Posts tagged with "ceremony"

BARD COLLEGE illustrated by Rita Azar in 360 MAGAZINE.

BARD COLLEGE – VIRTUAL CEREMOMY

BARD COLLEGE HOLDS ONE HUNDRED SIXTIETH COMMENCEMENT, IN A VIRTUAL CEREMONY, ON SATURDAY, AUGUST 22, 2020

Musician David Byrne Delivered Commencement Address
 
Honorary Degrees Were Awarded to Byrne, Multimedia Artist Laurie Anderson, Physicist Steven Chu, Composer Gao Xiaosong, Curator Thelma Golden,  Brooklyn Public Library President Linda Johnson,  Educational Historian Ellen Condliffe Lagemann, and Biophysicist George Rose ’63.
 
Bard College held its one hundred sixtieth commencement on Saturday, August 22, 2020. In the virtual commencement ceremony streamed live from the Bard College campus, Bard President Leon Botstein conferred 437 undergraduate degrees, in absentia, on the Class of 2020 and 161 graduate degrees, including master of fine arts; doctor and master of philosophy and master of arts in decorative arts, design history, and material culture; master of science and master of arts in economic theory and policy; master of business administration in sustainability; master of arts in teaching; master of arts in curatorial studies; master of science in environmental policy and in climate science and policy; master of music in vocal arts and in conducting; master of music in curatorial, critical, and performance studies; and master of education in environmental education. The program, which took place at 2:30 p.m. in the commencement tent on the Seth Goldfine Memorial Rugby Field, included the presentation of honorary doctoral degrees.
 
Owing to the severity and longevity of the COVID-19 pandemic, the College held a modified commencement. The events and ceremonies were held in real time, but, consistent with public health policies and regulations, access to them was limited.
 
Text (unedited) of commencement address by musician David Byrne:
 
Thank you. Congratulations to the brass ensemble. It’s very difficult to play together when you’re distanced. I heard a story from a musician the other day. There was a socially distanced orchestra that was playing, and some of the musicians said, “You have to gesture bigger, we can’t see you.” So, the conductor had to make it bigger than before, so that everybody could see.
 
This is certainly my first time talking to a live audience … performing, alright, to a live audience in many, many months. It’s kind of strange. It’s kind of wonderful. It’s strange and wonderful to actually be gathered in a group of people this much. I’m encouraged by this institution. I was invited to come here. I have some familiarity with this place. I understand what Bard stands for.

I recently worked with a Bard alumnus named Alex Kalman ’06 on a book. I’ve written about the Bard Prison Initiative, which I think some of you will be familiar with. And, I’ve read some pieces that Mr. Botstein wrote about music.
 
This place is special. I’ve been here, visited here a few times over the years. I saw an exhibition at the gallery in 2008. The gallery had been turned into a re-creation of the artist Keith Edmier’s parents’ house, with all its extreme ’70s décor. It was like walking into a movie set. And, you know, as you walk into a movie set, you know that it’s all fake, but part of you is still seduced into feeling that you’re in that place. There’s this kind of wonderful tension in something like that where you know it’s fake, but you kind of feel like you’re in the place at the same time, between the real and the artificial. We are in a world that someone has made that is just like this world that this artist made of his parents’ house.
 
His world, like our world, is unreliable. It’s based on unreliable memory and imagination. We all do this. We make these artificial worlds. The difference is, we have to live in them. A world that’s made like this, it can be a seductive lie, or it can be a revealing truth. On a thing like this, a commencement, I imagine it’s common to ask oneself, “Well, what comes next for me? What comes next for me as I leave this place? Will I be a different person? Will I be a different person than I was a month ago?” Well, I think we’re all different than we were last week. Things are changing incredibly rapidly. And then you ask, “What person am I now, and how should I be as that person? What do I love? What does that entail? What, if any, are the … obligations? Obligations to myself? Obligations to a larger community? How does one reconcile oneself, between one’s personal rights, one’s personal desires, and those of the community and the collective? What have I learned here? Has the world changed? Has the world changed [laughing] since the spring? It probably has. Has it changed into something far different than the world that I knew? Is that a good thing? Is everything I learned here, at this institution, now meaningless?” I don’t think so.
 
I’m very sorry for the world you inherit. We’ve left you a mess, the one that we made, the world that we made. But, there are reasons to be cheerful. The pandemic has pulled back the curtain, which has revealed both the worst and the best of what and who we are. Arundhati Roy, the writer, referred to this moment as a portal when we have unprecedented opportunity to change things, to cross into another world. In this moment, we have been both cursed and blessed. This is one of those moments that occur once in a while. Ideas that were taken as given, economic ideas, cultural ideas, etc., are being questioned, reconsidered. An era based on a set of biases and assumptions is ending. In a sense, we’re lucky. The portal that she mentions is opened and we have a chance to go through it.
 
I’m as a guilty as anyone else for waking up in the morning and feeling that nothing really changes very much. I have moments of despair and anger and frustration. No surprise. Martin Luther King Jr.’s quote, “The arc of the moral universe is long but it bends toward justice,” some mornings that feels like an empty platitude when I look at the news that morning. It sometimes feels like, oh, you know, same as it ever was. But that’s not really true. The real constant is change. We often forget or overlook the momentous changes in our thinking that we now accept as obvious, inevitable. But, in truth, nothing was inevitable. The changes that have happened, that we live with now, for better or worse, they’re here because we made them so.
 
Okay, here’s a few of them: slavery is now universally considered unacceptable. Two thousand years ago, Aristotle thought slavery was natural and necessary, but even then his contemporaries argued that it was unacceptable. These changes don’t happen overnight. Okay, here’s another one: women should be allowed to vote. If I said to anyone now that if you heard someone else say, “No, women shouldn’t be allowed to vote,” you would think that was completely ridiculous. It happened in the United States, state by state, one hundred years ago. In Saudi Arabia it happened five years ago, but it happened. Education, primary and secondary education, I think everyone accepts that it should be free, it’s a right for everyone to have it. This was not always true. Children were considered cheap labor. Eventually, maybe higher education will be considered a right as well. Interracial marriage: I think we all accept this now. We all accept this. It seems like, what’s the big deal? The Supreme Court made a ruling legalizing interracial marriage in 1967—not that long ago. Alabama has some laws on the books that counteracted the Supreme Court ruling, and those were overturned 20 years ago. Okay, gay marriage, we all know that this is now law, this is now legal. When I was a young person, if someone had told me that this would be legal and generally accepted, I would have said, “You’re crazy, this should happen, but it’s going to take forever.” But, just five years ago, in 2015, it was recognized as legal in all 50 states.
 
I can go on—infrastructure, clean air, clean water, things that don’t exist for us entirely now, but we do think of them as our right, and these ideas that we consider as part of our lives and how it is to live and how it is to be, it didn’t always have to be that way. It wasn’t always that way. This is something new in the world, and the world has changes. These changes weren’t predictable, and they weren’t inevitable. I’m a little older than some of you, and I can say that some of these changes, they weren’t expected. They weren’t expected to happen as soon as they did, and when they did, then they seemed inevitable. People make these changes. Things that seemed impossible have happened, and they will continue to happen. Try and imagine what radical and momentous changes in our thinking might happen next, and they will! We can imagine what they might be.
 
Okay, make no mistake, things can go wrong, things can go the other way. This country was ever so closely inching towards democracy, but, as in many other countries around the world, there’s been some serious backsliding. There’s no guarantee that change will be good. That part is up to us. And, so I ask myself, “How did these changes happen? Where’s the levers? Where’s the buttons? What’s the process? What can we, as a lone individual or with a little group of people, what can we do to have an effect?” I supposed you might ask yourselves the same questions. “Does my line of work have any wider resonance?” Not that every line of work has to focus directly or solely on social justice. I believe that the meaning of what we do, in our work and our lives, is more subtle than that. I’ll use myself as an example, okay? Most of the time I’m a performer and a musician, and it seems to me that music and performance affects people’s view of the world, not directly, not by me writing a song about climate policy or housing inequities, although I might like to do that. Rather, it works in a less didactic and not kind of text-based ways. It’s kind of a language without words. Music creates community. When I was young, I heard music on a little radio that was about the size of a phone. And, I realized when I heard this music that there was a world out there that was very different and wider than the little suburban town that I lived in. You’ve heard people say things like, “That song saved my life” or “That DJ saved my life,” and these are kind of clichés, but there’s a truth to it. Music can have that kind of effect. It reveals a larger world, and it brings people together because they know that there are other people out there like them. For someone else, it might not be music that has this effect. It might be the visual arts, theater, cooking, dance. It might be ways of thinking in education, sustainability, even economics can touch people about a new idea and it changes their thinking.
 
I also think that one discipline needs to influence all the others. There needs to be a lot of curiosity about what’s going on in other disciplines, and one discipline can, in surprising ways, affect another one. When I heard the music of James brown, as a young man, I came to realize that here is music where no one part is more important than any other. The melody is not played by one instrument, but it emerges out of the interlocking parts played by all the instruments. The groove is not just played by the drums, but it comes into being as a result of what everyone is doing. I sensed that, unlike traditional Western music, Brown’s music is nonhierarchical. In his musical model, we’re given an audio metaphor. We hear, metaphorically, a model of social organization and cooperation that makes us feel joyous and transported. We’re not kind of intellectually going through all of this, but I feel that we sense it. Here I sense is a social and economic argument made with music, and the transcendent feeling it brings, when you hear and experience it, is more persuasive that language. Music proposes a world. Metaphorically, it gives evidence of that possibility. An economist hearing James Brown might possibly see the world the same way. Of course, my model for cross-disciplinary influences comes from music, but it can go the other way as well.
 
I’m going to mention the first abstract artist, Hilma af Klint, who was influenced by spiritualism that was prevalent over a hundred years ago, turn of the last century. It had been proposed that one of the reasons for the wide enthusiasm for this spiritualism was because of the scientific discoveries that were happening at that time. The science was showing that there were invisible forces in our world. Electromagnetism, radiation, radio waves, X-rays. The entire world, ourselves included, are affected by these invisible and pervasive forces. Science proposed this world, a world that hadn’t previously existed in our imagination, and this affected how these artists worked. They realized that what we with see with our eyes is only part of what is there, and artists like af Klint and others began to attempt the abstractions to represent this world, a world of energy that go through buildings and go through our bodies. So, with art and science, we conjure worlds, and, over time, we who conjure these worlds, we ourselves change, and then worlds that we conjure, those change as well.
 
A couple of years ago, after I finished a music tour that lasted almost a year, I decided to go to India. I wanted to catch a traditional music festival in Chennai. It was wonderful. I saw a kid, this young kid in a kind of Elvis outfit playing Carnatic music on a saxophone. I saw singers communicating with drummers with their hands. And, I also went to Kerala, which is another state in the south, and there’s a kind of performance there called Kudiyattam. It’s an ancient form of dance drama. It’s about a thousand years old. In this dance drama, the performer begins the performance by metaphorically dancing into existence and kind of proposing a world. This will be the world that the story will take place in, kind of like Star Wars or Game of Thrones. It’s complete, it has a cosmology, it has a history, every detail. In the dance drama, the world building is not made with sets and props and computers. It’s conjured in the audience’s imagination, via singing and dancing and gesture. Like the actors in this drama, we, in whichever field we endeavor, we also dance a new world into existence—not just in music or theater, every kind of work and activity we engage in proposes a world. In the end of the Kudiyattam performance, the actors dismantle the world that they have made. Likewise, we destroy an old world, a worn-out world, the one we ourselves and others before us have made, so that a new one can be imagined and brought into existence.
 
Thank you.
 
 

ABOUT THE COMMENCEMENT SPEAKER

 
David Byrne’s recent works include the Broadway debut of David Byrne’s American Utopia (2019); launch of Reasons to be Cheerful—an online magazine focused on solutions-oriented stories about problems being solved all over the world (2019); the solo album American Utopia (2018), which was nominated for Best Alternative Album at the 61st Grammy Awards; Joan of Arc: Into the Fire, a theatrical exploration of the historical heroine, which premiered at The Public Theater in New York (2017); The Institute Presents: NEUROSOCIETY, a series of interactive environments created in conjunction with PACE Arts + Technology that question human perception and bias (2016); Contemporary Color, an event inspired by the American folk tradition of color guard and performed at Brooklyn’s Barclays Center and Toronto’s Air Canada Centre (2015); Here Lies Love, a 22-song theatrical production about the life of Imelda Marcos, authored in collaboration with Fatboy Slim, which premiered at The Public Theater in New York City (2013), traveled to London’s National Theatre for a sold-out run (2014–15), and was remounted at Seattle Rep (2017); Love This Giant, a studio album and worldwide tour created with St. Vincent (2012); and How Music Works, a book about the history, experience, and social aspects of music (2012).
 
In 2015, Byrne curated Southbank Centre’s annual Meltdown festival in London. A cofounder of the group Talking Heads (1976–88), he has released nine studio albums and worked on multiple other projects, including collaborations with Brian Eno, Twyla Tharp, Robert Wilson, and Jonathan Demme, among others. He also founded the highly respected record label Luaka Bop. Recognition of Byrne’s various works include Obie, Drama Desk, Lortel, and Evening Standard Awards for Here Lies Love; an Oscar, Grammy, and Golden Globe for the soundtrack to Bernardo Bertolucci’s The Last Emperor; and induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame with Talking Heads. Byrne has published and exhibited visual art since his college days, including photography, filmmaking, and writing. He lives in New York City.

Phantogram × “Ceremony”

PHANTOGRAM RELEASES NEW ALBUM: CEREMONY

PERFORMED LEAD SINGLE “DEAR GOD” ON JIMMY KIMMEL LIVE!

LISTEN TO CEREMONY HERE

WATCH “DEAR GOD” PERFORMANCE ON JIMMY KIMMEL LIVE! HERE

IN THE PRESS
“a darker but reflective and ultimately hopeful new album on recovery” – NPR
“Ceremony blends trip-hop and rock vibes with poignant lyrics and sharp hooks.” – New York Magazine
“The year of Phantogram continues.” – Billboard
“Josh Carter and Sarah Barthel…are more than pop hypnotists.” – The New York Times

Ceremony marks a rebirth and embodies a dark, but hopeful, chapter for the band, which is comprised of lifelong friends Josh Carter and Sarah Barthel. In advance of the release, the band posted a revealing letter to fans unveiling how the tragic loss of Barthel’s sister, Becky, to suicide, and peers like Mac Miller, Chris Cornell, Prince, Avicii, Chester Bennington and more, impacted their lives and influenced the album—read more HERE

The process for Ceremony began in the summer of 2018, after several years of touring the world in support of their most commercially successful album, Three. The album hit Top 10 on the Billboard Top 200 chart, Top 3 on Billboard’s Rock Albums chart and Top 5 on Billboard’s Top Albums Sales chart. The lead single, “You Don’t Get Me High Anymore,” also peaked at #6 on the alternative radio chart. In the midst of what was their most successful chapter—one that they had been building towards for nearly a decade—the pair were still reeling from the tragic passing of Becky. After returning from tour, both Barthel and Carter were finally forced to come to terms with Becky’s unfortunate death.

Barthel says, “When ‘Three’ was finished, I thought the weight of sadness and anger would release after finishing recording. Boy, I was wrong. Performing those songs every night was like reliving the feelings over and over again. After that tour, I was completely drained and spent. After 10 years of being in this band and pouring my heart into everything that is Phantogram, I felt like I didn’t have anything else. I think life was put on hold for a long time for Phantogram. Going through the loss of my sister from suicide was the icing on the cake.”

She continues, “After ‘Three,’ it was a time to reflect in a way we never had before. Life after losing someone from suicide is very confusing. Performing those songs every night kept us stuck in that one moment. It didn’t allow us to move forward and grow as people. When tour was over, we had to step outside of the Phantogram bubble and face real life. It almost felt like we were in survival mode. ‘Ceremony’ was inspired by self-care and seeing how common of a struggle everyday life had become.”

Of creating Ceremony, Carter says, “When the cycle for ‘Three’ wound down, we took some much-needed time to focus on our personal life, friendships and mental health. Going into the creation process of ‘Ceremony’ was a more refreshing approach to making music than how we normally create. We went back to our roots in a lot of ways—making art, listening to records and writing in our own secluded studio in the hills of Laurel Canyon. It was liberating and inspiring to just make music as it flowed, while also having fun doing it. This allowed us to still push our boundaries and create new ideas that we hadn’t explored yet.”

ABOUT PHANTOGRAM:
Lauded as an experimental and alternative band and one that’s never been married to a particular genre, Phantogram—comprised of lifelong friends Josh Carter and Sarah Barthel—have continued to change the zeitgeist for almost a decade by consistently challenging it with their signature blend of hard-hitting beats, guitar-driven dark psychedelia, and electronic pop. Since the arrival of 2010’s debut release, Eyelid Movies, the duo has amassed nearly half-a-billion streams, achieved two Gold-Certified singles in the form of “Fall In Love” and “When I’m Small,” headlined sold-out shows worldwide, become a festival staple and toured with artists including The xx, Muse, M83, Alt-J and more. In 2016, the band reached a career-high with the release of their most commercially successful album, Three. The album hit Top 10 on the Billboard Top 200 chart, Top 3 on Billboard’s Rock Albums chart, and Top 5 on Billboard’s Top Albums Sales chart. The lead single, “You Don’t Get Me High Anymore,” also peaked at #6 on the alternative radio chart. Three was met with critical acclaim from Pitchfork, Billboard, The New York Times, Entertainment Weekly, People, Vogue, New York Magazine, The FADER, Stereogum, NYLON, PAPER Magazine and many others. With syncs in major campaigns such as “Into Happiness” in a spot for Apple TV+, “Same Old Blues” in ads for Peloton and Apple Watch, “You’re Mine” in Apple HomePod video and additional placement in multiple TV shows, the band’s reach had never been so wide. The success of the album took them to Madison Square Garden playing with Alt-J and around the world opening for Muse and on their own headline tours, building upon their already rampant fanbase. In the midst of what was their most successful chapter—one that they had been building towards for nearly a decade—the pair were still reeling from the tragic passing of Barthel’s sister, Becky (also a close childhood friend of Carter’s), due to suicide. After several years of touring the world in support of Three, Phantogram was finally forced to come to terms with Becky’s unfortunate death, which resulted in their new full-length project, Ceremony, their most diverse and liberated record yet.

Follow Phantogram INSTAGRAM / TWITTER / FACEBOOK

phantogram, music, album, ceremony

360 MAGAZINE, FMI, FIM World Champions ,superbike, sports

FIM Gold Medals

The Principality of Monaco, steeped in motorsports history, once again proved the perfect location for the FIM Awards, with tonight’s glittering ceremony declared a huge success for the almost six hundred guests who packed into the beautiful Sporting Monte-Carlo venue. In front of an audience, including representatives from the one hundred and eleven national federations, motorcycling legends, various members of the FIM, championship promoters, manufacturer and team representatives, sponsors and other invited international guests, the 2019 FIM World Champions were duly rewarded for their respective sporting achievements.

During the glamorous ceremony riders from all disciplines were invited to the stage to collect their FIM gold medals, with many having their own individual stories of a season-long battle that required both dedication and determination to eventually reach their ultimate goal. With his brother Marc absent due to recent surgery, Alex Marquez was on hand to collect his FIM Moto2 Grand Prix prize, as was five-time FIM Superbike World Champion Jonathan Rea.

Illustrating the diversity amongst the 2019 FIM World Champions the aforementioned two Circuit Racing heroes tonight stood shoulder to shoulder with two motorcycling heroines in the form of six-time FIM Women’s TrialGP World Champion Emma Bristow and newly crowned FIM Women’s Motocross World Champion Courtney Duncan from New Zealand.

Fifteen-year-old Jesper Knudsen from Denmark claiming the FIM Speedway Youth World Championship and Italy’s fourteen-year-old Valerio Lata who secured the FIM 85cc Junior Motocross World Championship were the youngest two riders in attendance this evening. Whilst Bradley Freeman – FIM EnduroGP and E1 World Champion – and Toni Bou – FIM TrialGP and FIM X-Trial World Champion – both collected two gold medals each tonight.

In addition to celebrating the bravery and exploits of the many FIM World Champions, it was also a moment to recognise the work done by others – individuals and organisations – who continue to work tirelessly for the benefit of motorcycling overall, with the presentation of the following four very important FIM Awards.

The FIM Environmental Award was won by Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya, whilst it was Motorcycle Clothing Assessment Program – Australasia who collected the FIM Road Safety Award on this occasion. The highly competitive FIM Women in Motorcycling Award, which received eight nominations this year, eventually went to MissBiker – Italy after much deliberation. Finally, the FIM Award for the Future was won by Hobby Sport – Primi Passi FMI – Italy.

Throughout the ceremony, the long list of prizes and awards were presented by a highly decorated group of true motorcycling legends. These included Max Biaggi – FIM Circuit Tacing Legend; Joël Robert – FIM Motocross Legend; Juha Salminen – FIM Enduro Legend; Carmelo Ezpeleta – FIM Promoter Legend; Rob Rasor – FIM Family Legend; and Guy Maitre – FIM Family Legend, who were all recognised for their own contributions.

Both proud and delighted to have hosted this memorable evening, FIM President Jorge Viegas remarked: “ It has been a wonderful night. Having the chance to have all the World Champions together with Promoters and the FIM Family is very special. The riders made huge efforts during the whole season; they are here tonight and we are very happy.

Young Thug Wins “Song of the Year”

Young Thug won his first GRAMMY for “Song of the Year” – one of the awards top honors- at the 61st Annual GRAMMY Awards, for his songwriting work on Childish Gambino’s “This is America”.

Released in May last year, the song and it’s accompanying visual quickly went viral, with subject matter that touches on gun violence, racism and discrimination within America. The song has racked up nearly 500 million views on YouTube, and makes history as the first rap song to ever win the award.

“This is America” was nominated alongside other hits like Drake’s “God’s Plan”, Ella Mai’s “Boo’d Up”, Black Panther single, “All The Stars”, Shawn Mendes’ “In My Blood”, “The Joke” by Brandi Carlile, A Star Was Born’s “Shallow,” and Zedd’s “The Middle.”

Young Thug also performed alongside Camila Cabello at the ceremony, performing their record breaking song, “Havana” for the broadcast’s cold open. The song, which hit #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 Charts, was also nominated for a GRAMMY for “Best Pop Solo Performance.” The live performance also included appearances from Jay Balvin, Ricky Martin and Arturo Sandoval.

“Performing on the GRAMMY stage was such an honor.” – Young Thug

Young Thug also walked the carpet at the event, spending time with Bebe Rexha and interviewing with GRAMMY winning rapper, Eve for CBS.

2019 National Inventors Hall of Fame Inductees

Nineteen innovation pioneers were announced on January 8th as the 2019 Class of the National Inventors Hall of Fame®(NIHF) on the main stage at CES®.

These innovators, whose inventions range from the UNIX operating system to fluoride toothpaste, will be celebrated as the newest Class of Inductees during the NIHF Induction Ceremony. In partnership with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), NIHF will honor these Inductees in Washington, D.C. on May 1-2 at one of the innovation industry’s most highly anticipated events — “The Greatest Celebration of American Innovation.”

“I am honored to be inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame,” said 2019 Inductee Bill Warner, pioneer of digital nonlinear editing for video. “I love how inventions can change the world for the better, and I am thrilled to join this year’s Class.”

THE CLASS OF 2019

• Chieko Asakawa: Web Browser for the Blind and Visually Impaired 

Chieko Asakawa invented the Home Page Reader (HPR), the first practical voice browser to provide effective Internet access for blind and visually impaired computer users. Designed to enable users to surf the internet and navigate web pages through a computer’s numeric keypad instead of a mouse, HPR debuted in 1997; by 2003, it was widely used around the world.

• Jeff Kodosky and James Truchard: Virtual Instrumentation – LabVIEW™

Kodosky and Truchard introduced LabVIEW in 1986 as a graphical programming language that enables user-defined testing and measurement and control systems. It grew to be used by engineers, scientists, academics and students around the world.

• Rebecca Richards-Kortum: Medical Devices for Low-Resource Settings

Rebecca Richards-Kortum develops low-cost, high-performance medical technologies for people in places where traditional medical equipment is not an option. She’s led the development of optical technologies to improve early detection of cervical, oral and esophageal cancer; and tools to improve newborn survival in Africa, including the Pumani CPAP system for newborns with breathing problems; BiliSpec for measuring bilirubin levels to detect jaundice; and DoseRight, for accurate dosing of children’s liquid medication.

• Dennis Ritchie (Posthumous) and Ken Thompson: UNIX Operating System 

Thompson and Ritchie’s creation of the UNIX operating system and the C programming language were pivotal developments in the progress of computer science. Today, 50 years after its beginnings, UNIX and UNIX-like systems continue to run machinery from supercomputers to smartphones. The UNIX operating system remains the basis of much of the world’s computing infrastructure, and C language — written to simplify the development of UNIX — is one of the most widely used languages today.

• Edmund O. Schweitzer III: Digital Protective Relay

Schweitzer brought the first microprocessor-based digital protective relay to market, revolutionizing the performance of electric power systems with computer-based protection and control equipment, and making a major impact in the electric power utility industry. Schweitzer’s more precise, more reliable digital relay was one-eighth the size, one-tenth the weight and one-third the price of previous mechanical relays.

• David Walt: Microwell Arrays

Walt created microwell arrays that could analyze thousands of genes simultaneously, revolutionizing the field of genetic analysis. His technology accelerated the understanding of numerous human diseases and is now being used in diagnosis. It has also made DNA sequencing more affordable and accessible.

• William J. Warner: Digital Nonlinear Editing System

Bill Warner invented the Avid Media Composer — a digital nonlinear editing system for film and video. Warner’s technology revolutionized film and video post-production by providing editors with faster, more intuitive and more creative techniques than were possible with traditional analog linear methods.

• John Baer, Karl H. Beyer Jr., Frederick Novello and James Sprague: Thiazide Diuretics/Chlorothiazide (Posthumous)

Beyer, Sprague, Baer and Novello were part of the Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories team that pioneered thiazide diuretics, the first class of drugs to safely and effectively treat hypertension. Today, thiazide diuretics remain a first-line treatment for high blood pressure and related heart problems.

• S. Duncan Black and Alonzo G. Decker: Portable Hand-Held Electric Drill (Posthumous)

Virtually all of today’s electric drills descend from the original portable hand-held drill developed by Black and Decker, whose invention spurred the growth of the modern power tool industry. By 1920, Black & Decker surpassed $1 million in annual sales and soon had offices in eight U.S. cities and a factory in Canada. Today, the company is known as Stanley Black & Decker.

• Andrew Higgins: LCVP (Landing Craft, Vehicle, Personnel); Higgins Boats (Posthumous)

Higgins, a New Orleans-based boat builder and inventor, developed and manufactured landing craft critical to the success of the U.S. military during World War II. The best known was the Landing Craft, Vehicle, Personnel (LCVP), or Higgins Boat, used to land American troops on the beaches of Normandy on D-Day.

• Joseph Lee: Bread Machines (Posthumous)
The son of slaves, Boston-area entrepreneur Joseph Lee was a pioneer in the automation of bread and bread-crumb making during the late 1800s. The self-educated inventor was a successful hotel and restaurant owner who created his machines to allow for greater efficiency in his kitchens, and by 1900 his devices were used by many of America’s leading hotels and were a fixture in hundreds of the country’s leading catering establishments.

 Joseph Muhler and William Nebergall: Stannous Fluoride Toothpaste (Posthumous)

Dentist and biochemist Muhler and inorganic chemist Nebergall developed a cavity-preventing product using stannous fluoride. In 1956, Crest®toothpaste was introduced nationally. Four years later, it became the first toothpaste to be recognized by the American Dental Association as an effective decay-preventing agent.

For full biographies of each Inductee, visit invent.org/honor/inductees/.

THE CELEBRATION

The Class of 2019 will be honored at “The Greatest Celebration of American Innovation,” a two-day event held in our nation’s capital. Danica McKellar — star of the TV show “The Wonder Years,” Hallmark Channel regular, mathematician and author — will serve as master of ceremonies.

• May 1 – Illumination Ceremony at the National Inventors Hall of Fame Museum at the USPTO Headquarters in Alexandria, Virginia, where new Inductees will place illuminated hexagons displaying their names in the Gallery of Icons.

• May 2 – The 47th Annual National Inventors Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony will be held at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C., where the new Inductee class will be honored for their contributions to society during an evening including a black-tie dinner, ceremony and after party. To learn more about the event, visit invent.org/honor/inductees/induction-ceremony/.

“The National Inventors Hall of Fame honors the innovation game-changers who have transformed our world,” said NIHF CEO Michael Oister. “Through inventions as diverse as life-saving medicines and web browsers for the visually impaired, these superhero innovators have made significant advances in our daily lives and well-being.”

2019 GOLDEN GLOBE NOMINEE LOUNGE

Secret Room Events presented a Hawaiian Style Retreat in honor of the Nominees for the 2019 Golden Globes . This luxury celebrity gift suite will took place at InterContinental Century City on Friday, Jan. 4th, 2019.

Open to only celebrities and media, this event hosted some of today’s most unique, fashionable and luxurious companies, products and services. From trips, to Hawaii. American Luxury Tours will be gifting 7 night stays to the Nominees and special media & Estancia La Jolla Hotel & Spa gifted a 2 night stay including breakfast and massages, high end jewelry, to hip and trendy baby and pet products and luxurious skin and hair care products, the Secret Room is a total pampering experience.

Secret Room Events sponsored this year’s event with Anne Neilson Home, Thomas George Estates, BARE NATURE.

Guests lucky enough to score an invite to experience this lavish event, The Secret Room Event, were provided luxurious services ranging from massages, Eye Lashes, Teeth whitening, Botox, fillers & nails. Also on hand Beverly Hills Tennis Academy will be giving free tennis gift certificates to the Nominees and media .

The following sponsors were on hand to gift their amazing brands:

Camouflage cellulite body Liner
Baroque & Rose
Greek Island Labs
Nuvelon
Anne Neilson Home
Relaxium
Buckle me baby car seat coats
Shore Bags
Sun Soaker Flexible solar
Dandy Blend
Silver Stork (care packages)
COPPER+CRANE™
HEATHERCHAPPLAIN.COM
BARE NATURE
Frill Plant –based frozen Dessert
Thomas George Estates
LELO
WET
Secret Celebrity Licensing ,LLC
Nicole Kelly , MD
A20 WATER/ Think Alkaline

Nominees and special media walked out with a huge tote bag filled with our amazing gift bags sponsors:

Estancia La Jolla Hotel & Spa
American Luxury Tours
Elyptol Inc
San Clemente Cookie Dough Co
RX BAR
LIVIE AND LUCA
Mahifinefoods.com
LIFE CHOICE LTD
OUR PLANET SOAP
Delia organics
Bae Vegan perfume
Charlston & Harlow candle Co
Nancy Ganz
H2rOse
Cherry Blooms cosmetics
Cover Made Bedding
Chefs cut real jerky
Pacha soap Co
Jane Bakes cookies
LUMIFY™ redness reliever eye drops
Nail-snail.com
Dr Gingers Healthcare products LLC
LIVE LOVE POP
Celsius
Boho By Moe
Popcorn ,Indiana
Punch gunk
Dalmatia Imported by Atalanta
Thorlo
Bubbies Ice cream

WINNERS:

Patricia Arquette, 360 magazine, golden globes, jc olivera

Patricia Arquette (shot by JC Olivera)

Linda Cardellini, 360 magazine, golden globes, jc olivera

Linda Cardellini (shot by JC Olivera)