Posts tagged with "alcohol abuse"

Law article illustration designed by Allison Christensen for 360 MAGAZINE

How to Control Your Alcohol Intake and Drive More Responsibly

The next time someone says, ‘Fancy a couple of coldies?’ Take a moment before answering yes. Will you be driving after?

The legal BAC limit for driving in Australia is 0.5%, lower than many countries but still not enough for curbing road fatalities.

How does drink driving affect us?

According to Australia’s peak road transport and traffic agency, Austroads, the country sees 200 deaths annually due to drunk driving. This figure constitutes 18% of all deaths on the roads. Of course, this is accompanied by thousands of injury cases.

The national consensus is still debating on lowering the BAC limit to zero, along with other measures such as more roadside random tests, immediate licence suspension, increasing alcohol prices, and improving support for alcohol-dependent drivers.

What should you do?

Understand that the risks of drinking and driving are quite high. It can lead to accidents and serious harm, embarrassments, and health problems later in life. 

Better still, learn how to control your alcohol intake and drive more responsibly. Here are some simple steps on how to do that.

1. Know your limit

The Australian Guidelines on drinking alcohol state that a healthy person should not drink more than 10 standard drinks a week and/or 4 standard drinks a day. Of course, the amount of alcohol you can handle depends on your age, weight, gender, and mood too. If you aren’t aware of your limit, follow the ‘less is more’ policy.

2. Controlled assessment helps

Assessing your alcohol intake will show how much you drink daily, and when exactly things tend to get out of hand. You can further control this by avoiding situations that trigger drinking, purchasing less alcohol amounts, etc. This will also help you to calculate your safe limit. 

3. Remember to eat and pause

It’s always a good idea to eat before and also while you drink. Empty stomach allows the alcohol to hit the bloodstream faster. A full stomach will also control your alcohol intake. Pace yourself and pause to count your drinks and also, take regular sips of water in between.

4. Plan your journey back home

Even when you drink below the BAC limit, alcohol still impairs senses. Driving responsible after drinks is most fruitful when a sober friend can drive you back, or give a ride. Opt for public transportation. Or better still, leave the car at home to avoid temptation.

5. Don’t fall for peer pressure

There is no obligation to keep up with friends or other company in terms of drinking. Stay clear of drinking games, situations, and people who encourage binge drinking. 

6. Be proactive about alcohol control

Learn to say, ‘No’. Don’t drink and drive yourself, and neither let anyone else do it. If you find it hard to control your drinking, be ready to accept that there might be a problem. In that case, consider seeking help. It’s better than living with the possibility of harm.

The law should be strict but sometimes there is also a need for support. Specialized law firms such as Astor Legal understands this and can help you reduce your fines, disqualification periods, and even help you avoid imprisonment. 

QxA Davis Mallory

By Vaughn Lowery and Hannah DiPilato

Davis Mallory from MTV’s The Real World, discusses his struggle with alcoholism as well as how far he has come in his career. 

360 Magazine recently had the opportunity to sit down with Davis Mallory, a contestant from The Real World on MTV. He is now pursuing a music career while educating others about alcoholism. As an openly gay Christian, he hoped to share his story with others as a television personality as well as a musician. 

What was it like being on MTV’s The Real World Season 18? Any regrets? Do you still stay in contact with other cast members?

I was a senior in college, 21-years-old, when I auditioned for and was cast on MTV’s 18th season of the Real World, located in Denver Colorado. I was a fan of the show and had just come out of the closet to my classmates that summer. I felt that I had an interesting story to tell – being a Christian and openly gay was not something I had not seen on TV before – and I wanted to prove you could be both, while also showcasing a more masculine image of homosexuality than was often shown on TV.

Immediately after the show ended I flew around to colleges in the USA discussing and often debating Biblical professors in front of a student body; dissecting Bible verses and their interpretations on homosexuality. My grandfather James Davis Mallory JR (whom I’m named after) is a Christian author and psychiatrist – and so I was raised very orthodox – Southern Baptist. I found this time to be very rewarding and something I’m proud of – to date I still receive messages from viewers of the show expressing their gratitude for my story on The Real World.

I of course have regrets during my time on the show – I think most people who have done that show in their 20s will tell you they regret things they did or said. We were all heavily fed alcohol which created chaos, confusion, fights and hookups. I’m still close with several cast members, two of them live in Nashville so I see them most often. Tori Hall, who was on Road Rules and married Brad Fiorenza (I attended their wedding) and Brooke Labarbera, who was on my season of the Real World are two people I remain close with and I spent much of this summer 2020 with both of them!

What led up to you having an issue with drugs and alcohol? How’s life after sobriety? Are there any triggers that make it difficult to remain sober?

When I was younger (before trying alcohol) my mother told me to NEVER drink, instead of teaching me how to drink. This was because my parent’s divorce was caused in part by my father’s alcoholism. When I went off to college, I got drunk for the first time and I quickly progressed into blacking out when I drank. I would sometimes wake up the next morning and hearing stories from my friends about stupid things I said or did the night before. I tried to get that under control by lowering the amount of alcohol I drank and by not drinking hard alcohol.

I went through many chapters of my life taking breaks from drinking and reducing my alcohol intake. My father has now been completely sober for over a decade and his example is a big inspiration in my own decision to completely quit drinking. I’ve now been sober for 4 years. After reaching my 1-year mark of sobriety I had a big regret – that I hadn’t quit earlier. I felt so much better – I looked so much better and I just wished I had fully quit earlier in my life.

Thankfully, perhaps due to God or just growing up, I have ZERO temptation to drink anymore. I’m constantly reminded why I quit when I see other people’s struggles with alcohol. I have seen people wheeled off in an ambulance with alcohol poisoning, I’ve had close friends die from alcohol poisoning, a friend’s mother recently did; another close friend died from an overdose of drugs mixed with fentanyl recently. These everyday reminders keep me sober.

I really wish our society didn’t glorify drinking in movies/commercials/music, because the downfall from alcohol is not being taught to children: accidentally death, liver disease, the fighting it causes, relationships ruined, horrible, absent or addicted parents, job losses, physical damage it does to our bodies and faces are never shown in these alcohol commercials.

What was it like growing up with an uncle who had access to major recording artists like Wynonna Judd? Did that experience help shape you into the artist you are today? If so, how?

My uncle Chaz managed pop artist Amy Grant for many years and still manages Christian recording artist Michael W. Smith. My uncle John Mallory wrote songs for artists Wynonna Judd, Sixpence None the Richer, Ty Herndon and more. I  grew up in the music industry, attending a lot of these artist’s concerts and meeting them – I spent summers on Amy Grant’s farm in Nashville – I was a huge fan of her and Michael W. Smith.

As a kid I dreamt of being a singer and wanted to have careers like theirs – my positive message songs “Faith,” “Not That Far Away” “Lost” and “Somebody’s Watching” are examples of songs influenced by Amy & Michael’s music. I did not expect to become a songwriter. How songs were written was a mystery as a kid – I knew singers sang them but didn’t know how they were created. When I started out on this journey to becoming a recording artist I had to watch and learn from others in numerous songwriting sessions until I really got the hang of doing it myself.

During your first year in Nashville, one of your former cast members (Diem Brown) passed away from cancer. How did their loss impact your life at the time?

Diem Brown passed away in 2014 – I moved to Nashville at the end end of 2013 – so I had just started my journey into songwriting. My first original released song is titled “Beautiful Girl’s (Diem’s Song)”, a song I wrote about Diem with award-winning songwriters Ben Goldsmith and Tori Tullier. The song debuted in People Magazine, where Diem was a news reporter and received press in E! News, US Weekly and more outlets.

Diem and I grew up in nearby parts of Georgia (I’m from Marietta, she’s from Roswell – just 15 min away) although we did not meet until we did the show. Diem was a sorority sister with my mother’s best friend’s daughter, Carly Hartwick, who first introduced us over email prior to our meeting in person for the first time when Diem and I did an MTV Challenge together: The Duel II in New Zealand.

Diem and I gave a school speech together where she shared wisdom on pursuing one’s career goals by interviewing those with the same job, Diem becoming a News Anchor where she met her idol Katie Couric to ask questions on how to get to Katie’s place in life. Diem’s speech really inspired me as I chased after my own career dreams in music, so when she lost her battle to cancer I was deeply saddened and wrote the song to memorialize her through music. Her sisters’ often use the song on the anniversary of her death, which I’m always touched to see.

You grew up in Atlanta but now reside in Nashville. Do you prefer one city over the other? If so why?

I was born in Atlanta and raised in a suburb of Atlanta called Marietta. After attending college in Florida at Stetson University, I returned to Atlanta for 2 years before moving to NYC. I have not lived in Atlanta since 2009; however, I return every year to see my family who still live there. It’s changed a lot, the movie industry was not there when I left, and in my song titled “Atlanta,” the first song on my upcoming album Little Victory, I talk about my journey from Atlanta to New York and now Nashville with a longing for my hometown and noticing how much the city has changed.

I moved to Nashville to pursue a career in music, hearing it was a land full of songwriters. The things I really like about Nashville are the people and culture here. There are really great moralistic people here and I am thankful for that as it’s a safe great place to live. Nashville is like going to college in the music industry – people in all stages of their careers are here and many are willing to collaborate. I would not be where I am today if not for Nashville.

What are some of your musical inspirations? Can you name a few people that have inspired you or who continue to inspire you?

Aside from mainstream pop artists like Britney Spears, George Michael, NSYNC, Michael Jackson, Robyn, Prince, Mariah Carey, the real-life connections that have influenced my career include Parson James (vocalist on Kygo’s “Stole the Show”) who is one of the first people I wrote music with. We met in NYC in 2013, I followed him to Los Angeles to write with him and moved to Nashville prompted by advice from his then-manager who thought I sounded like a Country artist.

Roger Murrah (BMI Songwriter of the Decade and writer of several Country music #1s) is one of the first people I met when I moved to Nashville. At the time I was still learning how to write songs, so I watched him work in several sessions and I began to understand how to write the way he did.

Scot Sax (Grammy-winning songwriter for Tim McGraw/Faith Hill’s “Like We Never Loved At All”) is another person who was very influential on my songwriting journey – he taught me how the B52s recorded “Love Shack” in a go-as-you-flow style recording their ideas on the spot to build the song.

Aside from these few names, I have been in over 300 songwriting sessions, and I’ve traveled writing music in Europe (Berlin, Stockholm, Copenhagen, Malmo, London, Amsterdam), New York and Los Angeles. Everyone along the way has taught me something, a new trick or technique to writing music or producing music and I’m thankful for everyone who has worked with me.

As a songwriter, how do you come up with themes? Is your music based on an isolated experience or a chapter of your life?

I keep an ongoing note on my phone called Songwriting Ideas so that whenever I get an idea for a song I write it down there. I then bring these ideas into songwriting sessions to get something started. Sometimes I get a melody (occasionally during a dream) and record these on my phone, using it as another tool to get songs started.

In 2018 music publicist, Lyndie Wenner asked me what my most popular social media posts were – to which I replied: shirtless photos of myself. So she told me I needed to write a song called “Shirtless” and I did, releasing that song in 2019. This conversation with Lyndie changed the way I wrote songs. Before I was writing broader subjects, and after I began to write more about the things I saw my audience interested in. I still observe that the things I write about center around one of 4 themes: 1. God and my faith; 2. Love lost of found; 3. Partying and dancing, of 4. Overcoming addictions.

Another influential person in my songwriting career is PollyAnna (Dutch pop/EDM vocalist, songwriter of Paris Hilton’s new song “I Blame You”). I spent a summer writing with her in Nashville, Los Angeles and Berlin and  I observed her taking random phrases we said in conversations and writing them down for future songwriting materials. I now do the same, whenever something unusual is said in a conversation. PollyAnna and I wrote a song together in Berlin called “Without You, I Feel Good”, which has now been signed to Soave Records, produced by a DJ named Nexeri, and coming out on February 26, 2021.

What words of wisdom would you offer an emerging artist who is trying to break into the business?

The words “If you build it they will come” from the great baseball movie Field of Dreams, is a motto that holds a strong place in my mind regarding my strategy to release music and gradually having people discover your work. I have a business model of writing songs and selling them to DJ/producers and I think this is a great move for up-and-coming singers to build a name for themselves.

My first job after college (post-Real World) was a sales job that required reaching out to 100 potential customers every day with the expectation that between 1-10 would buy something – I now use this strategy in my music career in so many facets and find the same results.

Is there anything you would like to speak about that we didn’t already touch on? What can your fans look forward to?

2020 was set to have me perform in Germany, Boston, Chicago, Palm Springs, North Carolina but the shows were of course canceled due to the pandemic. I look forward to getting back to touring though and to meet more people who have been asking when I will be in their city. I have been spending the last year working on new music with DJs, finally releasing the sophomore album that I have been alluding to and even developing an idea for a third project of which some of the songs are ready 🙂

Little Victory is an upcoming single/video that you’re pushing. It’s an extremely inspirational piece of work about someone feeling like a fish out of water. What prompted such a piece?

I wrote “Little Victory” after returning from Israel where I had met and was at the time long-distance dating Israeli singer-songwriter Elhay Cohen, the song idea came from my co-writer: female Canadian producer and songwriter Robyn Dell’Unto. December 2020 French DJ RetroVision released a version of this song on Don Diablo’s record label Hexagon and the original version is going on my forthcoming album of the same name.

Retrovision, Davis Mallory – Little Victory 

Little Victory Music Video 

Little Victory single 

Pre-Save for the album Little Victory

Here is a private SoundCloud tracklisting for the “Little Victory” album:

  1. Atlanta –a song I wrote about my hometown, my journey to NYC and Nashville to pursue music – with nostalgia for Atlanta – the city where I had my first heartbreak and how much the city has changed since I left (it’s now a film industry).
  2. Ain’t Afraid – features a big name in the EDM industry Luma (Seven Lions, Nurko, Zack Martino) – who I co-wrote the song with – it’s about not being afraid to fall in love
  3. Little Victory– co-written with and produced by female Canadian artist Robyn Dell’Unto – a remix of this song made by French artist RetroVision released on Don Diablo’s label Hexagon. “Little Victory” is about a summer romance with my Israeli ex who I met after I opened for Eurovision winner Netta who told me I had to visit Israel.
  4. Fire Signs – features Miss Audrey the Katy Perry-inspired Best Pop Artist at the Nashville Industry Music Awards, I wrote this song in Sweden about zodiac chemistry compatibility – I’m a Leo and Miss Audrey an Aries, we’re both Fire Signs.
  5. Shirtless– this is a new Countrified mix of the song that aired on MTV’s War of the Worlds and became the theme song for men’s swimwear line: Poolboy
  6. Heavy – features an all LGBTQ identifying cast – with vocalist Blake Leider and rapper Daisha McBride – discusses why relationships have to be so heavy, produced by Danish Aren Anderson and Ukrainian Depdramez.
  7. Can You Tell Me?– produced by Canadian artist BLEM and written in Berlin with Vincent Stefansson and Valentin Glage – “Can You Tell Me?” is about being ghosted. Where does all the love go in this modern era when two people separate and the romance suddenly dies.
  8. Say You Hate Me– written in Sweden the same week as “Fire Signs” “Shirtless” and previously released single “Jane Fonda” – “Say You Hate Me” is a very Britney Spears/NSYNC-style Swedish pop song co-written with and produced by Magnus Funemyr about a relationship that has grown stale.
  9. Sink or Swim – with references to Madonna, Beyonce’s “hot sauce,” and Whitney Houston’s “receipts” – “Sink or Swim” is about a cheating partner and the end of a relationship, produced by Option A. Music video coming by Russian filmmaker Dmitry Zhitov.
  10. Forget You– co-written with Nashville female EDM vocalists Notelle & Luma, produced by artist Swiss DJ FENOX – “Forget You” is about the end of a relationship and having a hard time letting go of the memories.
  11. Broken Dreams– this unreleased version by Ukrainian producer Depdramez – was co-written with pop artist Drew Schueler – tells the story of all the hard work artists put into chasing their dreams of stardom.
  12. Faith – written in 2020 at the start of this pandemic with American Idol contestant Madeline Finn, “Faith” is an uplifting anthem giving hope for all to not lose their faith in these trying times, produced by Austrian producer Jakob Koller.

The music video for Can You Tell Me?” is scheduled to release on 2/19/2021

THANKS AMY

By Althea Champion

By the time of Amy Winehouse’s death in 2011, the death itself was no shock. Today, more than nine years after her death, people still wallow in the sorrow it brought and celebrate the birthday of a legend.

In the weeks leading up to her death, her antics were well-documented. She developed tumultuous relationships with rehab facilities that she entered and exited frequently, engaged in fights, and attracted unwanted attention from the press.

Winehouse insisted that she came by her popularity honestly.

“I don’t write a song and think, ‘oh, a million people will hear this,'” she told E! News in 2007. “I write a song because I need to make sense of why I do certain things.”

And the public loved it. Winehouse relished in her pain and imperfection, sporting big boobs, thick eyeliner, and a mane of hair that stood in contradiction to the rest of her small frame—but it undeniably worked.

Her fame began with the debut of Frank, a 2003 album that garnered acclamation from critics and others in the U.K. That success was followed by the infamous Back to Black album in 2006, known most well by Rehab, which shot her to Grammy-winner status, despite her inability to physically accept the awards in 2008; she couldn’t secure a visa in time.

Her talent was undeniable. Her sultry voice, embellished by a darling rasp, captivated her audience and made her a star. The musical contributions she gifted the world are still sung today from rooftops—now, with indisputable irony.

During 2010, she was singing, performing, and alternating between sobriety and heavy drinking. In Jan. 2011, she had a seizure that she allegedly had no recollection of. And for the rest of 2011, until her death in July, she alternated between hospitals, rehabilitation clinics, and her apartment.

Then on July 23rd, she was found dead by her security guard, Andrew Morris, accompanied by three empty vodka bottles.

On the day of her tragic death, stars like Lady Gaga, Adele, Rihanna, Tony Bennett, and Kelly Clarkson paid tribute to the singer, expressing their grief on social media. Today, a Winehouse birthday does not pass by without someone noticing. On what would have been her 37th birthday, the same occurred.

Famous figures like Patti Smith, Lady Gaga, and Nas took to social media, expressing how they missed the icon, and commemorating the gift she gave to everyone, despite herself.

Like the rockstars who preceded her, she lives on in the hearts and ears of many, reminding us to be proud of who we are.

If you or a loved one is struggling with alcohol abuse, visit this link or call this number: (877) 373-4513

Illustration, drinking, 360 MAGAZINE

Coronavirus and Alcohol: What Are People Drinking During the Outbreak?

Crazy times. Surreal. Uncertainty. These are some ways we describe the Coronavirus outbreak and the consequences. But what about…

What we’re drinking and how that has changed.

According to Seriouslysmoked.com, a cooking and BBQ website compiled more than 200,000 tweets from the last 30 days and analyzed their contents using keywords, phrases, and hashtags.

Their findings will surprise you.

Surge in Sales

Perhaps the scars of Prohibition still run deep. An overriding theme in the collected data was panic buying and stockpiling. The figures tell a dramatic story.

Alcohol sales ending the week of March 21 surged 55 percent.

Teasing those numbers reveals some shocking but not altogether unpredictable trends that SeriouslySmoked.com noted.

The volume of 1.75 liter-sized bottles sold increased dramatically.

Cheaper and more affordable brands saw significant upticks.

Half-bottles and luxury brands, not so much.

The latter makes sense given the uncertain economic situation. Many who didn’t have a liquor budget are probably reconsidering it now.

However, it’s essential to put these data in perspective. Many restaurants aren’t open for dine-in customers. The wine you’d enjoy with your steak entree, you’re now consuming at home. That’s evident when you look at the meteoric rise of online sales.

Wine.com, for example, saw a 200 percent increase during this same time.

What Else Are People Buying—or Not Buying?

SeriouslySmoked.com uncovered some other trends that the industry statistics support. Unlike in Europe, Americans reserve their sparklers for celebrations. The pandemic has hit that continent hard too. 

Consequently, Champagne says have taken a nosedive.

However, it’s probably not too much of a stretch to guess that Champagne will recover just fine when we all start painting the town red when all of this is behind us.

Interestingly, alcohol products that have seen slow declines are now enjoying something of a comeback, such as port and other fortified spirits.

Tequila and gin have also seen sales spikes, but that’s not all. Canned and packaged beverages are enjoying a similar surge.

Canned wine, for example, wasn’t a serious thing in the beginning. Now, with the outbreak, think again. The situation is fueling sales that rival its rise in popularity over recent years.

Boxed wine?

Yup. And probably for many of the same reasons of economy and getting more for your buck.

What else has changed?

The Industry Reinvents Itself

The unprecedented events have spurred many forces in the industry to reinvent themselves in innovative ways…

Restaurants and bars are sharing cocktail recipes as acts of solidarity to get through the crisis. Some are holding virtual tastings. We’re having virtual happy hours out of our homes.

Individuals are also reaching out to their favorite wineries and joining wine clubs in droves.

That’s especially significant given that most tasting rooms are closed. Cancellations of wine tours continue to grow with an uncertain future. The looming collapse of the summer tourist season weighs heavily on countless wineries.

Napa Valley visitor traffic brings $2.23 billion to the economy, according to the 2018 Economic Impact Report.

Luckily, e-commerce sales are surging with direct-to-consumer purchases, as SeriouslySmoked.com discovered too. Early figures show that online traffic has exceeded pre-pandemic volumes in some cases.

So there is hope that the industry will recover. But then what will happen?

Lingering Questions

The fact remains that the road ahead is uncertain, but likely has lots of twists and turns along its path. The questions that the industry and consumers ponder loom large.

Will wineries, breweries, and distilleries recover?

Will restaurants and bars open their doors again?

What is the future of online sales and its impact on brick-and-mortar stores?

One thing is clear from the data collected by SeriouslySmoked.com. Everyone is living in the moment. It’s hard to plan because the situation literally changes every day.

There are also some good takeaway messages from the responses of consumers and the industry.

We are supporting each other in a myriad of ways. The prospect of our favorite watering hole closing or hole-in-the-wall restaurant forever has given us pause.

Sure, we’ve adapted. The industry will survive too. It just might look a bit different on the other side. In the meantime, enjoy that new tipple that you’ve discovered. And support your local businesses.

summer drinking

Six Ways to Cut Down on Alcohol

by Tara Yombor, LMHC and clinical director at Pathway to Hope, a Delphi Behavioral Health Group facility.

Social (moderate) drinking, binge drinking, alcoholism, tolerance, and dependence. This is the typical pattern of progression for drinking that leads someone to think of him or herself as needing to cut down on alcohol. Some might think they are prone to alcoholism. Within that progression, the time for someone to cut down on drinking is based on the individual’s idea of what is causing dysfunction and unmanageability in their life.

Why is it so easy for someone to become addicted to alcohol, and what does it mean to have
an alcohol use disorder?

First of all, alcohol does not have an adverse social stigma, which makes the dependence for it more likely, and the consumption of it more acceptable. Alcohol is typically used to celebrate happy events and sooth the sad events in life. Think about a celebration. What do most people imagine? Alcohol, champagne, and a “toast to the New Year!”

During times of mourning or stress, alcohol can be used to ease the emotional pain of a loss or as a stress reliever. Social (or moderate) drinking is seen as a normal and perfectly harmless way of socializing, relaxing, or a form of celebration.

A binge drinker is defined as a man who drinks more than four to six drinks in a two-hour period, and a woman who drinks more than four to five drinks in a two-hour period. Someone with alcohol use disorder is typically a person with a long-term addiction to alcohol. This person is typically unable to control how much they consume or when to stop drinking and spends a lot of time thinking about the next drink.

It can be easy for someone to transition from a social drinker to a binge drinker to having an
alcohol use disorder. A binge drinker is someone who has more than the above allotted
acceptable drinks in a short amount of time.

Someone who is a binge drinker or struggling with heavy alcohol use may find that people close to them begin to notice negative patterns of behavior during times of drinking. Friends and family may start to become worried about the person’s drinking patterns and negative outcomes that have begun to arise from their drinking. A person who begins to engage in
binge drinking may find themselves calling out of work the day after drinking due to a hangover; they may miss important deadlines, get into arguments with their loved ones, or lose track of daily responsibilities.

Tolerance for alcohol means that a person needs more and more alcohol to feel the desired effect than they previously would not have needed. Someone who has a pattern of binge drinking may find themselves drinking even more alcohol in a short time to feel drunk.

Once tolerance increases, the possibility of dependence increases. Dependence can be defined as relying on alcohol to avoid withdrawal symptoms. Essentially, a person is controlled by their need to ingest alcohol to feel “normal.”

During any of these stages of alcohol use, someone may feel the need to seek treatment. how to deal with withdrawal symptoms varies for each person based on how dysfunctional or unmanageable their life has become due to their drinking.

Here are six things you (or anyone) can do to cut down on alcohol. Most of these mean a change in behavior.

1. Acknowledge the problem – in order to stop the behavior, you must first acknowledge what the negative behavior is and make a conscious effort to commit to changing that behavior. Also, put the goal in writing and make a list of reasons why you want to cut back on drinking. For example, if the behavior is drinking too much during celebrations, you have to determine what “too much” means to you and, next, set a goal to decrease the amount you are drinking during celebrations.

2. Set a realistic goal for drinking alcohol – if you struggle with binge drinking, set a realistic, and achievable goal. The next time you’re out during a social event, make it a goal to cut back to three to four drinks in two hours instead of five to six. Or perhaps instead of going to a happy hour on Friday or Saturday night, pick one night to go out and stay in the other night. Cutting back by making realistic and achievable goals will keep you on track and make you feel better about the fact that you are keeping your goals.

3. Write it down – make sure to keep a journal of the times you drink, how much you drink, and any negative outcomes related to the times you drink (for example, drinking and falling down or making an inappropriate comment to a friend). By keeping a journal, you will hopefully be able to see patterns of behavior. You can also share this journal with someone you trust and ask them to look out for any patterns you may have missed.

4. Don’t keep alcohol in your house – it is easier to come home after a long day of work and pour a glass of wine rather than going out to the bar on a Wednesday when you may have other obligations at home such as taking care of a child. When you don’t have alcohol in the house, it eliminates the desire or temptation to drink.

5. Stay busy – by having non-alcohol related activities to engage in, you are more likely to say no to drinking, as you’ll want to be present for the activity. Do things that keep you active, such as riding a bike, hiking, going for a walk as the endorphins from engaging in exercise may eliminate the desire for alcohol.

6. Ask for support/Talk to someone – tell people you trust about your goals and ask them to help keep you accountable during times when you may be struggling or find yourself surrounded by temptation. Also, there are therapists who specialize in alcohol/substance use who you can talk to that can assist you with your goals and process through any underlying emotions that may be related to drinking.

Remember that the above tips may not work for everyone. Some people may be into the stage of alcohol tolerance and dependence. If you or someone you love is struggling with alcohol dependence, reach out for help from a professional or call a treatment center in your area. Alcoholism and dependence look different for everyone.

10 Ways to Monitor Your Drinking this Cinco de Mayo

1. Don’t drink on an empty stomach. Savor your meal before you start drinking an alcoholic beverage.

2. Do not overeat and Sip your drink. Enjoy your beverage.

3. Avoid binging. The definition of binging is 5 drinks or more in less than 4-5 hours.

4. Keep your consumption of drinks as low as possible – not more than 3 drinks for a man and 2 for a woman.

5. Alcoholic beverages are similar in alcohol content. One beer is equivalent to a glass of wine or a shot of liquor.

6. Find a driver. Don’t drive after drinking. It is hard to judge your blood alcohol level and its effects on your cognitive ability and reflexes.

7. If you are a diabetic or hypertensive, suffering from a heart or liver condition, take your daily medications, and check with your doctor to avoid alcohol interactions with your medications.

8. If you are going to use Tylenol, don’t exceed more than 3 grams in one day. Be aware that a lot of headache medicines or pain killers contain acetaminophen (Tylenol), so avoid accidental overdosing.

9. Don’t mix alcohol with other recreational drugs.

10. Space your beverages to allow your body the ability to metabolize what you ingested and avoid intoxication.

Savor, Sip and Space

Curated by Dr. Tarek Hassanein of Southern California Liver Centers

HOW CAN YOU GET ADDICTION TREATMENT WITHOUT INSURANCE?

One of the most critical situations in modern society is being alone in a difficult situation. What do we have to do if you found out that you are alcohol or drug addicted? Surely, the first thing to do if you cannot control yourself is to ask for help. However, sometimes it happens that you have nobody to ask for help or people, who wish to help have no possibilities.

How much does rehab cost without insurance?

Actually, there is no correct answer to this question, because different recovery programs use different techniques, different specialists work with you, they use different medicines, and there are many other different conditions, which determine the price. First, look through the types of rehab facilities to choose the one you need. They may be medical detox centers, intensive outpatient programs, holistic rehab center, partial hospitalization programs, standard outpatient treatment, etc.

To talk generally, inpatient treatment usually costs more than participation in outpatient rehabilitation programmes in Bellevue. It is evident as the inpatient treatment foresees that you live in the facility and use all the conveniences, receive food, get medical supervision. The price also depends on how long you stay in the rehab facility and what other services and amenities you require (private rooms, swimming pool, gym, massage, etc.).

One is tempted to ask the question of what to do if you have no opportunities to pay for your addiction treatment? Is that possible to get help for addiction without insurance?

Different social programs may cover your expenses for the rehabilitation programme partially or fully. First, if there are some life-threatening risks of consuming some substance, you would receive emergency treatment and regardless of whether you can pay or not. Hopefully, you will not get into such a situation.

There also exist some options for flexible payment. They may be scholarship, grant, financing, etc. It is important to note here is that cutting corners on recovery programme may turn into future problems. It is of utter importance to reclaim your health and life. The fact is that you would spend more money on drugs or alcohol if you continue succumbing to the addiction than on any rehab for people with no insurance (find more here).

Do not be too lazy to call several recovery centers and find out what conditions of payment they have. First, many treatment facilities may offer reduced treatment costs or a sliding fee scale because of the pieces of evidence that you do not make high enough income.

Secondly, there exist some non-profit organizations or foundations, which may offer you some scholarships. Usually, one of the conditions of getting a scholarship is the absence of insurance. Application for such programs may give you access to Humana rehab insurance with no existing insurance.

Thirdly, depending on your credit score, you may ask some lending institutions for providing drug or alcohol treatment without insurance. The specifications of such cooperation differ in each personal case.

Fourthly, do not be too shy to ask your friends and relatives. Sometimes they do not even know that you need this sort of help. Doctors say that involving family members into the process of recovery may make you closer and you would definitely feel more support. This may also change the views of your family on the attitude before and make it more integrated. A friend at court is better than a penny in purse.

To sum up, do not be afraid of sharing your problems. In the modern world, many people feel sympathy for those, who cannot afford treatment, so the only thing you have to do is to ask.

Author:

Jeffrey Buckley is a blogger who investigates human health issues and behaviorist anthropology. He researches substance abuse problems and the ways to overcome addictions.