Posts tagged with "infections"

Art by Maria Solomon for use by 360 Magazine

Traveling in a time of COVID – How Parnell Pharmaceuticals nasal spray can help protect travelers 

Traveling in a time of COVID – How Parnell Pharmaceuticals nasal spray can help protect travelers. 

As many are starting to venture out on vacations and air travel the must have items to take include hand sanitizer, and disinfecting wipes but recent research has shown that nasal sprays can help protect against some viruses. Especially during this critical time when many are still hesitant to be vaccinated, consumers will look to products such as these to provide an extra layer of protection.

A successful ENT specialist and a board-certified dermatologist took their talents to develop, manufacture, and market prescription and OTC products that maintain and restore mucosal and skin integrity. These nasal sprays, mouth sprays and wipes are the must have products for consumers to arm themselves to combat viruses, bacteria and provide another layer of protection against COVID-19.

Dr. Francis Parnell, a practicing Otolaryngology-Head and Neck (ENT) Surgeon for over 30 years is Chairman and C.E.O. of Parnell Pharmaceuticals, the pharmaceutical company he co-founded. In 1986 with his wife Dr. Diana Parnell. Diana Parnell is a board-certified dermatologist with extensive experience and expertise in cosmetic and laser surgery as well as general dermatology and head of Cosmetic and Laser Surgery Institute, Kentfield, CA. Together the couple bring years of consumer health experience, treating patients and developing oral, nasal and personal care products so that consumers could have options to protect themselves.

Parnell Pharmaceuticals announced the development of the topical nasal spray called Nomovid. Nomovid is based upon a substance licensed by Parnell from New Mexico Tech University to treat drug-resistant bacteria and fungi such as MRSA and Candida auris.

Our products provide an extra layer of antiseptic protection which is so helpful especially for those who travel frequently. Since it breaks down lipids in the viral envelope, we tested the nasal spray against the novel coronavirus, says Parnell. An independent, outside laboratory has confirmed our findings and found it to be greater than 99.7 % effective in vitro within five minutes against the SARS-CoV-2 virus which causes COVID-19.

Parnell’s newest patented product, Mouth Kote-MD Mouth Spray, contains MycoDelens and Natural Yerba Santa and has been shown with in vitro laboratory testing to be an effective antiseptic against Antimicrobial Resistant (AMR) pathogens including bacteria, fungi, and coronaviruses such as the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Mouth Kote-MD is an excellent pre-rinse before dental exams to help prevent COVID-19 and, in addition, it helps dry mouth and restores enamel. It has also been shown to be effective as well against Streptococcus mutans, a major cause of dental caries (cavities) and Candida albicans (yeast).

For the convenience of travel, individually packaged DermSol-MD® Antiseptic Face & Body wipes were developed specifically for topically decontaminating dangerous viruses like Coronavirus (COVID-19) and Antimicrobial Resistant (AMR) bacteria like MRSA. They moisturize the skin and contain natural Yerba santa. Unlike standard wipes and sanitizers, DermSol-MD® is free from alcohol, biocides, and other toxic chemicals and it does not cause skin irritation and destroy skin cells.  Conveniently packaged and individually wrapped they are perfect for on the go.

For more information about the product please visit  Parnell’s website.

In addition, as viral infections tend to start in the nasal passages, keeping the nose healthy can protect against colds, flu and respiratory issues. Parnell offers the following travel tips:

  1. Especially during this challenging time….if required, always wear your mask to cover your nose and mouth. As airplane and summer travel season picks up, have a travel kit ready before you board or head out on an adventure – extra masks, sanitizing wipes and nasal spray
  2. Keep nasal passages moist – Parnell’s Pretz-MD/Nomovid Saline Nasal Spray adds an extra layer of protection even if you are vaccinated
  3. Drink water, stay hydrated – always so important when it comes to cold/flu season. Fluids can help avoid dehydration especially with air travel.
  4. Many medications (e.g. decongestants) can contribute to nasal dryness.
  5. Humidifiers are great in the home to keep the air moist and nasal passages healthy  There are some travel sized ones that are perfect to take along with you on your trip.

Parnell Pharmaceuticals, Inc. is a closely held, private pharmaceutical company founded in 1986 and headquartered in San Rafael, California with an office in Dublin, Ireland. The company develops, manufactures, and markets prescription and OTC drug products that maintain and restore mucosal and skin integrity. The products are natural-based and patented for oral and nasal care, personal care, and anti-infective use. Parnell products are marketed and distributed in North America and Europe. For more information, visit their website.

Mouth kote courtesy of AMS Communications for use by 360 Magazine
Courtesy of AMS Communications for use by 360 Magazine
Medical illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Mental Illness × Addiction Crisis

With Pandemic Worsening the Mental Illness and Addiction Crisis, Biden Administration to Provide Nearly $2.5 Billion to States, Territories for Treatment, Prevention Aid

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
Funding to Support Comprehensive Community Prevention, Treatment, Recovery and Health Services

The Biden Administration will provide nearly $2.5 billion in funding to states and territories to address the nation’s mental illness and addiction crisis, which has worsened during the COVID-19 pandemic. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) will direct $1.65 billion in Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Block Grant funding and $825 million in Community Mental Health Services Block Grant funding to states and territories. The Community Mental Health Services Block Grant program allows states and territories to provide comprehensive community mental health services and address needs and gaps in existing treatment services for those with severe mental health conditions. The Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Block Grant program allows states and territories to plan, implement and evaluate activities to prevent and treat substance use disorder. This funding will also allow recipients to maximize efficiency in existing treatment and recovery infrastructure, promote support for providers and address unique local needs to deliver substance use disorder prevention.

“We know multiple stressors during the pandemic – isolation, sickness, grief, job loss, food instability, and loss of routines – have devastated many Americans and presented unprecedented challenges for behavioral health providers across the nation,” said Acting Assistant Secretary for Mental Health and Substance Use Tom Coderre. “During this time of increased urgency, we want to assure them that funding is in place to help states and territories provide pathways to prevention, intervention, treatment, and recovery services, especially for underserved populations.”

Recently, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released data confirming a rise in fatal overdoses during the pandemic. This year’s increases in calls to helplines across the country indicate growing anxiety, depression, and trauma in Americans. The COVID-19 pandemic and the corresponding economic crisis have been especially devastating for Black and Latino communities, which are experiencing a disproportionate number of COVID-19 infections and deaths as well as higher-than-average unemployment rates.

“SAMHSA resources connect Americans to evidence-based treatment and services every day,” said Coderre. “Focusing on both mental and substance use disorders – challenges that pre-date the COVID-19 pandemic but that have worsened over the past year – will be a crucial part of SAMHSA’s approach to helping the nation move forward.”

In addition to the $2.5 billion awarded today, SAMHSA has awarded $686 million in Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinics (CCBHC) Expansion Grants; Emergency Grants to Address Mental and Substance Use Disorders During COVID-19 (Emergency Response COVID-19), and supplements to the fiscal year 2020 Emergency Response COVID-19 grant recipients.

Funding allocation tables can be viewed here:

FY 2021 Community Mental Health Block Grant Program COVID-19 Supplemental Awards

FY 2021 Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Block Grant Program COVID-19 Supplemental Awards

People searching for treatment for mental or substance use disorders can find treatment by visiting SAMHSA’s website or by calling SAMHSA’s National Helpline,
1-800-662-HELP (4357).

Covid and health illustration

COVID Collaboration Reducing Cases

A collaborative program developed at UVA Healthto work with local long-term care facilities to control COVID-19 is saving lives and offers a model for communities across the country, a new scientific paper reports.

The program has helped prevent COVID-19 infections and reducedmortality when outbreaks occur, its creators say. Of the first two facility outbreaks that the team has worked with, there were lower mortality rates than seen in previous outbreaks – 12% and 19%. That’s compared with a 28% mortality rate reported at a long-term care facility in Washington state.

“Developing this program has been a wonderful collaboration amongst many sites of care and types of care providers,” said UVA Health geriatrician Laurie R. Archbald-Pannone, MD, MPH, the program’s lead physician. “We call the program GERI-PaL – meaning Geriatric Engagement and Resource Integration for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Facilities – and it has been a great opportunity to bring together hospital and community-based resources to assist our local facilities in preventing and responding to COVID-19 outbreaks.”

A Practical Approach to Controlling COVID-19 Archbald-Pannone and her colleagues describe the program as a “practical approach” to controlling COVID-19 in long-term-carefacilities. Such facilities have been hard-hit by the pandemic because of the vulnerable health of many residents and the intensive nature of the care provided.

In their new paper, the UVA team highlights five key components of the program:

Infection advisory consultations: UVA Health infection-control experts worked hand-in-hand with the long-term care facilities to develop effective infection-control policies and address issues such as staffing needs and access to personal-protective equipment (PPE).

Project ECHO: A geriatrician, pulmonologist, nurse practitioner, clinical nurse leader and nurse educator were all made available using a model based on Project ECHO, a program that offers training and support for health professionals. The group met virtually with their colleagues at the nursing facilities to provide the latest COVID-19 information, testing and treatment guidance.

Telemedicine consultations: UVA Health pulmonary/critical-care and geriatric and palliative medicine experts provided consultations via telemedicine on testing, monitoring and treating facility residents for COVID-19. The team also facilitated transfers to the hospital, when needed, and transfers back to the nursing facilities when the patients had recovered sufficiently. The team also worked closely with the primary-care physicians to assist in decision-making and treatment of these patients.

Nursing liaisons: A nursing liaison offered concierge-style service for each facility, helping to keep lines of communication open and ensure any needs were met.

Resident social remote connections: Volunteer medical students spoke with residents by telephone to combat social isolation and keep their spirits up.

“This program has really been a team effort and highlights the dedication of colleagues across the healthcare continuum – physicians, nurses, administrators, technology experts, local health officials and more – all coming together to support work with our local facilities amidst the challenges of COVID-19,” Archbald-Pannone said. “We have all faced many challenges over the past few months. It’s been an honor to help support our local facilities and their dedicated staff members in the care of these vulnerable patients. Many of the systems we’ve put in place and lessons we have learned will be value to improve care beyond even COVID-19.”

Results Published

The UVA Health team members have described their experiences in the Journal of the American Medical Directors Association. The team consisted of Archbald-Pannone, Drew Harris, Kimberly Albero, Rebecca Steele, Aaron Pannone and Justin Mutter.

Covid and health illustration

COVID Collaboration Reducing Cases

A collaborative program developed at UVA Healthto work with local long-term care facilities to control COVID-19 is saving lives and offers a model for communities across the country, a new scientific paper reports.

The program has helped prevent COVID-19 infections and reducedmortality when outbreaks occur, its creators say. Of the first two facility outbreaks that the team has worked with, there were lower mortality rates than seen in previous outbreaks – 12% and 19%. That’s compared with a 28% mortality rate reported at a long-term care facility in Washington state.

“Developing this program has been a wonderful collaboration amongst many sites of care and types of care providers,” said UVA Health geriatrician Laurie R. Archbald-Pannone, MD, MPH, the program’s lead physician. “We call the program GERI-PaL – meaning Geriatric Engagement and Resource Integration for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Facilities – and it has been a great opportunity to bring together hospital and community-based resources to assist our local facilities in preventing and responding to COVID-19 outbreaks.”

A Practical Approach to Controlling COVID-19 Archbald-Pannone and her colleagues describe the program as a “practical approach” to controlling COVID-19 in long-term-carefacilities. Such facilities have been hard-hit by the pandemic because of the vulnerable health of many residents and the intensive nature of the care provided.

In their new paper, the UVA team highlights five key components of the program:

Infection advisory consultations: UVA Health infection-control experts worked hand-in-hand with the long-term care facilities to develop effective infection-control policies and address issues such as staffing needs and access to personal-protective equipment (PPE).

Project ECHO: A geriatrician, pulmonologist, nurse practitioner, clinical nurse leader and nurse educator were all made available using a model based on Project ECHO, a program that offers training and support for health professionals. The group met virtually with their colleagues at the nursing facilities to provide the latest COVID-19 information, testing and treatment guidance.

Telemedicine consultations: UVA Health pulmonary/critical-care and geriatric and palliative medicine experts provided consultations via telemedicine on testing, monitoring and treating facility residents for COVID-19. The team also facilitated transfers to the hospital, when needed, and transfers back to the nursing facilities when the patients had recovered sufficiently. The team also worked closely with the primary-care physicians to assist in decision-making and treatment of these patients.

Nursing liaisons: A nursing liaison offered concierge-style service for each facility, helping to keep lines of communication open and ensure any needs were met.

Resident social remote connections: Volunteer medical students spoke with residents by telephone to combat social isolation and keep their spirits up.

“This program has really been a team effort and highlights the dedication of colleagues across the healthcare continuum – physicians, nurses, administrators, technology experts, local health officials and more – all coming together to support work with our local facilities amidst the challenges of COVID-19,” Archbald-Pannone said. “We have all faced many challenges over the past few months. It’s been an honor to help support our local facilities and their dedicated staff members in the care of these vulnerable patients. Many of the systems we’ve put in place and lessons we have learned will be value to improve care beyond even COVID-19.”

Results Published

The UVA Health team members have described their experiences in the Journal of the American Medical Directors Association. The team consisted of Archbald-Pannone, Drew Harris, Kimberly Albero, Rebecca Steele, Aaron Pannone and Justin Mutter.