Posts tagged with "television personality"

Chef Adrianne Calvo headshot image via Adrianne Calvo for use by 360 Magazine

Chef Adrianne Calvo

Highly acclaimed chef, author, television personality and YouTube host Adrianne Calvo embodies the essence of the American dream. Opening her very own restaurant at the age of 22, she has become a living legend and a source of inspiration for those wanting to follow in her footsteps.

Receiving smashing success with her first venture, Chef Adrianne has since branched out with an array of restaurants, has been named Miami New Times Best Chef, appeared on an array of Food Network shows and is the youngest professional to cook for the United Nations.

During April of 2007, Chef Adrianne opened her first restaurant, Chef Adrianne’s Vineyard Restaurant and Bar, also referred to as “Chef Adrianne’s.” Having graduated from Johnson and Wales University with a Bachelor of Arts in 2004, the new restaurant was a risky decision, but it sure did pay off. Swiftly, the restaurant grew and gained widespread notarization due to Chef Adrianne’s signature Maximum Flavor.

Guests and Critics alike fell in love with her cooking; and Chef Adrianne’s was awarded Best Restaurant by Miami New Times’ Readers’ Choice Awards in 2014 and 2017. Continuing to receive praise by being named one of the 17 Most Important Restaurants in Miami by Thrillist, Chef Adrianne was only just beginning her career.

Chef Adrianne has cooked for the United Nations and its ambassadors, competed on Chopped and Beat Bobby Flay via Food Network and has been acknowledged for her cooking in Bon Appétit, Better Homes & Gardens, USA Today and Saveur.

Her passion for the culinary world and spirit of adventure inspired her to launch Emmy Nominated YouTube series “Searching for Maximum Flavor,” which has been nominated for an Emmy Award. In the show, Chef Adrianne meets with creators while reviewing iconic dishes and adding in her namesake Maximum Flavor.

360 had the opportunity to chat with Chef Adrianne about her success thus far, what made her interested in becoming a chef, and what we can expect to come in the future.

Q: When did you start dabbling in cooking and when did you know you wanted to pursue a career in the field?

A: I have always loved food. I used to come home from school and watch Great Chefs of The World, followed by more cooking shows. But at that time, I thought I wanted to be a journalist. Watching cooking shows was just entertaining until my junior year of high school. I was placed in home ec by mistake, and I had to wait two weeks for schedule to change. During those two weeks, Johnson and Wales University came to do a demo and talk about how they’re the leading culinary school. It was what I call the lightning strike. From then on, I knew I wanted to be a chef.

Q: What was the most difficult part in opening your own restaurant at such a young age?

A: 22 is too young to open anything much less a restaurant. Restaurants are equally demanding as they are rewarding (if successful). I didn’t have normal 20’s. I didn’t have my first real drink till I was 25. I didn’t go on a vacation for 8 years and I spent every day working the line for 11 years straight. I had to stay focused and determined. Looking back at that exchange to where I am today, it was all worth it.

Q: What has it been like receiving so much praise from critics, social media all the way to your beloved customers?

It’s a beautiful thing. I thank God for it every day. I believe I don’t deserve it which is why I keep working harder and harder. This industry doesn’t stop. And want to feel like have earned their love.

Q: How did the pandemic affect your businesses?

A: Thank the good Lord, our loyal customers kept us afloat doing take out.

Q: Tell us a little bit more about your signature maximum flavor.

A: When I decided to go to culinary school, I entered culinary competitions to raise money for college. I started winning, a year later I kept winning. By this time, the judges were talking amongst themselves about how I was winning. The answer was – Flavor. One judge advised me to write a cookbook with all my winning recipes. I took his advice and thus was born my first cookbook, ‘MAXIMUM FLAVOR,’ making me the youngest cookbook author at the time. That lead me to be on the Montel Williams show. He held my cookbook in the air and told his audience and all of the country glued to their TV screens, that they had to buy my cookbook because the scallop recipe he tried from [the book] changed him. He spent all his life hating scallops until he had them Maximum Flavor Style. The book sold like crazy.

Q: Tell us about “Baked,” one of your newest concepts, and what more we can expect from this expansion.

A: Baked by Chef Adrianne started as a Bakehouse I acquired to make bread and desserts for all my restaurants- an internal operation. I’ve always been in love with everything from scratch. I think you can just tell when something is made by hand, or chemically doused. I could buy desserts from any vendor and just defrost, slice, and throw on a plate. But that’s not Maximum Flavor. I am currently working with GoldBelly on a national direct to consumer campaign.

Q: What can we expect next from Chef Adrianne?

A: God willing, I hope to expand my wine label “A Family Vineyards.” After the wild success of “A Cabernet,” I think a Rose’ or Sauvi B is next.  

Article by: McKinley Franklin

music Ivory Rowen illustration for 360 Magazine.

JON BATISTE NEW MUSIC VIDEO – FREEDOM

Today, Academy Award, BAFTA, Golden Globe winning musician Jon Batiste releases a vibrant new music video for his single “FREEDOM,” a celebration of Black joy, independence and New Orleans culture and energy. Watch here.

There is no better time for Jon Batiste’s song of the summer “FREEDOM,” a funk-driven 70s-pop banger that Entertainment Weekly called an “exhilarating, horn-heavy celebration of independence.”

In this electrifying love letter to his hometown of New Orleans, Batiste leads the ultimate second line through the streets, linking with the legendary St. Augustine High School Marching 100 (Batiste’s alma mater), the Joyful Choir of New Orleans, Queen Tahj of the Golden Eagles Mardi Grass Indian Tribe, dancers, musicians, and residents alike.

Jon Batiste has had a good year. The Academy Award, Golden Globe, BAFTA winning musician’s hit song “I NEED YOU” reached #1 on the AAA Radio Charts, his album WE ARE debuted in the Billboard Top R&B Charts, Top Album Charts, and Top 200, his “I NEED YOU” music video surpassed 10MM views, he’s appeared on American Idol,  Live with Kelly and RyanThe Today ShowThe Late Late Show with James CordenCBS This Morning as guest and co-host, and of course the Late Show with Stephen Colbert.

“We Are represents a vivid turn from straight jazz to joyful, danceable pop and neo-soul… a bold declaration of conscience…” –Vanity Fair

On WE ARE, Batiste presents a captivating musical experience to the world rooted in catharsis, joy, freedom, contemplation and sensuality. It’s a love letter to his southern roots and the heritage of Black Music with guest appearances by Mavis StaplesQuincy JonesZadie SmithPJ MortonTrombone Shorty, St. Augustine Marching 100, his father Michael Batiste, grandfather David Gauthier and many more. It is a meditation steeped in the sounds of the times with collaborators including POMO (Anderson.Paak), Ricky Reed (Lizzo), Jahaan Sweet (Drake, Eminem) and others.

“I’m publicly known for some things already,” says Batiste. “But there’s so much more to know about me. It’s always been there. Now is the time to show the world my full artistry.”

Batiste continues, “WE ARE is a message of love for humanity, of humble reverence for our past, and of a hopeful future, in which we are the ones who can save us. The art reveals its motive to you. You just have to wait for the Spirit to tell you what it wants.”

A special thanks to Coach for dressing members of the cast of the “FREEDOM” video.

About Jon Batiste
One of the best-known musicians of his generation, virtuoso pianist, singer, bandleader, educator and television personality Jon Batiste has spent his career bringing that music back to where it started — that is, with the people. From his days at Juilliard, where he established his Stay Human band by playing around New York City’s subways and in street performances he called “love riots,” to his work since 2015 as the bandleader and musical director of The Late Show With Stephen Colbert, the Kenner, Louisiana native has consistently channeled his superb technical skill and deep knowledge of jazz tradition towards a specific, intentional purpose: making people’s lives better and brighter, one harmonaboard (that’s harmonica and keyboard, combined) solo at a time.

Born into Louisiana’s legendarily musical Batiste family, Jon has performed and recorded widely since his teens. His flexibility as an artist, his fluency in jazz as well as popular music of all stripes, has allowed him to collaborate with legends from Wynton Marsalis, a mentor since his Juilliard days, to Prince — as well as many of the widely-varied artists who appear on the Late Show.

Batiste’s marquee performances have ranged from the Grammy’s, to the Kennedy Center Honors, to the US Open and the NBA All-Star Game — in 2015, Batiste and the Stay Human Band became the first group to play the main stage at both the Newport Jazz and Folk festivals.

Batiste played himself on the HBO series Treme and appeared in director Spike Lee’s Red Hook Summer — most recently, his music was featured in the 2020 Disney/Pixar film Soul. Batiste won a Golden Globe and Critic’s Choice Award for his participation in the soundtrack alongside Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross, and the trio are currently nominated for an Oscar and BAFTA for Best Soundtrack.

He’s been awarded the American Jazz Museum Lifetime Achievement Award, the Harry Chapin ASCAP Humanitarian Award and appeared on Forbes’ 30 Under 30 list; Batiste also currently serves as the Music Director of The Atlantic and the Co-Artistic Director of the National Jazz Museum in Harlem.

Jon Batiste is devoted to the education and mentorship of young musicians. He has led his own Social Music Residency and Mentoring Program sponsored by Chase, as well as master classes throughout the world. He has also led several cultural exchanges, beginning in 2006, while still a teen, with the Netherlands Trust, which brought students from the USA and Holland to perform with him at the Royal Concertgebouw and Carnegie Hall.

Batiste balances a demanding performance schedule with public speaking engagements, masterclasses, brand partnerships, community activism and acting roles. His composing and songwriting will be featured in his large-scale, genre-melding symphonic work “American Symphony,” set to premiere at Carnegie Hall in 2021 and he has been developing a Broadway musical about the life of famed painter Jean-Michel Basquiat.

QxA Davis Mallory

By Vaughn Lowery and Hannah DiPilato

Davis Mallory from MTV’s The Real World, discusses his struggle with alcoholism as well as how far he has come in his career. 

360 Magazine recently had the opportunity to sit down with Davis Mallory, a contestant from The Real World on MTV. He is now pursuing a music career while educating others about alcoholism. As an openly gay Christian, he hoped to share his story with others as a television personality as well as a musician. 

What was it like being on MTV’s The Real World Season 18? Any regrets? Do you still stay in contact with other cast members?

I was a senior in college, 21-years-old, when I auditioned for and was cast on MTV’s 18th season of the Real World, located in Denver Colorado. I was a fan of the show and had just come out of the closet to my classmates that summer. I felt that I had an interesting story to tell – being a Christian and openly gay was not something I had not seen on TV before – and I wanted to prove you could be both, while also showcasing a more masculine image of homosexuality than was often shown on TV.

Immediately after the show ended I flew around to colleges in the USA discussing and often debating Biblical professors in front of a student body; dissecting Bible verses and their interpretations on homosexuality. My grandfather James Davis Mallory JR (whom I’m named after) is a Christian author and psychiatrist – and so I was raised very orthodox – Southern Baptist. I found this time to be very rewarding and something I’m proud of – to date I still receive messages from viewers of the show expressing their gratitude for my story on The Real World.

I of course have regrets during my time on the show – I think most people who have done that show in their 20s will tell you they regret things they did or said. We were all heavily fed alcohol which created chaos, confusion, fights and hookups. I’m still close with several cast members, two of them live in Nashville so I see them most often. Tori Hall, who was on Road Rules and married Brad Fiorenza (I attended their wedding) and Brooke Labarbera, who was on my season of the Real World are two people I remain close with and I spent much of this summer 2020 with both of them!

What led up to you having an issue with drugs and alcohol? How’s life after sobriety? Are there any triggers that make it difficult to remain sober?

When I was younger (before trying alcohol) my mother told me to NEVER drink, instead of teaching me how to drink. This was because my parent’s divorce was caused in part by my father’s alcoholism. When I went off to college, I got drunk for the first time and I quickly progressed into blacking out when I drank. I would sometimes wake up the next morning and hearing stories from my friends about stupid things I said or did the night before. I tried to get that under control by lowering the amount of alcohol I drank and by not drinking hard alcohol.

I went through many chapters of my life taking breaks from drinking and reducing my alcohol intake. My father has now been completely sober for over a decade and his example is a big inspiration in my own decision to completely quit drinking. I’ve now been sober for 4 years. After reaching my 1-year mark of sobriety I had a big regret – that I hadn’t quit earlier. I felt so much better – I looked so much better and I just wished I had fully quit earlier in my life.

Thankfully, perhaps due to God or just growing up, I have ZERO temptation to drink anymore. I’m constantly reminded why I quit when I see other people’s struggles with alcohol. I have seen people wheeled off in an ambulance with alcohol poisoning, I’ve had close friends die from alcohol poisoning, a friend’s mother recently did; another close friend died from an overdose of drugs mixed with fentanyl recently. These everyday reminders keep me sober.

I really wish our society didn’t glorify drinking in movies/commercials/music, because the downfall from alcohol is not being taught to children: accidentally death, liver disease, the fighting it causes, relationships ruined, horrible, absent or addicted parents, job losses, physical damage it does to our bodies and faces are never shown in these alcohol commercials.

What was it like growing up with an uncle who had access to major recording artists like Wynonna Judd? Did that experience help shape you into the artist you are today? If so, how?

My uncle Chaz managed pop artist Amy Grant for many years and still manages Christian recording artist Michael W. Smith. My uncle John Mallory wrote songs for artists Wynonna Judd, Sixpence None the Richer, Ty Herndon and more. I  grew up in the music industry, attending a lot of these artist’s concerts and meeting them – I spent summers on Amy Grant’s farm in Nashville – I was a huge fan of her and Michael W. Smith.

As a kid I dreamt of being a singer and wanted to have careers like theirs – my positive message songs “Faith,” “Not That Far Away” “Lost” and “Somebody’s Watching” are examples of songs influenced by Amy & Michael’s music. I did not expect to become a songwriter. How songs were written was a mystery as a kid – I knew singers sang them but didn’t know how they were created. When I started out on this journey to becoming a recording artist I had to watch and learn from others in numerous songwriting sessions until I really got the hang of doing it myself.

During your first year in Nashville, one of your former cast members (Diem Brown) passed away from cancer. How did their loss impact your life at the time?

Diem Brown passed away in 2014 – I moved to Nashville at the end end of 2013 – so I had just started my journey into songwriting. My first original released song is titled “Beautiful Girl’s (Diem’s Song)”, a song I wrote about Diem with award-winning songwriters Ben Goldsmith and Tori Tullier. The song debuted in People Magazine, where Diem was a news reporter and received press in E! News, US Weekly and more outlets.

Diem and I grew up in nearby parts of Georgia (I’m from Marietta, she’s from Roswell – just 15 min away) although we did not meet until we did the show. Diem was a sorority sister with my mother’s best friend’s daughter, Carly Hartwick, who first introduced us over email prior to our meeting in person for the first time when Diem and I did an MTV Challenge together: The Duel II in New Zealand.

Diem and I gave a school speech together where she shared wisdom on pursuing one’s career goals by interviewing those with the same job, Diem becoming a News Anchor where she met her idol Katie Couric to ask questions on how to get to Katie’s place in life. Diem’s speech really inspired me as I chased after my own career dreams in music, so when she lost her battle to cancer I was deeply saddened and wrote the song to memorialize her through music. Her sisters’ often use the song on the anniversary of her death, which I’m always touched to see.

You grew up in Atlanta but now reside in Nashville. Do you prefer one city over the other? If so why?

I was born in Atlanta and raised in a suburb of Atlanta called Marietta. After attending college in Florida at Stetson University, I returned to Atlanta for 2 years before moving to NYC. I have not lived in Atlanta since 2009; however, I return every year to see my family who still live there. It’s changed a lot, the movie industry was not there when I left, and in my song titled “Atlanta,” the first song on my upcoming album Little Victory, I talk about my journey from Atlanta to New York and now Nashville with a longing for my hometown and noticing how much the city has changed.

I moved to Nashville to pursue a career in music, hearing it was a land full of songwriters. The things I really like about Nashville are the people and culture here. There are really great moralistic people here and I am thankful for that as it’s a safe great place to live. Nashville is like going to college in the music industry – people in all stages of their careers are here and many are willing to collaborate. I would not be where I am today if not for Nashville.

What are some of your musical inspirations? Can you name a few people that have inspired you or who continue to inspire you?

Aside from mainstream pop artists like Britney Spears, George Michael, NSYNC, Michael Jackson, Robyn, Prince, Mariah Carey, the real-life connections that have influenced my career include Parson James (vocalist on Kygo’s “Stole the Show”) who is one of the first people I wrote music with. We met in NYC in 2013, I followed him to Los Angeles to write with him and moved to Nashville prompted by advice from his then-manager who thought I sounded like a Country artist.

Roger Murrah (BMI Songwriter of the Decade and writer of several Country music #1s) is one of the first people I met when I moved to Nashville. At the time I was still learning how to write songs, so I watched him work in several sessions and I began to understand how to write the way he did.

Scot Sax (Grammy-winning songwriter for Tim McGraw/Faith Hill’s “Like We Never Loved At All”) is another person who was very influential on my songwriting journey – he taught me how the B52s recorded “Love Shack” in a go-as-you-flow style recording their ideas on the spot to build the song.

Aside from these few names, I have been in over 300 songwriting sessions, and I’ve traveled writing music in Europe (Berlin, Stockholm, Copenhagen, Malmo, London, Amsterdam), New York and Los Angeles. Everyone along the way has taught me something, a new trick or technique to writing music or producing music and I’m thankful for everyone who has worked with me.

As a songwriter, how do you come up with themes? Is your music based on an isolated experience or a chapter of your life?

I keep an ongoing note on my phone called Songwriting Ideas so that whenever I get an idea for a song I write it down there. I then bring these ideas into songwriting sessions to get something started. Sometimes I get a melody (occasionally during a dream) and record these on my phone, using it as another tool to get songs started.

In 2018 music publicist, Lyndie Wenner asked me what my most popular social media posts were – to which I replied: shirtless photos of myself. So she told me I needed to write a song called “Shirtless” and I did, releasing that song in 2019. This conversation with Lyndie changed the way I wrote songs. Before I was writing broader subjects, and after I began to write more about the things I saw my audience interested in. I still observe that the things I write about center around one of 4 themes: 1. God and my faith; 2. Love lost of found; 3. Partying and dancing, of 4. Overcoming addictions.

Another influential person in my songwriting career is PollyAnna (Dutch pop/EDM vocalist, songwriter of Paris Hilton’s new song “I Blame You”). I spent a summer writing with her in Nashville, Los Angeles and Berlin and  I observed her taking random phrases we said in conversations and writing them down for future songwriting materials. I now do the same, whenever something unusual is said in a conversation. PollyAnna and I wrote a song together in Berlin called “Without You, I Feel Good”, which has now been signed to Soave Records, produced by a DJ named Nexeri, and coming out on February 26, 2021.

What words of wisdom would you offer an emerging artist who is trying to break into the business?

The words “If you build it they will come” from the great baseball movie Field of Dreams, is a motto that holds a strong place in my mind regarding my strategy to release music and gradually having people discover your work. I have a business model of writing songs and selling them to DJ/producers and I think this is a great move for up-and-coming singers to build a name for themselves.

My first job after college (post-Real World) was a sales job that required reaching out to 100 potential customers every day with the expectation that between 1-10 would buy something – I now use this strategy in my music career in so many facets and find the same results.

Is there anything you would like to speak about that we didn’t already touch on? What can your fans look forward to?

2020 was set to have me perform in Germany, Boston, Chicago, Palm Springs, North Carolina but the shows were of course canceled due to the pandemic. I look forward to getting back to touring though and to meet more people who have been asking when I will be in their city. I have been spending the last year working on new music with DJs, finally releasing the sophomore album that I have been alluding to and even developing an idea for a third project of which some of the songs are ready 🙂

Little Victory is an upcoming single/video that you’re pushing. It’s an extremely inspirational piece of work about someone feeling like a fish out of water. What prompted such a piece?

I wrote “Little Victory” after returning from Israel where I had met and was at the time long-distance dating Israeli singer-songwriter Elhay Cohen, the song idea came from my co-writer: female Canadian producer and songwriter Robyn Dell’Unto. December 2020 French DJ RetroVision released a version of this song on Don Diablo’s record label Hexagon and the original version is going on my forthcoming album of the same name.

Retrovision, Davis Mallory – Little Victory 

Little Victory Music Video 

Little Victory single 

Pre-Save for the album Little Victory

Here is a private SoundCloud tracklisting for the “Little Victory” album:

  1. Atlanta –a song I wrote about my hometown, my journey to NYC and Nashville to pursue music – with nostalgia for Atlanta – the city where I had my first heartbreak and how much the city has changed since I left (it’s now a film industry).
  2. Ain’t Afraid – features a big name in the EDM industry Luma (Seven Lions, Nurko, Zack Martino) – who I co-wrote the song with – it’s about not being afraid to fall in love
  3. Little Victory– co-written with and produced by female Canadian artist Robyn Dell’Unto – a remix of this song made by French artist RetroVision released on Don Diablo’s label Hexagon. “Little Victory” is about a summer romance with my Israeli ex who I met after I opened for Eurovision winner Netta who told me I had to visit Israel.
  4. Fire Signs – features Miss Audrey the Katy Perry-inspired Best Pop Artist at the Nashville Industry Music Awards, I wrote this song in Sweden about zodiac chemistry compatibility – I’m a Leo and Miss Audrey an Aries, we’re both Fire Signs.
  5. Shirtless– this is a new Countrified mix of the song that aired on MTV’s War of the Worlds and became the theme song for men’s swimwear line: Poolboy
  6. Heavy – features an all LGBTQ identifying cast – with vocalist Blake Leider and rapper Daisha McBride – discusses why relationships have to be so heavy, produced by Danish Aren Anderson and Ukrainian Depdramez.
  7. Can You Tell Me?– produced by Canadian artist BLEM and written in Berlin with Vincent Stefansson and Valentin Glage – “Can You Tell Me?” is about being ghosted. Where does all the love go in this modern era when two people separate and the romance suddenly dies.
  8. Say You Hate Me– written in Sweden the same week as “Fire Signs” “Shirtless” and previously released single “Jane Fonda” – “Say You Hate Me” is a very Britney Spears/NSYNC-style Swedish pop song co-written with and produced by Magnus Funemyr about a relationship that has grown stale.
  9. Sink or Swim – with references to Madonna, Beyonce’s “hot sauce,” and Whitney Houston’s “receipts” – “Sink or Swim” is about a cheating partner and the end of a relationship, produced by Option A. Music video coming by Russian filmmaker Dmitry Zhitov.
  10. Forget You– co-written with Nashville female EDM vocalists Notelle & Luma, produced by artist Swiss DJ FENOX – “Forget You” is about the end of a relationship and having a hard time letting go of the memories.
  11. Broken Dreams– this unreleased version by Ukrainian producer Depdramez – was co-written with pop artist Drew Schueler – tells the story of all the hard work artists put into chasing their dreams of stardom.
  12. Faith – written in 2020 at the start of this pandemic with American Idol contestant Madeline Finn, “Faith” is an uplifting anthem giving hope for all to not lose their faith in these trying times, produced by Austrian producer Jakob Koller.

The music video for Can You Tell Me?” is scheduled to release on 2/19/2021

tech illustration by sara davidson for use by 360 Magazine

MasterClass × Queer Eye’s Tan France Teach Style

MasterClass, the streaming platform that makes it possible for anyone to learn from the best, announced today that esteemed fashion designer, television personality, and author Tan France will teach a class on style for everyone. France will teach members confidence-boosting tips and tricks to discover their own personal style.

VIEW NEW TRAILER HERE

Now available at MasterClass.com, members can subscribe for unlimited access to all new and existing 85+ classes through the All-Access Pass. MasterClass categories include business, culinary arts, film & television, music & entertainment, photography, sports and more.

“[France’s] mastery lies in his ability to transform people’s lives through personal style, self-discovery, and confidence,” said David Rogier, co-founder and CEO of MasterClass. “His MasterClass peels back the curtain on his process and offers practical tips for members to come away feeling inspired to find and develop their own style to feel like the best version of themselves.”

France started his career working for some of the world’s leading brands before launching his own successful women’s clothing company, Kingdom & State. Best known for his role as fashion expert for the Netflix series Queer Eye, he became one of the first openly gay Muslim and South Asian men on a mainstream television program. France is also the host of the digital series Dressing Funny, where he styles some of the world’s most popular comedians. In 2019, France released his memoir, Naturally Tan, which became a New York Times bestseller in Hardcover Nonfiction and a Sunday Times bestseller in the U.K. France resides in Salt Lake City, Utah, with his husband, Rob France.

“An investment in style is an investment in yourself and your happiness,” said France. “I’m excited to help members find their own confidence by looking into their closet and discovering who they want to be and how they want to feel. It’s different from anything I’ve ever done before.”

For members who are just beginning to approach style for the first time or those who feel stuck in a style rut, France’s MasterClass offers practical tips on how to find and develop their own personal style to feel like the best versions of themselves. Drawing from his experience styling on and off camera for the past 20 years, France dives into the fundamentals of style focusing on two easy-to-follow rules⁠—knowing proportions and knowing yourself. Building on the foundational tools of proportion and fit, he also explores how to create a capsule wardrobe and how to confidently mix and match color, pattern, and texture. Members will learn practical lessons on how to shop for clothes, dress for work, and navigate fashion trends as well as get a behind-the-scenes look at how France works his transformational magic on Queer Eye. Through simple, straightforward guidelines, members will leave feeling inspired to find the most stylish, confident version of themselves.

France’s MasterClass joins the 85+ classes taught by world-renowned instructors on culinary arts, photography, writing, performance, and much more. Each MasterClass has digestible video lessons sized to fit into any part of your day and cinematic visuals with close-up, hands-on demonstrations that make you feel one-on-one with the instructor. The All-Access Pass gives you access to every MasterClass and new ones as they launch. Learn on the go with mobile apps or in the comfort of your home with Apple TV®, Amazon Fire TV, Android TV and Roku® devices. Subscribe to greatness at MasterClass.com.

ABOUT MASTERCLASS:

Founded in 2015, MasterClass is the streaming platform that makes it possible for anyone to learn from the best. With MasterClass, step into Kelly Wearstler’s design studio, Ron Finley’s garden, and Neil Gaiman’s writing retreat. Improve your serve with Serena Williams, perfect your pitch with Shonda Rhimes, and leave the atmosphere with Chris Hadfield. Hundreds of classes from 85+ of today’s most brilliant minds are available anytime, anywhere, on iOS, Android, desktop, Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV, Android TV, and Roku devices with the All-Access Pass ($180/year). Subscribe to greatness with MasterClass.

MasterClass’s current roster of courses includes:

Business, Politics & Society: Jane Goodall (conservation), Bob Woodward (investigative journalism), Karl Rove and David Axelrod (political campaign strategy), Paul Krugman (economics and society), Howard Schultz (business leadership), Anna Wintour (creativity and leadership), Sara Blakely (self-made entrepreneurship), Bob Iger (strategy and leadership), Doris Kearns Goodwin (U.S. presidential history and leadership), Chris Voss (art of negotiation), Goodby and Silverstein (advertising and creativity), RuPaul (self-expression and authenticity), Robin Roberts (effective and authentic communication)

Culinary Arts: Gordon Ramsay (cooking), Alice Waters (home cooking), Thomas Keller (cooking techniques), Wolfgang Puck (cooking), Dominique Ansel (French pastry), James Suckling (wine appreciation), Aaron Franklin (Texas BBQ), Massimo Bottura (Italian cooking), Gabriela Cámara (Mexican cooking), Lynnette Marrero and Ryan Chetiyawardana (mixology), Ron Finley (gardening)

Film & TV: Werner Herzog (filmmaking), Martin Scorsese (filmmaking), Ron Howard (directing), Spike Lee (filmmaking), Mira Nair (independent filmmaking), Jodie Foster (filmmaking), Ken Burns (documentary filmmaking), Helen Mirren (acting), Samuel L. Jackson (acting), Judd Apatow (comedy), Aaron Sorkin (screenwriting), Natalie Portman (acting), David Lynch (creativity and filmmaking)

Lifestyle: Bobbi Brown (makeup and beauty), Kelly Wearstler (interior design), Brandon McMillan (dog training), Tan France (style)

Music & Entertainment: Steve Martin (comedy), Christina Aguilera (singing), Usher (performance), Reba McEntire (country music), Herbie Hancock (jazz), Deadmau5 (music production), Armin van Buuren (dance music), Hans Zimmer (film scoring), Tom Morello (electric guitar), Carlos Santana (art and soul of guitar), Timbaland (producing and beatmaking), Penn & Teller (magic), Itzhak Perlman (violin), Danny Elfman (music for film), Sheila E. (drumming and percussion), Jake Shimabukuro (ukulele)

Writing: James Patterson (writing), Shonda Rhimes (writing for television), David Mamet (dramatic writing), Judy Blume (writing), Malcolm Gladwell (writing), R.L. Stine (writing for young audiences), Margaret Atwood (creative writing), Dan Brown (writing thrillers), Neil Gaiman (storytelling), Billy Collins (poetry), David Baldacci (writing thrillers), Joyce Carol Oates (short story writing), David Sedaris (storytelling and humor)

Design, Photography & Fashion: Frank Gehry (architecture), Diane von Furstenberg (how to build a fashion brand), Annie Leibovitz (photography), Marc Jacobs (fashion design), Jimmy Chin (adventure photography), Will Wright (game design)

Sports & Games: Serena Williams (tennis), Stephen Curry (shooting, ball-handling, and scoring), Garry Kasparov (chess), Daniel Negreanu (poker), Phil Ivey (poker strategy), Simone Biles (gymnastics), Misty Copeland (ballet), Tony Hawk (skateboarding)

Science & Technology: Chris Hadfield (space exploration), Neil deGrasse Tyson (scientific thinking and communication)

For more information, please visit www.masterclass.com.

RuPaul & Isaac Mizrahi

Isaac Mizrahi is packing up his sewing kit, rolling up his tape measure, and heading to DragCon NYC for an exclusive conversation with supermodel of the world RuPaul. The second installation in RuPaul’s “RuTalks” series will feature the iconic American designer as the duo discusses fashion, politics, and drag, ahead of the release of Isaac’s autobiography I.M.: A Memoir.

RUTALKS: ISAAC MIZRAHI
DragCon NYC’s 2018 RuTalks series continues with a one on one conversation with legendary fashion designer, television personality, and author with a forthcoming book, I.M.: A Memoir out February 26, Isaac Mizrahi. Join Ru and Isaac as they sit down to discuss everything from fashion to politics to, of course, drag. Panel will take place on Saturday at 5pm at the convention.
WHEN: Saturday, September 29 at 5:00PM

Buy tickets here: http://rupaulsdragcon.com/