Posts tagged with "classical music"

Hot Dogs Hooch and Handel via Kevin Condon for use by 360 Magazine

Hot Dogs, Hooch and Handel

Death of Classical and The Green-Wood Cemetery will present Hot Dogs, Hooch, & Handel on May 27, 2022, from 7:00-10:00 PM, with a rain date of May 28.  The event will feature several hot dog vendors, a selection of local spirits, and a performance of works by George Frideric Handel by a Baroque ensemble directed by Elliot Figg at the harpsichord.

The long-awaited follow-up to 2019’s acclaimed Burgers, Bourbon, and Beethoven will focus on the hot dog invented in 1867 by permanent Green-Wood resident Charles Feltman. Hot dog vendors include Little Hot Dog Wagon, Dog Day Afternoon, and Yeah Dawg!!! Vegan Hot Dogs. Hot dogs will be available for purchase and snacks are included in the ticket price. The food can be paired with a sampling of spirits generously provided by Van Brunt Stillhouse, Lost Explorer Mezcal, Départ Wine, L’Orgeat, Appalachian Gap Distillery and more.

HHH will take place on the grounds surrounding Green-Wood’s landmarked Gothic Arch and will officially kick off the fourth season of The Angel’s Share, the acclaimed opera and classical music concert series that takes place in the Green-Wood’s Catacombs, curated by Andrew Ousley and Harry Weil.

This year’s performances include Sarah Kirkland Snider‘s Mass for the Endangered, the one-night-only premiere of Aaron Seigel’s Watching Birds at the End of the World featuring opera superstar Anthony Roth Constanzo, Stewart Goodyear and Jed Distler performing a rarely-heard arrangement of Mahler’s 9th Symphony for four hands, Daisy Press’ full program of compositions by Hildegard Von Bingen, and the Grammy-winning Attacca Quartet performing music from their new recording Of All Joys.

Vaughn Lowery for use by 360 Magazine

92nd Street Y

92nd Street Y (92Y) is a nonprofit civic and cultural facility that aims to bring people together through the performing and visual arts, education, health, fitness and Jewish life. 92Y has a wide assortment of programs, classes and events open for the community that nurture creativity. Such curricula includes online and in-person live concerts, parenting workshops, master, fitness and art classes.

The mission of 92Y is to house resources that promote the physical, mental and spiritual health of individuals throughout their lives. Founded 147 years ago, all the programming generated at the 92Y center is built on the foundation of Jewish values. While curated to serve Jewish people, 92Y follows the Jewish value of welcoming all differing ages, races, religions and ethnicities of people.

The Knights Ensemble in Residence

As a collective of musicians seeking to renovate the orchestral experience, The Knights are artistically directed by the Jacobsen brothers, with Eric Jacobsen as conductor. The Brooklyn-based orchestral cooperative The Knights showcased the first of three concerts during this fall and spring at their residency at 92Y.

The heart of the concert stages two classical works – Schubert’s bright “Unfinished” Symphony and Vaughn Williams’ superb The Lark Ascending, featuring Knights Artistic Director Colin Jacobsen as violin soloist. The programming of The Knights navigates Manhattan’s Lower East Side in the 1990s and Vienna in the 1820s, highlighting subjects of revitalization and renewal, while echoing Schubert in work of a Creole-influenced composer.

360 Magazine was invited to attend The Knights concert on Saturday December 11. We stood by, bearing the recent loss of love. Our heads were heavy, entering this season, but be that as it may, we gathered the courage. And, what the audience witnessed was nothing short of astonishing – suspensive string clips, haunting flute sounds coupled with intermittent triangular percussion rings penetrated the auditorium.

Eric (conductor) and Colin’s limitless love for one another was the vitality of this whole series. Their playlist literally tickled our souls, watered our desires while our vellum hairs danced with deception. Each section took us on a mental roller coaster – sitting in the forward car, enjoying the initial fall with our hands toward the sky. This meticulously blended set is like good wine and possesses all the sweet and refreshing notes of Napa.

Eric ran into sweat directing while we were all mesmerized at his art of bending the air. Colin dominated the audience with his vulnerability, eerie arrangement and tremendous talent. To sum up, The Knights adopt an unorthodox approach to music, exposing their joie de vivre to whomever is willing to embrace their truth.

Eric Jacobsen

Conductor of The Knights Eric Jacobson has gained the reputation of leading revolutionary projects. Jacobsen has conducted The Knights at New York venues including Carnegie Hall and Central Park, as well as internationally at the Vienna Musikverein, Cologne Philharmonie and Hamburg Elbphilharmonie. Serving as Music Director of the Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra, Jacobsen was recently appointed Music Director of the Virginia Symphony. With much call as a guest conductor, he too just led the Camerata Bern, Detroit Symphony, Alabama Symphony, ProMuscia Chamber Orchestra, Deutsche Philharmonie Merck and Yo-Yo Ma’s Silkroad.

Colin Jacobsen

Known as a violinist and composer, Colin Jacobsen is a captivating figure serving the classical music scene. Jacobsen was named one of the top 100 composures under 40 by NPR listeners. Operating as an active Avery Fisher Career Grant-winning soloist, he has toured with Silkroad since it was established in 2000. For his landmark work in the string quartet Brooklyn Rider and orchestra The Knights, Jacobsen was chosen amongst the nation’s leading visual and performing artists to obtain an esteemed United States Artists Fellowship.

Wed, Jan 19, 2022, 7:30 pm ET

The Knights collaborate with pianist Aaron Diehl for a blend of jazz and classical music. The ensemble welcomes Diehl as they explore Gershwin’s iconic Rhapsody in Blue and trailblazer Mary Lou WilliamsZodiac Suite. Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 is also featured with varieties from Ravel’s Baroque-inspired Le Tombeau de Couperin. Closing out the show is Stravinsky’s Firebird Suite, arranged by Michael P. Atkinson.

Sat, Apr 30, 2022, 8 pm ET

Edgar Meyer, critically acclaimed double bass virtuoso and composer, unites with The Knights for the New York premiere of his second concerto. The show unfolds with a showing of Jamaican-born British composer Eleanor Alberga’s Shining Gates of Morpheus featuring Knights hornist David Byrd-Marrow. The closing of the show continues the American spirit of Meyer’s work is Coplands’ Appalachian Spring.

Vaughn Lowery for use by 360 Magazine

Auto Pleyella via Dreweatts Auctioneers for use by 360 Magazine

Dreweatts Auctions David Winston’s Pianos

Dreweatts auctioneers is thrilled to offer the private collection of David Winston, Restorer and Conservator of Pianos to HM the Queen. The collection includes 26 exceptionally rare and important pianos dating from the 18th century to present day. This landmark sale will take place on Thursday, September 23rd, 2021.

Amongst those expected to achieve the highest bids is a rare 1925 Pleyel grand piano fitted with an original ‘Auto Pleyela’ self-playing mechanism, in a spectacular Chinoiserie Louis XV case (estimate £30,000-50,000) and a remarkable double piano from Pleyel, which is one of only 50 ever made. This model, which has a guide price of £40,000-£60,000, was once owned by the concert pianist wife of French writer and minister of culture André Malraux. 

Speaking about the sale, Will Richards, Deputy Chairman of Dreweatts said, “It is rare to see so many exquisite pianos together in one sale. We are proud to offer such an outstanding collection of instruments of such quality, history and craftsmanship. It is also very exciting, as this is the first time the collection has been offered in its entirety. Spanning three centuries of craftsmanship and innovation, this is a historic sale and a wonderful opportunity to own a piece of piano history.” 

Dreweatts pianos have been collected by one of the world’s foremost piano restorers, David Winston, who has restored some of the most valuable pianos in the world, including those owned and played by the greatest names in classical music, including Beethoven, Chopin and Liszt. David Winston has a connoisseur’s eye for exceptional quality and unusual provenance. Many of his pianos are one-off pieces with significant historic importance. His collection represents a lifetime’s passion coupled with an exceptional depth of knowledge and personal involvement. Commenting, he says, “The first thing for me is that it must be something that nobody else has. It must be both an excellent musical instrument and a beautiful object. Each was chosen for its unique place in history, art and culture.”

Among other highlights in the sale is a Wurlitzer 1411 Butterfly grand. At only 4’1” it is one of the smallest 88 note grand pianos ever made. It features an iconic case design, making it one of the most highly sought-after Art Deco instruments of all time (estimate £10,000-£15,000). Another is the first piano ever built by David, a stunning Viennese Fortepiano created in 1991, based on an original by Joseph Brodmann, 1823. A remarkable instrument, the piano has been used internationally in many recordings and concerts by some of the world’s leading musicians (estimate £15,000-£20,000). 

Other covetable instruments include a handsome ship’s piano with folding keyboard, purchased by the RAF WWI Flying ace Captain Norman Macmillan for his wife, the Music Hall singer, Ena Beaumont (estimate £1,500-£2,000).

Death of Classical - PUBLIQuartet Freedom & Faith, credit Kevin Condon 6 via Olivia Rainoff at Unison Media for use by 360 Magazine

PUBLIQuartet Freedom and Faith Performance

Death of Classical will continue its third season of The Angel’s Share this August, with the innovative PUBLIQuartet performing in the Catacombs of The Green-Wood Cemetery on August 4, 6, and 7. The Angel’s Share is the Death of Classical’s second concert series, curated by the creator, curator, and leader of the series, Andrew Ousley, in partnership with Green-Wood. The perform will take place in the Catacombs of The Green-Wood Cemetary in Brooklyn, New York City.

The quartet will perform a program inspired by its GRAMMY-nominated 2019 album Freedom and Faith, featuring works that celebrate women composers through the ages, and explore ideas of spirituality, resilience, and inspiration.

Performances of Freedom and Faith will take place over the course of three evenings, with two performances per night, and include music by Nina Simone, Ella Fitzgerald, Jessie Montgomery, Hildegard von Bingen, as well as original MIND THE GAP compositions by PUBLIQuartet.

The innovative, barrier-breaking string quartet performs a program inspired by its GRAMMY-nominated album Freedom and Faith, featuring music that celebrates women composers through the ages, and explores ideas of spirituality, resilience, and inspiration.

The ensemble is innovating the performance of classic music and opera by incorporating free-flowing improvisational instrumentation and group compositions into their exhibitions. Death of Classical represents a modern take on timeless classic compositions by giving a voice to emerging performers and underrepresented composers. While many people say “Classical Music is Dead,” this group’s revitalized take on classical music allows for the group’s performances to reach new, younger, unexpected audiences then ever before. With their innovative and exciting twist on the performing arts, Death of Classic is reviving a passion for the genre.

Concerts feature works by Nina Simone, Ella Fitzgerald, Jessie Montgomery, Hildegard von Bingen, and original MIND THE GAP compositions by PUBLIQuartet.

Each performance includes a pre-concert reception with a whiskey tasting overlooking the Manhattan skyline and harbor at sunset, with distilleries including Madre Mezcal, Appalachian Gap Distillery, Ume Plum Liqueur, and more

The Angel’s Share series takes its name from the distiller’s term for whiskey that evaporates while maturing in the barrel, thus going to the angels. Accordingly, the live concert events on August 4, 6, and 7 will open with a spirits tasting, with distilleries including Madre MezcalAppalachian Gap DistilleryUme Plum Liqueur, and more. The Angel’s Share is curated by Andrew Ousley and co-presented by Death of Classical and The Green-Wood Historic Fund.

Listing Info

August 4, 6 & 7, 2021 at 6:00PM and 7:30PM
PUBLIQuartet: “Freedom and Faith
Live at The Green-Wood Cemetery

JESSICA MEYER: Get into the Now (2017)
The Pull
Years of In Me
Go Big or Go Home

MIND | THE | GAP: Sancta Femina *
HILDEGARD VON BINGEN: O ignee Spiritus
FRANCESCA CACCINI: Regina caeli laetare Alleluia
CHIARA MARGARITA COZZOLANI: O quam suavis est Domine spiritus tuus

MIND | THE | GAP: Ella! & Nina! *
VAN ALEXANDER: A Tisket a Tasket
NINA SIMONE/HERB SACKER : Blackbird
LESLIE BRICUSSE/ANTHONY NEWLEY:  Feelin’ Good
NINA SIMONE/WELDON IRVINE: Young Gifted and Black
NINA SIMONE: Mississippi Goddam

‍*Arr. Gookin, Norpoth, Revel, Stewart 2017-2018

Performers:

PUBLIQuartet
Curtis Stewart, violin
Jannina Norpoth, violin
Nick Revel, viola
Hamilton Berry, cello

About PUBLIQuartet

Applauded by The Washington Post as “a perfect encapsulation of today’s trends in chamber music,” and by The New Yorker as “independent-minded,” the GRAMMY nominated PUBLIQuartet’s modern interpretation of chamber music makes them one of the most dynamic artists of their generation.  Dedicated to presenting new works for string quartet, PUBLIQuartet rose on the music scene as winner of the 2013 Concert Artists Guild’s New Music/New Places award, and in 2019 garnered Chamber Music America’s prestigious Visionary Award for outstanding and innovative approaches to contemporary classical, jazz, and world chamber music.  PQ’s genre-bending programs range from 20th century masterworks to newly commissioned pieces, alongside re-imaginations of classical works featuring open-form improvisations that expand the techniques and aesthetic of the traditional string quartet.

Death of Classical - PUBLIQuartet Freedom & Faith, credit Kevin Condon 6 via Olivia Rainoff at Unison Media for use by 360 Magazine

Bluthner 1854 Paderewski via Dreweatts Auctioneers for use by 360 Magazine

Rare Piano Collection to be Auctioned

Dreweatts auctioneers is to offer an exceptional private collection of rare pianos in a landmark sale on September 23, 2021. The collection was amassed by David Winston, who holds a Royal Warrant as Restorer and Conservator of Pianos to HM the Queen. It is comprised of 26 unique instruments dating from the 18th century to present day.

Amongst those expected to achieve the highest bids is a rare 1925 Pleyel grand piano fitted with an original ‘Auto Pleyela’ self-playing mechanism, in a spectacular Chinoiserie Louis XV case (estimate £40,000-£60,000) and a remarkable double piano from Pleyel, which is one of only 50 ever made. This model, which has a guide price of £30,000-£50,000, was once owned by the concert pianist wife of French writer and minister of culture André Malraux. 

Speaking about the sale, Will Richards, Deputy Chairman of Dreweatts said, “It is rare to see so many exquisite pianos together in one sale. We are proud to offer such an outstanding collection of instruments of such quality, history and craftsmanship. It is also very exciting, as this is the first time the collection has been offered in its entirety. Spanning three centuries of craftsmanship and innovation, this is a historic sale and a wonderful opportunity to own a piece of piano history.”

The pianos have been collected by one of the world’s foremost piano restorers, David Winston, who has restored some of the most valuable pianos in the world, including those owned and played by the greatest names in classical music, including Beethoven, Chopin and Liszt. David Winston has a connoisseur’s eye for exceptional quality and unusual provenance. Many of his pianos are one-off pieces with significant historic importance. His collection represents a lifetime’s passion coupled with an exceptional depth of knowledge and personal involvement.

Commenting, he says, “The first thing for me is that it must be something that nobody else has. It must be both an excellent musical instrument and a beautiful object. Each was chosen for its unique place in history, art and culture.”

Among other highlights in the sale is a Wurlitzer 1411 Butterfly grand. At only 4’1” it is one of the smallest 88 note grand pianos ever made. It features an iconic case design, making it one of the most highly sought-after Art Deco instruments of all time (estimate £10,000-£15,000). Another is the first piano ever built by David, a stunning Viennese Fortepiano created in 1991, based on an original by Joseph Brodmann, 1823. A remarkable instrument, the piano has been used internationally in many recordings and concerts by some of the world’s leading musicians (estimate £15,000-£18,000).

Other covetable instruments include a handsome ship’s piano with folding keyboard, purchased by the RAF WWI Flying ace Captain Norman Macmillan for his wife, the Music Hall singer, Ena Beaumont (estimate £1,500-£2,000).

Dreweatts auctioneers is to offer an exceptional private collection of rare pianos in a landmark sale on September 23, 2021. The collection was amassed by David Winston, who holds a Royal Warrant as Restorer and Conservator of Pianos to HM the Queen. It is comprised of 26 unique instruments dating from the 18th century to present day.

Amongst those expected to achieve the highest bids is a rare 1925 Pleyel grand piano fitted with an original ‘Auto Pleyela’ self-playing mechanism, in a spectacular Chinoiserie Louis XV case (estimate £40,000-£60,000) and a remarkable double piano from Pleyel, which is one of only 50 ever made. This model, which has a guide price of £30,000-£50,000, was once owned by the concert pianist wife of French writer and minister of culture André Malraux. 

Speaking about the sale, Will Richards, Deputy Chairman of Dreweatts said, “It is rare to see so many exquisite pianos together in one sale. We are proud to offer such an outstanding collection of instruments of such quality, history and craftsmanship. It is also very exciting, as this is the first time the collection has been offered in its entirety. Spanning three centuries of craftsmanship and innovation, this is a historic sale and a wonderful opportunity to own a piece of piano history.”

 The pianos have been collected by one of the world’s foremost piano restorers, David Winston, who has restored some of the most valuable pianos in the world, including those owned and played by the greatest names in classical music, including Beethoven, Chopin and Liszt. David Winston has a connoisseur’s eye for exceptional quality and unusual provenance. Many of his pianos are one-off pieces with significant historic importance. His collection represents a lifetime’s passion coupled with an exceptional depth of knowledge and personal involvement.

Commenting, he says, “The first thing for me is that it must be something that nobody else has. It must be both an excellent musical instrument and a beautiful object. Each was chosen for its unique place in history, art and culture.”

Among other highlights in the sale is a Wurlitzer 1411 Butterfly grand. At only 4’1” it is one of the smallest 88 note grand pianos ever made. It features an iconic case design, making it one of the most highly sought-after Art Deco instruments of all time (estimate £10,000-£15,000). Another is the first piano ever built by David, a stunning Viennese Fortepiano created in 1991, based on an original by Joseph Brodmann, 1823. A remarkable instrument, the piano has been used internationally in many recordings and concerts by some of the world’s leading musicians (estimate £15,000-£18,000).

Other covetable instruments include a handsome ship’s piano with folding keyboard, purchased by the RAF WWI Flying ace Captain Norman Macmillan for his wife, the Music Hall singer Ena Beaumont (estimate £1,500-£2,000).

With a body of work such as this, it’s bound to be an excellent auction.

illustration by Samantha Miduri for use by 360 Magazine

Chloe Flower – Chloe Flower

Genre-redefining pianist, composer, and producer Chloe Flower—whose sensational appearance with Cardi B stole the show at the 2019 Grammy Awards—has released her self-titled debut album on Sony Music Masterworks. Chloe Flower is available to stream and purchase HERE

In three acts—I. Innocence, II. Suffering and III. Hope—this sublime collection was composed, produced and recorded in the artist’s New York City apartment during the Covid-19 pandemic. It features spoken word from Deepak Chopra and an interpretation of Billie Eilish’s chart-topping hit “Bad Guy.” 

Encompassing sweet melodies, hip-hop, and trap beats, Chloe Flower is a modern-day classical sensation, pushing the boundaries with her unique self-created Popsical genre. Of her album Chloe states: “I want people to listen to the album as a whole body of work, which is why I have a prelude and a finale as well as the three acts. The ultimate goal was to make an album that inspires listeners, and makes people hopeful. It’s new, edgy and a sound that is authentic to me.  Even though my music has no lyrics, I still have something to say.”

In conjunction with the album release, Chloe has also unveiled the video for “When I See You Again” from the new album. With lush, dream-like visuals, Chloe Flower delivers an expressive performance emanating nostalgia and longing. Watch HERE.

“I wanted to write something inspirational and hopeful,” explains Chloe, who was moved to compose the track after a friend died of pancreatic cancer when he was too scared to visit a hospital due to the virus. “The melody is melancholy but also hopeful. One day, in this life or in some other way, we will meet our loved ones again.”

This video comes as a follow up to “Bohemia,” a dazzling and provocative music video showcasing the range of sound with hypnotic trap beats and seductive piano playing. Featuring Tony, Golden Globe, and Emmy winning actor Jeffrey Wright (James Bond, Westworld), the video was inspired by the 20th anniversary of iconic musical blockbuster Moulin Rouge and filmed at the notoriously exclusive New York City cabaret club, The Box.

About Chloe Flower

Chloe Flower is the most talked about pianist in the world following a show-stopping performance with Cardi B at the 2019 Grammy Awards. Chloe is an official Steinway Artist, composer, producer, activist, and fashion influencer who began playing piano at the age of two. Chloe Flower proudly celebrates her Asian heritage and culture and is a fierce advocate for women’s representation—particularly women of colour—in the music industry. Chloe sits on the board of directors for the Liberace Foundation and is a strong voice against human trafficking. She was honoured by the Coalition to Abolish Slavery and Activism (CAST) and has spoken at the United Nations as a music education ambassador. With her self-created Popsical genre—a blend of pop and classical—Chloe Flower is pushing boundaries and reaching new audiences. She has collaborated with Babyface, Nas, and Swizz Beats along with producers Tommy Brown (Ariana Grande/Meghan Trainor) and Mike WiLL Made-It (Beyonce/Miley Cyrus) to name a few.

Playing Piano via Mina Tocalini for use by 360 Magazine

Chloe Flower – Tamie

Following the success of her singles “Get What U Get” and “Flower Through Concrete,” pianist, composer, and producer Chloe Flower—who stole the show with Cardi B at the 2019 Grammy Awards—has announced the release of her self-titled debut album on Sony Music Masterworks, out July 16, 2021.

The album is in three acts: I. Innocence, II. Suffering and III. Hope. It was composed, produced and recorded in the artist’s New York City apartment during the Covid-19 pandemic. It features spoken word from Deepak Chopra and an interpretation of Billie Eilish’s chart-topping hit “Bad Guy.” 

In conjunction with today’s announcement, Chloe Flower is releasing her latest single, “Tamie,” from the album. Chloe dedicates the song to her dear friend of the same name and has imbued it with the beauty and resilience of their Asian identity; thus releasing it in observance of Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month. Of the music video, Chloe notes “It’s a celebration of our Asian heritage and culture, and was shot at a classical Chinese garden. As our communities are being targeted with anti-Asian rhetoric and violence, now is the time to celebrate Asian American pride, culture and the positive impact our community has had on the world.” 

Encompassing sweet melodies, hip-hop, and trap beats, Chloe Flower is a modern-day classical sensation, pushing the boundaries with her unique self-created “Popsical” genre: a blend of pop and classical. Of her album Chloe states: “I was thinking about the life cycle. You start with innocence; born with a clean state. Throughout life there is suffering which hardens you. But there’s always hope for something better.”

Stating further: “I want people to listen to the album as a whole body of work, which is why I have a prelude and a finale as well as the three acts. The ultimate goal was to make an album that inspires listeners, and makes people hopeful. It’s new, edgy and a sound that is authentic to me.  Even though my music has no lyrics, I still have something [to] say.

The quality of Chloe’s technique and modern musical viewpoint sets her apart. This is a collection that will hopefully establish the artist as a force to be reckoned with. She modernizes the genre of classical music to create something that is totally unique, different and beautiful. 

About Chloe Flower

Chloe Flower is the most talked about pianist in the world following a show-stopping performance with Cardi B at the 2019 Grammy Awards. Chloe is an official Steinway Artist, composer, producer, activist, and fashion influencer who began playing piano at the age of two. Chloe Flower proudly celebrates her Asian heritage and culture and is a fierce advocate for women’s representation—particularly women of color—in the music industry. Chloe sits on the board of directors for the Liberace Foundation, and is a strong voice against human trafficking. She was honoured by the Coalition to Abolish Slavery and Activism (CAST) and has spoken at the United Nations as a music education ambassador. With the “Popsical” genre, Chloe Flower is pushing boundaries and reaching new audiences. She has collaborated with Babyface, Nas, and Swizz Beats along with producers Tommy Brown (Ariana Grande/Meghan Trainor) and Mike WiLL Made-It (Beyonce/Miley Cyrus) to name a few. 

Instrument illustration by Ivory Rowen for 360 Magazine

WQXR Music For Juneteenth

In honor of Juneteenth, WQXR is devoting the entire day to spotlighting the work of Black composers and performers from around the globe with an all-day tribute “Music for Juneteenth: A Celebration of Black Classical Artistry.

Juneteenth is celebrated annually on June 19 and commemorates the date in 1865 when the Emancipation Proclamation was finally enforced by Union officials in the state of Texas, over two years after the Proclamation was issued. Also known as Freedom Day, it is now widely celebrated as the anniversary of the abolition of slavery in the United States.

Over the course of 24 hours — from midnight to midnight — WQXR will showcase the talent, work, and voices of Black musicians. The day’s playlist includes over 150 pieces of music, featuring more than 40 Black composers and over 60 Black soloists and conductors.

Highlights include powerful symphonies by Florence Price, William Grant Still, and William Dawson; the Violin Concerto in F-Sharp Minor by Jose White, a virtuoso who performed with the New York Philharmonic in the 1870s; uplifting choral music by Margaret Bonds and Robert Nathaniel Dett; ragtime favorites by Scott Joplin; living composers like Adolphus Hailstork, Jessie Montgomery, Valerie Coleman, Daniel Kidane, and Nkeiru Okoye; performances by legendary singers such as Marian Anderson, Paul Robeson, Jessye Norman, and Leontyne Price; as well as great artists on the concert scene today including Wynton Marsalis, Lara Downes, Anthony McGill, and Sheku Kanneh-Mason, plus emerging stars.

At 7pm, WQXR will break its music-only format to present a special conversation about race and diversity in classical music. WQXR’s Terrance McKnight will host “The Black Experience in the Concert Hall,” a live two-hour program and discussion with listener call-ins and guests including:

  • Martina Arroyo, legendary soprano and founder of the Martina Arroyo Foundation
  • Wynton Marsalis, virtuoso trumpeter and Artistic Director of Jazz at Lincoln Center
  • Khalil Gibran Muhammad, professor of History, Race, and Public Policy at Harvard Kennedy School and author of The Condemnation of Blackness
  • Jesse Rosen, President and CEO of the League of American Orchestras
  • Alvin Singleton, composer
  • Chelsea Daniel, pianist
  • Greg Sandow, music critic and composer

“Classical musicians of African descent have existed on the margins of obscurity for centuries — in the classroom, the concert hall, the record industry, and on the radio,” said Terrance McKnight, WQXR’s Evening Host. “This underrepresentation is what brought me to work in public radio, and this 24-hour Juneteenth marathon is something I’ve looked forward to my entire radio career. I’m excited to share the work of these artists in a concentrated way, on Juneteenth and beyond.”

“We are honored to mark Juneteenth with a showcase of the work of Black performers and composers, many of whom have long been excluded from the canon,” said Matt Abramovitz, Vice President, WQXR. “And while a call-in show is an unprecedented break with our usual all-music format, a discussion of race and classical music is the conversation we need to have right now, and WQXR has the platform and mandate to host it. We hope listeners will join us for this day of celebration and reflection.”

“Music for Juneteenth: A Celebration of Black Classical Artistry” airs all day beginning at 12:01am June 19 on WQXR 105.9 FM and will stream online at WQXR.org.

ABOUT WQXR

WQXR is New York City’s only all-classical music station, immersing listeners in the city’s rich musical life on-air at 105.9FM, online at WQXR.org and in the real world via live events and broadcasts. WQXR presents new and landmark classical recordings as well as live concerts from Carnegie Hall and the New York Philharmonic, and broadcasts essential destination programs including New York Philharmonic This Week and Young Artists Showcase. WQXR is also the co-producer—along with the Metropolitan Opera—of the critically-acclaimed podcast Aria Code, hailed by The New Yorker as “illuminating …accessible…immediately pleasurable.” As a public radio station, WQXR is supported through the generosity of its members, donors and sponsors, making classical music relevant, accessible and inspiring for all.

Beethoven’s Effect on Test Results

Students Who Listened to Beethoven During Lecture — and Heard the Same Music in Dreamland — Did Better on Test Next Day

But scores on the material nine months later dropped to ‘floor level,’ Baylor University study finds

College students who listened to classical music by Beethoven and Chopin during a computer-interactive lecture on microeconomics — and heard the music again that night — did better on a test the next day than did peers who were in the same lecture, but instead slept that evening with white noise in the background.

Over the long haul — when students took a similar test nine months later — the boost did not last. Scores dropped to floor levels, with everyone failing and performance averaging less than 25% percent for both groups. However, targeting memory reactivation (TMR) may aid during deep sleep, when memories are theorized to be reactivated and moved from temporary storage in one part of the brain to more permanent storage in other parts, researchers said.

The study, supported by the National Science Foundation and conducted by Baylor’s Sleep Neuroscience and Cognition Laboratory (SNAC), is published in the journal Neurobiology of Learning and Memory.

“All educators want to teach students how to integrate concepts, not just memorize details, but that’s notoriously difficult to do,” said Michael K. Scullin, Ph.D., director of Baylor’s sleep lab and assistant professor of psychology and neuroscience. “What we found was that by experimentally priming these concepts during sleep, we increased performance on integration questions by 18% on the test the next day. What student wouldn’t want a boost or two to their letter grade? The effects were particularly enhanced in participants who showed heightened frontal lobe activity in the brain during slow wave sleep, which is deep sleep.”

He noted that the effects emerged when using gold standard procedures: neither participants nor experimenters knew who received a particular treatment, sleep was measured using EEG in a laboratory setting, and the learning materials matched those that would actually be used in a college classroom, in this case an undergraduate microeconomics lecture.

Poor sleep is widespread in college students, with 60 percent habitually sleeping fewer than the recommended seven hours on 50 to 65 percent of nights. While students may be more concerned about immediate test results — and TMR may help them cram for an exam — learning by rote (item memory) does not normally benefit grasping and retaining a concept.

For the study, researchers recruited 50 college students ages 18 to 33 for a learning task with a self-paced, computer-interactive lecture; and for two overnight polysomnography sessions, with the first night an adaptation to the lab and screening for sleep disorders, and the second done the evening of the lecture.

During the lecture, soft background selections were played from a computer: the first movement of Beethoven’s “Moonlight” Piano Sonata, the first movement of Vivaldi’s “Spring” Violin Concerto and Chopin’s Nocturne in E-flat major, Op. 9, No. 2.

That night in Baylor’s sleep lab, research personnel applied electrodes and used computers to monitor sleep patterns of both test and control groups. Once technicians observed a person was in deep sleep, they played either the classical music or the white noise — depending on whether the individual was in the test or control group — for about 15 minutes.

“Deep slow wave sleep won’t last super long before shifting back to light sleep, so we couldn’t play them endlessly,” Scullin said. “If we played it during light sleep, the music probably would have awoken participants. The first slow wave cycle is the deepest and longest.”

The music choice was important, researchers said.

“We ruled out jazz because it’s too sporadic and would probably cause people to wake,” Scullin said. “We ruled out popular music because lyrical music disrupts initial studying. You can’t read words and sing lyrics — just try it. We also ruled out ocean waves and ambient music because it’s very easy to ignore. You’re going to have a heck of a time forming a strong association between some learning material and a bland song or ambient noise.

“That left us with classical music, which many students already listen to while studying,” he said. “The songs can be very distinctive and therefore pair well with learning material.”

In the microeconomics exam the next day, the TMR of classical music more than doubled the likelihood of passing the test when compared with the control condition of white noise.

Scullin cautioned against confusing the Baylor study’s findings with the so-called “Mozart Effect” — the finding that having students listen to Mozart pieces led to better scores on intelligence tests. Subsequent tests of the “Mozart Effect” found that it either did not replicate or that boosts were strictly due to increased arousal when listening to energetic music.

“Mozart doesn’t make memories,” Scullin said.

Previous researchers have found that memories associated with sensory cues — such as an odor or song — are re-activated when the same cue is received later. When that happens during deep sleep, the corresponding memories are activated and strengthened, said co-researcher Chenlu Gao, a doctoral candidate of psychology and neuroscience at Baylor.

Early experimenters also played audio tapes during sleep to test whether individuals can learn new knowledge while sleeping. But while those experiments failed to create new memories, “our study suggests it is possible to reactivate and strengthen existing memories of lecture materials during sleep,” Gao said. “Our next step is to implement this technique in classrooms — or in online lectures while students complete their education at home due to COVID-19 social distancing measures — so we can help college students ‘re-study’ their class materials during sleep.”

“We think it is possible there could be long-term benefits of using TMR but that you might have to repeat the music across multiple nights,” Scullin added. “After all, you wouldn’t just study material a single time and then expect to remember it months later for a final exam. The best learning is repeated at spaced-out intervals — and, of course, while maintaining good sleep habits.”

*The study was supported by the National Science Foundation. Paul Fillmore, assistant professor of communication sciences and disorders in Baylor’s Robbins College of Health and Human Sciences, also was a co-researcher.

ABOUT BAYLOR UNIVERSITY

Baylor University is a private Christian University and a nationally ranked research institution. The University provides a vibrant campus community for more than 18,000 students by blending interdisciplinary research with an international reputation for educational excellence and a faculty commitment to teaching and scholarship. Chartered in 1845 by the Republic of Texas through the efforts of Baptist pioneers, Baylor is the oldest continually operating University in Texas. Located in Waco, Baylor welcomes students from all 50 states and more than 90 countries to study a broad range of degrees among its 12 nationally recognized academic divisions.

ABOUT THE COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES AT BAYLOR UNIVERSITY

The College of Arts & Sciences is Baylor University’s oldest and largest academic division, consisting of 25 academic departments and seven academic centers and institutes. The more than 5,000 courses taught in the College span topics from art and theatre to religion, philosophy, sociology and the natural sciences. Faculty conduct research around the world, and research on the undergraduate and graduate level is prevalent throughout all disciplines. Visit www.baylor.edu/artsandsciences.

ABOUT THE SLEEP NEUROSCIENCE AND COGNITION LABORATORY

The goal of the Sleep Neuroscience and Cognition Laboratory at Baylor University is to understand the basic processes supporting cognition and to translate that knowledge to promote health and flourishing across the adult lifespan. The two lines of inquiry focus on the sleep-based underpinnings of health and cognitive flourishing; and how technology can be leveraged to support prospective memory and quality of life in persons with Alzheimer’s disease and their caregivers.

 

Cat Delphi

– SINGLE “Way Back Home” 9/9/2018
– EP “Woman” 11/1/2019
– Pre Order – 5/9/2018

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Cat Delphi is a Singer/Pianist/Songwriter. One of the first recipients of the 2018 MOBO Awards ‘Help Musicians Fund’, Cat Delphi’s debut single ‘Fire’ was premiered by Clash Magazine, playlisted on BBC Radio 2 for 3 weeks and had over half a million streams.
The remix was also played on Kiss100.

Cat has appeared on ‘The Dermot O’Leary show’, ‘Jools Holland Presents’ & in the BBC Introducing (South) Live Lounge (including 3 track of the day’s). She also had a feature in the British Airways ‘Ones to Watch’ series.

Unlike most “pop” artists out today, Cat has an extensive education in Classical Music, having studied classical piano at the world famous ‘Royal College of Music’ in London & later winning the prestigious ‘Leverhulme’ scholarship (given to the most promising student at a conservatoire) to study at the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama where she received both her Bachelor Degree & Masters of Music Degree.

Cat was recently nominated for best Songwriter & Best Female at the Unsigned Music Awards presented by Laura Whitmore and Chris Stark on SKY 1, and songs from her first EP FIRE were played on the TV shows Home & Away’ & ‘Neighbours’.

Live shows have included headlining the 02 Academy Islington, a performance on ’Jools Holland Presents’ and ’Pixie Lott Presents’, Proud Camden , Metropolis Studios Sessions, 2018 FA Cup Final and the 2018 Hockey World Cup Final.

Cat is due to be a guest speaker and performer at BBC Introducing LIVE, Friday 9th Nov @ Tobacco Dock London.
All tracks on the EP were produced by Leo Appleyard.