Posts tagged with "gun control"

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June Top Stories

It’s official; we’ve hit the midway point of 2022. With such an array of breaking news headlines so far this year, let’s review the most resounding stories in the month of June.

Tulsa Shooting

Four people were killed in a shooting that broke out at a campus hospital in Tulsa, Oklahoma, just eight days after the catastrophic shooting at Robb Elementary School. The gunman, unidentified, was also found dead, producing a total of five fatalities. As the shooting broke out, panic set in as there were “hundreds of rooms and hundreds of people,” located in the hospital, as reported by Richard Meulenberg.

NFL Player Jeff Gladney Dies

After suffering a fatal car accident in Dallas, Arizona Cardinals cornerback Jeff Gladney has passed away. At the scene of the crash, along with Gladney, it was confirmed that Andrea Mercedes Palacios was also killed.

Previous Dallas Cowboys Player Marion Barber Found Dead

Marion Barber, former running back for the Dallas Cowboys, was discovered dead in his Frisco apartment. A complaint about a water leak was reported from Barber’s apartment, and police conducted a welfare check. At the scene, they found Barber neglected and unalive. It is uncertain what the cause of his death was.

Johnny Depp and Amber Heard Defamation Suit Ends

After a strenuous courtroom battle, both Johnny Depp and Amber Heard were found legally responsible for defamation by the jury. Their ultimate decision found Heard slandered Depp in three varying statements, with Depp defaming Heard in one statement.

Regarding the financial components, the jury awarded Depp with $10 million in compensatory damages and $5 million in punitive damages. For Heard, she was awarded $2 million in compensatory damages.  

Jubilee Live Updates: UK kicks off celebrations for Elizabeth II’s 70th year on the throne, United Kingdom

The ‘Trooping the color’ military parade kicks off four days of celebrations across the country for Queen Elizabeth II‘s Platinum Jubilee. Britain’s longest-serving monarch appeared on the balcony of Buckingham Palace with other members of the royal family at 11 am Thursday. Today, June 2nd, is the first of four days of the Platinum Jubilee festivities.

Thousands of people have flocked to the British capital (London) to greet a queen who arrives at the event at the height of her popularity. Many citizens spent the night outdoors, camping on The Mall, the avenue that leads to Buckingham Palace, in order to reserve a place in the front rows and witness the parade of 1,500 officers and the subsequent flight of the Royal Air Force over the Palace.

Police officer will not be charged for a shooting he committed in 2016, Wisconsin

The officer who shot and killed three people in the line of duty over five years will not be charged in the 2016 shooting of a 25-year-old man who was found sleeping inside a car in a park.

La Crosse County District Attorney Tim Gruenke, Milwaukee attorney Scott Hansen and special prosecutors have reported their assessment of the incident and no legal basis has been found to charge and blame former police officer Joseph Mensah for having shot at Jay Anderson.

Phoenix Suffers Mass Shootings

The city of Phoenix, Arizona endured an array of mass shootings in the area. At the end of the month of May, one man was shot at a house party in west Phoenix, leaving an additional five injured.

Only one week later, three separate shootings occurred within 24 hours of each other. In the first, a teenage girl was shot dead at a Phoenix strip mall, with eight enduring injuries. The other two shootings left a teenage boy and a man dead by gunshot wounds.

Shootings in Pennsylvania, Tennessee and Michigan Leave at Least Nine Dead

Saturday June 5 and Sunday June 6 attributed to the United States growing number of mass shootings in the year of 2022. In a shocking turn of events, shootings in Philadelphia, Tennessee and Michigan all broke out.

A fight broke out in Philadelphia that resulted in three people being slain, with 11 others shot in the crossfire. The next shooting occurred near a nightclub in Chattanooga with four people killed, and 14 more people suffering injuries from gunshots. The final shooting of the deadly weekend took place in Saginaw where an additional three people were killed.

JUNETEENTH

Juneteenth, also called Freedom Day, African American Independence Day, Emancipation Day, or Jubilee Day is a federal holiday celebrating the emancipation of slavery in the United States. It commemorates the proclamation of freedom for enslaved persons at Galveston, Texas, on June 19, 1865. Bringing together June and nineteenth, this festival represents pride and solidarity with the black community.

Latest update of the war in Ukraine

The United Nations (UN) denounces that Russia uses rape as a weapon of war. The Russian invasion of Ukraine has led to many allegations of war crimes and abuses perpetrated by Russian soldiers. The UN has corroborated 124 cases of alleged sexual violence committed in Ukraine.

The Secretary-General’s Representative on Sexual Violence in Conflict, Pramila Patten, has stated that “women make up the majority of potential victims”. Of the corroborated total, it indicates that 56 are women. It follows that 41 of the complaints are from girls and seven boys. It includes rape, forced public nudity, attempted rape, and threat of sexual violence.

Britney Spears Ties the Knot with Sam Asghari

The princess of pop herself, Britney Spears, married fiancé Sam Asghari in a magical ceremony Thursday June 9. Dressed by Donatella Versace, the bride and groom both worn custom Versace designs for their big day.

The magical, private evening took place at her Thousand Oaks home in California with around 60 guests. The icon celebrated the special night with some of her dearest friends and family, including Donatella, Paris Hilton, Selena Gomez, Drew Barrymore and Madonna.

A celebration of love and freedom, Britney danced the night away at her well-deserved fairytale wedding.

Justin Bieber Suffers Ramsay Hunt Syndrome

Justin Bieber announced the devastating news that he contracted Ramsay Hunt syndrome, “a neurological disorder characterized by paralysis of the facial nerve,” as defined by RareDiseases.org. Bieber took to his Instagram to announce the news, clarifying his recent cancellation of upcoming shows for the summer.

In a video posted to his Instagram, he showed followers the effects of the virus, stating, “As you can see, this eye is not blinking, I can’t smile on this side of my face, […] This nostril will not move. So full paralysis in this side of my face.”

Continuing he declared, “This is pretty serious, as you can see. I wish this wasn’t the case, but obviously my body’s telling me I gotta slow down.”

Texas Legislator Threatens Bill that would Prohibit Minors from Attending Drag Shows

Following a celebratory “Drag Your Kids to Pride” event held in Dallas, Texas, a Republican legislator has made threats to propose a bill that would forbid children from attending drag shows in the state. The event, held in celebration of Pride month, was described a family-friendly show that fostered honor and commemoration, like many other Pride events held throughout the month of June.

The event reportedly went viral across social media, alarming Texas Republican Bryan Slaton. Slaton took to Twitter to announce he would file a bill to restrict minors from attending drag shows. He stated, “I would never take my children to a drag show and I know Speaker Dade Phelan and my Republican colleagues wouldn’t either, […] The events of this past weekend were horrifying and show a disturbing trend in which perverted adults are obsessed with sexualizing young children.”

His disgust surrounding the celebratory event has alarmed people across the nation, especially after the mass elementary school shooting that occurred in Uvalde, Texas and left 22 dead one month prior.

Drag superstar Alyssa Edwards, originally from Texas, has publicly communicated her discomfort with Republican officials’ responses to the shooting versus the Pride event. Edwards took to TMZ and Twitter with statements, asserting directly to Slaton, “You, sir, have tweeted more about #drag than the loss at #Uvalde. Is this truly about children or politics? #Priorities.”

A group of US senators reaches a minimum agreement to increase gun control, United States

  1. The measures include a revision of the process for purchasing weapons for those under 21 years of age.
  2. The group of senators that has reached an agreement in principle consists of 10 Republicans and 10 Democrats.

A group of United States senators announced on Sunday June 12 an agreement in principle to increase control over firearms, which proposes minimum measures after the mass shootings in a school in Uvalde (Texas) and in a supermarket in Buffalo (New York) . In a statement, the group of senators, both Democrats and Republicans, have indicated that the agreement includes a review of the process for purchasing weapons for those under 21 years of age ( the perpetrators of the #Uvalde and the #Buffalo shootings were both 18 years old).

Rapper Trouble dies after being shot at an apartment complex in Georgia

Atlanta rapper Trouble was shot to death at an apartment complex in Georgia. The Rockdale County Sheriff’s Office confirmed news of the 34-year-old man’s death to local media on Sunday, June 5. According to WSBTV Atlanta, Trouble, whose artist’s real name was Mariel Semonte Orr, was shot around 3:20 a.m. at the Lake St. James apartment complex in Conyers.

Police officers claimed that when they arrived at the crime scene, they found the rapper lying on the ground. He was shot once in the chest and he was pronounced dead at the scene. The rapper’s label, Def Jam, released a statement: “Our thoughts and prayers are with the children, loved ones and fans of Trouble. A true voice for his city and an inspiration for the community he proudly represented. RIP Scoob.”

Bitcoin ATMs become more common, more than 880 machines installed in June already

In recent days, Bitcoin ATM installations around the world have increased, Coin ATM Radar has stated in its recent report. In the first two weeks of June alone, more than 882 Bitcoin ATMs have sprung up in different locations around the world. The increase in the number of these fiat-to-crypto exchange machines is related to the emerging regulation of cryptocurrencies in various countries. Besides, institutional investments in the crypto industry have managed to keep investor appetite intact, so more people have opened up their financial portfolios to also include crypto assets.

On average daily installation is between 16 and 23 crypto ATMs worldwide, data from Coin ATM Radar shows in a report.

Ranchers against the project to lower nitrogen pollution, Netherlands

The Dutch government announced on Friday, June 10, the obligation to lower emissions to 70% in some places and even up to 95% in others, to protect nature. The objective is to attack the emission of nitrogen from cattle that produces their digestion, feces and urine. The Minister for Nature and Nitrogen Policy, Christianne van der Wal, guarantees that it is an “inevitable transition”: “We have to emit much less nitrogen, and unfortunately the agricultural sector emits a lot of nitrogen. They have done a lot to emit less, but for unfortunately it is not enough. We still have to reduce it much more”.

Something that will cause major upheavals in the country’s multimillion-dollar agricultural industry since The Netherlands is the second largest agricultural exporter in the world, after the United States. A definite NO from farmers’ associations; the head of the Netherlands Association for Horticulture and Agriculture, Sjaak van der Tak, replies: “Our members say that it is good enough, that we have reached the limit. That means that we will prepare the appropriate actions to make it clear, in a dignified way, that These plans are unacceptable.”

The new National Museum in Oslo becomes the largest cultural building in the Nordic region

The most striking feature of the new museum is the huge illuminated exhibition hall at the top of the building. It will be used for temporary exhibitions of international importance. The building was designed by architect Kleihues + Schuwerk Gesellschaft von Architekten, with an emphasis on longevity and dignity over sensational architecture. The roof terrace of the new museum offers a unique view of the inner fjord of Oslo. The square in front of the main entrance has become an urban meeting place, with a coffe shop and benches that invite you to enter to rest.

“The new National Museum is the largest museum in the Nordic countries and is built to contain, preserve and display our amazing collection of visual arts, crafts, design and architecture dating back to ancient times and continuing to this day,” explained the director from the National Museum, Karin Hindsbo.

Spanish NASA finally takes off: this is how its space agency should be to be effective, Spain

The Spanish Government will approve today (June 14) the Space Council to promote the start-up in 2023 of the long-awaited Spanish Space Agency. Scientists and engineers from the sector give their opinion on how this body should be and if it is feasible to locate it outside of Madrid.

Mick Jagger tests positive for covid-19, Amsterdam

The Rolling Stones cancel a concert in Amsterdam after singer Mick Jagger tested positive for covid-19. Mick Jagger’s positive status was announced in a statement on the band’s verified Instagram account: “The Rolling Stones have been forced to cancel tonight’s concert in Amsterdam at the Johan Cruijff ArenA, after Mick Jagger tested positive after experiencing COVID symptoms upon arrival at the stadium,” the statement read. “The Rolling Stones deeply regret tonight’s postponement, but the safety of the audience, fellow musicians and touring crew must come first.”

The concert will be rescheduled for a later date and original tickets will be honored. The Rolling Stones’ current summer tour is for the band’s 60th anniversary.

The emotional farewell of the Real Madrid player: Marcelo Vieira, Spain

Marcelo: “I’ve done everything I set out to and leave here feeling happy, I leave a legacy for the youngsters”. “This season I realized that you don’t need to play to be important, you need to be part of a team and understand the coach”, he added.

The football player addressed the media at the press conference held after the tribute and farewell ceremony that took place at Real Madrid City: “I don’t think much about the future, I always live in the moment. It’s hard to leave the club of your life after so much joy, suffering, training, pain, giving your all for the club. Putting on this shirt is a beautiful and powerful thing. The future doesn’t scare me because history’s already been written, I had to do this. I’m pleased with myself and my family’s proud of me too. There’s no uncertainty”.

Current Real Madrid teammates like his compatriots Vinícius Júnior, Éder Militão or Casemiro, former teammates like, Cristiano Ronaldo, Iker Casillas, or Sergio Ramos have wanted to pay tribute on social networks to Marcelo, who leaves the white club after 16 seasons.

Shakira and Gerard Piqué confirm their separation as a couple, Spain

After twelve years together, Shakira and Gerard Piqué separated in the midst of an international scandal. The Colombian singer would have discovered her Spanish husband’s infidelities with a young model and decided to ask for a divorce.

Te felicito‘ (I congratulate you): Shakira’s song whose lyrics all relate to Piqué. After the announcement of the separation, the speculations have not stopped and it has become a highly commented topic on television talk shows. The song has not only become popular for being a danceable theme, but also for the lyrics. And it is that there are many who have related the lyrics of the song with the FC Barcelona footballer on social platforms.

A jihadist attack in Burkina Faso causes 86 deaths and 19,000 displaced, Africa

The number of displaced people after the terrorist attack that took place in northern Burkina Faso on the night of June 11 to 12 and in which 86 people died, amounts to more than 19,000 people, the authorities of the African country reported this past Saturday.

Since 2015, Burkina Faso has been dealing with a jihadist insurgency that has claimed thousands of lives and displaced nearly two million people. The conflict, which is also affecting parts of Niger and Mali, is displacing rural communities and contributing to widespread food shortages.

The left political party makes history and wins the Presidency of Colombia for the first time with Gustavo Petro

With 98.86% of the recognized votes, Petro obtained 11,185,671 votes, equivalent to 50.49%. Gustavo Petro is a 62-year-old Colombian economist and politician, leader of the Political Coalition Historical Pact. he will succeed the president of Colombia, Iván Duque, from next August 7.

Beyonce releases “Break My Soul”

Beyonce released her new song on Monday June 20, and we can safely say that “Break My Soul” did its part in “breaking” the internet. With a house music melody, the single has marked the return of the artist. The new track also reunites queen Bey with bounce music legend Big Freedia, who collaborated on the artist’s 2016 track “Formation.”

VidCon 2022

VidCon returned for the first time in a few years and was held at the Anaheim Convention Center. An array of creators and digital moguls came together at the four-day event. A surplus of panels, vendors, meet and greets and after hour celebrations took place. Sponsored this year for the first time by the popular platform of TikTok, esteemed creators like Charli D’Amelio, MrBeast, Brittany Broski and Nia Sioux were in attendance.

R. Kelly senteced to 30 years prisontime

R. Kelly was sentenced to 30 years in prison for numerous sex trafficking charges. The R&B singer reportedly used his celebrity status throughout his career to coerce young individuals to participate in sexual acts. 

Kelly’s conviction in 2021 found him guilty of one count of racketeering and eight breaches of the Mann Act, which criminalizes the use of “any woman or girl for prostitution or debauchery, or for any other immoral purpose.” 

Joel Peterson photo via Deseret News for use by 360 Magazine

Joel Peterson x My Road to Cancellation

Joel Peterson, Stanford Professor and former JetBlue Chairman, writes about his experience navigating the minefield of woke hostility in his piece My Road to Cancellation:

“Wokeism,” America’s new civil religion, draws on elements of neo-Marxism, critical race theory, social justice and identity politics. Its adherents believe it will lead to a more just society. Its detractors, on the other hand, believe its “cancel culture” will push civil society to the brink. And, for the “woke,” either will do.

The roots of my own unlikely cancelation go as far back as 1987, when Jesse Jackson marched Stanford students up Palm Drive to a rhythmic chant of “Hey, hey, ho, ho! Western Civ has got to go!” The next year, I joined the advisory council of its Graduate School of Business where I was soon invited to fill a one-year faculty vacancy. To everyone’s surprise (including my own), I returned every fall for the next three decades to teach four courses to a generation of exceptional MBA candidates.

Then, last year, before a student-politician boldly posted that “White people need to be eradicated,” I was summoned to respond to an equally disturbing complaint over having “triggered” woke students. Because I didn’t think I’d done anything worthy of the summons and because I had received the distinguished teaching award from students, a “Silver Apple Award” from alumni and been appointed to a faculty chair, I wasn’t worried. Alas, I’d misjudged my peril.

Years after Jackson’s campaign to eliminate Stanford’s requirement to study Western civilization, an Iowa-born, New York Times reporter, Nikole Hannah-Jones, developed what she titled “The 1619 Project.” In it, she presented America as founded on slavery and stained by perpetual bigotry.

With boosts from the Pulitzer Foundation and from George Floyd’s tragic death, her social justice message struck a nerve. However, when a number of historians debunked the pseudo-history, Hannah-Jones repositioned her essay as “a work of journalism that explicitly seeks to challenge the national narrative.” She followed up with a New York Times Magazine article headlined “What is Owed” making a case for reparations, consistent with her 1995 letter to the editor in Notre Dame’s “The Observer,” in which she likened Christopher Columbus to Hitler.

With police departments defunded, monuments vandalized and cities torched, Dr. Seuss was soon condemned as racist, Mr. Potato Head scheduled for gender reassignment, and free speech restricted by social media oligarchs. So, it wasn’t a surprise to see social justice warriors on the previously welcoming Graduate School of Business campus.

Content of character vs. color of skin

In a class I teach, students objected when guest CEOs claimed to have been “color blind.” When I volunteered that I, too, had resisted hiring based on skin color, gender or quotas, and had relied, instead, on character, competence and commitment, some students were offended. To understand why those “triggered” would object to standards of character and competence being added to the emergent holy grail of diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI), I turned to one of my own daughters.

Sensing my bafflement at the outrage, she immediately wrote back:

“I have known you my entire life, and I know by your words and deeds that you value all people of all races, ethnicities, and genders. I know you are constantly impressed and inspired by immigrants and their amazing stories of courage and perseverance. I’m proud of the work you’ve done. If this younger, ‘triggered’ generation pushes out of their lives all who seek to improve their understanding, teach them, and open their minds to broader ways of thinking, it will be to their detriment.”

I’d taught my kids – and, until now, my students — that talent, character, and competence are evenly distributed across every demographic. In response to my determination to be on the lookout for leaders without regard to identity, an offended gender-studies major wrote that she’d not known “whether to scream or throw up.” After all, it had been nearly 60 years since Martin Luther King had dreamt of the day when the content of one’s character mattered more than the color of one’s skin. But, by the time that day happily arrived, “wokeism” had hijacked his dream, re-elevating skin color over character.

As demands for skin-color diversity were broadened to include gender and sexual orientation, a student notified me that I’d called on more men than women in two (of four) classes. Knowing that I was no respecter of persons — whether by gender, race, sexual orientation, or anything else — I moved ahead with the course, suddenly aware that my interactions with students were being catalogued by identity.

Soon, a Black Lives Matter advocate asked, of all things, whether I would stand for the American flag. To provide context for my decision, I shared a story. As a toddler, I’d seen my mother take a call from the Department of Defense announcing that her fighter-pilot brother had been killed. Honoring her grief, I’d chosen to stand for the flag under which my only uncle had offered the ultimate sacrifice. The student’s response was presented as an irrefutable argument; my choice was “racist.”

Furthermore, in this woke new world, my professional experience was no longer relevant because of the race and gender I’d been assigned at birth. Despite having created tens of thousands of jobs, promoted women and minorities, and coached scores of entrepreneurs, I was deemed an “oppressor” in the catechism of “wokeism.” Furthermore, the penance for being raised in a “systemically racist” society — founded on millennia of Greek, Roman and Judeo-Christian antecedents, no less — was submission, and, if resisted, cancelation.

The reason behind such tyranny came into focus for me when Condolezza Rice, former secretary of state and current director of the Hoover Institution at Stanford, told me she’d shared with her students that the capture of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed (9/11’s architect) had felt like “having Erwin Rommel under lock and key.” The blank looks on the faces of her very bright students revealed that they had never heard of WWII’s famous Desert Fox.

Until then, I’d traced the enmity to activists like Jackson and Hannah-Jones. Now, I could see that it also stemmed from students having swapped an education for indoctrination. Those enlisted as social justice warriors had avoided the lessons of history, missed out on refining skills that might have allowed them to judge assertions, and denied themselves the insights required to make wise trade-offs.

Because such uninformed activism brought with it a minefield of woke hostility, I kept to myself any reservations I harbored about critical race theory, gender fluidity, and climate alarm. And, when Stanford’s math department proposed achieving “racial equity” by eliminating AP math (as racist, no less), I also kept quiet. Instead, I hoped my hardscrabble climb to CEO might inspire those who saw themselves as victims of inequity. Ironically, those who strained to label my uphill journey a product of “white supremacy” were often the very beneficiaries of woke preferences.

Oppressor-victim

To understand this recipe for canceling predecessor generations, I spoke next with Stanford military historian Victor Davis Hanson. Because Hanson had written the following, I wanted his help in gracefully handling the oppressor-victim theme:

“We should not… allow a current affluent, leisure, and pampered generation to hijack the past, and damn it to perdition. (They have) not earned the right to… cancel… those of the past who won Gettysburg, or built the Hoover Dam, or produced a Liberty ship every week.”

While Stanford had long nurtured a remarkably diverse and admirably inclusive community, it nonetheless rejected Hanson’s counsel in favor of a now fashionable “institutional racism.”

When Graduate School of Business faculty were further instructed to avoid “racist and xenophobic rhetoric and actions against the Asian American and Pacific Islander community,” I found myself wondering if the addendum were a virtue-signaling accusation, or if it were based on something I’d simply never encountered in all my years at Stanford. And, when the facts behind subsequent murders (of a Capitol police officer and 10 Colorado shoppers) contradicted de rigueur narratives, I wondered if the time had come to move beyond racial memes.

Apparently not. With free markets also labeled “racist,” those of us with responsibilities outside the ivory tower began to feel our “diversity of optic” (based on long experience) had been dismissed in favor of a “diversity of identity” (rooted in ideology). So, while I care deeply about Stanford University, and like and admire its president, provost, and business school dean, I was beginning to feel isolated.

Their deference to selective diversity led me to reflect upon a meeting I’d conducted in Berlin as chairman of JetBlue Airways. After the meeting, I’d taken a stroll down Unter den Linden to the Bebelplatz, 500 yards to the east of Berlin’s famous Brandenburg Gate. It was at that plaza, on May 10, 1933, that newly empowered Nazi officials had orchestrated the burning of “objectionable” books. Later dubbed “The Night of Shame,” the conflagration eventually contributed to Germany’s liberal democracy turning a blind eye to Kristallnacht, the Holocaust and an appalling rationale for war.

While loath to compare such a long-ago shame with how I was currently feeling in Palo Alto, of all places, I remembered being impressed that, in Berlin, the survivors of that era’s cancelation had later inserted “stumbling stones” between pavers to ensure that all who followed neither forget, nor repeat, that calamity.

As I traversed the once-riven capital city, the ground-level reminders had provoked in me a surge of optimism. Surely, the world would avoid the sort of conflict for which my own father had gone to war. Surely, everyone realized by now that banning books, restricting free speech and stoking fear would lead to tragedy. And, just as surely, America would eventually reject totalitarianism, even in its “wokest” form.

Yet, here I was, only three years later, 6,000 miles to the west of Berlin, sensing I was perilously connected to a prior generation’s intolerance. Adding to my anxiety was a discovery that my grandchildren’s generation were being scheduled to view an honorable heritage through a lens cleverly manufactured to provoke shame.

Forced to consider moving to a less hostile teaching environment, I heard from former students. One female “of color” offered that, of all her professors, I’d been the most supportive of women and minorities. Another confirmed that the majority of his classmates felt silenced by the threats of a racist label. One student even scolded me for having allowed “the slings and arrows” of the woke to achieve their hoped-for effect.

I smiled wanly to see that Prince Hamlet had somehow survived Jesse Jackson. I, on the other hand, had failed utterly to anticipate the distorting polemics of identity politics. The script advanced during America’s annus horribilis had pitted race against race, gender against gender, and generation against generation, all risking a degradation of spirit worse than any virus.

As a former CEO, it seemed to me that the narrative had gone well beyond gaining political or market advantage. It had even exceeded antifa’s hope for French-Revolution-style anarchy. In fact, by 2021, it looked like a bold attempt at a hostile takeover of mankind’s best hope for peace and prosperity.

This conclusion led me to contrast two Americans best known for their connections to societal breakdown — a mid-19th-century Abraham Lincoln and a mid-20th-century Saul Alinsky. I selected Lincoln because he’d guided America through a civil war, and Alinsky because his dream had been to provoke civil unrest by inciting those he called the “have-nots” against those whom he called the “haves.”

President Lincoln’s observation of America’s vulnerability mirrored community organizer Alinsky’s precondition for a successful revolution. Thus, the warning attributed to Lincoln that “America will never be destroyed from the outside; if we falter and lose our freedoms, it will be because we destroyed ourselves” was the basis for the race and class warfare Alinsky welcomed by rewriting history, inciting envy and “canceling” a large portion of the population.

Whereas Martin Luther King had called upon our “better angels” to subordinate our differences to shared values and, thus, to overcome what Condi Rice called our nation’s “birth defect,” Alinsky chose to repudiate King’s redemptive dream. If he could get people to ignore e pluribus unum (America’s motto since 1782), he might be able to overcome the spirit under which the nation had thrived.

By 2020, the pandemic had offered activists a unique opportunity to cleave the nation along identity and tribal lines, skirting the 238-year-old aspiration that had been Alinsky’s steepest obstacle. Using a fear of cancellation to silence half the population, SJWs dismissed the steady social progress that was the trademark of the world’s most successful multicultural society. Instead of celebrating the progress flowing from our commonalities, they fomented division by pointing to historical injustices.

Between a pandemic, racial tensions and the absence of a Lincolnesque figure to bind up our wounds and bring us together, America was, indeed, vulnerable. As its citizens awakened to the soft tyranny promoted during the pandemic, many felt betrayed by institutions they’d once admired and leaders they’d once trusted. And, for my part, I discovered that the experience I’d had with cancellation in the academy was being repeated all across the nation.

While I may well survive, America will not survive the rewriting of its history, the violation of its Constitution and the abandonment of the freedoms it has promised to citizens of all political persuasions, ethnicities, genders and orientations. No matter our differences, unless we preserve free speech, secure our Constitution and re-enthrone individual responsibility over victimhood, all the king’s horses and all the king’s men will be unable to put Humpty Dumpty back together again.

And Alinsky’s vision will have canceled Lincoln’s.

Joel Peterson Bio

Joel Peterson is the Robert L. Joss Professor of Management at Stanford University, the former managing partner of the Trammell Crow Company, the former chairman of the board of Overseers of the Hoover Institution, the former chairman of JetBlue Airways and the founder and chairman of Peterson Partners, a sponsor for a quarter century of more than a dozen funds covering private equity, venture and real estate investments in hundreds of companies and real estate projects across the nation and throughout the world.

Gun Violence illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Indianapolis FedEx Mass Shooting

EIGHT KILLED IN INDIANAPOLIS FEDEX FACILITY SHOOTING

What we know so far

  • Brandon Hole, the shooting suspect, opened fire outside and inside of a FedEx facility in Indianapolis, Indiana on Thursday evening.
  • Eight people were shot and killed, while several others were wounded in addition to the gunman.
  • Police believe the gunman killed himself as officers encountered him.
  • The motive for the shooting known at this time.

Law enforcement were notified of a mass casualty situation at the Indianapolis FedEx location late Thursday evening. Timothy Boillat, a FedEx employee, was inside of the building when the gunshots began, according to CNN. He was on break when he heard “two loud metal clangs,” not realizing that it was gun shots. Boillat said his friend saw someone grabbing a gun out of the trunk of their car. It was at that moment that Boillat saw a body on the ground. Levi Miller was interviewed this morning by the Today Show and stated “I saw a man, a hooded figure. The man did have an AR in his hand, and he started shouting and then he started firing. I thought he saw me, so I immediately ducked for cover.”

Deputy Chief of Criminal Investigations for Indianapolis Police, Craig McCartt, stated that four of the victims were found inside of the FedEx facility and four were found outside. The suspect was found deceased, in addition to eight other people. The Indianapolis Police Department said they have an idea of who the suspect was, however, have not formally identified him. The Department believes that the shooter was using a rifle, but they do not yet have any specifics on the weapon. The police are being assisted by the FBI in searching the suspect’s house. Special agent Paul Keenan is in charge.

During a news conference McCartt stated, “This suspect came to the facility. He got out of his car and pretty quickly started some random shooting outside the facility. There was no confrontation with anyone. That began in the parking lot and then he did go into the building.”

Alfarena McGinty, the Chief Deputy Coroner at the Marion County Coroner’s Office, said that the Department is conducting an investigation, but cannot yet enter the crime scene to confirm the victims’ identity until all evidence has been collected. “We are still a number of hours out before we are able to go on to the scene to conduct our investigation, and then after that, we’ll work with the families. Following that process, what we have to do is we will perform our examinations,” she said, adding that extra staff will be called in to complete those examinations in the next 48 to 72 hours, reports CNN.

According to data from the Gun Violence Archive, there have been at least 147 mass shootings incidents in 2021 in the United States. The Gun Violence Archive is an online archive of gun violence incidents collected from various law enforcement, media, government and commercial sources daily in order to provide near-real time data about the results of gun violence. GVA is a non-profit corporation based out of Washington DC, as stated on their website.

UPDATE:

Indianapolis Police has released the names of the deceased victims from Thursday night’s shooting. 

The victims are: 

  • 32-year-old Matthew R Alexander 
  • 19-year-old Samaria Blackwell
  • 66-year-old Amarjeet Johal
  • 64-year-old Jaswinder Kaur
  • 68-year-old Jaswinder Singh
  • 48-year-old Amarjit Sekhon
  • 19-year-old Karlie Smith
  • 74-year-old John Weisert

A statement by IMPD says the next of kin has been notified by the Marion County Coroner’s Office.

The cause of death will be determined after autopsies are complete, according to the statement. 

IMPD said the names of those injured are not being released. 

End Gun Violence illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Boulder Shooter Kills Ten People

Colorado Supermarket Mass Shooting:

Gunman kills 10, including police officer

The series of mass shootings have continued within the United States, this time in Boulder Colorado at 3600 Table Mesa Drive. A gunman killed 10 people at a King Soopers supermarket on Monday afternoon. One of the victims included police officer Eric Talley who was first on the scene. Officer Talley was first to respond to report of gunfire at the grocery store. The workers and shoppers that survived were able to flee the scene and others were able to take shelter within the store – enduring the horrific violence that echoed throughout the store.

The shooting started shortly after 2:30 p.m. in the parking lot of King Soopers. Videographer Dean Schiller provided a livestream video showing what appears to be victims and an employee saying the shooter was inside of the store. Two roommates commented that “he just came in and started shooting” without saying a word. They went on to note that the gunman “let off a couple of shots, then was silent, and then he let off a couple more – He wasn’t spraying.”.

Survivor Ryan Borowski commented to CNN’s Don Lemon that he was still processing what happened. Borowski had just gone to buy some ice cream at the grocery store. He had changed his mind at the last minute and went down a different aisle. Borowski then heard the first gunshots, which he then started running to the back of the store. Borowski and several others rushed out of the store through the back, telling employees “Gun, gun, gun. Run, run, run.” Borowski went on to comment “I don’t remember anybody screaming. It was just go, go, go, get out of here… I knew I had to move.”.

Steven McHugh commented that his son-in-law and his two granddaughters were in the store as their dad got the vaccination for Covid-19. McHugh was told that his family watched people get shot and managed to run to a staff area to hide in a coat closet until police were able to intervene.

The 21-year-old suspect, Ahmad Al Issa, was taken into custody and treated for injuries, however, there are not many answers as to why the violent crime was carried out. Issa is facing 10 counts of first-degree murder and will be taken to Boulder County Jail. Officials say it will take days to investigate the crime scene thoroughly and notify families of the loss of their loved ones. Local, state, and federal agencies responded to the scene to aid in the investigation.

Officer Eric Talley had been with the department since 2010 and was very passionate about his job according to Officer Mark Bliley, head of the Boulder Police Department’s union. Bliley continued to say that Talley had a unique ability to connect with people; that he was a highly respected, well-loved person and officer – a solid person that everyone loved.

Kelli McGannon, King Soopers spokeswoman, said the company is working with investigators and will be deferring to law enforcement on all inquiries about the shooting. “Our hearts are broken over this senseless act of violence,” she said.

Former Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords commented “It’s beyond time for our leaders to take action” on gun control. Giffords is a gun control advocate and mass shooting survivor. She went on to comment that “This is not normal, and it doesn’t have to be this way. This is an especially personal tragedy for me. I survived a shooting at a grocery store, in a tragedy that devastated my beloved community of Tucson. It’s been 10 years, and countless American communities have had to face something similar. Today it’s a tragedy in Boulder, Colorado. This past weekend it was a house party in Philadelphia. And last week it was an armed attack on Asian American women in the Atlanta area.”

The supermarket shooting occurred just seven days after the violent mass shooting in Atlanta where eight innocent people, including six Asian women, were killed when a gunman terrorized three spas. On March 17, five people were gunned down in a drive-by shooting while preparing a vigil in Stockton, California. Just a day later, four victims were shot in Gresham, Oregon. In Houston, five people were shot within a club during a disturbance on March 20. In Philadelphia, five people were injured and one murdered during a shooting at a party on the same day.

The Colorado Healing Fund is collecting donations for victims of the Boulder shooting. The Colorado Healing Fund is a non-profit organization created to support victims of mass tragedies.

Victims of the King Sooper’s Mass Shooting:

  • Denny Strong, 20 years old
  • Neven Stoanisic, 23 years old
  • Rikki Olds, 25 years old
  • Tralona Bartkowiak, 49 years old
  • Suzanne Fountain, 59 years old
  • Teri Leiker, 51 years old
  • Officer Eric Talley, 51 years old
  • Kevin Mahoney, 61 years old
  • Lynn Murray, 62 years old
  • Jody Waters, 65 years old
gun violence image for 360 magazine by Kaelen Felix

Motherhood Does Not Drive Support For Gun Control

A recent study has found that moms are not more likely than other women to support gun control efforts. In fact, this new study finds that parenthood doesn’t have a substantial effect on the gun control views of men or women.

“Everybody ‘knows’ that moms are more politically liberal on gun control issues,” says Steven Greene, corresponding author of the study and a professor of political science at North Carolina State University. “We wanted to know if that’s actually true. And, as it turns out, it’s not true – which was surprising.”

To explore the impact of parenthood on people’s gun control views, the researchers drew on data collected by the Pew Center for Research in 2017 as part of Pew’s nationally representative American Trends Panel. The researchers then used statistical models to account for various confounding variables, such as political affiliation, allowing them to focus specifically on the effect that parenthood has on one’s beliefs regarding gun control.

The Pew surveys had examined a range of issues pertaining to gun control. Across the board, men were substantially more politically conservative than women on questions related to gun laws and regulations. In other words, men were more likely to favor fewer regulations and laxer legal requirements when it comes to guns.

On four of the gun control issues, parenthood had no statistical impact at all – meaning that the positions of moms were no different from the positions of women who weren’t parents, and the positions of dads were no different from the positions of men who weren’t parents. Those four issues pertained to: gun ownership, or how permissive gun ownership laws should be; home safety, or laws pertaining to how guns and ammunition are stored or secured in the home; teachers and guns, or whether school personnel should carry firearms; and whether stricter gun laws would reduce mass shootings.

However, parenthood did have a small – but statistically significant – impact on two other gun control issues.

Mothers were actually more politically conservative than other women on the issue of gun strictness – meaning that moms were slightly more likely to support less restrictive gun laws.

And fathers were more politically conservative than other men on the issue of gun prevalence – meaning they were slightly more likely to believe that more people should be allowed to own guns, and guns should be allowed in more places.

“When we talk about political movements and efforts to change laws, it’s important to have a clear, accurate sense of where people stand on the relevant issues,” Greene says. “Using the potent symbolism of motherhood in America in order advance a political agenda, in this case, is actually ignoring the fact that positions on gun control are virtually identical for women across the board. There is some minor variation, but even there, it actually suggests that mothers are less supportive of restrictive gun laws.

“To be clear, most women – including most moms – support more restrictive gun laws. But it’s not because they’re parents.” In conclusion, there is no true correlation between how adults feel about gun laws and if they are a parent.

The paper, “Do moms demand action on guns? Parenthood and gun policy attitudes,” appears in the Journal of Elections, Public Opinion and Parties. The paper was co-authored by Melissa Deckman, of Washington College; Laurel Elder, of Hartwick College; and Mary-Kate Lizotte, of Augusta University.

“Do moms demand action on guns? Parenthood and gun policy attitudes”

Authors: Steven Greene, North Carolina State University; Melissa Deckman, Washington College; Laurel Elder, Hartwick College; and Mary-Kate Lizotte, Augusta University

Published: Dec. 28, 2020, Journal of Elections, Public Opinion and Parties

DOI: 10.1080/17457289.2020.1862130

Abstract: The idea that motherhood primes women to support stronger gun control policy permeates our contemporary politics. Motherhood shapes views on a variety of issues, but the question remains whether mothers hold distinctive views on gun control policies relative to their non-parent peers. We draw on 2017 Pew Research Center data to explore the ways gender, parenthood, and race intersect to shape attitudes on gun policy in the post-Sandy Hook era when gun violence has become prominently linked with schools and children, and during a time when the Black Lives Matter movement has drawn national attention to the relationship of gun violence and racial inequality. Most notably, we find that contemporary depictions of mothers as a distinctively pro-gun control constituency are largely inaccurate. The very real gender gap in gun policy attitudes appears to be falsely attributed to motherhood, rather than gender. We also find very little impact of parenthood for men. Finally, we generally fail to see much relationship between race, parenthood, and gun attitudes. Overall, despite common belief and media reporting to the contrary, the story is very much one where parenthood seems to play little role in gun policy attitudes.

Rita Azar illustrates relationship article for 360 MAGAZINE

“If Anything Happens, I Love You”

By Hannah DiPilato

Warning: Spoilers Ahead 

Netflix has recently released the heart-wrenching short film, “If Anything Happens, I Love You.” The twelve-minute animation has gained immense popularity on social media and many people on TikTok are urging others to watch the film. 

Written and directed by Michael Govier and Will McCormack, the film looks into the life of two grieving parents. At the beginning of the film, it’s hard to tell what to expect. We see a couple that is visibly fighting and their shadows, which could represent their souls, leave their bodies, and interact with one another. We soon see foreshadowing that the loss of their child is causing the grief. 

The entire film is in black and white except for a few strategic placements of color. We first see this color on the side of the family’s shed, a large, blue spot that the father looks at as if the spot holds meaning. The next time this same blue hue appears is while the mom is doing laundry and finds a blue shirt in the grey pile of clothing. She embraces the shirt into her nose, another hint to the watcher that this family is grieving. 

A soccer ball then falls off the washer and rolls into an ominous room with a closed door. The family’s cat follows the ball into the room and the ball bumps a record player which begins the song, “1950” by King Princess. The mom follows the sound into the bedroom and is met with photos of a young girl with a toothy smile. The dad is close behind and the mother holds up the shirt she found while doing laundry, they share a sympathetic smile. 

The shadow of a young girl pops up out of the record player and shares a heartwarming reconnection with the cat. The parents’ shadows come together and embrace the shadow of the girl and we see the parents finally reconnect since their argument. 

We get a few flashbacks and watch the couple’s daughter grow up. We see the family take a road trip, the girl learns to play soccer and the family celebrates her 10th birthday. We learn the spot on the shed came from the girl kicking a soccer ball too hard into the side. The parents then send their daughter off to school and this is when the tears really start flowing. 

The girl starts to approach the school and the shadows of the then naive parents are trying desperately to stop the girl from going. Of course, the shadows are unsuccessful and the girl waves goodbye as she walks into school, and impending doom. 

An American flag is seen hanging over the doors inside of the school and the red, white and blue pops against the grey background. This is another time the directors used a splash of color in the grey film. At first, the background noise is the basic sounds of a school such as chatter and slamming lockers. Then, we hear a gunshot. Two more gunshots blast in the background followed by the horror of screaming children. The screaming and gunshots continue and police sirens begin to blare while the screen switches to flashing red and blue lights.

While the chaotic background noise continues, a sketch of a phone appears with a bunny phone case. “If anything happens, I love you” sends from the phone and one final gunshot makes the screen go black. The audience finally connects the pieces of the film. The daughter has been killed in the school shooting. 

The text appears again and the letters fall turning to raindrops. The rain falls on the parents’ shadows as they sit facing away from each other on two sides of a piece of land. In the final moments of the film, we see the parents reunite thanks to the shadow of the daughter, and we see the parents finally find comfort in one another. 

It was shocking how much emotion could be fit into a twelve-minute animated film. There were many themes displayed in the film touching on family, loss, grief, trauma and love. This film also speaks out on the very important issue of gun control in America. For so many families, losing a child to gun violence in a school shooting is a harsh reality. A child’s life can be snatched away from them at an incredibly young age. 

With no dialogue and simple illustrations, the writers were able to convey an entire story that plays with the emotions of the viewer and evokes important conversations. The distress shown in the marriage after the loss of the daughter is something parents experience and may not necessarily want to talk about. It’s easy for the loss of a loved one to break people apart. 

The main takeaway from the film should be to hold your loved ones close because you never know what will happen next. In our fast-paced lives, we often take our lives and loved ones for granted. This film flawlessly shows how easily we can experience a loss that can make our world come crashing down. Remember, hold your loved ones close and tell them you love them, before it’s too late.

Watch the short animated film on Netflix now.

Mina Tocalini, 360 Magazine, Fireworks

4th of July Violence Across America

By Eamonn Burke

This year’s Fourth of July, while stifled by the coronavirus concerns and pleas from officials to stay in, was still a violent one.

39 people were shot in New York City on the night of July Fourth, including three confirmed deaths. All three victims were in their 20s, and two were in Harlem; the other in Brooklyn. One of the deaths, a 23 year old man, was the result of a party and the product of much confusion amidst fireworks. “You didn’t know where it was coming from because they were running this way and that way,” said a witness.

Among the other non-fatal violence was a 34 year old woman struck by a haywire bullet while walking her dog in the Bronx, a group of four men and one woman shot in Manhattan, and a man walking in Brooklyn with a friend who was shot and killed. Additionally, there were 13 reported stabbings in the city that night. The violent night comes after an overall above average level of violence in the city throughout the month of June.

Chicago saw an even bloodier night, as 67 people were shot over the weekend, killing 13. Two of the dead were children, 7 and 14, prompting a statement from Mayor Lori Lightfoot:

“As a city, we must wrap our arms around our youth so they understand there’s a future for them that isn’t wrapped up in gun violence.”

The death of the teen late Saturday resulted from the open fire that a group of four men unleashed on a large crowd, killing four people total. The 7 year old girl was shot in the head on the sidewalk outside a party at her grandmother’s house.

While LA seems relatively unscathed by gun violence over the holiday, the emergency services nevertheless had their hands full dealing with over 3,000 calls to the fire department, despite banning fireworks due to the coronavirus. The most severe of the cases was a fire that had engulfed an apartment complex in Northridge. The extensive use of fireworks in the city also lead to decreased air quality. It was one of worst firework cases the city had seen in years, according to air quality management executive Philip Fine.

Baltimore shootings over the weekend claimed the life of one in a double shooting, shortly after a quadruple shooting injured four more, and two other unrelated shootings, bringing the total injured to eight.

A family of five was shot in Detroit, killing the 39 year old mother and injuring four others. Two shootings injured four people in Philadelphia on Saturday night, and more violence followed on Sunday, including a six year old boy who died. A child is in critical condition after being shot in the head in St. Louis, and an eight year old girl was shot and injured in Cleveland. A nightclub shooting in Greenville left two people dead and injured eight others.

So far, no arrests have been made in the wake of any of these shootings.

ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE

Critically acclaimed exhibition ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE returns this April with a benefit auction hosted by ARTSY. Celebrate art for activism with works by more than 65 emerging and mid-career artists including Ann Lewis, Grace Graupe-Pillard, Rebecca Leveille, Michelle Pred, Indira Cesarine, Signe Pierce and Parker Day, among many others. Every work sold goes toward supporting the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and its mission to defend and preserve the rights and liberties guaranteed by the constitution of the United States. 

The ARTSY benefit auction features artwork across all mediums addressing the issues our society has been confronted with such as immigration rights, health care, reproductive rights, climate change, transgender rights, white supremacy, gender equality, gun control and more. It will additionally feature many new works by artists of the ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE exhibition.

Bidding opened today at 12 noon and will close on April 19th at 5pm! Head over now to bid and help raise funds for the ALCU. 

ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE BENEFIT AUCTION ARTISTS: 

Alexandra Rubinstein, Alyson Provax, Ann Lewis, Anna Rindos, Annika Connor, Anya Rubin, Bradford Scott Stringfield, Cabell Molina, Camilla Marie Dahl, Danielle Siegelbaum, Daryl Daniels, Desdemonda Dallas, Desire Moheb Zandi, Dessie Jackson, Diana Casanova, Dolly Faibyshev, Domenica Bucalo, Eleni Giannopoulou, Elisa Garcia de la Huerta, Elise Vazelakis, Erin Victoria Axtell, Fahren Feingold, Gabriela Handal, Grace Graupe Pillard, Hannah Stahl, Indira Cesarine, James Hsieh, Jamia Weir, Jamie Martinez, Jen Dwyer, Joanne Leah, Joel Tretin,Kate Hush, Katya Kan, Kristin Malin, Kristin O’Connor, Leah Schrager, Leslie Kerby, Leslie Sheryll, Lola Jiblazee, Lola Ogbara, Manju Shandler, Marne Lucas, Mary Tooley Parker, Michael Reece, Michele Pred, Miss Meatface, Nichole Washington, Olga Filippova, Olive Allen, Panteha Abareshi, Parker Day, Rada Yakova, Rebecca Leveille, Rosary Solimanto, Rosemary Meza-DesPlas, Rute Ventura, Sarah Dillon, Signe Pierce, Stephanie Hanes, Tatana Kellner, Tommy Mitchell, Touba Alipour, Valerie Carmet, Valery Estabrook, Vanessa Teran, Yuri Murphy

VIEW AUCTION CATALOGUE

BID NOW ON ARTWORKS

 

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