Posts tagged with "clothing design"

Men’s Arab Fashion Week

Dubai Design District (d3), in strategic partnership with the Arab Fashion Council, will cut the ribbon on Men’s Arab Fashion Week Ready-To-Wear SS23 on June 28th evening. Staged within the city’s design and fashion pulse, a total of 12 designers will unveil their season’s best between June 28-30 (7-10 pm).

The event will present a curated roster of fashion-forward designers from the Middle East, as well as key industry capitals. Among them, Maison Du Mec (Lebanon), Tagueule (Lebanon), Emergency Room (Lebanon), Michael Cinco (UAE), Amato (UAE), Heyun Pan (UK), Rian Fernandez (The Philippines), KA-1 (UAE) and Anomalous (UAE).

In addition, and a notable first for Men’s Arab Fashion Week, will be three special guest designers presented by The Fédération de la Haute Couture et de la ModeLazoschmidl, Arturo Obegero and Valette Studio. The three dynamic Paris-based brands have been carefully selected by the chamber to represent France’s menswear sector and are set to showcase designs that embody a fresh sense of individuality of spirit, matched with high-end European craftsmanship and innovative textiles. 

Serge Carreira, Head of Emerging Brands Initiative at the Fédération de la Haute Couture et de la Mode, comments: “While the world is evolving on a fast track and faces major challenges, emerging designers embrace these changes and contribute to rethinking fashion. They catch the zeitgeist and introduce it in their narrative with a bold and sensitive view. Fashion is about inventing a future; they make a better future. As we aim to support and empower our designers by forging promising commercial ties worldwide, our relationship with the Arab Fashion Council is important. It sees Parisian designers featured on the official calendar of Arab Fashion Week and vice versa for Arab designers who are members of the Arab Fashion Council.”

Also commenting ahead of opening night, Khadija Al Bastaki, Executive Director of Dubai Design District (d3) – a creative platform by TECOM Group dedicated to design, fashion, architecture, art and retail, said: “We are delighted to kick off this fourth edition of Men’s Arab Fashion Week, the only Men’s Fashion Week held throughout the Middle East and Asia, and our second edition this year. In addition to marking the 20th edition of Arab Fashion Week overall, the Spring-Summer 2023 Men’s Ready-to-Wear collections will bring an exciting mix of local, regional and international talent and opportunity to Dubai – to engage, rethink the regular, inspire and push the boundaries on the menswear fashion offering here in the region.

“Collaborating with the Fédération de la Haute Couture et de la Mode, we are immensely proud to see the three special guest designers – selected by the federation – in the line-up, ready to take to our runway.  The trajectory for menswear globally is an exciting one and we, in strategic partnership with the Arab Fashion Council, are committed to being at the forefront of this flourishing sector across the region, cementing Dubai’s status as a global creative and fashion capital.”

Further highlights of the upcoming edition will be the participation of two official sponsors that will design novel looks for models showcasing this season’s collections.  All backstage hair will be done by SCHWARZKOPF, while Italian cosmetic company KIKO will create all the makeup looks showcased on the runways.

Arab Fashion Week-Men’s Spring-Summer 2023 is also an opportunity to highlight two remarkable collaborations that bring to the fore the Arab Fashion Council’s pioneering commitment to the worlds of sustainability and fashion tech.

Logistics company Aramex has teamed up with Lebanese designer EMERGENCY ROOM, who are leaders in the realm of upcycling and second-hand sourced fashions. The two will unveil, during Fashion Week, their campaign for the release of a collection that will be showcased in October.  The objective of this cross-industry collaboration is to highlight the importance – and urgency – of implementing viable, enduring sustainable practices into each branch of the fashion supply chain. Mike Rich, Chief Marketing Officer at Aramex, states: “We are pleased with our collaboration with Emergency Room, which underpins our strong belief in the importance of empowering entrepreneurs, creative and sustainable businesses, and supporting them to create their own opportunities. At Aramex, we truly champion all sustainable practices, and this is what upcycled clothing is all about. Through this collaboration, we are keen to facilitate access to various logistical services and solutions, and we look forward to playing a continued, key role in the success of the Arab fashion industry”.

Also forward-looking is the collaboration between Swiss label Ferronato, the first luxury accessories range with full data privacy protection, and Lebanese menswear brand Maison du Mec. Their collaboration will see the two brands integrate meta-fabrics into high-end, accessories that are ultra-fashionable all whilst blocking electromagnetic interferences and unwanted tracking via devices.  For the occasion, an opening surprise has been planned at the start of the Maison du Mec Spring-Summer 2023 fashion show.

“We very much enjoyed collaborating with Maison du Mec, and we believe our shared vision of aesthetics has succeeded in complementing both brands. With his design and our technology embedded, this new collection will be one of a kind,” said Alessia Ferronato, CEO of Ferronato. She continues: “Arab Fashion Week has a track record for connecting emerging brands with buyers in one place, driving awareness and commerce in a rapidly evolving market. We are elated to be taking part in Arab Fashion Week and look forward to a fruitful collaboration with Maison du Mec.”

Every year, the Arab Fashion Council, in collaboration with the Fédération de la Haute Couture et de la Mode, hosts an exclusive showroom and presentation on the official Paris Fashion Week calendar aimed at providing a global platform to regional designers with a view to connect talent with international media and buyers.

The calendar for Men’s Arab Fashion week can be found here: www.arabfashionweek.org

esther perbandt image for use by 360 magazine

Esther Perbandt Q×A

By: Kai Yeo

Born in Berlin, Esther Perbandt studies fashion design at the Berlin University of the Arts and polished a master’s degree in Fashion and Textile Design in Paris. In 2020, she made it to the finals of international designer show “Making The Cut” with Heidi Klum and Tim Gunn, supported by Naomi Campbell.

Not only is she a contemporary fashion designer, but also a visionary, performer, and mistress of ceremonies. Esther Perbandt describes her fashion as an act of (post)feminism irrespective of gender: personality, autonomy and individuality are at the center of her avant-garde style. The non-binary silhouette is deconstructed and reframed with classical menswear details, however, maintaining timeless aspects of elegance and style.

360 MAGAZINE had the pleasure of corresponding with Esther to learn about her inspiration, goals, and much more. Read on to find out her answers!

What/who are your biggest inspirations?

The joy of life is my greatest inspiration. This motor is so big that I can’t imagine running out of ideas at some point. I like doing two things for a living: sleeping and dancing. Many ideas come to me when I fall asleep or wake up and when I can dance without restraint.

How did Making The Cut (MTC) change your view of the fashion industry? 

When I studied fashion design in Berlin and Paris in the nineties and early noughties, the term “digitalization” was not really an issue in the fashion industry. I founded my own label over 17 years ago, which has grown very slowly on its own. Until I took part in MTC, I didn’t have an online shop, or only one that didn’t work. But I knew that if my brand was to survive the next 30 years, I had to change and become more digital. Who should I learn from, if not the biggest?

From a show like MTC of course you don’t only learn, you see what’s possible with a lot of money. But if you manage to transfer what you have experienced and seen at the highest level and translate it to your very own DNA, you can take the next steps. I don’t think there is a right or a wrong way in the fashion industry. There are an incredible number of individual paths. Depending on what the goal is.

After coming back from the MTC shoot, I didn’t do anything creative for 8 months, I just prepared business-wise for the airing of MTC: New website, new online store, new strategy. Today, I work with my pattern maker with avatars and digital fittings. This saves us a lot of time and resources.

How has the newly found attention changed/shaped you?

The new attention was a boon for my brand to finally grow. Many things have become a little easier professionally. But the pandemic probably slowed down the speed of this growth a bit and still does. Personally, I only got a limited amount of that attention. When the first season of MTC came out, which I was part of the cast of, the world went into its first hard lockdown. For months, I just worked a lot with my small team and sent packages all over the world every day, but especially to the US, without having the opportunity to meet many people. Germany is a grateful or ungrateful country, depending on how you take it, when it comes to addressing public figures. In the meantime, I had the feeling that hardly anyone in Germany had seen the show.

You were unsure about whether or not to take part in Making The Cut. How do you feel about it now?

Yes, I was indeed very unsure when I received the first request to participate in MTC 1. For 16 years, I had been flying the flag for a freer, more unconventional and uncommercial way in the fashion industry, which also had a stronger connection to art. I felt it wasn’t for me or would betray my brand. But quite the opposite. It was the best decision I made for my business, but also for my life in general. In the last three years, since shooting MTC 1, I have learnt an incredible amount and finally started to build a sustainable foundation for my brand. Every path in the fashion industry is very individual and mine is probably also an atypical one. But it’s fun to see myself making strategic and business decisions in a very different way now and to see that the word “commercial” is not a dirty word for me.

Do you have any moments in your career you look back to often?

Oh yes, of course. I often think today where I got the strength to hold out for so long and to go through all the deep valleys. For many years I called my studio the “Palace of Tears”. Every few days there were tears because I felt like I was standing on the spot or because it was financially on the brink. But somewhere deep inside me, I always believed that it would work out and become easier one day.

How would you describe your design aesthetic?

The signature of my brand has developed from the three cities in which I have lived in and which have been very important and inspiring for me: Berlin, Moscow and Paris.

Berlin, as the city where I was born, the city divided over the years with a great historical history, with its roughness, toughness, punk, subculture, snootiness. Moscow, with its avant-garde of the 1920s, the constructivists, high-necked, the uniforms and the austerity. And then of course Paris, as the city that gave me the finishing touch, the elegance, the femininity, and the glamor.

This special mix and the reduction to the color “black,” is meant to give my wearers a strength and make them grow. The focus on details should make the viewer curious to take a closer look at clothing.

What are the biggest challenges you have faced as a designer?

It has always been both a curse and a blessing that I have had to fight my own way through, especially financially. This has extremely slowed down the growth of my brand, but at the same time it has given me the chance and the time to carefully develop my signature and the DNA and to look closely at what I really want.

Do you think your surroundings and environment play a part in how you choose your designs?

Yes, definitely. As a creative, you unconsciously absorb everything you come across. I love observing people and thinking about why they wear the clothes they do. What identity do they have, and which one do they want to slip into? Dealing directly with my customers in the shop every day has of course influenced my choice of designs. Since MTC, I do a lot of styles in larger sizes and now a lot of women come and have my collection pieces made to measure. That’s a big market.

What are the next goals for your brand?

The USA has become my main sales market in the last two years. The next goal would be to open my own shop in New York for a while and then also produce locally so that customers who buy online don’t have to pay customs and the high shipping costs.

In fashion Esther Perbandt will continue to explore various paths, especially in creating haute couture looks for numerous events, as well as digging into costume design areas whenever projects allow for it.

It’s said that the future is unknown but at least with Esther Perbandt it will always continue to surprise and excite. We look forward to seeing more from her.

As A Child cover art of Madeline The Person by Warner Records for use by 360 Magazine

Madeline The Person – As A Child

INTRODUCING BRAND NEW ARTIST MADELINE THE PERSON

PEEK INTO HER WORLD WITH WARNER RECORDS DEBUT

“AS A CHILD”  – WATCH THE VIDEO HERE

FIRST CHAPTER IN COLLECTION OF PERSONAL STORIES TO BE RELEASED ON DEBUT EP NEXT MONTH

Alt Pop wunderkind Madeline the Person invites you to Personville, her rainbow-colored art emporium where all humans & all feelings are welcome to express themselves. The Houston, Texas native, who has spent the last year building a significant following on TikTok through her soulful covers of everyone from Frank Ocean, Phoebe Bridgers, Harry Styles and Lizzo to Joni Mitchell, Brandi Carlile and Queen, has emerged as a powerful antidote to conformity with her deeply personal debut single As a Child,” out today on Warner Records.  Listen to As A Child” HERE and watch the video HERE.

The 19-year-old, who inked a deal with Warner Records over a monochromatic Zoom meeting, lives her life boldly and loudly, confecting a universe where creativity reigns. From making her own clothes and jewelry and dying her hair a spectrum of colors to directing short films and painting, Madeline the Person has found a litany of ways to show that there are no limits to expressing yourself. With the release of “As a Child,” she does just that, countering her optimistic exterior with a tender ballad that grapples with the crippling emotional weight of losing a parent at a young age. 

She explains: “The difference in the way that I express my personality versus my music, I think that has to do with my belief in the fact that all emotions are equally important. With my music, I’m trying to normalize the sad and hard and really gross stuff and make it more acceptable and less scary, because to me, as a person, I am all of those things combined. I’m super sad and also really happy and joyful and grateful. I have a lot of emotions and I don’t like to boil it down to just a few. I like to show lots of facets at a time and sometimes, that creates a juxtaposition that I think makes it kind of cool.”

Madeline the Person already struck a chord on social media by being true to herself, showcasing her incredible talent across platforms and accruing a robust legion of devotees. Since launching her TikTok account in early 2020, she’s amassed nearly 300,000 followers and 5 million likes on the platform.   She first shared “As a Child” with fans on TikTok last year – the clip has over 1.1M views, 300K likes and more than 13K shares.  It also landed her in the DMs with some of pop’s new elite.

While music was at the forefront of Madeline’s upbringing, learning piano at the tender age of four & guitar shortly after, it was the loss of her father a few years ago that pushed her to write without holding back, to feel every feeling. In her journey through unimaginable grief, Madeline continued to flourish as a songwriter, unafraid to share every part of herself in her music, be it splashy and exuberant or contemplative and sad. 

Following her debut with “As a Child,” Madeline the Person will guide us through her human experience in a series of musical chapters disguised as EPs set to release through 2021, the first of which will arrive next month.  It’s page one in the story of Madeline the Person, who already shines as bright as the future that lies ahead.