Posts tagged with "Saudi Arabia"

Floating Homes illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Digital Twin Floating Homes

Digital Twin floating home designs could help coastal cities cope with rising sea levels

Climate Change may force some city dwellers to take to the water, according to the C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group.

It estimates that some 800 million people and 570 cities could be at risk by 2050 if sea levels rise half a metre, as forecast by some experts, but C40 Cities – 97 cities representing a twelfth of the global population and a quarter of its economy – believes a floating neighborhood in Amsterdam, Netherlands, shows a way to cope.

Known as the ‘Schoonschip‘ – literally ‘clean ship’ in Dutch but translating more as green or environmental ship – it houses more than 100 people in 46 sustainable homes across 30 water plots. The area was designed to be mainly self-sufficient, with a minimal impact on nature while adapting to the rising water.

Space&Matter, the Amsterdam architects’ practice behind the water village, said: “Since urban areas struggle with high density, we should make better use of the space on the water.

“With Schoonschip, we want to set the example and show how living on water can be a great and better alternative for people and our planet.”

Schoonschip also utilizes clean energy sources: solar panels and heat pumps provide heating, and the architects plan to convert wastewater from toilets and showers back into energy. All buildings also have a green roof – part vegetation and geared to rainwater collection.

With almost 70% of the world’s population expected to be living in cities by 2050, the Schoonschip concept could help places like the Indonesian capital Jakarta (pop: 10.5 million) where evacuation currently appears to be the only answer to rising sea levels.

US cities are also at risk; news organization Climate Central listed 22 in Florida in a Top 25 US cities most vulnerable to coastal flooding.

And that’s where 3D Digital Twin modelling steps in, according to Cityzenith CEO Michael Jansen, by enabling the Schoonschip concept to be adapted for large scale use:

“As many have pointed out, including world-renowned philanthropist Bill Gates, Climate Change threatens the existence of coastal cities, but Digital Twin software can ensure infrastructure efficiency, minimize emissions, and most importantly, simulate cities on the water to ensure they can survive and thrive in adverse conditions.”

Cityzenith’s tech already features in key projects worldwide, such as the Orlando SED smart district, the Lamina Tower luxury property apartment project in Saudi Arabia, and the smart city of Amaravati, India. 

Book award illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Sheikh Zayed Book Award

Sheikh Zayed Book Award Announces 2021 Winners

The World’s Leading Arab Literature and Culture Prizes

  • Three women win including Iman Mersal for the Literature Prize, with additional awards to a study of Saudi Women writers, Arab oration, and a history of supremacy
  • Each winner receives a career-changing prize of $204,181
  • Winners hail from five countries: Egypt (2), Lebanon (1), Saudi Arabia (2), Tunisia (2), and the US (1)
  • Literature and Children’s Book categories receive translation funding
  • The awards will be presented in a ceremony streamed live during the Abu Dhabi International Book Fair (May 23-29, 2021)
  • Record-breaking year for submissions with over 2,349 entries from 57 countries
  • Cultural Personality of the Year to be announced at a later date

Under the patronage of His Highness Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan, Crown Prince of the Emirate of Abu Dhabi and Deputy Supreme Commander of the United Arab Emirates Armed Forces, the Sheikh Zayed Book has revealed the winners of its 15th edition across eight key categories.

Three women took prizes this year with internationally renowned Egyptian author Iman Mersalwinning the Literature Prize, Dr. Asma bint Muqbil bin Awad Al-Ahmadi taking the Young Author Prize for her critical study of Saudi Women writers, and University of Chicago professorTahera Qutbuddin winning the Prize for Culture in Other Languages for her book Arabic Oration: Art and Function.

Michael Cooperson, a UCLA professor of Arabic, won the Translation Prize for his innovative translation of Maqamat Al-Hariri’s Impostures, a story of the popular Arab folk character Abu Zayd. The Children’s Literature category was won by the Tunisian author Mizouni Bannani for his novel An Artist Journey (Rehlat Fannan); The Literary and Art Criticism Prize was won by Khelil Gouia for his history of Tunisian art, The Path of Modernisation in the Visual Arts: From Drawing to Painting (Massar al Tahdeeth fil Funoon al Tashkeeliyya men al Ursooma ela al Lawhah). The Development of Nations Prize went to the Egyptian scholar Saeed El-Masri for his thought-provoking Legacy of Supremacy between Folklore and Religion (Turah al Este’la Bayn al Fokelore wal Majal al Dini). The Publishing and Technology Prize was presented to Dar Al Jadeed Publishing of Lebanon. The Cultural Personality of the Year Award to be announced at a later date. 

The winning titles in the children’s books and literature categories will be entitled for translation funding through the Award’s Translation Grant. Nine books have been translated into multiple languages since the launch of this grant. The Award has seen a growing interest in translation requests, reiterating the importance of building bridges between nations, cultures, literature, and heritage.

The Awards will be formally presented on May 24th and streamed live on YouTube from the Abu Dhabi International Book Fair (23-29 May 2021).

The winners will each receive a prize of $204,181 US (the equivalent of 750,000 United Arab Emirates dirhams) both in recognition of their achievements and to support their ongoing work. SZBA prize alumna Dame Marina Warner (Arab Culture in Other Languages, 2013) has described the Award as one that nourishes the academic community, “less of a trophy than a lavish bursary that allows the recipient to continue their adventures in understanding”.

2020 saw a record-breaking year for submissions, with 2,349 entries from 57 countries, particularly strongin the Young Author, Literature, and Children’s Literature categories. The Judging Committee noted that, despite a challenging year due to the global pandemic, they were delighted by the increase in submissions, reflecting not only the importance of literary awards but the resilience and vitality of the publishing industry.   

One of the Arab world’s most prestigious literary prizes, the Sheikh Zayed Book Award aims to showcase the most powerful, stimulating, and challenging works representing the Arab world, and to encourage greater scholarship and creativity by recognizing and rewarding these significant cultural achievements in Arabic culture.   In the words of last year’s Children’s Literature winner Ibtisam Barakat, the Sheikh Zayed Book Award is “the Arab world’s equivalent to the Nobel prize”.

H.E. Mohamed Khalifa Al Mubarak, Chairman of the Department of Culture and Tourism – Abu Dhabi, said, “Since its first edition in 2006, the Sheikh Zayed Book Award has proved to be a beacon of culture and literature, recognised and respected internationally as a champion of creativity. Through this inspirational Award, we honour the memory of our nation’s founding father, the late Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan, whose far-reaching vision for the UAE was intrinsically linked to the cornerstones of culture, knowledge and human development.”

Dr. Ali bin Tamim, Chairman of the Abu Dhabi Arabic Language Centre and Secretary General of the Sheikh Zayed Book Award, commented, “As one of the Arab world’s leading cultural awards we are proud to support a flourishing international publishing landscape and pleased to see winners are from five countries across the globe. The judges were especially impressed with the range of genres, the breadth of topics and the ambition of the scholars and writers represented here.  This year’s winners highlight the depth and prestige of the Award in the Arab world and beyond. We commend their achievement and look forward to seeing more superb work in the years to come.

French-Lebanese author Amin Maalouf, winner of the 2016 Cultural Personality of the year, commented, ‘In such difficult times, it is more important than ever to focus on books and on cultural values. They alone can provide us with the moral compass we so desperately need to move on with our eyes wide open.’

The 2021 Sheikh Zayed Book Award Winners:

The Prize for Literature: Dr. Iman Mersal for her book In the Footsteps of Enayat Al-Zayyat (Fee Athar Enayat Al Zayyat)

The judges presented this award to Ms. Mersal for her unique and poignant exploration of the life of the Egyptian writer Enayat al Zayat who died in 1963 four years before her only novel was published. Mersal blends a mix of investigative journalism and storytelling to illuminate a writer’s struggles with mental health and uncover the roots of a woman’s search for identity in contemporary Arab society. 

Iman Mersal is an Egyptian poet, writer, academic and translator. She works as an assistant professor of Arabic literature and Middle Eastern studies at the University of Alberta, Canada and currently resides in Marseille, France. An anthology of her works was translated into more than twenty-two languages and she has five poetry collections published. Herr book, Mamar Moetem Yasloh fee Talom Al Raks (A Dark Path Suitable for Learning to Dance), is one of the most important poetry books issued by the generation of the nineties in Arabic poetry.

The Prize for Young Author: Dr. Asma bint Muqbil bin Awad Al-Ahmadi for her book The Problems of the Narrated Self in the Saudi Feminist Novel (Eshkalyat Al-Thaat Al-Saredah Fee Al-Rwayah Al-Nesaayah Al-Saudiah)

The judges present this award to Dr. Asma bint Muqbil bin Awad Al-Ahmadi for her exploration of the themes of female identity through the lens of Saudi Arabian feminist literature, 1999-2012. This groundbreaking work focuses on topics that female Saudi writers have explored, such as belonging and self-realization.

A Saudi academic and critic, winner of the Sharjah Prize for Gulf Women’s Creativity 2019. Dr. Al-Ahmadi holds a PhD in Philosophy – Specializing in Arabic Language and Literature, and she is currently working as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Islamic Culture and Language Skills in the College of Science and Arts – King Abdulaziz University.

Prize for Children’s Literature: Mr. Mizouni Bannani for his book An Artist’s Journey (Rehlat Fannan)

The judges present this award to Mr. Bannani for his innovative use of language and multi-sensory educational techniques in ‘An Artist’s Journey‘. Mr. Bannani’s work is intended to inspire educators and children to learn through active participation and to ignite a sense of wonder and imagination in the process.

Mizouni Bannani is a Professor of Education Sciences at the Higher Institute for Applied Studies in Humanities in Sbeitla, Tunisia. He published two collections of short stories entitled Humma Al Ardh (The Fever of the Earth) in 1989, and Mawawil Aaed men Dhefat Al Nar (Mawawil of the One who Returned from the Shore of Fire) in 1996, in addition to a novel entitled Doroob Al Hawan (Paths of Humiliation). Bannani works as a literary and artistic consultant at Al Moanasah Publishing House and has participated in establishing the branch of the Union of Tunisian Writers in Kasserine in 1997 and chaired it until 2017.

Prize for Publishing & Technology: Dar Al Jadeed Publishing – Lebanon

The judges present this award to Dar Al-Jadeed Publishing for their continued dedication and focus on intellectual and linguistic studies. Their commitment to amplifying Arab poets and writers, as well as their dedication to young writers, has greatly fostered the Arab literary landscape.

Dar Al Jadeed Publishing was founded in Beirut in 2000 with a unique focus on long-forgotten topics in Arab publishing, as well as science books and linguistic and intellectual studies. The company was founded by late Lebanese writer and translator Lokman Slim and Rasha al Ameer as a strictly cultural project that pursues genuine skills and talents looking to be discovered and published in isolation from ideological considerations and partisanship. Bearing in mind the importance of science books to knowledge and the progress of a society, as well as the cultivation of rational, mythology-free knowledge.

Prize for Arabic Culture in Other Languages: Dr. Tahera Qutbuddin for her work Arabic Oration: Art and Function  

The judges present this award to Chicago-based writer Tahera Qutbuddin for her close examination of oration in the Arabic language. Ms. Qutbuddin’s comprehensive exploration of the oration tradition in Arabic society allows for a deeper understanding of how this tradition has shaped the contemporary Arab world.

Tahera Qutbuddin is a Professor of Arabic Literature at the University of Chicago and serves on the editorial board of NYU Abu Dhabi’s Library of Arabic Literature. She obtained her PhD and MA from Harvard University, USA, Tamhidi Magister and BA from Ain Shams University, Cairo, and high school diploma from Sophia College, Mumbai. Her research focuses on intersections of the literary, the religious, and the political in classical Arabic poetry and prose.

Prize for Translation: Dr. Michael Cooperson for his translation of Impostures by Al-Hariri from Arabic to English  

The judges present this award to Michael Cooperson for his bold and innovative approach to translation of the classic Arab work ‘Impostures’. Mr. Cooperson excellently translated the sentiments and emotions of the ‘Impostures‘ in such a way that makes for increased accessibility among English-speaking audiences. 

Michael Cooperson is an American author and translator, Cooperson studied at Harvard University and the American University of Cairo, and currently a professor of Arabic language and literature at the University of California, Los Angeles. He has published two monographs on early Abbasid cultural history: ‘Classical Arabic Biography’ and ‘Al-Ma’mun’. In addition to Impostures, he has translated Abdelfattah Kilito’s ‘L’Auteur et ses doubles (The Author and his Doubles)’ and Ibn al-Jawzi’s ‘Manaqib al-Imam Ahmad ibn Hanbal (Virtues of the Imam Ahmad ibn Hanbal)’. His other interests include Maltese language and culture.

Prize for Literary and Art Criticism: Dr. Khelil Gouia for his book The Path of Modernisation in the Visual Arts: From Drawing to Painting (Massar al Tahdeeth fil Funoon al Tashkeeliyya men al Ursooma ela al Lawhah)

The judges present this award to Khelil Gouia for his narrative and research uncovers the progression of Tunisian art, illustrating connections between pre-modernist and contemporary forms of the art form.  

Doctor Khelil Gouia is a professor of aesthetics, art theories and semiology of the image at the Higher Institute of Arts of the University of Sfax, Tunisia. He holds a PhD in arts sciences and techniques, specialising in art theories and history, as well as a professorial degree in philosophy from the University of Tunis, and an in-depth studies certificate in the history of modern art (ISBAT). His published books include Tashkeel Al Roya (The Formation of the Vision), Omarat Al Roya (The Architecture of the Vision), Bonyat Al Thaeykah wa Soltat Al Namothaj (The Structure of Taste and the Authority of the Model), Al Aamal Al Fanny wa Tahwolatoh bayn Al Nathar wa Al Natharyah (Artwork and Its Transformations between Theory and Theory, An Attempt in the Constructivism of Looking) and Masar Al Tahdeeth fe Al Fonoon Al Tashkelyah, men Al Orsomah ella Al Lawha (The Path of Modernisation in the Visual Arts, From Drawing to Painting).

Prize for Contribution to the Development of Nations: Dr. Saeed El-Masri for his book Legacy of Supremacy between Folklore and Religion (Turath al Este’la Bayn al Folklore wal Majal al Dini)

The judges present this award to Dr. Saeed El-Masri for his groundbreaking research into the history of arrogance in pre-modern and contemporary Arabic society. His exploration of arrogance gets to the root of how arrogance has contributed to the spread of extremism and hate within Arab society. 

Saeed El-Masry is a Professor of Sociology at the Faculty of Arts at Cairo University, and an advisor to the Minister of Culture on the development of the cultural system in Egypt. Dr. El-Masry is a cultural anthropologist and holds a PhD in sociology. He won the United Nations Award for Excellence in Human Development in 2013 for the Egypt Human Development Report, which he participated in preparing in 2010. He also won the Arab Grand Prize for Heritage for the book Eaadat Entaj Al Turath Al Shaaby; Kayfa Yatshabath Al Fokaraa Belhayat fee thel Al.

Alya Alghamdi photo credits to Casey Withers used by 360 Magazine

Alya Alghamdi’s Sprint To Her Dreams

By Alya Alghamdi

Every fire begins with a single flame — mine was ignited with the thought of freedom. Growing up, I always knew there was something more for me. My sisters and I would talk often about what we wanted to be when we matured. They would mention their dreams to have a family and own a house, and I would simply reply, “I want to be on top of the world!”

Despite having a privileged childhood in Saudi Arabia, I longed for a life far beyond what material goods could provide because my fulfillment came from a deeper place — a place of purpose. As I grew, the flame burning inside spread like wildfire, consuming me. I knew my purpose was to burn bright, but the world in which I existed sought to extinguish that. It became clear that my journey to live as my true self would not be an easy one. Still, I decided at an early age that instead of letting my circumstances hold me back, I would redefine them to reflect the reality I wanted to live in.

At that time, I had no idea I would one day pursue athletics professionally. My potential as an athlete went untapped for many years due to the fact that Saudi Arabia did not allow women to go to the gym or join sports teams. It was simply unacceptable for a female to participate in any kind of physical activity. Still, this couldn’t and wouldn’t stop me from dreaming, hoping and impatiently waiting.

Foregoing the arranged marriage that is expected of Saudi Arabian women, I made the unfortunate discovery that my best chance at gaining freedom would come at the expense of leaving my family and my home. Still, I was determined to keep my fire burning, so I left for Europe. I chose my destiny to be a free human being, and that came with a lot of losses, but my gains far outweigh those costs.

In Europe, I was able to discover my true passion — running. I spent the majority of my time exploring new physical activities like long distance running, surfing, hiking and competing in marathons. The simple freedom of putting on your shoes in the morning and doing whatever you wanted to do was a completely new concept to me and I promised myself I would never take it for granted.

Staying true to my childhood pipe dreams and capitalizing on my new found freedom, I set my sights on making it to the top of the world – Mount Everest. This was one of the most difficult but rewarding things I have ever done, and it was just as treacherous, unwelcoming, and life-changing as one would imagine. By definition, the environment was inhospitable. Temperatures were below freezing, there was no running water and any water packed for the trip was frozen still. When you are placed in such a life-threatening position, suddenly, all you can think about is how much you want to live. That trip really opened my eyes to what was truly important in life — love and passion. For some people, they find those things in raising a child, but for me, I found it in my sport.

It was not long after my return from Mount Everest that Saudi Arabia’s Olympic Committee extended an invitation for me to take part in the 2016 Rio Olympic Games. Physically I had reached the top of the world, but professionally, the Olympics became my new Mount Everest. Working with Olympic royalty Michael Johnson, I dedicated my entire life to training, thinking, dreaming and speaking only of the Olympics. Then, three weeks out from the games, my offer to compete was rescinded by Saudi Arabia due to a culturally based decision that had nothing to do with my ability as an athlete. This was earth-shattering for me. I had dedicated everything to training for this opportunity, to represent my country and make them proud, and in a flash, it was gone! I spiraled into a depression and my soul felt hollow where my fire used to burn.

My coach saw the internal anguish and he told me I was left with only two choices — go home or try again. With my options laid bare, the outcome became increasingly clear. I knew this was not the end of my Olympic journey and my fire once again started to burn. Picking up right where I left off, I trained vigorously for the 2020 Olympics, breaking the record for the 60-meter dash. I am also working toward breaking the 100 and 200-meter, which I am confident I can achieve with my abilities, as well as coach’s confidence in me. But my dreams becoming a reality were once again postponed, this time due to the COVID-19 pandemic. I now have my sights set on carrying my country’s flag at the 2021 Olympic Games in Tokyo.

However, to be clear, the Olympics are not my endgame. Once the games are in my rearview, I plan on starting a mentorship program and non-profit foundation for young Saudi Arabian female athletes to provide them with the support and resources I did not have during my training journey. Ultimately, I’m not here to break a record, I’m here to show women they can accomplish anything, even with just a single flame.

Follow Alya Alghamdi: Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn

360 Magazine, Abha Alsoudah

Saudi Summer

The Saudi Tourism Authority (STA) has unveiled a new campaign, called Saudi Summer, to encourage residents to explore the Kingdom this year, in lieu of a holiday abroad, following the lifting of lockdown restrictions due to Covid-19.

The campaign launch follows extensive research* by STA, revealing that 57 percent of Saudi residents are concerned about travelling on holiday by plane, but 85 percent are still planning to take a break of around ten days this year. 78 percent expressed curiosity in exploring their country.

“Saudi Summer comes as a wonderful opportunity to discover multiple tourist destinations in KSA, alongside its historical, natural and cultural treasures. The campaign also contributes to enhancing efforts by the Ministry of Tourism to revive the tourism sector, which was most affected by the repercussions of the Covid-19 crisis,” said His Excellency Ahmed Al Khateeb, Minister of Tourism for the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and Chairman of the STA.

Starting from 25 June and running until 30 September 2020, the Saudi Summer campaign is promoting ten locations across the nation. The ten areas are: Jeddah and KAEC; Abha; Tabuk; Khobar, Dammam and Ahsa; Al Baha; Al Taif; Yanbu and Umluj; and Riyadh.

Together, these locations offer fertile valleys, quiet beaches, dense forests, cool climates, mountain peaks, buzzing cities, historic villages and more. Travelers are encouraged to visit multiple destinations to take advantage of the different packages and activities available, from sea trips and diving, to museum visits and hiking.

“The tourism sector resumes its activities with a renewed spirit and great hopes for moving forward at an accelerated pace, to achieve our aspirations in harmony with Saudi Vision 2030, which seeks to pursue economic diversification, attract investments, increase revenues and create job opportunities for citizens,” said H.E. Ahmed Al Khateeb.

Saudi Summer is led by the STA in close collaboration with the private sector. The STA’s main role is to position the Kingdom as one of the leading tourism destinations in the world, by developing its tourism product and promoting it on a global scale.

Najd, Saudi Arabia
Rojal Village, Saudi Arabia

JAGUAR I-PACE eTROPHY

Jaguar I-PACE eTROPHY Completes Final Pre-Season Test 

Up to 20 I-PACE eTROPHY racecars will take to the grid at the first race on 15 December in Ad Diriyah, Saudi Arabia

Pre-season testing for the Jaguar I-PACE eTROPHY championship took place this week at Rockingham, Europe’s fastest racing circuit. Previously announced entrants Katherine Legge, Bryan Sellers, Cacá Bueno, Sérgio Jimenez and Simon Evans were joined by confirmed multi-car entrants from Saudi Arabia, China and Germany, who are due to announce their team and driver details in November.

British model and racing enthusiast David Gandy also attended the test and drove the Jaguar I-PACE eTROPHY racecar. Each round will feature a VIP car driven by famous faces from the world of motorsport and beyond.

David Gandy said:

“This is a hugely impressive car. I was initially sceptical about electric cars, but now after driving the I-PACE and the I-PACE eTROPHY I’m a convert. The racecar is so powerful but it’s a friendly car to drive – it’s a lot of fun and holding your speed around the corners is a test of nerve. I’m already a Formula E fan but adding the element of production car racing will add something special. I’ll definitely be watching.”

Gandy, who first attended a Formula E Race in Hong Kong in 2016 has also previously raced for Jaguar in the Mille Miglia in an XK120.

The Jaguar I-PACE eTROPHY series will be the official support race to ABB FIA Formula E from December onwards. The new championship will take place over 10 rounds in nine global cities, with up to 20 entrants competing for a prize fund in excess of £500,000.

The Jaguar I-PACE eTROPHY begins on 15 December in Ad Diriyah, Saudi Arabia. Final entrants and details of where to watch the championship around the world will be announced shortly.

Historic Drive by Saudi Woman as Driving Ban Lifts

Saudi woman racer commemorates the reversal of the ban on female drivers with a lap of honour

Female racing driver Aseel Al Hamad celebrated the end of the ban on women drivers with a lap of honour in a Jaguar F-TYPE. Aseel, the first female board member of the Saudi Arabian Motor Federation, had never driven on a track in her home country before.

Aseel said:

“Having loved cars since I was a child, today is highly emotional for me. This is the best driving moment of my life. What better way to kick off World Driving Day than a lap of honour in my home country in a Jaguar F-TYPE – the ultimate car to roar around the track. I hope people around the world will share in our joy today by sharing their most memorable driving story using #worlddrivingday.”

Aseel joined Jaguar in a call for June 24th to be known as World Driving Day – a day when finally, the whole world can enjoy the thrill of being behind the wheel of a car.

On World Driving Day Jaguar invites people to share a memory of their best driving moment (image or anecdote) using the #worlddrivingday.

By creating World Driving Day, Jaguar urges people to remember this historic day and what it means to women, to Saudi Arabia and to world progress in general. As part of its ongoing work with over 40 Universities and Academic institutions globally on future mobility solutions, the company will also be partnering with University in Saudi Arabia to join this global network. The partnership, to be announced later this year, will be a unique exchange to tap into the brightest young minds in Saudi Arabia to shape the company’s future innovations as it moves to ACES (an Autonomous, Connected, Electrified and Shared future).

Jaguar Land Rover spokesperson, Fiona Pargeter, Customer Experience Director comments:

“It’s easy to forget and take for granted the enjoyment of driving and just what a privilege it is to get behind the wheel of a car. World Driving Day is a commitment from Jaguar to celebrate this key moment annually for both men and women. This year, we’re really excited to collaborate with the brilliant students from Saudi Arabia to shape the future of mobility for people around the world.”

Norway, Georgia, India and China triumph at World Chess Championship in Saudi Arabia

Described by players as a championship to remember, the World Open and Women’s Blitz Chess Championships kept onlookers from across the world with bated breath for the jam-packed affair. Saudi Arabia welcomed male and female players from 55 countries, among them 10 men and 11 women of world’s top players, in an effort to become a sporting hub and a beacon for change.

After a suspenseful opening which saw his initial defeat, World No.1 Magnus Carlsen (Norway) found his groove and reclaimed his supremacy as Champion of World Open Blitz Chess. In the Women’s Championship, Georgian mother-of-two Nana Dzagnidze fulfilled her dream and snatched the gold with her stellar performance.

For the Rapid Chess category, Indian grandmaster Viswanathan Anand, fondly known as ‘The Tiger from Madras’, remained unbeaten against some of the highest IQs in the world and swiftly emerged as winner. The Women’s Championship was dominated by Chinese Grandmaster Ju Wenjun, who won the gold medal as the only player to finish with a win rate of nearly 80%.

Watch the video here

King Salman World Open and Women’s Chess Championships 

The Inaugural 2017 King Salman World Open and Women’s Rapid & Blitz Chess Championships

Full of surprises after day 1 rounds
The inaugural King Salman World Open and Women’s Rapid & Blitz Chess Championships have begun, held in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia for the first time in history, with Chinese classical chess champion Ju Wenjun achieving a perfect opening score. Meanwhile the World Number One, Magnus Carlsen, got off to a less than ideal start. Surely, he will look to improve on his game today.

The event, running until 30th December, marks an important advance in Saudi Arabia’s mission to become a sporting hub capital and provides a refreshing inclusion of women in such high profile public events.

The event has attracted attract more than 200 players from all over the world, providing aspirational role models for players in the region and sees famed male and female chess players compete on the World stage for a chance to prove their strategic prowess against some of the highest IQs in the world.


Content now available:

26th December, 12pm: Opening Ceremony Web Film

27th December, 2pm: Opening ceremony event, key highlights, GVs Rapid Rounds 1-5; IV Magnus Carlsen; IV Georgios Makropoulos, Acting President of FIDE; IV Kosai Al-Fawaz, Investment & Marketing Advisor to the President of the General Authority for Sport His Excellency Turki bin Abdulmohsen Al-Sheikh

Additional content coming:

29th December, 10am: IVs Rapid Round Winners; GVs Rapid Rounds 6-15; GVs Award Ceremony

31st December, 10am: IVs Blitz Round Winners; GVs Blitz Rounds; GVs Award Ceremony; GVs Closing Ceremony
Watch here: 

YOUTUBE: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O4OlK1hJsEs&t=6s