Posts tagged with "burger king"

Travis Scott and McDonald's collaboration illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 MAGAZINE.

Travis Scott x McDonald’s

By Hannah DiPilato

Hip Hop fans everywhere have been buzzing about Travis Scott’s recent collaboration with McDonald’s that includes both a meal and special merchandise.

The “Travis Scott Meal” is the artist’s go-to McDonald’s order: a quarter pounder with lettuce and bacon, a medium fry, a sprite, and barbecue sauce. The meal costs $6 and is available for dine-in, carry-out, and at the drive-thru. Although this is not an unusual order, fans have been rushing to get the superstars meal of choice.

For those that want the McDonald’s kick without the calories, Scott released an extensive line of McDonald’s x Cactus Jack merchandise. The merch, available on Scott’s website, channels the energy of Scott’s hip hop culture and the classic love for McDonald’s that fans everywhere have in common.

Fans can choose from a variety of clothing such as t-shirts, hoodies, and pants, all of which have a unique Cactus Jack and McDonald’s design. Some clothing pieces display a more subtle love for McDonald’s like a simple McDonald’s logo, while others illustrate a Travis Scott figurine reining over a quarter pounder meal.

For fans that want to display their love for Cactus Jack and McDonald’s in other ways, Scott also dropped accessories and decorations. This includes a variety of rugs, a Cactus Pack blanket, and the McNugget body pillow that has gained a lot of popularity on social media.

This is the first celebrity collaboration McDonald’s has done since 1992 when the company partnered with Michael Jordan. McDonald’s is hoping this celebrity collaboration will boost their sales that are down from the previous year by thirty percent. McDonald’s CEO, Chris Kempczinski, brushed this loss off as a result of the pandemic.

In the announcement of the collaboration made by McDonald’s, Scott explained he “couldn’t be more excited to bring the collaboration to life.” He also expressed how the collaboration is “bringing together two iconic worlds.”

In the same announcement, McDonald’s U.S. Chief Marketing officer Morgan Flatley said “everyone has a favorite McDonald’s meal, no matter who you are.” He also mentioned that the company is “excited to bring the Travis Scott Meal to a McDonald’s near you.”

Scott promoted the collaboration on both his Instagram and Twitter accounts. He included a photo in the drive-thru window flashing a McDonald’s bag and a bedazzled chain, as well as a promotional video featuring an explanation of his order with his classic Travis Scott autotune.

The excitement began on September third when McDonald’s tweeted a cactus and hamburger emoji hinting at a collaboration. Travis then retweeted this tweet with “CACTUS JACK FOR MCDONALD’S” and stimulated excitement within his fanbase.

This promotion will be available until October 4th, but merchandise could be gone sooner. This merchandise channels the nostalgia of McDonald’s from the past while still including the bold energy that is Travis Scott. Whether you’re more of a hip-hop fan or a McDonald’s regular, the extensive merchandise page will give everyone something to choose from. To put it simply, and in the words of Travis Scott, “It’s Lit.”

Mina Tocalini, 360 Magazine, Burger

Burger King VS McDonald’s

Burger King and McDonald’s are at it again. Burger King Finland places outdoor ads outside its competitors restaurants promising free delivery – if you set your order’s pickup location to a McDonald’s restaurant.

“Nearly every district in Helsinki has a McDonald’s restaurant. Sadly Burger King is not quite as common. We feel for the whopper-less city dwellers of these regions. We know how it feels like to yearn for the taste of our juicy flame-grilled burgers. But lucky for them, there’s an easy fix”, says Kaisa Kasila, Brand Manager of Burger King.

Burger King turns local McDonald’s into their delivery hot-spots. Helsinkians can order out Burger King and pick up their order from their nearest McDonald’s restaurants free of charge from the 29th of June to the 1st of July.

A local food delivery and takeout app Wolt (similar to UberEats) is in with the prank.

Burger King and McDonald’s have created a global prank war. Earlier this year in Scandinavia Burger King made “The Moldy Whopper” – a small jab at McDonald’s. The experiment wasn’t tasty, but more of a unique way to show how the classic burger is free of artificial preservatives.

And just because nothing is sacred, Burger King has pulled pranks on other franchises as well, like Star Wars.

Follow Burger King: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | YouTube

Rita Azar, 360 Magazine, illustration, corporation

Companies Profiting from BLM

By Eamonn Burke

As the nation grapples with the murders of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, and Breonna Taylor, among many others over many years, protests have called for massive police and corporate reform. Changes have already been made, as major companies and institutions have begun to exclude forms of racism and include new reforms and statements. However, as with many corporate sentiments, the genuine nature of these statements is being called into question and exposed as hollow.

It has become a trend for major companies to undertake policies and claim responsibility for social issues, in what is known as “Political Corporate Social Responsibility.” Media is flooded with brands preaching change and pledging to be a part of it. In today’s instant society, however, it is difficult to discern the true motives of these businesses in their support of the BLM movement.

Major companies like Microsoft and Amazon have been actively projecting support for the BLM movement, yet both corporations have shockingly low involvement of black people within their company structure. Intel joined in the trend with a cringey tweet as well.

Fast food companies like Wendy’s and Burger King, and Popeyes have also seemingly been using the movement to boost their reputation using tweets and ads, despite the fact that they thrive on minimum wage workers who are often people of color. The stark insensitivity is reminiscent of Pepsi’s distasteful ad that was pulled amidst the movement in 2017. Some companies, however, didn’t even try to voice support. One such company was Starbucks, who announced that employees were forbidden from wearing BLM merchandise, a policy that has since been reversed. Other food brands such as Quaker Oats are making real changes – the Aunt Jemima brand will be dropped because of it’s racial stereotyping, as well as Uncle Ben’s.

Following a petition signed by more than 5,000 people, Trader Joe’s announced in July that they would be changing the names of their “racist packaging” such as “Trader Ming’s” and “Trader José.” San Francisco High School student Briones Bedell, who started the petition, claimed that “The Trader Joe’s branding is racist because it exoticizes other cultures — it presents ‘Joe’ as the default ‘normal’ and the other characters falling outside of it.”

The company is now going back on that promise, and have says in a new statement that “We disagree that any of these labels are racist,” arguing that they are meant to show appreciation for these cultures. Company spokeswoman Kenya Friend-Daniel originally had accepted the petition, acknowledging that it may have the opposite effect of its intended inclusiveness. Now, however, she says that they will only look into these types of changes from employees, not from petitions online.

The racial revolution in the wake of George Floyd’s death has seen the downfall of other brands and images such as Aunt Jemima and the Washington Redskins, but Trader Joe’s is the first prominent one to resist the “cancel culture.”

What consumers really want, however, is not posts on social media. They want real action and real change. This means companies should “Open Their Purse” and donate to anti-racism organizations. Many companies have, but many have also donated to campaigns for Congress people that are rejected by the NAACP.

The public is skeptical of these statements and promises, and not without reason. The history of major businesses like Bank of America and Goldman Sachs have in the past had to cover up allegations of discrimation, and others fail to include minority members in their top ranks. Other major institutions like the NFL condemned the kneeling for the National Anthem just a few years ago, but is now apologizing and admitting the players were right. The question remains: have sentiments truly changed?

Brands and institutions are recognizing that being anti-racist and pro-BLM is selling more than ever. “Costs Signals,” which are the cost that companies pay to undertake these policy changes, are what should be used for judgement, says UPenn Marketing Professor Cait Lamberton to ABC News. Andre Perry, another ABC correspondent from Brookings Institution, warns that “These statements are a sign of defensiveness more so than an indication that they are proactively working to deconstruct racism in this country.”

For a list of donations made by major companies click here.

Colonel Sanders The Muse For Iconic Designer

 

Kentucky Fried Chicken® has collaborated with iconic fashion designer (and KFC fan) NIGO to create a one-of-a-kind collection of quality fried chicken streetwear for the fashionable, finger lickin’ hypebeasts of the world.

As a fan of Colonel Sanders and the iconic KFC brand, Hypemaker, Hypebeast LTD’s global creative studio, worked alongside NIGO to help combine his passion for the brand and streetwear to create the Human Made x KFC Capsule Collection, a KFC twist on NIGO’s Human Made brand inspired by Americana and workwear style.

For design inspiration, NIGO visited the KFC headquarters in Louisville Kentucky, spent time at the Colonel Sanders Museum, in the KFC archives and in the kitchen learning to make the Colonel’s world famous fried chicken.

“When we heard of NIGO’s obsession with Colonel Sanders, we had to invite him for a rare tour of the Colonel’s personal archives to help inspire him,” said Steve Kelly, Director of Media and Digital Marketing. “We’re humbled to work alongside both Hypemaker and NIGO in debuting this collection and are proud to have been a small part of his creative process.”

With his entrepreneurial spirit and world-famous designs, NIGO was the perfect designer to curate KFC’s streetwear debut with a fashion line that would make the World’s Most Famous Fried Chicken Salesman, Colonel Sanders, proud.

The Human Made x KFC Capsule Collection includes a Colonel shop jacket, 70s style racing jacket, hoodies, t-shirts and more ranging from $20 to $375.

Fans will be able to purchase Human Made x KFC Capsule Collection items at a pop-up shopping experience on Friday, Nov. 16, at a KFC restaurant in Manhattan (242 E. 14th Street, New York, NY 10003). NIGO will make an appearance at the opening of the pop-up.

For those unable to make it to the shopping experience, a limited number of items will also be available on HBX.com on November 23, just in time for Black Friday, while supplies lasts. The collection will also be available at the Human Made store in Tokyo starting November 23.