North America, South America, Asia Pacific, and Europe.

HOW TO TRAVEL WITH A VAPE AND NOT BREAK THE LAW

What does your usual day look like?

The most common script is that you wake up, take a shower, have your breakfast and leave for work. The other option is lying in bed until midday and enjoying your distanced work from home. However, it does not matter, which obligations you have, but it is important, which habits you have. If you have any of all possible unhealthy habits, it may be difficult for you to travel with family during your holidays or to go on business trips.

Today we would talk about possibilities to travel if your habit is vaping. If you are a long-termed vaper and cannot imagine your working day without using best vape pen (Vapingdaily gives helpful hints), you might be surprised when you would have to leave your device at home during traveling abroad. These prohibitions depend on the destination country laws, the rules of traveling adapted by your airline company and also on the type of device you use and the substance you vape. For example, even the best vape pen for weed regarding safety and security must be left at home, because in the country (or state), you travel to, marijuana or other substances are illicit.

It also happens that you have to leave your vape at home because of strict rules of airlines, but then you can buy new vape pens in any vape shop at your destination country (or state).

What are the rules of taking vaping devices to the plane?

The most evident rule is that you can never vape while being on the plane during your flight, but usually, you can bring your vaping device in the plane. The important point here is that it should not be in the checked bag, because all the batteries must be in special storage in the pressurized cabin. Some airlines may have additional peculiarities about carrying some types of e-cig or vaporizer pen. The policies of different airlines may vary, so read the policies carefully before you purchase the ticket. This may save your money and help to avoid conflicts or other possible unpleasant situations.

The other question is about e liquids and vapor juice for your pen vaporizer. You know that any airlines have limits to the amount of any liquid that you can take along with you. To minimize possible problems try to put the liquid into a special plastic container to facilitate the screening process. Do not forget that the dosage of allowed liquid may vary depending on the company.

What countries you would better fly without vaping devices and why?

The short list of countries, where using vape pen may turn sour, is:

Thailand

Singapore

Brunei

Taiwan

Vietnam

Philippines

Lebanon

India

To exemplify, a traveler caught with pen vaporizer can get sentenced up to 10 years behind bars. Lebanon, India, Vietnam and some other countries impose harsh penalties on those, who vape. Vaping is strictly banned there.

The fact is that we know very little about laws on vaping in our country, not to say about the countries we have never been to. There is plenty of either country, where vaping is illegal, and you can get a fine, or being put into prison. So find a couple of minutes to google the legislation of the country of your destination.

In 2011 not only the process of vaping is banned, but also essential, transferring, selling or buying of even those vape pens, which contain no nicotine was banned in Argentina. If you have a trip to this country, better leave you vape at home. To continue the theme of South America, the production and sales of electronic cigarettes are illegal in Brazil since 2014.

One of the most popular countries for holidays is Egypt. Electronic cigarettes are banned there for already four years. Border patrol agent can commandeer your device at customs.

Talking about Asia, you would have to pay from $300 to $500 if you use any type of vaporizer pen in the areas, where smoking is forbidden, since 2010 in Brunei. To talk business, the government does not regulate the ability of personal use of vape pens, but people advise not to take your device to this country. One cannot be too careful.

In Singapore, the fines are much higher. The first offense will cost you about $4000 or more. In Cambodia, the government banned vaping in 2014. In India, though e-cigs are forbidden only in six states (Maharashtra, Karnataka, Kerala, Punjab, Jammu, and Kashmir). In some of these states, police can force you to pay a fine, but in some, they can get you into prison as well. Some states in Malaysia also have particular bans on vaping. It is illegal in public buildings, gas stations, etc. The fine might rich $2000, or you can get into prison for up to 2 years. In Jordan, any type of e-cig (even those, which contain no nicotine) is under a ban since 2009.

As for Europe, you cannot transfer, sell or purchase any of the products, which contain nicotine in Norway. The only exception is a medical note, which proves that you need an e-cig to give up smoking. On the contrary, the Netherlands are famous for the ability to smoke anything. They sell weed in cakes, as cigs, and in many other forms. Therefore, this is the country, where you can use drugs, surely, if you stick to the dosages allowed.

As a conclusion, we have pointed out several tips for traveling with vapes. They are:

Demount your vaporizer pen before the trip. You have to put different parts of it into some plastic bags or something because not all the constituents are allowed to be taken in the checked bag. This means you would better clean them, not to make your clothes dirty or sticky. Be sure to browse flawless vape shop for pens which don’t leak.

Check how much of e-liquid you can take according to the policy of your airlines. It is better to use several bottles because one can be broken or spilled during the flight or inspections at the airport.

Check the expiry date of all the substances you need and check if you put your charger with you. Also, it is better to google the location of vape shops in the area of your hotel.

You must pack all the batteries into special packs. This rule is extremely strict-followed in all the airline’s companies.

Check the laws of the country you travel to once again. It is better to read more than to spend two years in an Asian prison.

About the author:

Christina Matthews, the journalist who studies the latest news in the health industry. Now she studies the effects of smoking and vaping on health and reasons for such its popularity.

It also happens that you have to leave your vape at home because of strict rules of airlines, but then you can buy new vape pens in any vape shop at your destination country (or state). If you decide to travel to Canada we recommend 180Smoke.ca.