Posts tagged with "bullying"

Mina Tocalini illustration for mental health article inside 360 magazine

Non-Immigrant Kids Respond Differently When Immigrant Children Are Bullied

A recent study finds that, while youth think all bullying is bad, non-immigrant adolescents object less to bullying when the victim is an immigrant. However, the study found that the more contact immigrant and non-immigrant children had with each other, the more strongly they objected to bullying.

“We know that bystanders can play a key role in stopping bullying, and wanted to better understand bystander responses to bias-based bullying,” says Seçil Gönültaş, first author of the study and a Ph.D. student at North Carolina State University. “What role does a victim’s background play? What role does the bystander’s background play? Are children more or less likely to intervene if they come from different backgrounds?”

To explore these questions, the researchers conducted a study with 179 children, all of whom were in either sixth grade or ninth grade. Seventy-nine of the study participants were of immigrant origin, meaning that at least one of their parents was born outside of the United States. Researchers categorized the remaining 100 participants as non-immigrants for the purposes of this study, meaning both of their parents had been born in the U.S.

Study participants read three different scenarios and were then asked a range of questions to assess what they thought of the interactions in each scenario and how they would have responded in each situation.

In the first scenario, a non-immigrant child socially bullies an immigrant child because of his or her immigrant status. In the second scenario, a non-immigrant child socially bullies another non-immigrant child for being shy. And in the third scenario, a non-immigrant child socially bullies an immigrant child for being shy. Social bullying involves verbal or emotional abuse, rather than physical abuse. Immigrant youth in the fictional scenarios were born outside of the U.S.

“In general, the kids thought bullying was not acceptable,” says Kelly Lynn Mulvey, co-author of the study and an associate professor of psychology at NC State. “But non-immigrant youth thought bullying immigrant peers was more acceptable than bullying of other non-immigrant peers. Immigrant origin youth thought bullying any of the kids was equally wrong.”

“On a positive note, we found that there were two things that made a difference,” Gönültaş says. “First, we found that the more contact children in one group had with children in another group, the less accepting they were of bullying and the more likely they were to intervene to stop the bullying. That was true for immigrant origin and non-immigrant youth.”

“We also found that children who scored higher on ‘Theory of Mind’ were more likely to intervene,” Mulvey says. “Theory of Mind is an important part of understanding other people’s perspectives, so we suspect this is likely tied to a child’s ability to place themselves in the victim’s shoes.

“Ultimately, we think this study is valuable because it can help us develop more effective anti-bullying interventions,” Mulvey adds. “For example, these findings suggest that finding ways to encourage and facilitate more positive interactions between groups can help kids to understand that all bullying is harmful and to encourage kids to step in when they see it.”

The paper, “The Role of Immigration Background, Intergroup Processes, and Social-Cognitive Skills in Bystanders’ Responses to Bias-Based Bullying Toward Immigrants During Adolescence,” is published in the journal Child Development. The work was done with support from the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues’ Grants-In-Aid Program.

Abstract

This study examined how intergroup processes and social-cognitive factors shape bystander responses to bias-based and general bullying. Participants included 6th and 9th graders (N=179, M=13.23) who evaluated how likely they would be to intervene if they observed bullying of immigrant-origin and nonimmigrant-origin peers. Adolescents’ grade, intergroup attitudes, and social-cognitive abilities were evaluated as predictors of bystander responses. Nonimmigrant-origin adolescents reported that they expect they would be less likely to intervene when the victim is an immigrant-origin peer. Further, participants with more intergroup contact and higher Theory of Mind were more likely to expect they would intervene in response to bias-based bullying. Findings have important implications for understanding factors that inform anti-bullying interventions that aim to tackle bias-based bullying against immigrants.

Ellen DeGeneres illustration done by Mina Tocalini of 360 MAGAZINE.

Ellen’s Reputation

By Eamonn Burke

The reputation of Ellen Degeneres and her show, The Ellen Degeneres Show, are unstable after employees of the production alleged there was a “toxic work environment.” This included citations of being fired after medical leave, bullying, racism, and sexual misconduct by producers. While there were rumors of Ellen’s toughness, this is the first time a proper investigation has been done internally. 

Of the report, released in July, Ellen said in a statement: “We all have to be more mindful about the way our words and actions affect others, and I’m glad the issues at our show were brought to my attention.”

This report is not the only scratch on Ellen’s reputation, as it is the culmination of multiple years of rumors. Back in 2018, in an interview response to the Hollywood stories of Ellen not being as cheerful and kind as she appears on television, she called the rumors an “outright lie.” In early 2019, she was criticized again for pardoning Kevin Hart of his previous homophobic comments in an interview with him. A photo of her talking with George Bush in late 2019 drew distaste again, though she defended herself and said that they were friends despite different political beliefs. 

The closer examination of Ellen started with a November interview with Dakota Johnson, in which Johnson awkwardly calls out Ellen for lying about not being invited to her birthday party. It led to a viral Twitter thread including ugly stories about Ellen’s meanness which further damaged her reputation. Lastly before the report was an April scuffle with Ellen’s audience as she insensitively compared quarantine to being in jail while she sat in her mansion. It was also reported that her employees had been told very little about the future of the show. 

Most recently was a Daily Mail article revealing that Ellen may leave the show or be “cancelled” and that employees are terrified of this scenario. “The show feels done” says a source, despite producer Andy Lassner asserting that “No one is going off the air” in a tweet. It is possible that James Corden will replace Ellen on her daytime television slot.

Allison Christensen is an artist and specializes in illustration art.

Allison Christensen

Allison Christensen, is a New Jersey-based illustrator, attending Moore College of Art & Design. She is heavily inspired by plants and nature. Her style tends to be lighthearted with clean lines and a minimalist neutral color palette. Illustration has always been an outlet for her to express herself. Ever since she was a child, drawing fun and silly pictures have always brought her joy no matter what situation she was in. Allison was bullied excessively and at one point, she even had to be homeschooled for a year.

She always knew she wanted to do something artistic as a career. It wasn’t until her Junior year of high school when she knew what that would be. When she was visiting art colleges and getting portfolio reviews, one of the students introduced her to illustration design. Allison immediately knew that illustration art was what she needed to do for the rest of her life. She wants others to be able to look at her art and make their day brighter, even if it is just for a brief moment.

SODY × BULLYING

EVEN POP STARS GET BULLIED – SODY SHARES HER STORY IN NEW SINGLE

Sporting long blonde hair, blue eyes, and pink sweater, SODY is not your conventional victim of bullying and has since turned it into a positive and personal experience by becoming a vocal advocate for anti-bullying in new single “The Bully.”  PRESS HERE TO WATCH THE VIDEO

Featuring a range of unenthusiastic schoolchildren posing for their school photos, “The Bully” presents itself as an ode to anyone picked on or feeling alone. “For my sanity, I needed to try to move on and find the positive in a negative situation to accept what happened and move on,” SODY told Celeb Mix. “I found my way to heal in the lyric ‘I’m glad it happened to me and not to you,’ and I hope it helps others find theirs too.”

Known to speak bluntly and honestly, SODY expresses raw emotion that allows audiences to relate. “It’s always going to be hard to show that vulnerability and be honest about yourself but the more people that show their authentic self, the more people will be confident to do so,” SODY told Thomas Bleach.

With a passion for standing against injustice, bullying and hate crime, SODY is just beginning to use her platforms to highlight the issues she cares about and plans to keep addressing these passions to help make the world a little less mean one song at a time.

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Five Steps for Prevention from Watson Institute Experts

The Majority of Children with Autism Are Bullied—Do You Know How to Help?

Children with autism face unique social and education challenges that require attentive support. 1 in 59 children is diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. Boys are four times more likely than girls to have autism. Autism affects all ethnic and socioeconomic groups. Autism spectrum disorder encompasses a wide range of challenges with repetitive behaviors as well as social and communication skills.

For students with Autism, school can be daunting, as they are faced with social interactions and not feeling accepted. Coupled with that, children with Autism are at higher risk for being victimized or bullied by peers. Nearly two-thirds of children with autism between the ages of 6 and 15 have been bullied—over twice the rate of children without autism. 65% of parents report that their child had been victimized and 50% report being scared by their peers (Issues in Comprehensive Pediatric Nursing (2009)).  

These pressures can lead to refusal to attend school, anxiety or depression, and an overall decline in academic performance. This is borne out in the high school graduation rates for students with disabilities, which is only 67.1% (U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics), compared to an overall 84% graduation rate.

Clinical experts from the Watson Institute have five tips on combating bullying among all students, especially those with autism:

  1. Highlight individual strengths. Parents and teachers can be proactive by teaching children that it’s natural to expect others to be just like us, but the things that make us different are often the very things that make us special. Make a habit of complimenting students on their strengths—including in front of their peers.
  2. Widen perspectives. Teaching children to see things from more than one perspective is a key part of developing empathy. Help children connect beyond surface circumstances to underlying emotions. If a child makes fun of a student for not being good at something, ask them to reflect on something that is hard for them.
  3. Praise kindness. Children risk being teased or bullied themselves when they reach out to a student who is being bullied. It takes courage for students to act. Turn this perceived liability into an asset by applauding acts of kindness. This can be done individually, (“I saw how you stood up for Kyle and I’m really proud of you.”) and corporately, through public recognition or incentive programs.
  4. Get involved. If a bullying situation has developed, adult intervention is usually required. Leaving students to “work it out themselves” will often exacerbate or prolong a negative situation. Involve students and parents in addressing the situation. Approach the conversation with a problem-solving, not a punitive attitude.
  5. Provide support. Children can feel a range of emotions—from fear to shame and many more—when they’ve been the victim of bullying. Don’t assume because a child is no longer actively being bullied, that the situation is resolved. Make space for them to talk about their feelings and provide any additional support they need.

ABOUT THE WATSON INSTITUTE

The Watson Institute is organization providing special education programming as well as outpatient mental health services such as social skills groups, therapy, and evaluations for children ages 3 to 21.  www.thewatsoninstitute.org.

“Two Reasons Why I Won’t Report My Child Abuse”

Excerpt from The Teenage and Young Adult Survival Handbook By Steve Simpson

“The first reason is I know that I could be better in school. I know I mess up at home. The clothes I wear. The way I have my hair. The attitude I have. The trouble that I get in. I bring it on myself. If I were a better person these things probably wouldn’t happen to me. Ever since I can remember, I have been told by my parents that all the problems at home are my fault. People have it worse than I do.” These are the thoughts of many who are being abused and the first reasons why they won’t report it.

What I discovered was that even children who do fantastic in school, never get in any trouble, and do everything “right” still get abused by their parents or abusive adults in their home. Their parents even called them the same names as me and they were model children. I’ve found it has nothing to do with the way I act at all. It has nothing to do with who I was. It has nothing to do with the children. It has to do with the adults. Child abuse and discipline have nothing to do with each other. People who abuse children do it because of their own sickness, be it alcoholism, drug abuse or other problems they have.

“I knew my father or my mother’s boyfriend had no right to abuse me but I always felt that my mother would get in trouble for it.” This is the thought of many abuse victims and the second reason why they don’t report it. Even though they are getting abused they still try to protect the non-abusing/co-dependent parent. What I offer to those children is you would not so much be getting your parent in trouble, but you would be getting them help. Most authorities get them to go to therapy, which would stop that parent from allowing abuse to themselves and others in the future, therefore making their life better. So by protecting yourself you’re actually not getting anyone in trouble but protecting them and getting them help as well. Even the abusive adult could end up getting help as a result of you reporting it. Nobody should abuse you, period!

If you are being abused in any way, sometimes the abuse looks like it’s becoming less frequent. Don’t be fooled by this. It could suddenly pick up again and get worse. It will not stop unless you do something to stop it. Speak to a teacher, guidance counselor, school social worker or psychologist. Counselors from community centers and sometimes even people from local churches will know what to do and how to get you help. You can call Child Protective Services for your local area. Nobody should be abused in any way. You are no exception. You are worth getting help.

Approximately 5 children die a day as a result of child abuse. For those who suspect child abuse whether it be a relative or neighbor, it always amazes me how people will call 911 simply because someone parked in the wrong spot or put the garbage out on the wrong night, yet they won’t get “involved” in possibly saving a child’s life or at a minimum their childhood (not to mention the problems they will have as an adult as a result of their abuse). As responsible people we are already “involved”.

If you suspect child abuse it probably does exist. Don’t make excuses or protect and enable the abuser. Protect who you are supposed to protect, the children.

 

About Steve Simpson
Steve Simpson is a child advocate, child abuse survivor and media commentator who just released The Teenage and Young Adult Survival Handbook — a small guide that is modestly tucked inside in all four of his YA adventure novels which covers most of the topics plaguing young people today—suicide, bullying, sexual abuse, physical abuse, verbal abuse, self-worth, being the child of an addict, living in a dysfunctional home, surviving school and more. Simpson was even recognized by President Barack Obama, former New York governor David Paterson and the County Executive of Nassau County for his efforts on behalf of abused children.

 

Niki demartino, 360 MAGAZINE

Niki DeMartino

Singer/Songwriter Niki DeMartino, who’s new single “Anthem of the Judged” is a rallying cry for the disenfranchised and misunderstood. Niki, who has personally experienced online bullying, wanted to create an anthem of support and encouragement for those that often feel voiceless. Her powerful music video, out today, features a handful of popular content creators including Teala Dunn, Jessie Paege, and Eugenia Cooney.

About Niki

Niki DeMartino is an online content creator, actress and recording artist. Boasting 2.6 million followers on her Instagram and 1.6 million on her personal YouTube channel, Niki and her twin sister Gabi also have an extremely successful YouTube channel with over 7 million subscribers and over 700 million views. Each week the sister duo shares a video in the realm of fashion, beauty, comedy, and singing.

Niki has recently been focusing on her music career, releasing a new EP titled “individual” with Gabi. The twins’ song “Sleep it Off” garnered 2.1 million views in only one month. On top of several joint songs, Niki also has solo tracks on the album. The video for her song “Let it Roar” shows off Niki’s performance capabilities and amassed a viewership of 2.5 million.

In addition to her massive success in the world of social media, acting and music, Niki is a powerhouse in the beauty industry. She recently won a Stream yfor Best Fashion at the 2018 Streamy awards. In 2016, she was named one of the top 10 Beauty Influencers by Women’s Wear Daily. Niki also made a splash at the 2018 NY Fashion week, sitting front row for shows like Yajun, Hogan McLaughlin, and Michael Costello.

Klondike Blonde Releases “No Smoke”

Buzzing rapper and singer Klondike Blonde shares her new singleNo Smoke after its world premiere on Zane Lowe’s Beats 1radio show. The single is now available at all digital retailers and the music video was released today via Complex. Click HERE to view!

STREAM NO SMOKE

Klondike says of the song, “In a weird way, “No Smoke” is all about becoming the better version of yourself. I am the ex-girlfriend, and I am better than her.

Bright, bold, and brilliant colors practically pop off the screen in the visual, which reflects her vibrant and vivacious personality seamlessly. The technicolor dream also perfectly complements her half-blonde, half-pink hairstyle (highlighted by a dyed heart). Between charismatic and cocky bars, the artist’s attitude takes center stage with the intoxicating hookShe don’t want no smoke.However, Klondike is about to light up the game, deftly angling herself as an artist to watch in 2018 and beyond.

No Smokepaves the way for Klondike’s anxiously awaited debut EP, arriving very soon via L.A. Reid’s HITCO Entertainment. The single is the follow up to her track Dripwhich garnered over 2 million views on YouTube in under a month’s time.

ABOUT KLONDIKE BLONDE
Born in Raleigh and raised in the Bay Area, Klondike Blondes perspective has the power to reach listeners everywhere. Breaking boundaries with her sound, innovative sense of style, and Big Gang movement, she brings a much needed energy to hip-hop and pop culture. She began her musical career in high school as a way to escape a not-so positive experience she endured verbal bullying regularly. Shortly after graduating high school in 2017, Klondike relocated to Atlanta where she released her first two songs on Soundcloud, entitled “Big Gang Glocks” and “Love Letter.” The arrival of these two tracks built her a nice buzz and solid social following on Instagram. In 2018, she unveiled her first music video for “Drip,” which garnered 2 million views on YouTube in a month’s time. This caught the attention of established artist and producer Jazze Pha who quickly took her under his wing. Shortly after, she inked a deal with HITCOEntertainment, which she claims, felt like family. Now, she amps up the energy even more withNo Smoke.

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Demi Lovato’s Overdose

25-year-old American singer, songwriter, and actress, Demi Lovato was found lying unconscious in her home on Tuesday after a suspected overdose. She is currently recovering and receiving treatment at a hospital in LA. Lovato has stated how she has previously had issues dealing with eating disorders, self-harm, addiction, and mental health problems. She had also made a documentary regarding her struggles that affected her daily life along with trying to stay sober, but in June 2018 Lovato released a new song titled Sober in which she sings “I’m not sober anymore.” Her documentary went on explaining how these problems began at a very young age, such as having suicidal thoughts and bulimia when she was only 10 years old, and trying cocaine for the first time when she was 17. Even before starting the hit series on Disney Channel’s “Sonny with a Chance” and “Camp Rock,” she had been a huge target for bullying. There were many struggles and pressures on her as she drove quickly to fame at such a young age. Lovato is currently receiving lots of support from fans and celebrities throughout social media while wishing her a quick recovery.