Posts tagged with "Finland"

Ten European teams selected for the Helsinki Energy challenge

Ten European teams selected for Helsinki Energy Challenge

Ten teams have been selected for the final phase of the Helsinki Energy Challenge. The finalist teams highlight the international and interdisciplinary nature of the participants. They have a wide variety of proposals for how Helsinki can phase out the use of coal for heat production in the most sustainable way possible by 2029. Next, the competition is advancing into the co-creation phase.

In the 252 teams taking part in the Helsinki Energy Challenge, there were 1,528 experts and innovators from across the globe designing potential solutions to the challenge of decarbonising the heating of Helsinki.

The ten proposals selected to advance consist of a diverse set of solutions that have significant potential for further development in the coming phase. Many of the suggested solutions are also scalable to the needs of other cities. Included in the race are several wide-ranging comprehensive solutions, some of which find new ways to combine technologies that are already in use. There are also competition entries that include entirely new technologies. Among the solutions are new approaches to heat storage and transfer, waste heat utilization, energy consumption control and consumer activation. Included are also some non-technological innovations that enable the realisation of future sustainable solutions and the combination of centralised and decentralised solutions.

“I launched the Helsinki Energy Challenge to bring the world’s best talent together to consider solutions to Helsinki’s heating challenge. The competition has sparked conversation around the topic on a global scale. It has succeeded in combining wide-ranging international expertise and ambitious problem solving, and we are certain that this collision of different competences will generate new ways of thinking in the future as well. Our challenge competition has strong international support from different organizations and from several of my fellow Mayors, and we will be working together to make sure the solutions that are created are put to use as broadly as possible. Every city must do their part in the fight against global climate change,” says Mayor of Helsinki Jan Vapaavuori.

The teams are interdisciplinary and international

The teams that have advanced to the final phase are each made up of 3–20 members and together include 85 experts from a diverse set of fields. The finalists include, and are primarily made up of combinations of, start-ups, large companies, research institutes and universities, as well as international consortia made up of various companies.

The finalist teams represent excellence and a credible combination of various expertise, making them capable of elevating their competing proposals to the next level in the final phase of the competition.

The finalist teams are all European. The selected teams represent organizations from Finland, Sweden, Denmark, Great Britain, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Hungary, Austria and France. Most of the teams include experts and organizations from more than one country.

“When you consider that we received such a large number of proposals and that the competing teams included 1,528 experts from different backgrounds and countries around the world, it becomes clear that the competition includes a very wide range of different solutions. Evaluating these solutions has been more difficult than expected. However, the hard part is now behind us, and the competition is advancing to the next, even more interesting phase.Currently, the teams’ solutions are only provisional proposals, and each team will receive support and additional information to further develop their proposal in the co-creation phase. We are looking forward to seeing what the finalist teams’ final proposals will look like. They have some impressive and diverse expertise on display, so we are going in with high expectations,” says Project Director Laura Uuttu-Deschryvere.

The co-creation phase begins

The teams selected for the finals are invited to the co-creation phase, during which they will receive support for further development of their solution and additional information to enable them to tailor their idea to the context of Helsinki. At the centre of the co-creation phase is the boot camp in December.

An international panel of judges will evaluate the final competition proposals at the beginning of 2021, and the winner of the competition will be announced in March 2021. The proposals will be evaluated on the basis of their climate impact, impact on natural resources, cost impact, implementation schedule and feasibility, security of supply and capacity. The City of Helsinki has committed to openly sharing the lessons and results of the competition to allow other cities to use them in their own climate work.

Proposals submitted in the first phase of the competition included also a large variety of other ideas and concepts that did not reach the finals but which the City of Helsinki intends to highlight during the competition process too. The 252 submissions included ideas in which solving the challenge is “gamified”, new solutions for the utilization of different heat sources, new market and business models, heat storage solutions, decentralized heat production models, new technologies such as small modular reactors (SMR), and hydrogen based solutions.

Cities have a key role – the COVID-19 pandemic will not stop Helsinki’s climate work

Climate change is the biggest challenge of our time, and cities have a decisive role in mitigating it. Despite the COVID-19 pandemic, the City of Helsinki keeps investing heavily in its climate work. The climate crisis has not been cancelled and the City of Helsinki is working its way towards a carbon neutral Helsinki by 2035. At the moment, more than half of Helsinki’s direct carbon dioxide emissions originate from heating the city. This is why finding a sustainable heating solution will have a critical impact on achieving the City’s carbon neutrality goal. Currently, more than half of Helsinki’s heating energy is produced with coal, the use of which will have to stop by 2029. Helsinki wants to find long-term sustainable solutions, which is why it does not want to replace the use of coal with biomass-fired production.

Helsinki wants to find long-term sustainable solutions to heat the city in the future and to act as a platform for new and innovative solutions that also other cities around the world can benefit from. For this purpose, it opened the international Helsinki Energy Challenge competition on 27 February 2020. The competition seeks solutions through which the city can be heated sustainably in the coming decades – without coal and with as little biomass as possible. The competition’s first prize is one million euros.

Tuska Utopia combines a travel show with metal music

While music and travel industries are suffering from the lockdown and people around the globe have fewer opportunities to enjoy concerts and fulfil their wanderlust, Tuska Utopia offers a new way of experiencing both of these. The concept sees Finnish artists performing and audiences embarking on a journey to intriguing landscapes in the global home of heavy metal, from church ruins to disused gasometers.

Combining an entertaining travel show, one-of-a-kind metal concerts and state-of-the-art music video aesthetics, Tuska Utopia will receive its premiere this November. The concept is created and produced by the team behind Tuska Festival, the biggest metal festival in the Nordic region, and it takes audiences on a journey to some of the most exceptional landscapes in Finland. Each hour-long episode includes a concert, an interview with the artists and a tour of the location in the spirit of a travel show. Watch season 1 trailer here.

The first season comprises of three episodes. Industrial metal powerhouse Turmion Kätilöt will perform at the Suvilahti gasometer in Helsinki on 13 November, power metal band Battle Beast at a secret stone castle on 20 November, and cello metal sensations Apocalyptica at the church ruins in Pälkäne on 27 November. Tickets to all three episodes have already gone on sale.

Tuska Utopia is hosted by Samy Elbanna from the thrash metal band Lost Society and directed by Taku Kaskela, a household name behind many music videos and TV productions.

“The series takes the visuality of gigs to a whole new level. It was a real dream for a director like me to get the opportunity to create new utopian worlds through music and light design for soulscapes that are so familiar to us Finns,” Kaskela says.

“The power of Tuska Utopia stems from the curating between the artists and locations, which creates a story, a tension and a theme that connects all the concerts in the series. The name of the series itself acts as a kind of reading guide, as each episode reveals an actual existing place in the Finnish landscape, as well as a fantasy world created especially for the series,” adds Jenni Kääriäinen, Artistic Director of Tuska Utopia.

“This is not just a way to replace live concerts”

Tuska Utopia aims to offer unique experiences, as well as to create new opportunities between the fields of music and travel. While both industries are suffering from a worldwide lockdown, Tuska Utopia enables people to enjoy both activities in a new way.

“This is not just a way to replace live concerts now that so many events are on hold. We hope to succeed in creating a new crossover culture that I can easily see continuing along its own path also after the crisis is over,” says Eeka Mäkynen, Executive Producer of Tuska Utopia.

The artists featured in the programme all have well-established global fan bases, so the English-language series is expected to attract interest around the world.

“Finland has already been called the global home of heavy metal, with more metal bands per capita than anywhere else in the world, and this country definitely has a strange appeal. Tuska Utopia is a dive into the deep end of the Finnish metal soulscape, a place where your feet can no longer touch the bottom. Welcome along!” Mäkynen invites.

Tuska Utopia

Friday 13 November 2020 at 9pm UTC +2, Turmion kätilöt, Suvilahti gas holder, Helsinki (available for purchase until 15 Nov at 9 pm UTC +2)

Friday 20 November 2020 at 9pm UTC +2, Battle Beast, secret stone castle (available for purchase until 22 Nov at 9 pm UTC +2)

Friday 27 November 2020 at 9pm UTC +2, Apocalyptica, the ruins of the Church of St. Michael, Pälkäne (available for purchase until 29 Nov at 9 pm UTC +2)

The episodes are available worldwide on SemiLive’s platform. The price of each stream is €14.90, which includes viewing rights for 48 hours. Special Tuska Utopia merchandise is available on Tuska’s web shop. Ticket holders are entitled to a discount on Utopia Collection items with a promotion code provided with the ticket.

In cooperation with Helsingin Sanomat, Sinebrychoff, Genelec and Varusteleka. Powered by SemiLive.

Helsinki Design Week Goes Virtual

Helsinki Design Week, the Finnish capital’s renowned multidisciplinary festival, will this year run as a hybrid digital and physical format. Running from 3rd – 13th September its main exhibition programme being will be hosted from the newly renovated Helsinki Olympic Stadium, with a stream of digital events taking the design festival to a wider audience and those unable to attend in person.

Now in its 16th year, the Helsinki Design Week will celebrate the theme Commitment Matters, raising questions regarding how we can achieve and improve on meaning and long-term value in design.

Jan Vapaavuori, Mayor of Helsinki said: “Design is and should be present in everything we do. Now more than ever we must ask ourselves how design can improve lives, create commitment to modern democratic values, promote sustainability and innovation in urbanization, and provide us the tools needed for championing in the post-COVID world. I believe in exposing people to these questions through design. Partnership with Helsinki Design Week helps us achieve that.”

In a partnership with Virtual Helsinki, the programme will include Helsinki Virtual Design Street, a street-long virtual exhibition, transforming the city’s main shopping street Aleksanterinkatu with three installations from emerging Finnish designers. The project will transform the city into a colourful and immersive virtual design experience, featuring the work of product designer Hanna Anonen, graphic artist Matts Bjolin, and fashion designer Fanni Lyytikäinen.

For the duration of the festival, local and international visitors to the virtual city will experience a transformed urban realm, finding themselves in flowing water or standing on grass, under Escher-inspired bridges, or looking up at the street’s facades which have been coloured, and patterned with flowers and moving abstract shapes.

Hanna Harris, Chief Design Officer at the City of Helsinki said:  “Helsinki wants to be the city that pioneers digital innovation to create engaging solutions for the future of our cities. The collaboration between Helsinki Design Week and Virtual Helsinki shows the potential for this kind of technology to not only be a playful, alternative and sustainable way to experience our city, but also demonstrates the impact it can have on how places might be envisioned, designed and managed in the future.”

Helsinki Design Week will mark the launch of the newly renovated Helsinki Olympic Stadium. Designed by architects Yrjö Lindegren and Toivo Jäntti for the 1940 Olympics, the iconic stadium has undergone a four-year refurbishment by Finnish studio K2S. It will play host to the main exhibition; a series of installations on design, architecture and fashion, presenting unique one-off pieces to largescale set ups.

Helsinki Design Week’s Programme Director Anni Korkman said: “As the largest design festival in the Nordic countries, the aim this year is to make Helsinki Design Week as safe and as accessible as possible for Helsinki’s citizens and our international visitors. The newly reopened Olympic Stadium is a fitting location to host the main Helsinki Design Week exhibition and Children’s Design Weekend, but we are also excited to expand our programme into a comprehensive digital – and for the first time – virtual format. We look forward to welcoming visitors from across the world to join the wider discussion on why Commitment Matters.”

Helsinki Design Week events will include:

  • Climate College, Friday 4th September

The Climate College introduces leading speakers and viewpoints in the field of urban planning and an eco-friendly future in cities. Mayor of Helsinki, Jan Vapaavuori, will open the day, with Hanna Harris, Chief Design Officer at the City of Helsinki, hosting the session. Registration and information here: https://www.helsinkidesignweek.com/events/climatecollege/

  • Data-Driven Design Day, Tuesday 8th September

The theme for this year’s event is “Committed to Excellent Services for Everyone”. The full-day conference will share inspiring stories about developing products and services based on data to enhance customer experience and business. You can expect thoughts and practical tips on how to utilize data in design from experts in the field. Information here: https://www.helsinkidesignweek.com/data-driven-design-day/  (VIP registration through ING Media.)

Helsinki Design Week is the latest event to take place in Virtual Helsinki and follows the unprecedented success of the virtual May Day concert earlier in the year. The event saw over 700,000 people tune in live to a virtual gig with Finnish rap stars JVG, totalling over 1.4million views by the end of the weekend. Helsinki, which was crowned as the most innovative region in the EU by the European Commission in 2019 and awarded the European Capital of Smart Tourism in 2019, is at the forefront of technical innovation. With a democratic approach to data and knowledge sharing, the city operates much like a city-wide test bed. By facilitating public and private collaborations the city is demonstrating how policies like open data and digital twins can benefit citizens and visitors alike.

Travel illustration by Rita Azar for 360 MAGAZINE.

Visit Rovaniemi × Sustainable Travel Finland

The future of travel is in sustainability, and responsibility is the new luxury. Visit Rovaniemi is among the first to join Sustainable Travel Finland program, which was made possible on June 1, 2020 for companies and destinations to undergo in order to achieve a Sustainable Travel Finland label. The first companies have already been awarded with the label- the first labelled company in Rovaniemi being The Arctic TreeHouse Hotel, one of the six Sustainable Travel Finland labels awarded to Lappish companies by Visit Finland.

Because of the crisis, the development of sustainable travel industry in Lapland, Finland has experienced a boost. Sanna Kärkkäinen, the managing director of Visit Rovaniemi states that this is the perfect time for everyone to take these steps towards sustainable tourism; “Sustainability and responsibility are the core values of tomorrows destinations, through our communication we, at Visit Rovaniemi, ensure that local companies making responsible and sustainable actions, will prosper in the future.”

Businesses can join the program free of charge

Visit Rovaniemi, with its partners, has taken the responsibility and sustainability seriously and now runs a Sustainable Travel Finland programme, helping the local tourism to develop more responsibly. Kärkkäinen encourages all local businesses to join this program free of charge. It provides companies and destinations with a sustainable development process including ecological, social, economic and cultural dimensions, a concrete toolkit to gain the Sustainable Travel Finland label, and access to a continuous development model.

By taking the local voices into account in the planning and offering locally produced services and products, Rovaniemi stands a chance of serving a variety of more sustainable experiences to travellers of the future.

Read the whole story about Sustainable Travel Finland here.

Keep up to date with Visit Rovaniemi here. 

Mina Tocalini, 360 Magazine, Burger

Burger King VS McDonald’s

Burger King and McDonald’s are at it again. Burger King Finland places outdoor ads outside its competitors restaurants promising free delivery – if you set your order’s pickup location to a McDonald’s restaurant.

“Nearly every district in Helsinki has a McDonald’s restaurant. Sadly Burger King is not quite as common. We feel for the whopper-less city dwellers of these regions. We know how it feels like to yearn for the taste of our juicy flame-grilled burgers. But lucky for them, there’s an easy fix”, says Kaisa Kasila, Brand Manager of Burger King.

Burger King turns local McDonald’s into their delivery hot-spots. Helsinkians can order out Burger King and pick up their order from their nearest McDonald’s restaurants free of charge from the 29th of June to the 1st of July.

A local food delivery and takeout app Wolt (similar to UberEats) is in with the prank.

Burger King and McDonald’s have created a global prank war. Earlier this year in Scandinavia Burger King made “The Moldy Whopper” – a small jab at McDonald’s. The experiment wasn’t tasty, but more of a unique way to show how the classic burger is free of artificial preservatives.

And just because nothing is sacred, Burger King has pulled pranks on other franchises as well, like Star Wars.

Follow Burger King: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | YouTube

ALMA – Have U Seen Her?

ALMA RELEASES DEBUT ALBUM HAVE U SEEN HER? VIA SONY MUSIC GERMANY/RCA RECORDS

Finnish pop-punk supremo ALMA has shared her brand new single today “LA Money” alongside the release of her compelling punk-tinged pop debut album Have U Seen Her?, which are both out now via Sony Music Germany/RCA Records. Stream/Buy Now HERE.

LA Money” follows her recent three-track offering Have U Seen Her? Part II, which features the lead track “Stay All Night” alongside “King Of The Castle” and “Find Me“, all of which are featured on her debut record.

ALMA says; “‘LA Money’ is the core of this album. It’s a story about my life at the time. I felt like I was somewhere I didn’t want to be, making music I didn’t want to make, everyone had me wrong. Writing ‘LA Money’ was like a release after it everything started to flow out and make sense. I knew I had to move on, make music that made me happy, and live my life how I wanted to.”

A unique and talented writer, ALMA is leading the charge on a new wave of female powerhouses that have something to say through their music. Engaged, forward-thinking and opinionated, she addresses issues from women’s rights to body positivity to sexuality to depression, drug use and anxiety head-on.

The anticipation for her debut record has been building with frenzied excitement and the day is finally here with the release of Have U Seen Her?, which has been executive produced by Justin Tranter (Justin Bieber, Julia Michaels, Britney Spears, Gwen Stefani). From out and out pop anthems such as “Bad News Baby” and “Worst Behaviour (feat. Tove Lo),” to avant-garde emotive driven tracks such as “Final Fantasy” and “My Girl,” with refreshingly thought-provoking and honest lyrics throughout, the album is a welcome explosion of the senses.

ALMA offers the following about the inspiration for her songwriting and music:

“My childhood wasn’t very easy. Growing up with both of my parents poorly and struggling through school, I felt like I was invisible and didn’t have a voice a lot of the time. I think that’s why at night I used to have this recurring dream that my sister and I ran away. We’d go to the same place every time, a fantasy land full of giant blue flowers, butterflies and pink mountains. I fell in love with that place and never wanted to wake up.”

“As I got older and the pressure of living in the public eye grew, that dream came back to me. The idea of running away, leaving everything, and finding that quiet, calm, safe space replayed in my brain again and again, especially while I was making this album.”

“My world had turned upside down. From feeling invisible, suddenly everyone wanted to know where I was, what I was doing, and when, always asking ¨Have U Seen Her?¨. I thought it was ironic, especially abbreviated ‘HUSH’.”

“I haven’t found the pink mountains or the giant blue flowers yet, but I have found a happier place through making music, somewhere I want to be. I have people around me that really see me and care about what I have to say, it feels like a miracle sometimes.”

“So that’s what ¨Have U Seen Her?¨ is about – finding your place and your people in the world, feeling valued. It’s for everyone who felt unimportant or couldn’t find their voice. You matter.”

About ALMA

In just 3 years, the 23-year-old highlighter-haired polymath has topped global charts with her incredible scream-along hooks and irresistible melodies. Previous international hit tracks “Chasing Highs” and “Karma” in particular reached Platinum status with “Dye My Hair” going Gold. An in-demand songwriter, Alma has written songs for the likes of Ariana Grande, Miley Cyrus, Lana Del Ray, Charli XCX and Tove Lo, and has garnered fans the world over from Annie Mac and Miley Cyrus to Elton John and Dua Lipa, who she worked with last summer in LA. Notably, she recently co-wrote two songs on Miley Cyrus’ EP She Is Coming, including the female empowerment anthem “Mother’s Daughter” and “Cattitude” ft. RuPaul as well as The Charlie’s Angels hit theme tune “Don’t Call Me Angel,” which debuted at number 13 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, becoming Grande’s 20th top 20 song, Cyrus’ 14th and Del Rey’s 3rd. A thrilling live performer, ALMA  has toured extensively, performing headline shows and touring in the US with Tove Lo, bringing punk and pop together in a not to be missed show that assaults all the senses.

Praise for Have U Seen Me? 

“Icon” Teen Vogue
“Finland’s big pop hope” Noisey
“Fearless genre-bending, rip-roaring beats, and refreshing vulnerability” LADYGUNN
“ALMA’s latest is sure to comfort listeners during these undeniably stressful times” PAPERMAG
“No question that ALMA will be sticking around to make-and break-more rules in the pop sphere to come” Interview Magazine
“If her highlighter-hued hair doesn’t catch your attention, this Finnish singer-songwriter’s earthshaking vocals surely will” Nylon

INSTAGRAM / TWITTER / FACEBOOK

Helsinki, Finland, 360 MAGAZINE

Helsinki Energy Challenge

Helsinki wants to offer a platform for new, sustainable and innovative solutions, and, on 27 February, the City opened the international Helsinki Energy Challenge. The competition seeks to find solutions, by means of which the city can be heated in a sustainable way without coal and with as little biomass as possible during the upcoming decades. The grand prize of the competition is one million euros. The City of Helsinki lives up to its global responsibility in the fight against climate change and is committed to sharing the results of the competition openly, in order to allow other cities to benefit from them in their own climate work. The role of the cities in the fight against the climate crisis is decisive.

Despite the world situation caused by the coronavirus, the City of Helsinki keeps investing heavily in its climate work. The climate crisis has not been cancelled and the City is still working its way towards a carbon neutral Helsinki. In order to get the best possible result out of the Helsinki Energy Challenge even in this changed situation, it has been decided that the registration phase is prolonged. The prolonged registration phase ends on 30 September 2020. The finalist teams invited to the second phase of the competition are announced in the beginning of November and the winner of the competition will be revealed in March 2021.

“Our competition got off to a great start at the end of February, and the reception has been overwhelmingly positive both in Finland and abroad. It is clear that we have started something unique. However, the changed world situation caused by the coronavirus comes at a difficult stage in respect to our competition. Innovators and potential competitors now need time to adapt to the new situation and prolonging the registration phase of the competition is necessary at this point. The competition process will remain otherwise unaltered. Despite the coronavirus, we need to stick to the climate goals. We still have to get rid of coal and we want to replace it with long-term sustainable solutions. We are fulfilling our responsibility in the fight against the global climate crisis and we will not let it wait until the coronavirus crisis has blown over. Both the Helsinki Energy Challenge and our other climate efforts continue at full strength”, notes Helsinki Mayor Jan Vapaavuori.

During the prolonged registration phase of the Helsinki Energy Challenge, there will be additional webinars and other virtual events, during which the competitors can learn more about the competition, but also look for members to their competition team. Interested parties are encouraged to enter the competition as diversified and cross-disciplinary teams.

The new competition schedule and further information about the Helsinki Energy Challenge can be found HERE

(Photo courtesy of Jussi Hellsten)
 

Raising Children to Eat Greens

Getting children to eat their greens? Both parents need to set an example

A positive example set by both the mother and the father promotes the consumption of vegetables, fruit and berries among 3–5-year-old children, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. The study explored the association of the home food environment and parental influence with the consumption of vegetables among kindergarten-aged children. The findings were published in Food Quality and Preference.

Children eat inadequate amounts of vegetables, fruit and berries across Europe and elsewhere, too. As the health and nutrition benefits of these foods are well-known, increasing their consumption among children is a challenge many countries are struggling with. Dietary habits also track from childhood to adulthood, and the period of early childhood is critical for adapting to a diet rich in greens.

The researchers studied the consumption of vegetables, fruit and berries, and the family’s home food environment, through a survey taken by parents. The study looked at 114 kindergarten-aged children and their parents (100) in Finland. Raw and cooked vegetables and fruit and berries were analysed separately.

The researchers found that to a certain degree, the consumption of vegetables is affected by different factors than the consumption of fruit and berries. Maternal example was associated with the consumption of raw and cooked vegetables as well as with the consumption of fruit and berries. Paternal example, on the other hand, was the strongest for cooked vegetables.

“This shows that teaching children to eat their greens is not something mothers should be doing alone. A positive example set by both parents is important, as is their encouragement of the child,” Researcher and Nutritionist Kaisa Kähkönen from the University of Eastern Finland says.

The study also showed that dinner is the most important meal at home when it comes to teaching children to eat vegetables. The families participating in the study often ate dinner together, highlighting the role of parental influence on the development of children’s dietary choices and preferences.

Dinner constitutes a daily opportunity to serve vegetables in a variety of different forms: as the main course, as a side dish, and as salad.

“Variation can be created by serving raw vegetables, such as the ever-popular cucumber and tomato, accompanied by cooked ones. In fact, many root vegetables, cabbages and squashes are best served cooked,”
Kähkönen says.

When it comes to eating fruit, evening snacks were the most important meal.

The study shows that many families still eat less vegetables, fruit and berries on average than would be beneficial in view of health promotion. Cooked vegetables and berries were the least eaten food items among the study population.

The Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition at the University of Eastern Finland studies how food education in early childhood can support good nutrition among children and promote the establishment of healthy dietary habits.

The newly published study was carried out in collaboration between researchers from the Universities of Eastern Finland, Jyväskylä and Turku. The study was funded by the Jenny and Antti Wihuri Fund.

North Pole Pop-Up Bar

A pop-up bar will open at the North Pole and offer free gin for life

Finnish Arctic Blue Gin is opening the northernmost pop-up bar “Arctic Bar” at the North Pole on April 17th. Any explorer courageous enough to reach it will earn free gin for life.

Situated at N90°E0°, the Arctic Bar will be open for one day on the 17th of April and gift anyone who shows up a lifetime supply of award-winning Arctic Blue Gin. The Arctic Bar will be the northernmost bar in the world, topping the Bar in Hotel Tulpan in Svalbard, Norway.

Why the North Pole?

“To survive here, you need to be a little mad, and quite a lot tougher. Just like the wild bilberries we season our gin with, that fight their way through the frozen earth just to survive. It’s not easy, but you can truly taste their zest for life.” says Mikko Spoof, Co-Founder and Brand Director of Arctic Brand Group.

“And just like the bilberries, our ideas have to fight through a dark and frosty element to survive.” Continues Mr. Spoof, “We believe actions are more impactful than words in telling stories. That’s why we will open a bar at the North Pole. The customers can enjoy free gin during the pop-up day and even better than that: they will get a lifetime supply of Arctic Blue Gin delivered to their front door. ”

The Finnish expedition will ride on the North Pole for a week in very harsh conditions. The thickness of the ice may vary from a few centimeters to a few meters and the temperature can even drop down to -40°C/F.

The expedition to N90°E0° will start today as Mikko Spoof and other three mad explorers embark on an adventure with the beloved gin to open a bar amongst polar bears, walruses, and seals. If you find yourself at N90°E0° on April 17th, you will get a free supply of Arctic Blue Gin for the rest of your life, or at least as long as the bilberries survive and are not extinct due to climate change.

The team is headed by the experienced polar expert and photographer Poppis Suomela. Photographer Valtteri Hirvonen and director Otso Tiainen will also join the extreme trip and film a short documentary on the effects of global warming.

About Arctic Brands Group

Arctic Brands Group is a high-quality artisan spirits company founded in 2017 and merged with Chevaliers Holding Ltd Hong Kong in 2018. The company has produced its first double gold award winning spirit the ARCTIC BLUE GIN. The products of Arctic Brands Group are based on the unique Finnish nature and its pure raw materials. Domestic blueberries, fresh spring water and Nordic plants give Arctic Blue the unique, sophisticated blueberry, juniper, spicy and coniferous taste. Arctic Blue Gin is already exported to over ten countries.

Follow Arctic Brands Group on Social Media

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Risks of an Animal Protein Diet

Diet rich in animal protein is associated with a greater risk of death

A diet rich in animal protein and meat in particular is not good for the health, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland finds, providing further backing for earlier research evidence. Men who favored animal protein over plant-based protein in their diet had a greater risk of death in a 20-year follow-up than men whose diet was more balanced in terms of their sources of protein. The findings were published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Men whose primary sources of protein were animal-based had a 23% higher risk of death during the follow-up than men who had the most balanced ratio of animal and plant-based protein in their diet. A high intake of meat in particular seemed to associate with adverse effects: men eating a diet rich in meat, i.e. more than 200 grams per day, had a 23% greater risk of death during the follow-up than men whose intake of meat was less than 100 grams per day. The men participating in the study mainly ate red meat. Most nutrition recommendations nowadays limit the intake of red and processed meats. In Finland, for example, the recommended maximum intake is 500 grams per week.

The study also found that a high overall intake of dietary protein was associated with a greater risk of death in men who had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease or cancer at the onset of the study. A similar association was not found in men without these diseases. The findings highlight the need to investigate the health effects of protein intake especially in people who have a pre-existing chronic medical condition. The mean age of the men participating in the study was 53 years at the onset, and diets clearly lacking in protein were not typical among the study population.

“However, these findings should not be generalized to older people who are at a greater risk of malnutrition and whose intake of protein often remains below the recommended amount,” PhD Student Heli Virtanen from the University of Eastern Finland points out.

Earlier studies have suggested that a high intake of animal protein, and especially the consumption of processed meats such as sausages and cold cuts, is associated with an increased risk of death. However, the big picture relating to the health effects of protein and different protein sources remains unclear.

The study is based on the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study (KIHD) that analyzed the dietary habits of approximately 2,600 Finnish men aged between 42 and 60 at the onset of the study in 1984-1989. The researchers studied the mortality of this study population in an average follow-up of 20 years by analyzing registers provided by Statistics Finland. The analyses focused on the associations of dietary protein and protein sources with mortality during the follow-up, and other lifestyle factors and dietary habits were extensively controlled for, including the fact that those eating plenty of plant-based protein followed a healthier diet.