Posts tagged with "The Daily Beast"

Corey Taylor – CMFT

Corey Taylor, vocalist for Stone Sour and Slipknot, charted extremely well with his first solo album “CMFT.”

The album debuted at No. 1 on Billboard‘s Current Hard Rock Albums chart, No. 2 on Billboard’s Current Rock Albums chart, No. 6 on Billboard’s Vinyl Albums chart and No. 9 on Billboard’s Top Albums chart.

It also debuted in the top ten in Australia and Germany and in the top 20 in the United Kingdom and Japan. You can stream the album in its entirety by clicking right here, and you can purchase limited edition merchandise bundles by clicking right here.

Forbes praised the album, calling Taylor’s singing “the best it’s ever been” and saying he’s “easily among the best sounding rock singers alive.”

Kerrang! said Taylor’s album is just what 2020 needs, and The Daily Beast said the album “finds the singer broadening his horizons and showing off his considerable versatility.”

Taylor premiered the album at The Forum in Los Angeles for a globally streamed rock show, and you can see the performance of “Halfway Down” by clicking right here.

“CMFT” includes songs like “Culture Head,” “HWY 666,” “CMFT Must Be Stopped,” and the radio hit “Black Eyes Blue,” which is vying for No. 1 positions on the charts.

Some of the songs were recently written, but others were written as far back as Taylor’s teenage years. The entire tracklist is as follows:

1. HWY 666

2. Black Eyes Blue

3. Samantha’s Gone

4. Meine Lux

5. Halfway Down

6. Silverfish

7. Kansas

8. Culture Head

9. Everybody Dies on My Birthday

10. The Maria Fire

11. Home

12. CMFT Must Be Stopped

13. European Tour Bus Bathroom Song

You can learn more about Corey Taylor by clicking right here.

Lila Iké, 360 Magazine

Lila Iké New Video

Lila Iké drops the music video for “Forget Me” from her debut release The ExPerience

“Filled with fearless, confessional-style lyrics, the Phillip “Winta” James-produced track truly solidifies Ike as one of Jamaica’s rising stars through its use of classic dub motifs blended with elements of contemporary jazz, soul, R&B, reggaeton and rap. And though it’s easy to be instantly hypnotized, make no mistake that the song contains a much deeper and all-too-relatable meaning.” – PAPER

“The ExPerience is a valiant induction of Iké not only as a force to be reckoned with as a rising reggae artist in Jamaica, but globally…The ExPerience is a reminder that Jamaican artists aren’t singing about a season. They’re singing about their entire lives.” – VICE

Lila Iké sheds layers of emotion revealing her most vulnerable side on “Forget Me,” the standout track and music video from her debut EP The ExPerience. Director Oshane ‘Shane Creative’ Junior from Wikid Media JA & co-director Nickii Kane filmed a breakup to makeup sequence in Kingston, Jamaica.

While The ExPerience is a perfect display of Lila Iké’s soul-stirring vocal range, her fearless songwriting also explores the blissful and heartbreaking nuances of relationships. “If everyday we ah-go fight, I think it’s best that you forget me,” Lila says in the chorus. Producer Phillip “Winta” James constructed a sparse instrumental on “Forget Me” using a classic bounce of high hat, kick drum, and snare that gives space for Lila’s passionate confession. At the climactic bridge of the song, Winta James adds trumpets evoking the flavor of Jamaican dub, followed by Lila’s rapid nonchalant flow in her island country’s traditional patois.

About Lila Iké:

Since ascending in 2019 with a string of songs that fused contemporary reggae with elements of soul, hip-hop, and dancehall, Lila Iké has continued her atmospheric rise in 2020. She has earned critical acclaim from The New York Times, NPR, The Daily Beast, The FADER, and NYLON as an artist to watch, and The ExPerience proves these praises to be true.

The spotlight shines brighter on Lila Iké as she pivots from Jamaica’s independent singing sensation to global superstardom guided by her natural talents, co-signed by In.Digg.Nation Collective, Six Course and RCA Records. Lila Iké’s endearing tone can be felt in every word she sings, displaying equal amounts of vulnerability and dominance in her signature vibrato. While her early hits are foundational elements of her debut, “Forget Me” is the latest thread from The ExPerience that continues to tread through the thick, potent smoke of introspection and intimacy.

Follow Lila Iké: Instagram | Facebook | Twitter

Instrument illustration by Ivory Rowen for 360 Magazine

Bob Dylan – “Rough and Rowdy Ways”

Bob Dylan’s new album, Rough and Rowdy Ways has debuted in the Top Ten in 13 countries, including #1 chart entries in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Norway, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Germany and Switzerland, #2 positions in The United States, Australia and Belgium, #3 in Sweden, and #4 in France and Italy. The album’s #2 entry in the U.S. on Billboard’s Top 200 is Dylan’s highest chart debut in this country since 2009 and marks the artist’s 18th studio album to debut in the U.S. Top 10. Rough And Rowdy Ways has also debuted at #1 on Billboard’s Top Album Sales Chart.

The 10-track Rough and Rowdy Ways is Bob Dylan’s first album of new songs since becoming the only songwriter to receive the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2016; an award bestowed upon him by the Swedish Academy “for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition.” Critical response to Rough and Rowdy Ways has been rapturous, with many calling the album a masterpiece and one of the strongest works in Dylan’s canon.

Bob Dylan has released seven studio albums within the past 23-years; a creative span that also included the recording of an Oscar- and Golden Globe-winning composition, “Things Have Changed,” from the film Wonder Boys, in 2001; a worldwide best-selling memoir, Chronicles Vol. 1, which spent 19 weeks on the New York Times Best Seller List, in 2004 and was recently named the greatest rock memoir of all time by Rolling Stone. He is the recipient of the Officier de la Legion d’honneur in 2013, Sweden’s Polar Music Award in 2000, a Doctorate from the University of St. Andrews in Scotland, and numerous other honors.

Bob Dylan has sold more than 125 million records around the world. Rough and Rowdy Ways is the artist’s 39th studio album.

Stream Rough and Rowdy Ways: Apple Music, Spotify, YouTube

The Critics Have Listened:

“A testament to his eternal greatness…. Rough and Rowdy Ways might well be Bob Dylan’s most consistently brilliant set of songs in years: the die-hards can spend months unravelling the knottier lyrics, but you don’t need a PhD in Dylanology to appreciate its singular quality and power.” — Alexis Petridis, The Guardian

“True to form, Dylan surprises yet again by delivering a late-career masterpiece with Rough and Rowdy Ways.  It’s a moody, reflective, meditative, befuddling, funny and awe-inspiring turn for the Nobel Prize winner. Rich with biblical and pop culture references, at its core Rough and Rowdy Ways is a record on the borderline of this world and the next, wherever or whatever that may be….The wait was worth it.” — Scott Bauer, AP

“It’s not merely the novelty of new Bob songs that offers comfort in this black swan moment, it’s a set of songs that provides inspiration when it’s in short supply. Call it a vaccine against culture’s shrinking expectations and the subsequent sapping of spirit. or just call it great music….Contradiction has always lived comfortably in Bob Dylan’s work – more evidence of the vast scope of his artistic vision. What’s extraordinary is how it continues to expand, containing multitudes no one else thought of.” — Michael Simmons, Mojo

“A savage pulp-noir masterpiece….A word of advice: Don’t mess with Bob Dylan, who, at 79, rips, snorts and cackles through his new album like a man with something — or absolutely nothing — to prove….Rough and Rowdy Ways rolls out one marvel after another.” — Mikael Wood, Los Angeles Times

“When Dylan embarked on his musical journey as a young man in the Sixties, he forged an almost completely new type of song, open and multifarious, that became a new kind of standard…songs that defiantly inhabit his own myth, shifting perspective between his idiosyncratic views on the world and the world’s views on him.  Almost 60 years since we first heard from him, the old protest singer is still composing extraordinary anthems for our changing times.” — Neil McCormick, The Telegraph

Rough and Rowdy Ways is his first batch of new songs in 8 years, and it’s an absolute classic—it has the bleak majesty of latter-day Dylan albums like Modern Times and Tempest, yet it goes beyond them, tapping even deeper into cosmic American mysteries….his creative vitality remains startling—and a little frightening….But he refuses to rest on his legend. While the world keeps trying to celebrate him as an institution, pin him down, cast him in the Nobel Prize canon, embalm his past, this drifter always keeps on making his next escape. On Rough and Rowdy Ways, Dylan is exploring terrain nobody else has reached before—yet he just keeps pushing on into the future.” — Rob Sheffield, Rolling Stone

“With Rough and Rowdy Ways, he’s produced arguably his grandest poetic statement yet, a sweeping panorama of culture, history and philosophy peering back through assassinations, world wars, the births of nations, crusades and Biblical myths in order to plot his place in the great eternal scheme…. It would be foolish indeed to assume that Rough and Rowdy Ways is Dylan’s last word, but it’s certainly a historic address.” — Mark Beaumont, NME

“Truth is the talisman, tell it like it is. And that is what Dylan does….Rough and Rowdy Ways is exceptional.  If it were a painting, I’d call it a masterpiece.” — Will Gompertz, BBC

Rough and Rowdy Ways, an album that somehow manages to sound like nothing [Dylan] has ever done before, and that looks back across a long and hard-fought life while still insisting on always looking forward….The songs reveal an astonishing intensity and hunger, and a consistency that marks the album as one of Dylan’s major works….What leaps off of Rough and Rowdy Ways is Dylan’s blazing sense of purpose and focus. The man is not bullshitting. It comes through, full of humor and rage and heartbreak, in every word as they are written and sung.” — Alan Light, Esquire

Rough and Rowdy Ways hits hard.  [It’s] a gruesome, crowded, marauding album that feels unusually attuned to its moment….Dylan’s vast and intersectional understanding of the American mythos feels so plainly and uniquely relevant to the grimness and magnitude of these past few months. As the country attempts to metabolize the murder of George Floyd, it is also attempting to reckon with every crooked, brutal, odious, or unjust murder of a black person—to understand a cycle that began centuries ago and somehow continues apace. What is American racism? It’s everything, Dylan insists. Indiana Jones and J.F.K. and Elvis Presley and Jimmy Reed—nothing exists without the rest of it. None of us are absolved, and none of us are spared. Amanda Petrusich – New Yorker  Bob Dylan is a heavyweight champion. Five stars aren’t enough for his new album, Rough and Rowdy Ways. The album is a masterpiece, and a masterclass in lyric-writing in league with Dylan’s – and therefore anyone’s – best….Dylan is on fire lyrically throughout Rough and Rowdy Ways, offering up ten songs as dense in imagery and flawless in craftsmanship and quality as any of his long career….Perhaps the lesson in Rough and Rowdy Ways is that inestimable light can come from the dark places, once again making Dylan the voice we need to hear, just when we need it most.” — Jeff Slate, The Daily Beast

Follow Bob Dylan: Instagram | Twitter | Facebook | Youtube

360 Magazine, Justice, Protest

Candace Owens x Controversial Perspective

By Armon Hayes x Jason Tayer

Recently, conservative Candace Owens released a pot-stirring rant video on Youtube of her perspective on Black issues in America. Now the focal point of black issues is the wrongful death of George Floyd, which sparked outrage across the nation. Becoming the largest civil right’s protest to date, Ms. Owens shared thought-provoking ideologies of blackness and denounced that police and race issues exist. She further supports her elitist agenda with statistics to justify the death of a man who can be considered a career criminal. Those who stood with removing her account in response to her recent comments led to her Gofundme account suspension.

According to The Daily Beast, Owens’s response to her Gofundme suspension was that it shows how conservatives live in “a world that tells us that our very existence is unacceptable.” Even when critics bring up the point that George Floyd should not have suffered a brutal death with by the knee of a police officer, she defends her argument by claiming that white people are more affected by police brutality and that the whole racist police brutality concept is essentially a myth. In correspondence with her view on George Floyd and his criminal record, Donald Trump endorsed her comments and added that George Floyd is an example of “broken black America” in today’s world.

By now, the world knows Mr. Floyd had a history of challenges. Are there no second chances in life? Consider, that your past determined how you should and would die. The officer kneeling on George, subsequently killing him, also shared a colorful past, including blood on his hands from a prior incident. Solution number one, if you want to help the black community and “Make American Great Now,” consider a bill for officers with bad behavior to be removed along with discipline. Also, the world has witnessed the sickening displays on social media of the Cancer cells in Law enforcement.

Society is not perfectible, nothing is perfectible that has grey areas, considering centuries of oppression before she or I was even a thought. Black America, she asks “Is it too hard to stay out of prison?” No! As a 34-year-old black man, I’ve never been arrested. Neither has my father, who is also black and retired. Candace, we’re all running the same race called life, therefore acknowledge that we don’t all start at the same point. Never assume everyone has access to the bootstraps to pull themselves up. She expressed her fatigue of having to play pretend. Pretend for whom Candace? One thing she’s not pretending is to offer solutions to issues staring the nation in the face. Her bating verbiage is far from pretend and it’s dangerous and to distract from a cause that is sensitive and deeply layered is irresponsible and lacks leadership. Please refrain from falling victim of the same spell from which you are so desperately trying to save the Black community, which is the “Media’s cycle” of race bating during Election season. Seriously, she studied journalism, and she’s pushing propaganda at the cost of black lives.