Posts tagged with "Stanley Kubrick"

Gucci Exquisite campaign inside 360 MAGAZINE

Exquisite GUCCI

As first presented in the hall of magic mirrors during Milan fashion week, the Exquisite Gucci collection was designed by the House’s Creative Director, Alessandro Michele for Fall-Winter 2022. The emphasis on tailoring was the show’s organizing theme, but the headline was Michele’s collaboration with adidas. Merging sartorial tradition and sportswear codes, he added the brand’s trademark stripes and emblem to suits and an array of ready-to-wear.

A Note From Gucci’s Creative Director Alessandro Michele

I’ve always been charmed by cinema. For its power to tell stories that can probe human adventure and its drift. For its visionary power to dig up in the real, making it vertiginously imaginative and questionable. Such a careful look on the human, after all, is so close to me. I could never imagine clothes as severed from the story and life of the person wearing them. If you ask me, a garment is not, and never will be, just a piece of fabric. It’s rather the means through which we are able to unfold who we really decide to be, it’s how we shape our desires and the ultimate sense of our staying. That’s why I’ve always imagined my collections as films able to convey a cinematography of the present: a score of stories, eclectic and dissonant, that can sacralize the human and its metamorphic ability.

The “Exquisite” campaign is my tribute to cinema and to one of its brightest maestros, Stanley Kubrick. A philosophic filmmaker who, better than others, emanated the magic of that inextricable knot through which cinema exudes life and magnifies it. I’ve always admired Kubrick’s remarkable capacity in tackling very different subjects. His experimental drive goes beyond any possible categorization. Every film, in fact, digests the manifold souls where dystopia meets parody, drama becomes human comedy, horror looks like a psycho-philosophic treatise, the feeling of truth evolves into the uncanny. Kubrick was, in essence, a real sculptor of genres: the “cross-genre” director, ahead of his time. His ability to build stories that exceed significance, crossing borders and setting labels on fire, has always been deeply inspiring to me.

As an act of love, I decided to reinhabit Kubrick’s films, pushing to the core this incendiary approach. I took the liberty of disassembling, blending, grafting and reassembling them. Sticking to my creative praxis, I seized those movies, romanticizing them, populating them with my clothes. Trying to create short circuits where the adidas gown, that had already lost its status of sportswear to become a Victorian costume, appears as a new character in the script of Barry Lyndon. The dress designed by Laura Whitcomb, wearing which Madonna grabbed the New York spotlight in the nineties, fits in the gothic scenes of The Shining. The mysterious darkness of the enigmatic ritual of Eyes Wide Shut embraces a venus in fur, embellished with sensual bourgeois pearls. And more, the 90s shoes with a fetish flavor explode through the frames of A Clockwork Orange. Finally, the dreamiest evening dress dangled in soft tulle ruches bursts into the aseptic and dystopian space of the Discovery One in 2001: A Space Odyssey. This situationist game mixes historical plans, references, experiences. The past explodes into the present. Everything can become anything, or something else. As in that famous scene of Kubrick’s masterpiece, where the bone turns into a spaceship. As in life.

With “Exquisite” I carry on my attempt to mingle high and low, this time coherently and synergistically with the grammar of the great director. In the selected sequences it feels like Nietzsche, Kant and Freud speak casually to the people in the street. The biggest questions about the meaning of life become pop images. Complex transfigurations in terms of significance, get immediate access in terms of experience. Everything comes to be iconic, symbolically sophisticated, though able to reflect on a culture that we can definitely identify as pop. I chose Kubrick also for this, after all. What he created is part of our collective imagination. Since he was a diviner of vision, his works are as recognizable as the Sistine Chapel, the Virgin of the Rocks or The Simpsons. Manipulating his images, inside a brand new semantic framework, is like hacking La Gioconda. Plus the inspiration and the empathy only possible through the fictional cinematographic machine.

This involvement generates a change of state that is very significant for my job: clothes get closer to bare life again. They turn into highly imaginative functional prostheses, and they do so to tell a story. A story that shatters, enchants, tortures, ignites. Because it’s the story of the human that dwells in each and every one of us. As Stanley Kubrick knew too well. And also Milena Canonero, a very dear friend of mine, who accepted my invitation to go back over some of the scenes that hailed her as an undisputed star in the history of costume design. Her presence in this project is moving for me, a very precious gift.

– Alessandro Michele

Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey,” “A Clockwork Orange,” “Barry Lyndon,” “Eyes Wide Shut,” and “The Shining” are available to own today on Blu-ray and Digital.

CREDITS:

Creative Director: Alessandro Michele

Art Director: Christopher Simmonds 

Photographers & Directors: Mert & Marcus  

Make up: Thomas De Kluyver

Hair: Paul Hanlon

Exquisite GUCCI inside 360 MAGAZINE
the Dress via London Flair PR for use by 360 Magazine

Tadeusz Lysiak Interview

The 94th Oscar nominations have been announced, and with the awards happening on March 27. 360 was able to speak with the director of one of the nominated films, Tadeusz Lysiak. “The Dress” is hoping to garner best short film at the event. Topics include the director’s start with film making, the film itself, and his plans for the future.  

1. How did you get into filmmaking?

It all happened after I watched Inglourious Basterds by Quentin Tarantino. I was probably 16 years old back then and I remember going out of the theater and having coffee with my family and telling them: I’m gonna be a filmmaker one day. They said that was a great idea and they gave me a lot of advice: they suggested that it’d probably be better if I wouldn’t go to film school just after finishing high school. They reasoned that, “if you’d like to tell stories about life, you’d have to experience life a little at first.” So that’s why I decided to study Cultural Studies at the University of Warsaw. And only after finishing… [was when I] applied to Warsaw Film School. And it was the best choice of my life, they taught me everything I know. Warsaw Film School is such a cool place!

2. A lot of your work covers sensitive topics. Why is that?

In WFS they always teach us to ask ourselves what bothers us with the world, what there is to change or repair, and to never tell stories that are not important to us personally. So that’s what I’m doing. I’m deeply interested in sensitive, social, or psychological topics, and that’s why my films are focused on them.

3. Why did you decide to create a film about disability and intimacy?

Because it is something that is not often talked about! I find it deeply disturbing that there are still some prejudices in that territory, and some really bad things are still happening to women with disabilities all around the world. University of Michigan says that 40% of women with any sort of disability are being sexually or physically assaulted during their lifetime. This is absolutely terrifying. 

4. How did you feel when you found out you received an Oscar nomination?

This is such a surreal feeling, especially because “The Dress” is a student project made just to pass an exam in Warsaw Film School. We were all hoping to get a good grade and that’s it. And now we are nominated for an Oscar. This is a story for yet another movie. 

5. How long did the filming process take?

I think you can sum all of it up in roughly one year. At first, it was a couple of months of research and writing the script, then further development, preproduction, and finally 6 days of shooting and three months of postproduction. It was a hard time since we didn’t have a big budget and too many resources.

6. What was your best moment on set?

I must say that the best moment was the last shot. It was 5 AM, we were all so tired and exhausted and I remember that as soon as we finished rolling I started crying, and we all cried so much, and then we hug[ged] each other and drank champagne and it was such a great moment of accomplishment and relief!

7. Who were your favorite people to work with on set?

I just loved everybody. Since it was a student project, most of the crew were my close friends. We were having a lot of fun, but also we worked so hard, driven by our passion to tell this story. I have to thank Konrad Bloch, my cinematographer, who is such a sensitive guy and a true artist. I think of him as an absolute co-author, …as well as Anna Dzieduszycka. It was a huge group effort.

8. Who are your influences?

I think I have many, but the most important ones are certainly: Stanley Kubrick, David Fincher, Roman Polański, Krzysztof Kieślowski, and Michael Haneke. I believe that all of them did in their films what I would like to do: they looked into people’s minds, they looked at what is hidden, what is repressed.

9. What would you like to accomplish career-wise?

Ultimately, I would like to make films in the US, in English— for the simple reason that I want as many people as possible to watch them. I feel like I need to tell different stories and share them with others. This is a hunger that I cannot satisfy. My focus is now on working on my feature-length debut, which will be a psychological thriller.

10. What should we expect from you in the future? 

My full-length debut is at a fairly advanced stage of development, we are working on the script. The working title is “Obsession.” I have not yet decided whether I will want to do it in Poland or in the States. It’s a universal story, it would work anywhere. The film will tell the story of a young couple whose daughter one day disappears without a trace and both of them begin to fall into madness because of it.

11. Describe “The Dress” in one word.

Desire.

12. What do you want people to take away from “The Dress?”

I would like them to see that there is still a lot of evil in the world. That we still have a lot to fix. And that we should treat eachother with respect and dignity. This is especially important nowadays.

POORSTACY image provided by Hannah Haines and 10K Projects for use by 360 MAGAZINE.

POORSTACY Releases Children of the Dark

Today, South Florida rock artist POORSTACY releases his latest single “Children of the Dark,” out now via 10K Projects. The second single released ahead of his forthcoming album Party at the Cemetery (set to release this fall), Stacy considers “Children of the Dark” to be a precursor to the full album. “‘Children of the Dark’ kind of sets the tone for the album more than anything. It was the record I recorded that really helped me guide the full project. It’s a tribute to the lives of my friends who have died, but it’s also very live and energetic,” he says.

“Death is the one thing everyone’s super afraid of, but it’s the only thing we are promised. I’m choosing to celebrate it instead of being sad,” POORSTACY explains. For the South Florida native, the last few years have been some of his hardest, but they also have given him purpose and conviction like never before.

With his upcoming album Party At The Cemetery, the rock artist pays his respects to his friends who passed away. Self-admittedly, he’s lost really “all [his] original friends,” in one tragedy or another, and the music reflects that. Forged in equal parts pain, apathy and celebration, POORSTACY tells a nuanced story of life and loss with a level of understanding that can only come from someone who has seen it all.

For Stacy, born Carlito Milfort Jr., making a rock album like Party At The Cemetery is not a trend, designed for clout. In fact, he “doesn’t give a fuck” about that kind of thing at all. This is the music that soundtracked his life. Growing up in West Palm Beach, Florida, Stacy fell in love with music by hanging out in the crowds of local shows. “I’ve been going to shows since I was 12 or 13. Slam punk, metalcore, death metal. Lots of satanic shit. I also went to a lot of raves where there was a ton of drum and bass,” he says.

Though the rock and electronic music that he gravitated towards as a kid once seemed like two very different scenes, they both thrived on a true DIY sensibility which Stacy loved. By his late teens, he began releasing his own songs to SoundCloud, in hopes that he could capture that same DIY spirit native to South Florida. Part of the early wave of emo-rap talents on the platform, Stacy penned underground hits like “make up” which gained millions of streams and ushered the subgenre into the mainstream consciousness.

His influence on the streaming platform led him to a deal with Elliot Grainge’s 10K Projects where he began releasing songs with labelmates like producer Nick Mira of Internet Money and iann dior and other talents like Travis Barker and Whethan. With his acclaimed crossover project The Breakfast Club and single “Choose Life” (a nod to the film Trainspotting), Stacy showed his penchant for storytelling and allusion, something which he cements as one of his artistic signatures on Party At The Cemetery.

Even his name is an homage to one of his favorites (skateboarder Stacy Peralta) who inspired POORSTACY with his craftsmanship and his ability to play the long game. “Stacy Peralta himself was not shown a lot of attention at the start, but he ended up being one of the biggest legends in skateboarding in the end. I always loved the idea of that, of doing your own thing and having it pay off.” Just like Peralta, POORSTACY isn’t making music for short term accolades and fame, he’s doing this for the art and legacy of it.

With this boundless interest in pop culture and art, POORSTACY’s first fully fledged rock record Party At The Cemetery is an eclectic collage of the stories, films, friends, and subgenres that have captured his attention and inspired him throughout his life. “I want to incorporate it all into my art. I love ballet. I love Stanley Kubrick. I love Tim Burton. I love Victorian architecture. There’s so much I draw on,” he says.

LISTEN TO “CHILDREN OF THE DARK” HERE
AND WATCH THE MUSIC VIDEO HERE

Best Irish Movies Ever

Ireland is known for a lot of things, including its crystal, beer, anyone who wins the Irish lottery as well as wool-knit sweaters. But one of the things that this nation has bestowed to the world of Hollywood is its plethora of actors, poets, and playwrights. That’s right; we’re talking about Irish movies. 

With that in mind, we have put together a list of some of our favorite Irish films that people can binge-watch in 2020. You can expect anything from classic favorites such as Into The West to the more contemporary hits like The Wind That Shakes The Barley. 

  1. Waking Ned (1998)

Waking Ned or Waking Ned Devine, as it’s known in North America, will forever go down as one of the best Irish and comedy movies in cinema history. It’s so funny, you’ll barely have enough minutes to catch your breath while laughing between the scenes. 

The movie takes place in rural Ireland and depicts the story of two elderly best friends, namely Jackie O’Shea (Ian Bannen) and Michael O’Sullivan (David Kelly). Later on in the story, it was found out that someone in their tiny village wins the Irish lottery and they sought to discover the winner’s identity.  

  1. Barry Lyndon (1975)

This masterpiece by Stanley Kubrick depicts the story of a scoundrel from the 18th century (Ryan O’Neal) who travels all over Europe and eventually woos a noblewoman (Marissa Berenson). However, the events later bring about a series of “Misfortunes and Disasters” as the intertitle indicates. Nasa-based cinematography and majestic music make this is one of Kubrick’s finest entries imaginable.

  1. P.S. I Love You (2007)

This Hilary Swank-led flick isn’t going to sway over the critics due to its sentimental-laden narrative. But don’t let that stop you from enjoying some of the Emerald Isle’s most beautiful locations. A heartbroken young widow forced to start a new life without her husband, who had lost his life due to an unprecedented illness, is something that is relatable and can help lighten the mood that Irish Cinema can often remain brooding in.

  1. The Wind That Shakes The Barley (2006)

When he’s not shooting other gangs in Peaky Blinders, or antagonizing Batman as Scarecrow in The Dark Knight trilogy, renowned Irish actor Cillian Murphy is out fighting for the Irish Independence in The Wind That Shakes The Barley. Murphy stars as Damian O’Donovan, who, alongside his brother Teddy O’Donovan (Padriac Delaney) join the Irish Republic Army to fight for the Emerald Isle’s independence from the United Kingdom in 1920. 

Like other war dramas, this film has its share of bloody and bleak moments. So don’t expect yourself to go in with a smile on your face by the time you’re done with it. Nevertheless, don’t let that get in the way of you enjoying one of the best Irish-produced films of all time.

  1. Brooklyn (2015)

It takes a great movie to tell a compelling story and bring about a robust emotional response, and that’s exactly what Brooklyn (2015) aims to provide its viewers.

The movie is based on Colm Tobin’s novel of the same name and stars multi-Oscar-nominee Saoirse Ronan. It’s a wonderful story of a young Irish girl who ventures off to New York in the United States, torn between two of her lovers and two states. 

Filmed in Coney Island, New York, Dublin, and Wexford, and being nominated for three Academy Awards, including Ronan for Best Actress, Brooklyn is, without a doubt, one of the best period drama flicks to have emanated from Ireland. 

  1. The Hole in the Ground (2019)

Ireland had its highest-grossing movie in the form of a horror number known as The Hole in the Ground courtesy of writer/director Lee Cronin. It revolves around a woman who may believe that her son has been replaced with an imposter. 

  1. Intermission (2003)

If you haven’t seen Intermission yet, you are really missing out. It starred some of Ireland’s best actors, including Colin Farrell, Cillian Murphy, Colm Meaney, and Kelly MacDonald. 

When it was released, Intermission was the overall package deal: it has thrills, romance, and a barrel of laughs that we still reminisce even after 17 years. 

  1. The Commitments (1991)

This movie is about an independent rock band from a poor rural area of North Dublin who desires to introduce soul music to Ireland. A bit of an oddball of a goal, but it no doubt makes for an enjoyable movie. This Alan Parker-helmed is known for its humor and vulgarity, which also serves as a decent introduction to Irish folk-rock artist Glen Hansard. Those who know of Hansard could be because he shared the spotlight with Czech singer-songwriter Marketa Irglova in Once or his real-life Swell Season duo group. 

  1. Hunger (2008)

Hunger was renowned British director Steve McQueen’s first dip into directing where he and Irish playwright Enda Walsh wrote the story for the movie. Hunger, which stars popular Irish/German actor Michael Fassbender, is a profoundly engaging movie that will both entice and challenge its viewers. 

The story of the movie revolves around ira volunteer and MP Bobby Sands (Fassbender). He had led the Northern Ireland Maze Prison’s second IRA hunger strike to regain some of the political statuses for Republican prisoners.

Interestingly, Fassbender’s own mother happens to be the great grand-niece of the historical Irish politician and revolutionary Michael Collins. 

Before going into this, we should warn you that the movie isn’t for the faint-hearted as it is violent, disturbing, and shocking. However, Fassbender gave a lifetime performance, which in turn shot his name into stardom at that point onward.