Posts tagged with "360 magazine Vaughn Lowery"

Kaelen Felix illustrates truck article for 360 Magazine

Rules of the Road: Why Following the Law Matters

Traffic fatalities claim the lives of over 30,000 Americans every year, making it vital to know the rules of the road before you hit the street. In 2018, 36,560 Americans died in car crashes, one of the highest amounts on record in recent years. Traffic laws help to mitigate many of the risks of the road, provided everyone knows them and adheres to them. Following the law can keep you safe while you’re driving and is vital to staying out of legal trouble. 

Should you be in an accident, your strict adherence to the law can benefit you in a court of law and in seeking compensation from another driver. Find out why it matters to follow the law when you’re on the road and how you can do it.

Wear Your Seatbelt

It can be tempting to joyride without a seat belt, but you place yourself at great risk of harm and legal trouble if you don’t buckle up before hitting the road. Mandatory seat belt laws for front seat drivers exist in every state and the District of Columbia except New Hampshire. Another 31 states have mandatory seat belt laws for adult passengers in the rear seats. There’s a good chance that if you’re not wearing a seat belt while your car is in motion, you’re in violation of the law. Should you be pulled over or become the victim of an accident, you could face a ticket or worse.

Stay Off Your Cell Phone

Answering a few texts while you’re on a quiet stretch of road can seem harmless, right? Unfortunately, doing so can be used as evidence against you should you be in a car accident. While you’re texting, you could easily lose track of the following on the road:

Other drivers

Pedestrians

Bicyclists

Speed limits

Obstacles

Changes in the road

Weather conditions

Many states have laws against cell phone usage while you’re operating a motor vehicle. Using your phone to call or text while you’re driving leaves an electronic trail that can be used to establish you were distracted and are responsible in full or part for your accident.

Follow the Speed Limit

Speeding is a dangerous and illegal activity that can land you with an expensive ticket and keep you from where you’re trying to go. Speed limits are set to safely govern the flow of traffic, and if you move too fast (or too slow) you can throw off this delicate balancing act. If you are violating the speed limit of the road you’re on, you may get pulled over, and with too many tickets on your record, you could face a temporary or even permanent suspension of your license.

Don’t Drive While Intoxicated

Driving while under the influence of a controlled substance, such as drugs or alcohol, places yourself and other motorists at grave risk of collision. When driving under the influence, your reflexes will be impaired, even if you feel like you’re in full control of them. In all likelihood, your driving will be erratic enough to tip-off a police officer, who may stop you and give you a DUI or DWI. In the worst cases, you could collide with another car, a pedestrian, a motorcyclist or bicyclist, or an obstacle on the road.

Seek Legal Advice

Sometimes, even when we play by the rules, we still are victims of unfortunate events. If you’ve been involved in an automobile accident, an experienced car accident lawyer can argue your case and help you obtain justice and the compensation to which you’re entitled. A traffic accident can change your life forever, but with the right legal representation, you can take great strides to make it whole again. 

Six-Time World Champ Comes out of Retirement

A former six-time World Boxing champion from Miami is making a highly anticipated comeback to the sport at the ripe age of 40 years old, as part of a mission to reclaim the title once hers and raise the caliber of women’s professional boxing.

Puerto Rico-born Melissa Hernandez has been living in Miami for the last nine years, building a name for herself as one of the region’s most reputable boxing instructors—teaching a hardened class of fitness enthusiasts at the Continuum on South Beach Sporting Club for the last three years. As someone who is self-confessed as Married to Boxing, Hernandez now yearns for gold again, since retiring from the sport in 2016 and while keeping a watchful eye on the women rising up the ranks with utmost contempt for whom she considers as not that great.”

Last year, Melissa re-laced her gloves and returned to her New York gym to resume training at Gleason’s in Brooklyn, where she sparred at the height of her career. While considering Miami her home, she regularly travels to New York to train with her eye on the prize, after recently becoming the number one contender for the World WBC Welterweight Title, currently held by American fighter, Jessica McCaskill. With her new Las Vegas-based manager and promotor in New York behind her, Melissa is determined to de-throne the reigning champion when boxing resumes in the wake of COVID-19.

I decided to retire in 2016 after winning all the titles in my weight class because the purse that came with the glory was ridiculously low says Melissa when asked why she threw in the towel. “I decided to return to the sport because I’ve seen how competitively weak the field has now become and I want to change that. I love working with my classes at the Continuum Sporting Club in Miami Beach and I’ve seen the passion and hard-working talent that comes from Miami as a city with a strong boxing history. I like pushing the envelope and my body and mind feels just as able as I was ten years ago.”

Melissa moved from Puerto Rico to the Bronx in New York with her family in 1984. Melissa’s mother was as scientist and father a psychologist and she attended the Bronx Community College, but dropped out to pursue her love for the arts and a career in film, video and photography after an internship at the Whitney Museum at the age of 15 years old. Melissa wanted to be an editor in film but ended up in the fashion business working for the likes of Patagonia and The GAP in New York City for four years until she was 22 years old.

Melissa admired fellow Puerto Rican boxer, Héctor Camacho, and began hanging-out with friends at a local boxing gym in the Bronx. In 2002 at 22 years old, Melissa started sparring with a trainer who saw tremendous potential and encouraged her to train for participation in the prestigious New York Golden Gloves boxing tournament at Madison Square Garden where she lost in the final. Melissa grew to enjoy her time in the ring and realized she was made for boxing.

After fighting at the USA Boxing Nationals as an amateur, Melissa became certified by USA Boxing in 2003 to train amateur boxers, but was determined to continue with her own career in Florida where she was scouted by a number of trainers. Melissa continued to hone her boxing skills for a year before moving back to New York City, where she continued her training in the Bronx at The Webster Police Athletic League Center. Melissa won the New York Golden Gloves tournament over two consecutive years in 2004 and 2005 and turned pro in the winter of 2005 under the mentorship of trainer Belinda Laracuente. Melissa began training as a professional at the renowned Gleason’s Gym in Brooklyn and fought her first WBA Junior Welterweight World Title fight against Kelsey Jeffries in 2006. In the same year, Melissa claimed her first title and became the WIBA Super Bantamweight World Champion after beating Lisa Brown in Edmonton, Canada. By 2008, Melissa became the top ranked pound-for-pound fighter in the world and would travel the globe defending her titles and claiming many more along the way, before moving to Florida in 2011 where she would train at the world famous 5th Street Gym in Miami Beach.

After winning six World Boxing titles over a ten-year period, Melissa decided to hang up her gloves in 2016, citing how female boxers were financially being treated unfairly. Over the next several years, Melissa would concentrate on being a successful boxing instructor, teaching at local gyms throughout Miami and building her individual client base for one-on-one instruction. Melissa’s elite talent as a boxing instructor was spotted by a fellow trainer who introduced her to the Continuum Sporting Club in Miami Beach, where Melissa would become immensely popular among the residents and homeowners at the luxury beachfront community.

Last year, Melissa resumed her training at Gleason’s Gym in New York City in her quest to reclaim the WBC Welterweight title that she hopes will be planned for later this year, after winning her first comeback fight in Louisiana in 2019. Known as Melissa “HuracanShark” Hernandez, her previous titles include: WIBA Super Bantamweight, GBU Lightweight World Title, WIBA Lightweight World Title, WIBA Super Featherweight World Title, WBA Intercontinental Featherweight Title, WIBA Interim Lightweight Title, IBS Light Welterweight World Title, WBC Featherweight World Title and UBF Super Lightweight World Title.

While age 40 is considered old for women’s boxing, this doesn’t deter Melissa, who wants to continue fighting for another two years until she claims the one or more titles she vows to bring home to Miami. Her long-term plans are to open her own boxing studio while continuing to paint and discover new art galleries in her spare time. Melissa lives in Miami Beach, Florida and is currently single.

Rita Azar illustrates helicopter for 360 MAGAZINE

See Las Vegas with Papillon Helicopters

Papillon Grand Canyon Helicopters is introducing two brand new, exclusive packages featuring a luxury dining experience and a fabulous night flight of the Las Vegas Strip.

The VIP Fly & Dine Luxury Night Out package is a great way to experience the best Las Vegas has to offer. Starting at $199* per person, guests begin the evening with an incredible five-course tasting menu at Mott 32 at The Venetian® Resort Las Vegas, a Forbes Travel Guide 4-Star Award restaurant. This contemporary restaurant brings a modern approach to Chinese cuisine. The menu features dishes such as Hot & Sour Iberico Pork Shanghainese Soup Dumplings, Signature 36-month Acorn-fed Barbecue Pluma Iberico Pork, Grilled Sea Bass or Stir-Fried Australian M6 Wagyu Sirloin and a signature Maine Lobster Fried Rice served with king oyster mushrooms and edamame. The meal concludes with the Bamboo Green Forest, an elegant dessert with rich Yuzu cream, yoghurt, lime sorbet with matcha sponge cake topped with crispy yoghurt and a white chocolate bamboo.

Following dinner, guests will be transferred via limousine to Papillon’s VIP Las Vegas terminal to begin their helicopter Strip Highlights Night Flight. Guests will experience breathtaking sights of the Las Vegas Strip as they enjoy views of the Luxor’s Sky beam, the Eiffel Tower, the fountains of Bellagio, Doge’s Palace plaza at The Venetian, the 1,000-foot-tall Strat & SkyPodand Downtown Las Vegas.

The second package, the Afternoon Bites + Night Flights, includes a tasty three-course lunchtime menu from Matteo’s Ristorante Italiano at The Venetian Resort. Priced at $129 per person*, this dynamic menu brings flavors inspired by Northern Italian cuisine with choices that include Cremella, Mandilli di Seta, Branzino, Herb Roasted Half Chicken with Reggiano crema, and Slow Roasted Pork Belly. For dessert, guests will choose between a homemade Cannoli or Panna Cotta. This package will also include the exciting Strip Highlights Night Flight.

To book reservations, call (702) 736-7243 or book online – Fly & Dine Luxury Night Out or Afternoon Bites + Night Flights.

Make a passionate pitch—if you want investors

The brains of investors are wired to pay closer attention to entrepreneurs who pitch with passion, according to new research.

One would expect that entrepreneurs who pitch their startup ideas with passion are more apt to entice investors. Now there’s scientific proof the two are connected: enthusiasm and financial backing. According to new research from Case Western Reserve University, the brains of potential investors are wired to pay closer attention to entrepreneurs who pitch with passion.

Researchers examined investors’ neural responses to entrepreneurs’ pitches, conducting a randomized experiment that explored the response of investors’ brains using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

(fMRI)—finding a causal relationship between passion of the pitcher and interest from investors.

“No one has ever invested in a startup they ignored,” said Scott Shane, the A. Malachi Mixon III Professor of Entrepreneurial Studies in the Weatherhead School of Management at Case Western Reserve.

“Founder passion is essential to establishing investor attention, and our study demonstrates measurable neural effects that offer a biological explanation for their tendency to react positively to enthusiasm and emotion of entrepreneurs,” said Shane, lead author of the paper, published in the Journal of Business Venturing. By showing such energy in pitching their business ideas, entrepreneurs can considerably increase neural engagement in potential investors—increasing the odds these financiers will support a new, untested venture by having strong, measurable effects on their decision-making.

“Most of time investors just say ‘no,’” said Shane. “In fact, the vast majority of entrepreneurs never receive a dime from external investors.

“Entrepreneurs should know: More engaged brains are more likely to meaningfully evaluate pitches,” he said. “We believe our data makes a strong argument that displays of passion trigger heightened engagement that, in turn, makes investors more likely to write a check.”

The experiment

Videos of pitches—identical in content but different in delivery—were randomly assigned to investors inside an fMRI machine. Depending on the passion-level of the pitch, investors’ brains reacted differently: Heightened displays of passion increased investor fixation on the stimulus (the pitch) to override distractions—and demonstrate a causal effect of displayed passion on investor interest.

· Investors randomly assigned a pitch with high founder passion resulted in informal investor interest increasing by 26%, relative to the same pitch delivered with low passion;

· Data from fMRIs showed investor neural responses to entrepreneurs’ high-passion pitches increased investor neural engagement by 39% over lower founder passion.

“More engaged brains are more likely to meaningfully evaluate pitches—and not play on their phones or think about lunch which should result in more favorable investor assessments,” said Shane.

While it’s possible that other mechanisms may be present in the brains of investors—such as inferring from passion that entrepreneurs may be more capable or competent—the experiment showed that passion is a key mechanism because it causes investors to pay attention, said Shane.

The practice of passion

The findings offer strong implications for the practice of entrepreneurship. “Pitching with enthusiasm and passion—these are skills that can be taught,” said Shane. “Flat, unenthusiastic pitches are the enemy of attracting investor attention and to succeeding in a competitive, cutthroat environment.”

Each year, hundreds of thousands of early-stage entrepreneurs, who often lack established track records, offer pitches—widely recognized as the gateway to investor funding—to financiers across the globe. The study focused on Informal investors—referred to as “family, friends and foolhardy strangers” by the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor who account for most startup investments, investing $1 trillion globally between 2012-2015, according to the organization.

The study was co-authored by David Clingingsmith, an associate professor of economics at the Weatherhead School. Will Drover of the University of Oklahoma, and Moran Cerf of Northwestern University also co-authored the paper.

Texas Country Musician–from Nashville to NASA

Tom Wilmer 360 Magazine Culture Editor reports from the heart of Texas in Burnet County where he visits with a Texas country music legend.

John Arthur Martinez performing deep in the heart of Texas

John Arthur Martinez has written more than 700 songs, and produced 13 albums including his latest, San Antonio Woman.

One of Martinez’s songs went intergalactic—accompanying the crew of the space shuttle Atlantis.

John Arthur Martinez’s music accompanied the Space Shuttle Atlantis astronauts company while orbiting the earth. Photo Credit: NASA

Martinez, a veteran of the TV series Nashville Star, visits with correspondent Tom Wilmer at the Trailblazer Grill in the Highland Lakes town of Burnet.

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN TO JOHN ARTHUR MARTINEZ KCBX/NPR-ONE PODCAST INTERVIEW

Music segments included in the Podcast: An Early Thursday Morning, The Ride, and Making Good Time used with permission of the artist, John Arthur Martinez.

 

You are invited to subscribe to the Lowell Thomas Award-winning travel show podcast, Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer, featured on the NPR Podcast DirectoryApple Podcast, the NPR One App & Stitcher.com. Twitter: TomCWilmer. Instagram: Thomas.Wilmer. Member of the National Press Club in Washington D.C. Underwriting support provided by the Society of St. Vincent de Paul.

Lake Geneva Wisconsin-year round paradise

360 Magazine Culture Editor, Tom Wilmer visits with Kathleen Seeberg, Executive Director of Walworth County Visitors Bureau as she shares insights about the four seasons attractions of Lake Geneva, Wisconsin.

boating and yachting on Lake Geneva, Wisconsin has been an iconic part of the allure since the 1870s. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

The modern iteration of Lake Geneva as a consummate resort/vacation destination commenced with Gilded Age barons of Chicago who came to build their mansions on the shores of Lake Geneva, Wisconsin following the devastating Great Chicago Fire of 1871.

 

Iconic Eastlake Victorian architecture on the Lake Geneva waterfront. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

Situated just 75 miles away from the Windy City, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin quickly became a coveted destination for the rich and famous…and it remains true today.

The innkeeper’s welcoming smile at the historic circa-1856 Maxwell Mansion symbolizes the friendliness of the locals in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin  Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

Over the years, the lakefront town has evolved in to a year-round vacation destination for everybody even though luxurious mansions still line the lakefront—and in Lake Geneva’s modest fashion—even the resort-sized mansions are sometimes fondly referred to as summer cottages and cabins.

 

Since the days of Big Band live music performances Lake Geneva’s Riviera remains as cool place for gatherings of all sorts. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

Vacation time in Lake Geneva doesn’t stop with the first November gales…that’s when the locals start prepping for the winter ice festival, tuning up their ice boat racers, and dreaming of snowmobiling, drilling holes in the ice, and setting up their fish shanties on the frozen lake.

 

Gage Marine century old classic vessels are an ideal way to cruise around on Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

In the wheelhouse of an iconic Gage Marine vessel touring Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

Bill Gage at Pier 290 Restaurant at Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

This us just a sampler of the outdoor allures that keep this cool, small town humming year round. The businesses are mostly ma & pa operations–an important ingredient that makes Lake Geneva a most welcoming place.

 

Downtown Lake Geneva, Wisconsin is like stepping back in time. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

Lake Geneva Wisconsin’s downtown Horticultural Hall pays homage to the region’s agrarian roots. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN TO THE NPR.ORG PODCAST ALL ABOUT LAKE GENEVA

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN TO BILL GAGE PODCAST TALK ABOUT EVERYTHING MARITIME ON LAKE GENEVA

 

You are invited to subscribe to the Lowell Thomas Award-winning travel show podcast, Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer, featured on the NPR Podcast DirectoryApple Podcast, the NPR One App & Stitcher.com. Twitter: TomCWilmer. Instagram: Thomas.Wilmer. Member of the National Press Club in Washington D.C.

Doggie Haven-Home For Life

360 Magazine Culture Editor,Tom Wilmer, reports from Wisconsin where he discovers a last hope option for unadoptable dogs and cats.

There are two standard options for dogs and cats that arrive at shelters and pounds: adoption or euthanasia.

Lisa LaVerdia decided to create another option that she dubbed The Third Door, providing a home for unadoptable dogs and cats.

Dr. Jane Goodall visits with Home For Life’s Raha

In a recent visit to Home For Life in rural Wisconsin Tom learns that LaVerdia was a successful lawyer with a specialization in asbestos issues and juvenile lead poisoning.

But mid-career, she took down her shingle, purchased 40 acres skirting the Apple River in Star Prairie, Wisconsin, and opened the Home For Life sanctuary for dogs and cats.

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN TO Lisa LaVerdia on NPR.ORG digital media podcast

 

Lisa LaVerdia at Home For Life   Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

Central to Laverdia’s mission is to provide care for life for dogs and cats that are unadoptable—either due to severe health issues or traumatic injuries, often intentionally inflicted by sadistic tormenters.

Through a network of animal rescuers around the world, the dogs arrive from various countries including India, Southeast Asia, Mexico and Saudi Arabia.

The facility includes temperature-controlled buildings and three catteries, including a building specifically for cats with communicable feline leukemia.

 

Journalist Heide Brandes visits with kitties at Home For Life   Photo Credit:Tom Wilmer

In addition to being home to an average of 100 cats, about 100 dogs reside at the facility in doggie accommodations that include suites and townhouses designed for dogs who need to live in pairs or small groups— complete with piped-in music.

Dog and cat runs are attached to each residential unit, along with four off-leash, expansive meadows.

 

Heide Brandes with paralyzed doggie at Home For Life  Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

Staffer Barbara Swenson at Home For Life’s Cattery   Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

Latest News– Ashely Judd is scheduled to participate in Home For Life’s gala 2019 fundraiser!

 

You are invited to subscribe to the Lowell Thomas Award-winning travel show podcast, Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer, featured on the NPR Podcast DirectoryApple Podcast, the NPR One App & Stitcher.com. Twitter: TomCWilmer. Instagram: Thomas.Wilmer. Member of the National Press Club in Washington D.C

Big Island’s Bright Side

360 Magazine Culture Editor Tom Wilmer reports from the Big Island of Hawaii

The reason the 4,000-square-mile island of Hawaii is fondly dubbed the “Big Island” is because it’s the size of Connecticut—it’s so big, all of the other Hawaiian Islands would fit within the boundary of the island.

The island’s recent volcanic activity has impacted the economy due to substantial cancellations by vacationers. But there are major resort destinations far from the adverse effects of the lava flows and attendant air pollution.

For example, the Kohala Coast—with a large enclave of homes, condos, and resorts—is situated approximately 100 miles from the East Rift Zone.

Join the conversation with three islanders as they share their thoughts about the positive aspects of island life today. Simon Amos is the hotel manager at the Hilton Waikoloa Village; Vicky Kometani works at the historic Mauna Kea Resort in the heart of the Kohala Coast; and Laura Aquino is with Island Events based in Kona.

Mauna Kea’s beach is one of Hawaii’s most exotic

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN TO THE NPR.ORG PODCAST INTERVIEW

Many local businesses island-wide are experiencing a downturn in business, and some workers have had their hours cut back or been laid off due to the decrease in tourism.

International news reports have been surgically focused on the Kīlauea volcano’s East Rift Zone volcanic eruptions and seismic activity—leaving many people with the false impression that the entire island is a disaster zone.

Big Island Hawaii’s Kohala Coast sunset

Paradoxically, Volcanoes National Park has been the island’s number one tourist draw for decades.

150 years ago, 31 year-old Mark Twain put the island’s volcanism on the world map when he came to the island specifically to experience and write about the island’s volcanic activity as a correspondent for the Sacramento Union newspaper in 1866.

Helicopter flightseeing companies, such as Paradise Helicopters, cater to tourists and locals alike signing up for over-flights of the volcano. Adventurous tourists and locals are hopeful that a viewing platform will open in the near future for up-close observation of the flows.

Volcanism and its attendant vog (volcanic fog) have been an intermittent part of island life for more than 30 years. Vog is definitely an issue in the Kona Kailua area, but most days up the coast along the Kohala Coast the sky is often bright blue and clear.

MACHINE GUN KELLY × PETE DAVIDSON

Machine Gun Kelly drops new video Loco featuring SNL’s Pete Davidson

 

Machine Gun Kelly has put together a special video in between shooting a strong supporting role opposite SNL player Pete Davidson in the indie Big Time Adolescence.  While on location the rapper/actor shot this off-the-cuff,  gritty, and raunchy hot video titled, LOCORunning rogue throughout the streets of Syracuse, MGK & Pete got especially creative with this psychedelic journey that literally takes fans on a “TRIP…”  The video is basically a “run & gun” video that they shot from 2am – 5am for two days after they wrapped shooting the film for the day.

Japanese tourist Tomomi Hanamure who was brutally murdered near Havasu Falls in the Grand Canyon

Murder in the Grand Canyon

Culture Editor Tom Wilmer visits with Annette McGivney, author of “Pure Land: A True Story of Three Lives, Three Cultures, and the Search for Heaven on Earth.”

McGivney’s book tells the story of Tomomi Hanamure, a Japanese citizen who loved exploring the wilderness of the American Southwest. She was murdered on her birthday—May 8, 2006.

Hanmure was stabbed 29 times as she hiked to Havasu Falls on the Havasupai Indian Reservation, at the bottom of the Grand Canyon. Her killer was a distressed 18-year-old Havasupai youth.

CLICK HERE to Listen to McGivney’s podcast interview

Pure Land book cover

“Pure Land” is about this tragedy. But it is also the story of how McGivney’s quest to understand Hanamure’s life and death wound up guiding the author through her own life-threatening crisis.

On this journey—stretching from the southern tip of Japan to the bottom of the Grand Canyon, and into the ugliest aspects of human behavior—”Pure Land” offers proof of the healing powers of nature and the resiliency of the human spirit.

Annette McGivney

Annette McGivney

McGivney is Southwest Editor for Backpacker Magazine and professor of journalism at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff, Arizona.

You are invited to subscribe to the Lowell Thomas Award-winning podcast travel show,  Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer, featured on the NPR Podcast Directory,  Apple Podcast, the NPR One App & Stitcher.com. Twitter: TomCWilmer.Instagram: Thomas.Wilmer.